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Faculty/Staff Profile

David W. Newton

David W. Newton, Ph.D.

Professor of English

Phone: 678-839-4877 | Fax: 678-839-4849

Email:  dnewton@westga.edu

Office: Technology Learning Center 2-225

Hours: Fall Semester 2014
Please email dnewton@westga.edu to schedule an appointment.


Courses and Sections

  • Courses Taught
    • ENGL-3000 (Research and Methodology)    
    • ENGL-4300 (StudiesInEnglishLang:Grammar)    
    • ENGL-5300 (StudiesInEnglishLang:Grammar)    
  • Spring 2014 Sections
    • ENGL-4300 (StudiesInEnglishLang:Grammar) Section: 01   [View Syllabus]
    • ENGL-5300 (StudiesInENGL Lang:Grammar) Section: 01   [View Syllabus]
  • Fall 2013 Sections
    • ENGL-3000 (Research and Methodology) Section: 03   [View Syllabus]
  • Spring 2013 Sections
    • ENGL-4300 (StudiesInEnglishLang:Grammar) Section: 01   [View Syllabus]
    • ENGL-5300 (StudiesInEnglishLang:Grammar) Section: 01   [View Syllabus]

Other Courses Taught

Undergraduate Courses: Introduction to English Linguistics; History of the English Language; American English Dialects; Edgar Allan Poe; Native American Literature; Southern Literature; American Romanticism / Graduate Seminars: (Re)Presenting the Native in American Literature; Nineteenth-Century American Poetry; Nineteenth-Century American Popular Fiction; American Captivity Narratives; Narratives of Discovery, Exploration, and Encounter; Democratic Eloquence: Literature, Democracy and the American Language


Education/Degrees

  • B.A., English, The College of Charleston, 1983
  • M.Div., Theology, The Candler School of Theology, 1988
  • Ph.D., Linguistics, Emory University, 1993

Biography

My professional interests are in the areas of historical linguistics and Southern literature. My publications and research have focused primarily on the language, culture, and literature of the American South. I teach courses in linguistics (History of the English Language, American English Dialects, and English Grammar), Nineteenth Century American Literature, and Southern Literature.