Masters Program Details

Picture

Nothing prepares students for the future like a glimpse back into the past, which makes our History department the perfect place to hone your skills in research, critical thinking and writing. With such a solid liberal arts background, History majors are prepared for careers in law, business, banking, politics, journalism, teaching and government, not to mention research and teaching in specialized fields such as museum studies, women's issues and the development of the world's diverse societies and cultures, both ancient and modern.

Program Description

The History Department at the University of West Georgia offers an exciting and versatile M.A. program in History to prepare students for careers in teaching, law, business, government, museum work, archive management, public history, and library and information science. There are concentrations in American, World, European, Public History, Atlantic World, and War and Society in Global Perspective; a certificate program in Museum Studies in conjunction with the Atlanta History Center; and a post-M.A. certificate in museum studies. Working closely with our faculty, you will be trained to think critically, write clearly, and analyze effectively.

Method of Delivery

Courses are 100% Face-to-face.

Accreditation

SACS

Credit & Transfer

Total semester hours required to earn a degree: 36
Maximum Hours Transferable into program: 6

Tuition & Fees

For the most up-to-date and accurate cost information, see the Bursar's Office website at http://www.westga.edu/bursar/.

Coursework

Plan 1: M.A. with Thesis

Major field courses-- 15 hours

Minor field courses-- 9 hours

Thesis units-- 6 hours

History 6684 (Historiography)-- 3 hours

Elective (with approval)-- 3 hours

Plan 2: M.A. with Non-Thesis

History, major field-- 12 hours

History, first minor field-- 9 hours


History, second minor field-- 9 hours

History 6684 (Historiography)-- 3 hours

Elective (with approval)-- 3 hours

General:

Modern Germany - HIST-5440

Description: A political and social study of Germany since unification with heavy emphasis on the 20th century (1871-Present).

Modern Ireland: 1780 to Present - HIST-5441

Description: A political, social, and cultural study of Ireland since 1780 with special emphasis on the evolution of Irish nationalism and Anglo-Irish relations. The roots and history of 'the Troubles' in Northern Ireland will also be explored.

Introduction to Modern Japan - HIST-5443

Description: An introduction to the history of Japan, emphasizing the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Japanese immigration to the United States, and Japanese-American relations.

Soviet Russia - HIST-5446

Description: An analysis of Soviet history from the October Revolution of 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, with an emphasis on Stalinism and post-Stalin developments.

Colonial America, 1492-1763 - HIST-5451

Description: The history of early America, from the Age of Discovery through the establishment and growth of England's New World colonies, with emphasis on the evolution of American society and culture.

American Revolution, 1763-1783 - HIST-5452

Description: A study of the origin of America's break with Great Britain, with emphasis on the causes of the Revolution, the course of the War of Independence, and the establishment of the new nation's political, social and cultural institutions.

The New American Republic, 1783-1815 - HIST-5453

Description: The political, diplomatic, economic and social history of the United States from the end of the American Revolution through the War of 1812.

Jacksonian America, 1815-1848 - HIST-5454

Description: American history from the end of the War of 1812 to the Mexican War, with emphasis on politics and society. Western expansion also will be emphasized.

Civil War and Reconstruction - HIST-5455

Description: American history from the end of the Mexican War to the Compromise of 1877, with special attention to the political, military and social history of the Civil War.

Environmental History - HIST-5461

Description: A study of American understanding of ecology, wilderness, resource usage, conservation, agriculture, technology, and natural hazards from colonial times to the present.

American Military History - HIST-5463

Description: This history of American warfare from the colonial conflicts through the wars of the 20th century, with emphasis on society's impact on warfare and warfare's impact on American society.

American Sports History - HIST-5464

Description: Traces the history of the development of American sports from the Colonial period to the present with emphasis on the social, cultural, economic, and political factors that influences American society.

U.S. Society and Culture to 1865 - HIST-5465

Description: Examines the most important social and cultural trends in America from the colonial period to the end of the Civil War

U.S. Society and Culture Since 1865 - HIST-5466

Description: Examines the most important social and cultural trends in the US since the Civil War.

Women in American History to 1890 - HIST-5467

Description: An examination of the diverse experiences of women and their impact on American History up to 1877.

Women in American History Since 1890 - HIST-5468

Description: An examination of the various experiences of women and their impact on the history of the United States since 1877.

The Civil Rights Movement - HIST-5469

Description: The history of the Civil Rights Movement with emphasis on major leaders, organizations, and events in the twentieth century black freedom struggle.

The Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 1877-1920 - HIST-5471

Description: Explores the social, political, cultural, economic, and diplomatic history of the U.S. from the end of Reconstruction to the aftermath of World War I.

The Rise of Modern America, 1920-1945 - HIST-5472

Description: Explores the social, political, cultural, economic, and diplomatic history of the U.S. from the end of World War I to the end of World War II.

Recent America: The U.S. Since World War II - HIST-5473

Description: Explores the social, political, cultural, economic, and diplomatic history of the U.S. in the second half of the twentieth century.

History of Georgia - HIST-5474

Description: A survey of Georgia history from prehistory to the present, emphasizing politics and society.

Southern Families and Communities - HIST-5475

Description: A study of the approaches to researching and analyzing the history of the varied families and communities in southern history.

The Old South - HIST-5476

Description: A study of the American South from the Colonial Period through the Reconstruction with special attention on nineteenth century politics and society. Ideas and events leading to secession and Civil War are particularly emphasized.

The New South - HIST-5477

Description: A study of the American South since 1865 including the interaction of economic, political, social and cultural factors, especially in the context of struggles in rural and urban communities and in the textile industry.

