Biology Home at The University of West Georgia

Log On

Course Listing

GRADUATE BIOLOGY COURSES (BIOL) 

(All courses carry three hours credit unless otherwise noted.) 

BIOL 5241 Entomology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2108

The study of insects. This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of insect taxonomy, morphology, physiology, behavior, and evolution. The relationships between insects and humans, other animals, and plants will be examined. The influences of insects on culture, religion, art, history, and colonization will be discussed. The laboratory will be devoted primarily to developing an understanding of insect identification. BIOL 5242 Invertebrate Zoology

BIOL 5242 Invertebrate Biology

           Prerequisite: BIOL 2108

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of taxonomy, morphology, physiology, and evolution of the more common invertebrate phyla. The distribution and interspecific relationships among invertebrates and other forms of life will be presented and discussed. The laboratory will be devoted primarily to developing an understanding of insect identification.

BIOL 5245 Ichthyology

Prerequisite: BIOL 1108

The biology, systematics, and taxonomy of fishes with an emphasis on the biodiversity/biogeography of fishes in the state of Georgia.

BIOL 5315 Microbial Physiology and Genetics

Prerequisite: BIOL 3310

Microbial physiology is designed to illustrate that procaryotic organisms follow the same physiological rules and restrictions as eucaryotes. The course will illustrate the value of biophysical, biochemical, and thermodynamic principles to bacterial growth and function and will utilize mathematical formulae to illustrate the basic principles of microbial reproduction. Microbial physiology will utilize problem solving to strengthen the ability of students to design, conduct, and evaluate biological experiments and data.

BIOL 5321 Applied and Environmental Microbiology

Prerequisite: One course in microbiology or consent of instructor

The applied and environmental microbiology course is designed to expose students to the importance of microorganisms in industry and in the environment.

BIOL 5325 Advanced Medical Microbiology

Prerequisite: BIOL 3310 or consent of instructor

Advanced medical microbiology is designed to inform students of current developments in the areas of clinical and medical microbiology. The course will focus on mechanisms of pathogenesis and host defense. Discussion of new and emerging infectious agents will be addressed.

BIOL 5440 Aquatic Ecology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2108, CHEM 2411/2411L

A study of biological, chemical, and physical components and interactions in freshwater systems. Field labs include a study of reservoirs and streams in west Georgia. A three-day field trip to the Georgia coast or the Okefenokee Swamp is required.

BIOL 5441 Animal Behavior

Prerequisite: BIOL 2134 and 2135

A study of the mechanisms and adaptive functions of behaviors. The genetics, development, physiology, and ecology of behaviors are investigated with an evolutionary approach.

BIOL 5445 Marine Biology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2135

The biology, systematics, and taxonomy of marine organisms with an emphasis on the ecological principles that influence their biogeography and distribution.

BIOL 5450 Terrestrial Ecology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2135

This course is designed to give the student an overview of the structures and functions of populations, communities, and ecosystems in the major terrestrial biomes on Earth. Emphasis will be placed on ecological analyses and disturbance impact assessments in the dominant terrestrial ecosystems of the southeastern United States.

BIOL 5520 Developmental Biology and Embryology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2134

A course combining the fundamentals of embryology with the genetic and molecular analysis of embryonic development.

BIOL 5539 Comparative Physiology

Prerequisite: BIOL 3513 or consent of instructor

This course is designed to study the similarities and differences in how various animals have solved a wide variety of physiological problems imposed by the natural world in which they exist. The student will investigate the functions of the different organ systems in invertebrates and vertebrates. The main goal of this class is to focus on the observation of how problems in nature are solved by various organisms. A complete understanding of the physiology of the human is an absolute prerequisite for this course as this will be the point of reference for most discussions.

BIOL 5541 Plant Physiology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2134, 2135, CHEM 2411

This course is intended to give students an overview of the processes which allow plants to function as living organisms. Emphasis will be placed on how plants interact with their environments.

BIOL 5631 Eukaryotic Molecular Genetics

Prerequisite: BIOL 2134

This course thoroughly examines the molecular aspects of nuclear structure and function. A special emphasis will be placed on understanding the experimental methods and interpretation of data on which current understanding is based.

BIOL 5727 Essentials of Immunology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2134

Essentials of immunology is designed as an introduction to the immune response. The student will obtain a broad, comprehensive understanding of the principles of immunology. The course will focus on a detailed study of antigen-antibody interactions, humoral immunity, and cell-mediated immunity. Medically important syndromes, including AIDS, will be discussed to reinforce the principles of immunology.

BIOL 5729 Medical Virology

Prerequisite: BIOL 3310 or consent of instructor

Medical virology is designed as an introduction to viruses that are involved in human disease. The student will obtain a broad, comprehensive understanding of the principles of virology using specific medical examples. The course will focus on a detailed study of the viral structure, replication, gene expression, pathogenesis, and host defense.

