Creative Writing Program Hosts Poets

Friday, November 14, 2008

International poets Andrew Zawacki and Donna Stonecipher will read their poems at the Kennedy Chapel on the University of West Georgia campus on Wednesday, Nov. 19, at 7 p.m. A book signing will follow the reading. The event is free and the community is invited to attend.

International poets Andrew Zawacki and Donna Stonecipher will read their poems at the Kennedy Chapel on the University of West Georgia campus on Wednesday, Nov. 19, at 7 p.m. A book signing will follow the reading. The event is free and the community is invited to attend.Both poets will visit creative writing classes throughout the day to speak with student writers about the creative process and publishing their work.

Aside from being a Rhodes and Fulbright Scholar, Zawacki has authored three poetry books, including “By Reasons of Breaking,” which won the University of Georgia Contemporary Poetry Series Competition in 2001.

Other achievements include past fellowships from the Bogliasco Foundation in Italy, the Hawthornden Castle in Scotland and the Salzburg Seminar in Austria. He also co-edits Verse, an international poetry magazine, and teaches English and creative writing at UGA.

Stonecipher received a master of fine arts degree from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop, the first creative writing degree program in the U.S., and went on to write three books of poetry. Her first book, “The Reservoir,” also won the UGA Contemporary Poetry Series Competition and her latest book of poems, “The Cosmopolitan,” won the 2007 National Poetry Series.

Stonecipher’s translations of French and German poetry have appeared in multiple journals as well as the New European Poets anthology.  She currently lives in Athens and is earning a doctorate at UGA. She has a second home in Berlin.

The readings are the second installment of the Creative Writing program’s 2008-09 UWG Reading Series. Both Stonecipher and Zawacki are poets of rich verbal textures and their shared interest in foreign places and tongues heavily impact their poetry, said Dr. Chad Davidson, associate professor of English and the Creative Writing Program coordinator.

“They are artists deeply invested in language’s power to transform the world and our places in it,” said Davidson. “Their poetries, in fiercely individual ways, seek to recapture some of that paradox and mystery within the language we use every day.”

For more information, contact Davidson at davidson@westga.edu or call         678-839-4865.