American Religion to 1800 - HIST-5478

Description: A study of the history of American religious beliefs, practices, and influences on American society, from its colonial settlement to 1800.

American Religion Since 1800 - HIST-5479

Description: A study of the history of American religious beliefs and practices, and religion's influence on American society, from 1800 to present.

Special Topics - HIST-5485

Description: Courses on topics not usually offered by the department.

Archives Arrangemnt Practicum - HIST-6201

Description: Advanced training in arranging, describing and processing archival collections for graduate students interested in archives work.

Theory and Method of Material Culture Studies - HIST-6202

Description: Examines methods and theories for studying material culture from an interdisciplinary perspective, analyzing what material culture reveals about the culture and society in which it was created with an emphasis on America. Required for Museum Studies Certificate.

Studies and Research Methods in American Folklife - HIST-6203

Description: An examination of the traditional, expressive, shared culture of various groups in the United States through its history, emphasizing analysis of regional folklife traditions and folklife research and fieldwork methods.

Administration of Museums and Historic Sites - HIST-6301

Description: Study of administrative functions: governance, financing, grant-writing, public relations, marketing, human resources, accreditation, and museum law and ethics. Taught in association with Atlanta History Center.

Collections Management in Museums - HIST-6302

Description: An examination of the processes by which a museum manages it collection. Taught in association with Atlanta History Center and involves a practicum experience.

Education and Interpretation at Museums - HIST-6303

Description: Studies include interpretative principles and techniques, school programs, adult and community programs, staffing, marketing and other programming logistics. Taught in association with Atlanta History Center.

Exhibits at Museums and Historic Sites - HIST-6304

Description: An examination of how museums create exhibits using various interpretive techniques, from planning and research through exhibit design, display techniques, script-writing and installation. Taught in association with Atlanta History Center.

Public History Internship - HIST-6486

Description: Experience in applying history in a museum, historical society, archive, historic preservation agency, or other public history setting. Students must maintain a journal develop a portfolio of their work.

Historiography - HIST-6684

Description: Historiography, or the historian's craft, is an introduction to the history of historical thought from its emergence in the classical world to the present. The course will cover many of the major historigraphical schools and ideas that have developed over time. Student will study the tools and methods of various historians, how they formulate hypotheses from gathering of information, and how different historians write about the same era or subjects. Required of all M.A. history graduates.

Topics in European History - HIST-6686

Description: A seminar class with specific titles announced at time of offering. Transcript entries carry different nomenclatures to correspond to material taught. Seminars will vary according to topic and the specialty of the professor offering the course.

Topics in United States History - HIST-6687

Description: A seminar class with specific titles announced at time of its offering. Transcript entries carry different nomenclatures to correspond to material taught. Seminars will vary according to topic and the specialty of the professor offering the course.

Topics in Latin American History - HIST-6688

Description: A seminar course with specific titles announced each term. Transcript entries carry different nomenclatures to correspond to the materials taught.

Topics in Georgia History - HIST-6689

Description: A seminar class with specific titles announced at time of offering. Transcript entries carry different nomenclatures to correspond to material taught. Seminar will vary according to topic and the specialty of the professor offering the course.

Guidelines for Admittance

  • All graduate applicants must complete the online Grad Application. A one-time application fee of $40 is required.
  • Applicants should also review the Graduate Studies Website for individual program specific requirements and tasks that must be completed prior to admission. See Graduate Studies Application Process.
  • International applicants are subject to additional requirements and application deadlines. See Procedures for International Students.
  • Official transcripts from a regionally or nationally accredited institution are required and should be sent directly to the UWG Admissions Office.

Program-specific Admittance Guidelines

The minimum requirements for acceptance as a regular student in the History MA program include:
1. An undergraduate major or minor in history or a closely related field, including survey (or equivalent) courses in American History and European or World History.
2. Acceptable scores on the General (Aptitude) Test of the Graduate Record Examination are at least 51 for the Verbal Section on the new GRE, and at least 4.0 for the Writing Section.
3. A cumulative undergraduate grade point average of at least 2.75 on a 4.0 scale for all work taken at all colleges.
4. An average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale for a major in History or a closely related field.
5. A writing sample that indicates an ability to research and write at the graduate level.
6. Evidence from the personal statement and the letters of recommendation that the applicant’s abilities and needs match our resources and course offerings.

Application Deadlines

See The Scoop for more specific deadlines: http://www.westga.edu/registrar/766.php

Specific graduate deadlines are listed here: http://www.westga.edu/gradstudies/important-dates.php

Admission Process Checklist

The Graduate Studies Application Process checklist is available here: http://www.westga.edu/gradstudies/apply-now.php

One exception: If you will not ever be traveling to a UWG campus or site, you may apply for an Immunization Exemption. Contact the Immunization Clerk with your request.

Contact

Dr. Nadejda Popov
Technology Learning Center 3200
University of West Georgia
Carrollton GA 30118
Phone: (678-839-5370    
Fax: (678) 839-4160

Dates

Specific dates for Admissions (Undergraduate Only), Financial Aid, Fee Payment, Registration, Start/End of Term Dates, Final Exams, etc. are available in THE SCOOP at http://www.westga.edu/registrar/766.php.

Specific Graduate Admissions Deadlines: 

Learning Objectives

  • demonstrate the ability to undertake advanced historical research
  • show basic familiarity with historical literature in major and minor fields of study
  • demonstrate an understanding of historiography and its permutations over time
  • demonstrate a knowledge of the theory and ethics of public history [for Public History concentration]
  • demonstrate knowledge of the standards and practices for at least two fields in public history [for Public History concentration]