BIOL 5731 Introduction to Toxicology

Prerequisite: BIOL 3513 or consent of instructor

The primary objective of the course is to present students with the concepts and practical applications of the science of toxicology. This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the principles of toxicology, focusing on the biochemical, physiological, and ecological effects of various toxicants. The use of toxicology in biomedical, pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and environmental research will be examined and discussed.

BIOL 5985 Special Topics in Biology    var. 1-3 credits

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

Specific titles will be announced for each term in class schedules and will be entered on transcripts.

BIOL 6150 Scientific Integrity and Propriety

A course designed to inform students of the ethical and professional obligations of scientific investigation and communication. Students will be instructed in proper methods for record keeping and for reporting scientific discoveries. Topics such as scientific integrity, authorship, peer review, ethical use of animals in research, conflict of interest, ownership of data, and intellectual property will also be addressed. Case studies will be used heavily as teaching tools. This course is recommended for all graduate students conducting research in the department and is required for all students who are supported by federal funds for their research or degree program.

BIOL 6325 Procaryotic Biology

Prerequisite: Cell and Molecular Biology and Organic Chemistry

This course is intended to introduce graduate students to the complexity and diversity of procaryotic organisms, including the eubacteria and archaea. The course will involve both lecture and laboratory learning, will engage problem-solving skills, and will require extensive written and oral communication components.

BIOL 6503 Biological Perspectives: Biochemistry

Prerequisite: BIOL 2134, 5 hours of Biology at 3000 or above, and CHEM 2422 or 3422.

This course is designed to study the interactions of biochemical pathways and the control systems that function to regulate cell and whole body metabolism. This course emphasizes the regulation of biochemical pathways as opposed to the mechanisms involved in each enzymatic step within a given pathway.

BIOL 6513 Human Physiology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2134 or consent of instructor

A survey of the mechanisms involved in the function of the human body. Study is approached from the organ system level to address muscular, neural, hormonal, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, renal, and reproductive functions. Correlation will be made to the similarity between the demands placed on living systems regardless of whether the organism is multicellular or a single cell.

BIOL 6526 Histology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2134

A microanatomical study of cell and tissue structure. Emphasis is on the complex nature of tissues and how the cellular associations within the tissue contribute to the overall functions of the tissues. Laboratory is devoted to preparation and interpretation of tissue samples.

BIOL 6981 Graduate Independent Study    var. 1-3 credits

Independent study of topics not offered in the current term. Independent study is only available for topics addressed by current courses if the topical course will not be offered during the academic year, or if the scheduling of the topical course is such that it will require a delay in timely completion of the degree for the student.

BIOL 6982 Directed Readings    var. 1-3 credits

Directed readings are available for graduate students who need to conduct an independent review of the literature in a topic not addressed by the curriculum of the department. Students must complete a statement of understanding and expectation and must have the topic approved by their major professor and either the graduate coordinator or the department chair. Selected readings are appropriate for topics related to thesis research or for topics that provide a foundation for comprehensive examinations for non-thesis track students.

BIOL 6983 Graduate Research    var. 1-12 credits

The research course is designed to teach students methods for biological research. Students will conduct research under the supervision of a faculty mentor and will learn proper methods for record keeping and report writing. Each student will work on a unique research project to be selected by the faculty mentor and the student. The research conducted is expected to provide the basis for the thesis for students in a thesis track degree program.

BIOL 6984 Graduate Biology Seminar    1 credit

Graduate seminar will meet each term. Each offering will have a different topical focus, to be determined by the faculty discussion leader. All students will select an area to present that is consistent with the topic for the term. Students are also expected to fully participate in the discussions generated by student presentations. Graduate students should enroll in graduate seminar each term.

BIOL 6985 Graduate Special Topics in Biology    var. 1-3 credits

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

Specific titles will be announced for each term in class schedules and will be entered on transcripts.

BIOL 6995 Comprehensive Exam    2 credits

Comprehensive examination should be taken by all students in a non-thesis track program during the last term in their graduate degree program. The student will complete an examination of a body of biological work as determined by the graduate committee. The student must submit to an examination to be coordinated by the student’s major professor and composed by the graduate committee. The examination will generally be of an oral format; however, the graduate committee and student may elect an alternative format with sufficient justification.

BIOL 6999 Thesis     2 credits

Prerequisite: Completion of qualifying examination

Thesis should be taken during the final term of a student’s program. Students should complete a statement of understanding with endorsements by the major professor and department chair or graduate coordinator verifying that thesis completion is probable during the term of enrollment for this course. Students must submit and revise the research thesis to the satisfaction of all committee members and to the satisfaction of the graduate coordinator. In addition, the student must present an oral defense of the thesis in an open forum. Successful completion of the thesis and successful performance in the defense, as determined by the graduate committee for the student, will be used to determine satisfactory performance in this course.