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Periodicity Chart: 2012-2017

Learning Outcomes

B.A. in Mathematics

All students completing a B.A. Degree in Mathematics will demonstrate that they have:
   L1.  A thorough understanding of the calculus, including its computational aspects, applications, and theoretical foundations.

   L2.  An ability to read, write, and understand mathematical proofs involving foundational aspects of mathematics, such as logic, set theory, basic function theory, and mathematical induction.

   L3.  A solid foundation in the fundamentals of applied linear algebra, including its computational aspects and applications.

   L4.  An ability to make written an oral presentations on various mathematical topics and problems.

   L5.  A broad understanding of several branches of mathematics, e.g., algebra, combinatorial mathematics, analysis, statistics, geometry. 
 

B.S. in Mathematics

All students completing a B.S. Degree in Mathematics will demonstrate that they have:
   L1.  A thorough understanding of the calculus, including its computational aspects, applications, and theoretical foundations.

   L2.  An ability to read, write, and understand mathematical proofs involving foundational aspects of mathematics, such as logic, set theory, basic function theory, and mathematical induction.

   L3.  A solid foundation in the fundamentals of applied linear algebra, including its computational aspects and applications.

   L4.  An ability to make written an oral presentations on various mathematical topics and problems.

   L5.  A broad understanding of several branches of mathematics, e.g., algebra, combinatorial mathematics, analysis, statistics, geometry.

   L6.  (Traditional Track) A broad understanding of the analytical, algebraic, and geometric branches of mathematics.

   L7.  (Traditional Track) A solid background in the fundamentals of some branch of mathematics; e.g., analysis, combinatorics and graph theory, probability and statistics, abstract algebra

   L8.  (Applied Computational Track) A solid background in the fundamentals of the applied computational area of mathematics, including numerical analysis, differential equations, and applied linear algebra.

   L9.  (Applied Computational Track, Applied Discrete Track) An ability to apply mathematical techniques and models to solve specific problems.

   L10.  (Applied Discrete Track) A solid background in the fundamentals of the applied discrete area of mathematics, including graph theory, combinatorics, and number theory.

   L11.  (Statistics Track and Actuarial Science Track) A solid background in the fundamentals of statistics, including its computational aspects, applications, and theoretical foundations.

   L12.  (Statistics Track and Actuarial Science Track) An understanding and ability to use statistical software packages.

   L13.  (Actuarial Science Track) A background in business, economics, and finance suitable for a career in actuarial science.

   L14.  (Secondary Education Track) A solid background in the fundamentals of modern algebra, number theory, applied statistics, and college geometry.

   L15.  (Secondary Education Track) Proficiency in the methods and philosophies pertinent to secondary education.

 


 

Assessment

Assessment Methods:  
  1. Senior Exit Exam (For Learning Outcomes L1 - L15).
  2. Senior Project Course (For Learning Outcomes L4, L7, L9, L10, L11, L12, L13, L14).
  3. Alumni/Employer Survey (For Learning Outcomes L1 - L15).
  4. Teacher Competency Examination - Praxis II Exam (For Learning Outcomes L1, L2, L3, L5, L14).
  5. Exit Interview Questionnaire. 
Description of Assessment Methods  
  1. Senior Exit Exam*: In their senior year prior to graduation, all students majoring in mathematics must pass a Senior Exit Exam. This exam will reflect the degree program's learning outcomes and include questions which address the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors summarized in learning outcomes, and will be independent of individual courses. This exam will be administered by a subcommittee of the Tenured Mathematics Faculty that is chosen by the student in consultation with the Department Chair.
  2. Senior Project Course**: In their senior year prior to graduation, all students majoring in mathematics must pass a Senior Project Course which is a faculty-directed independent research project culminating in the writing of a paper and an oral presentation of the results of the project.
  3. Alumni/Employer Survey: The department will survey graduates two to five years after graduation to determine their current educational and employment status, and their opinions on the strengths and weaknesses of the program. The department will also periodically survey employers of alumni to see if program graduates are performing successfully on the job.
  4. Teacher Competency Examination (Praxis II Exam): In their senior year prior to graduation. all students majoring in mathematics who are seeking teacher certification must take the Teacher Competency Examination (Praxis II Exam) in mathematics. Their performance on this examination will be reported in writing to the Chair of the Department of Mathematics.
  5. Exit Interview Questionnaire: In their senior year prior to graduation, all students majoring in mathematics will be interviewed by a committee selected by the Department Chairman and will complete a questionnaire to determine the degree to which the program has successfully achieved its goals and to learn from the graduates what they believe are the strengths and weaknesses of the program.

*The Senior Exit Exam is no longer being used.
**The Senior Project Course became part of the curriculum in the academic year 2002-2003.
 

Use of Assessment Results

As assessment findings are compiled, a faculty committee will analyze them and make recommendations regarding necessary improvements or changes in the degree programs. The committee will then submit a plan for improving the degree program's effectiveness in achieving the intended learning outcomes. Actions which may be taken include strengthening certain aspects of the curriculum, adding coursework or other requirements to the program, changing prerequisites or course sequencing, etc. as indicated by the evidence generated through assessment.