Professors Provide Insight on 2013 Nobel Prize Winners and their Advancements

Friday, November 8, 2013

On Monday, Nov. 11, 2013, the College of Science and Mathematics at the University of West Georgia will present “Popular Lectures on 2013 Nobel Prizes” discussing the significance of this year’s Nobel Prize winners and their advancements in science. This free event, held at the Townsend Center for the Performing Arts, is open to the public and will include a reception beginning at 5:00 p.m. before the lectures at 5:30 p.m.

The event will include three presentations given by UWG faculty members on the 2013 Nobel Prize winners in physiology and medicine, physics and chemistry. The presentations are meant to provide guests with a greater understanding of the advancements being made in science today.

“This is the fourth straight year that faculty members in the natural sciences are making popular presentations on these prizes,” said Dr. Farooq Khan, dean of the College of Science and Mathematics at UWG. “I invite students, faculty and staff at UWG, as well as members of the community of Carrollton, to attend these presentations. I want to take this opportunity to thank the three presenters, Professors Johnson, Talbot and Hansen, and the event's organizer, Professor Swamy-Mruthinti, associate dean of the College of Science and Mathematics.”

Dr. Melissa Johnson, assistant professor of biology at UWG, will present the details behind The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2013. According to www.nobelprize.org, this year, the award went to James E. Rothman, Randy W. Schekman and Thomas C. Südhof “for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells.” Since 1901, the Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, has awarded 204 Nobel Laureates with The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Dr. Julie Talbot, associate professor of physics at UWG, will explain the significance of The Nobel Prize in Physics 2013 awarded to François Englert and Peter W. Higgs. According to www.nobelprize.org, Englert and Higgs received the award “for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particles, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.” Since 1901, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden has awarded 196 Nobel Laureates with The Nobel Prize in Physics.

Lastly, Dr. John Hansen, associate professor of chemistry at UWG, will provide insight to The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2013. According to www.nobelprize.org, Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel received the award “for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems.” Since 1901, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden has awarded 166 Nobel Laureates with The Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

For more information on these and other events, please visit www.westga.edu/cosm. For information on The Nobel Prize, please visit www.nobelprize.org.