dept info

DAVID POLITZER: Around Four Corners
Video & Sound Projections
October 22 -Dec 3
Bobick Gallery
Reception: Oct 22 , 5-7pm
Artist Talk Oct 22, 11-12pm, HUM203
Student critiques: Oct 21-23 (sign up in Photo Lab)

gallery image

David Politzer is an artist based in Houston, TX. He received his MFA in Photography from Syracuse University and a BS in Art from Skidmore College. David also studied at the Glasgow School of Art and the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. He teaches in the Photography and Digital Media Program at the University of Houston.

Solo exhibition venues include Artspace (CT), Museum of Northern Arizona, Real Art Ways, Roswell Museum and Art Center and Lawndale Art Center. Group show and screening venues include the Bronx Museum of the Arts, New Mexico Museum of Art, the Soap Factory, Southern Exposure, Vox Populi, video_dumbo and Gallery Korea. He was an artist in residence at Djerassi, Yaddo and Roswell Artist in Residence.

The Bobick Gallery and Gallery 2 are open Monday-Friday: 9am to 5pm.
For more information contact Stephanie Smith at, 678-839-4950,

About the Permanent Collection
The Department of Art's permanent collection holds over 500 pieces dating from 1964 to the present, and primarily purchased from talented UWG students enrolled in art courses, in addition to visiting professional artists. As a whole, the collection's fifty years of work provides an insightful document and cultural history of the University and the Department of Art. The collection's strengths include pieces from the printmaking and painting programs, while artwork from photography, drawing, sculpture, and ceramics is also represented. Through an active loan program, such work is available for check out and, as a result, may be seen across the University. Thanks to a recent SRAP grant in 2012-2013, the collection was reinventoried and photographed. For more information, contact the Department of Art's Visual Resources Center at

Previous Events
Meaghan Dee
March 13, 2014
Typographic Collage Workshop &Professional Portfolio Q & A

Jay Ryan of The Bird Machine
April 2, 2014
Artist talk & Screenprint demo

Valerie Zimany
March 27-April 24,2014
Ceramic Exhibition & Artist talk

For more information contact Stephanie Smith, Gallery Director, at (678) 839-4950 or (678) 839-6521.

The Bobick Gallery, located on the first floor of the Humanities Building is the Department of Art's primary exhibition space. Exhibitions change monthly and the gallery is open Monday- Friday 9am-4pm. Closed weekends and school holidays. The gallery and events are free and open to the public.

The Bobick Gallery is named in honor of former chair and professor emeritus Bruce Bobick. Bruce served as chairmain of the department for 26 years until he retired in 2005. His website is

Gallery Information:

Parking Map

Please Submit documents for review to:
Stephanie Smith, Gallery Coordinator
UWG Dept. of Art
1601 Maple Street
Carrollton, Georgia 3011

Gallery 2 and the Visual Arts Building Installation space both serve as primary gallery spaces for students and are dedicated to the experimentation and development of student artists as they progress toward their professional careers.

Located throughout the campus grounds, the Sculpture on Campus Program includes rotating exhibitions of sculpture from some of the most exciting artists working today.

The Visiting Artist and Scholar Lecture Series brings creative and talented individuals to campus for one to three days to interact with students and faculty, creating opportunities for demonstrations and discourse.

Carrollton Collects: Prints from the WPA exhibition features original prints from UWG's permanent collection and the collections of local residents. On display are works commissioned as part of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Works Progress Administration and the Federal Art Project of the 1930s.

Roosevelt's Federal Art Project, a part of the WPA, could be considered a Depression era stimulus package. Its goal was to provide work for artists. It was also meant to raise the spirits and confidence of citizens across the country, through theater, dance, art education, and the fine and graphic arts. This highly successful and historically significant project brought a myriad of art forms to humble locations and non-traditional settings. It cut across financial and racial boundaries, and revealed the melting pot that was the American artist while documenting a cross-section of America before the technology-saturated world of today.