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Film Studies Minor

Film Studies Coordinator:
Dr. Erin Lee Mock, Assistant Professor of English
Department of English and Philosophy
Office: TLC 2243
Office Phone: 678-839-5487 | Email: emock@westga.edu
 

The film minor at the University of West Georgia is designed to educate and inspire students interested in film. The addition of a film minor to the curriculum will complement the University of West Georgia’s strong liberal arts tradition. The minor consists of a series of courses from departments including English and Philosophy, Foreign Languages and Literatures, History, Mass Communications and Theatre Arts, and Psychology. These courses are designed to provide students with a solid background in the history, technical analysis, aesthetics and cultural significance of film. As an interdisciplinary minor, film studies encourages students to explore further the rich and diverse aesthetic, philosophical, historical, and cultural expressions articulated in films.  

Requirements for the Minor  

FILM 2080: Introduction to the Art of Film In this course students will consider the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. Students will watch a wide range of films from a variety of countries and historical moments in film history. Students will have the chance to explore issues such as framing, photographic space, film shot, editing, sound, genre, narrative form, acting style, and lighting in the context of wider discussions of the weekly films. This is an introductory course, and assumes no prior knowledge of film. Students will be evaluated primarily on the basis of weekly postings, a shot-by-shot analysis, and exams. Weekly screenings will be offered.  

FILM 2100: History and Theory of Film This course will explore major developments in film history, theory, and criticism. Students will become familiar with several different film movements in the development of the art form and will be introduced to basic ideas in film theory. Through a variety of film movements and historical periods, students will develop an understanding of the cultural, industrial, and political contexts for some of most significant debates about film. Specific topics covered will include Russian formalism, the history of classical Hollywood cinema, the French New Wave, recent global cinemas, as well as alternatives to Hollywood in the United States. Students will be evaluated on the basis of weekly postings, participation in discussion, essay exams, and formal writing opportunities.  

COMM 3356: Film and Culture (Film Studies minor students need to contact Teresa Yates [lyates@westga.edu] for the Mass Comm major override for this course.)
An examination of films as texts through historical, aesthetic, thematic, and/or cultural questioning and analysis. Typical offerings may include Film and the Novel; Representations of War in Film; Film Censorship and the Marketplace; etc. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.  

HIST 4485: History in Film (Special Topics)
Courses on topics not usually offered by the department.  

PHIL 3160: Philosophy in Literature and Film
An examination of significant philosophical, literary, and cinematic texts in terms of their thematic and/or conceptual interconnections.  

POLS 3103: Media and Politics
Analysis of the role of the mass media in American politics, including the impact of media coverage on public and elite opinions and the interactions between the media and public institutions.  

FILM 3200: Screenwriting
An introduction to the art of screenwriting. (Students may substitute ENGL 3200 if the topic is "Screenwriting" and not another genre like poetry)  

ENGL 4109: Film as Literature
An examination of films as texts through historical, aesthetic, thematic, and/or cultural questioning and analysis. Offerings may include Film and the Novel, Representations of Women in Film, Shakespeare and Film, etc. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.  

ENGL 4385: Special Topics (film-based courses may count for minor credit)
Courses on topics not usually offered by the department.  

FORL 3111: World Film
This course will offer film viewings and analysis from selected national traditions, several of which will always be represented. Readings in Film history and theory will be used to illuminate films from different cultures and traditions (French, German, Spanish, Latin American, Japanese, etc.). All films have subtitles and all readings are in English. No knowledge of the foreign language(s) in question is necessary.  

FORL 4485: Topics in National Film
This course will offer film viewings and analysis within individual national traditions. Readings in film history and theory will be used to illuminate selected films from a national tradition (French, German, Spanish, Latin American, Japanese, etc.). All films have subtitles and all readings are in English. No knowledge of the foreign language(s) in question is necessary. Course may be repeated with a different subject.  

FREN 4210: French Literature and Film**
A comparative approach to the study of French literature and its cinematic adaptation and/or a thematic approach to selected literary texts and films. Discussions and papers will be in French.  

GRMN 4220: German Culture Through Film**
This course offers an introduction to 20th-century history and culture, especially 20th-century German history and culture, through the depictions (and interpretations) of aspects of social history in German film and painting. Discussion and papers will be in German.  

GRMN 4240: Mystery and Horror in Literature and Film**
This course offers an introduction to Kafka’s life and work and examines his influence on 20th-century thought and art. In the process we will both broaden and personalize our understanding of “the Kafkaesque.” Discussion, papers, and readings will be in German.  

GRMN 4250: Contemporary German Cinema**
This course traces the mystery and horror genres from their beginnings in German Romanticism through early German film to New German Film of the 70s and 80s. Discussion, readings and paper will be in German.  

SPAN 4200: Spanish Literature and Film**
A comparative approach to the study of Spanish and Spanish-American literature and its cinematic adaptation and/or a thematic approach to selected literary text and films. Discussion and papers will be in Spanish.  

PSYCH 4085: Psychology and Film (Horizon Seminar)
A special series of topical seminars meant to explore subjects at the leading edge of contemporary psychology which are of special interest to students and faculty.  

THEA 3290: Costume Design
The student will be introduced to the total process of the costume designer. This process includes play analysis, research skills, costume period and style, design problems, rendering and construction skills, organization skills and an understanding in the principles and elements of design.  

THEA 4485: Acting for the Camera (Special Topics)
Courses offered on a one-time or experimental basis to examine selected issues related to Theatre Arts and performance.  

FILM 4000: Independent Study
This course is a guided investigation of a topic not addressed by regularly scheduled courses.  Students must propose a detailed plan of readings, articulating precise learning objectives, and secure the written consent of both a supervising instructor and of the department chair. Not more than one Independent Study may count toward the minor in Film Studies without advisor's permission. A further specific description pertaining to this section of the course may be added.  

***Other courses may be applied toward the minor with approval of advisor. Total credit hours: 18 hours  

*Students are required to take electives in at least 3 different disciplines.  

** These courses are currently taught in the specific foreign language, but FORL versions in English have been proposed. See FORL3111 and FORL4485 above.