CEPD 6101 PSYCHOLOGY OF CLASSROOM LEARNING

3 Semester Hours

Semester/Year: Fall 2001

Instructor: Dr. Paul Phillips

Office Location: Room 235, Education Annex

Office Hours: Monday 9:00 – 11:00 Tuesday 9:00 – 12:00

Wednesday 9:00 – 12:00 Thursday 1:00 – 4:30

Telephone: 770-836-4480

E-mail: pphillip@westga.edu

Fax: 770-836-4645

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course provides an in-depth study of the major cognitive and behavioral theories of classroom learning. Emphasis will be placed on enabling teachers and counselors to better understand how students learn; on helping educators identify and remove barriers that impede student learning; and on helping educators develop, utilize and advocate teaching practices, programs, and curriculum that lead to academic success for all. Theories of motivation, classroom management practices, and belief systems that promote learning will also be addressed.

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

The conceptual framework of the College of Education at UWG forms the basis on which programs, courses, experiences, and outcomes are created. By incorporating the theme "Developing Educators for School Improvement", the College assumes responsibility for preparing educators who can positively influence school improvement through altering classrooms, schools, and school systems (transformational systemic change). Ten descriptors (decision makers, leaders, lifelong learners, adaptive, collaborative, culturally sensitive, empathetic, knowledgeable, proactive, and reflective) are integral components of the conceptual framework and provide the basis for developing educators who are prepared to improve schools through strategic change. National principles (INTASC), propositions (NBPTS), and standards (Learned Societies) also are incorporated as criteria against which candidates are measured.

The mission of the College of Education is to develop educators who are prepared to function effectively in diverse educational settings with competencies that are instrumental to planning, implementing, assessing, and re-evaluating existing or proposed practices. This course’s objectives are related directly to the conceptual framework and appropriate descriptors, principles or propositions, and Learned Society standards are identified for each objective. Class activities and assessments that align with course objectives, course content, and the conceptual framework are identified in a separate section of the course syllabus.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

Students will:

1. develop a knowledge base about the role of the teacher and cite current research findings on effective teaching and student achievement (Bruning, Schraw, & Ronning, 1999; Goetz, Alexander & Ash, 1992; Slavin, 2000) (D1: Decision makers; D6: Culturally Sensitive; D8: Knowledgeable; D10: Reflective);

2. demonstrate the ability to compare and contrast behavioral and cognitive theories of learning and their implications for the classroom (Bruning, Schraw, & Ronning, 1999; Goetz, Alexander & Ash, 1992; Slavin, 2000) (D8: Knowledgeable; D10: Reflective);

3. compare and contrast theories of motivation and their practical implications for the teaching-learning-process (Bruning, Schraw, & Ronning, 1999; Goetz, Alexander & Ash, 1992; Slavin, 2000) (D8: Knowledgeable; D10: Reflective);

4. learn to integrate and synthesize research findings on teaching and learning to generate new, more effective teaching activities (Bruning, Schraw, & Ronning, 1999; Goetz, Alexander & Ash, 1992; Slavin, 2000) (D1: Decision makers; D6: Culturally Sensitive; D9: Proactive; D10: Reflective);

5. develop an awareness of belief systems that impede or enhance learning (Bruning, Schraw, & Ronning, 1999; Goetz, Alexander & Ash, 1992; Slavin, 2000) (D1: Decision makers; D6: Culturally Sensitive; D8: Knowledgeable; D9: Proactive);

6. acquire knowledge and competency about individual student differences and how to account for them in the classroom, focusing especially on multicultural diversity (Bruning, Schraw, & Ronning, 1999; Goetz, Alexander & Ash, 1992; Slavin, 2000) (D1: Decision makers; D6: Culturally Sensitive; D7: Empathetic; D8: Knowledgeable; D9: Proactive; D10: Reflective); and

7. demonstrate technical competencies including the ability to use and help others use e-mail, productivity software, and search for and evaluate relevant professional information on the internet (ACES Technology Competency).

TEXTS, READINGS AND INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES

Required Text: No text required.

 

 

References:

Goetz, E. T., Alexander, P. A., & Ash, M. M. (1992). Educational psychology: A classroom perspective. NY: Merrill.

Slavin, R. (2000). Educational psychology: Theory and practice (6th ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

 

ASSIGNMENTS, EVALUATION PROCEDURES, AND GRADING POLICY

Assignments:

1. Attendance, Preparation, and Class Participation

Each student is expected to have read all assigned material and to be thoroughly prepared for each class. Classes will be highly interactive and will require the student to use his or her knowledge base to engage in higher-level thinking.

2. Class Paper/Project

A two page paper, on one sheet of paper, front and back, APA style, with a minimum of two references on the topics of intrinsic and extrinsic loci of control, is required.

3. Exams

There will be a mid-term exam and a final comprehensive exam.

Evaluation Procedures:

Mid-term exam 100 points

Final exam 100 points

Class Paper/Project 50 points

Grading Policy:

A=90-100% B=80-89% C=70-79% F=below 70%

CLASS OUTLINE

Aug. 20 Introduction and organization of course

Aug. 27 The distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic

Sept. 6 Beliefs drive the way we teach

Sept. 13 Consequences of behavior influence behavior

Sept. 20 The collection of data on school based consequences

Sept. 27 The analysis of data on school based consequences

Oct. 4 Teaching students not to violate

Oct. 11 Midterm Exam

Oct. 18 The collection of data on academic achievement

Oct. 25 The analysis of data on academic achievement

Nov. 1 Self referencing – an intrinsic motivator

Nov. 8 Research on intrinsic and extrinsic motivation

Nov. 15 The assessment of effective teaching

Nov. 29 The achievement gap

Dec. 6 Final Exam

 

 

Students are expected to adhere to the highest standards of academic honesty. Plagiarism occurs when a student uses or purchases ghostwritten papers. It also occurs when a student utilizes the ideas of or information obtained from another person without giving credit to that person. If plagiarism or another act of academic dishonesty occurs, it will be dealt with in accordance with the academic misconduct policy as stated in The Uncatalog, Undergraduate Catalog, and Graduate Catalog.