MEDT 6467 TECHNOLOGY FOR MEDIA SERVICES

 

3 Semester Hours

 

Spring 2001

 

Instructor: Dr. Elizabeth Kirby Bennett

 

Office Location: 150 Education Annex

 

Office Hours: Mon. 7:00 - 8:00 pm (Newnan or online);

Tues. 1:00 - 4:00 pm (office), 7:00 - 8:00 pm (office or online)

Weds. 10:00 - Noon (office), 2:00 - 5:00 pm (office)

Other hours by appointment.

Telephone: (770) 836-4438 (office); (770) 836-8941 (home)

 

E-mail: ebennett@westga.edu

 

Distance Support: http://www.westga.edu/~distance/webct3/main/help.html

http://webct.westga.edu:7900/webct/public/home.pl

http://www.westga.edu/~library/depts/offcampus/

http://www.westga.edu/~library/info/library.shtml

http://www.westga.edu/~distance/

 

 

Fax: (770) 838-3088

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

Prerequisite: MEDT 2401 or equivalent

An introduction to technology for media services and library automation including computer and video networking, internet, automation technologies, and library applications software. This course is GSAMS 60% and WebCT 40%.

 

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

 

Through this course students will demonstrate progress in the achievement of two NBPTS propositions that form the conceptual framework for advanced preparation programs in the College of Education. This course will enable the student to begin the development of a portfolio that could be submitted for National Board certification.

 

Proposition 3. Educators are responsible for managing and monitoring student learning. Graduate students will be able to manage learning resources to support optimal student learning through creation and management of technology infrastructures such as computer and video networks.

 

Proposition 5. Educators are members of learning communities. Graduate students will be able to generate plans for personally staying abreast of technology innovations and for sharing and infusing technology integration strategies with other teachers, administrators, and parents.

 

 


COURSE OBJECTIVES

 

Students will:

 

1.                               identify and evaluate networking applications for school and media center use [Proposition 3] (Barron and Orwig, 1995; Bucher, 1994; Derfler and Freed, 1996; Lowe, 1998; Meghabghab, 1997);

 

2.                               identify and evaluate access methods, software applications and acceptable use policies for

Internet utilization in schools and media centers [Proposition 5] (Barron and Orwig, 1995; Eddings, 1994; Ryder and Hughes, 1997; Simpson, 1995);

 

3. describe the process involved in automating a school library media center [Proposition 3] (Meghabghab, 1997; Murphy, 1992; Winnebago, 1993; Wisconsin Dept. Public Instruction, 1991);

 

4. identify and evaluate the hardware and software components of a library automation system [Proposition 3] (Meghabghab, 1997; Murphy, 1990; Murphy, 1992; Saffady, 1991; Winnebago, 1993; Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 1991);

5. define and explain the MARC standard [Proposition 3] (Eppelheimer, 1993; Furrie, 1998; Meghabghab, 1997; Murphy, 1992; Piepenburg, 1999; Winnebago, 1993; Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 1991);

 

6.                               use an automation program to generate MARC catalog records [Proposition 3] (Eppelheimer, 1993; Furrie, 1998; Meghabghab, 1997; Murphy, 1992; Piepenburg, 1999; Winnebago, 1993; Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 1991); and

7.                               identify sources of library automation products and services [Proposition 3] (Meghabghab, 1997; Murphy,1992; Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 1991).

 

8.                               identify and develop strategies for training students, faculty and others to use technology based resources [Proposition 5] (Barron and Orwig, 1995; Meghabghab, 1997; Ryder and Hughes, 1997; Simpson, 1995)

 

TEXTS, READINGS, AND INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES

 

Required Texts: Furrie, B. (1998). Understanding MARC-bibliographic ( ed.). McHenry, IL: Follett Software Co.

Meghabghab, D. B. (1997). Automating media centers and

small libraries. Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.

UWG Distance Learning Success Guide (2001).


Additional readings will come from technology-related periodicals and journals available online through GALILEO.

 


References:

 


Automate your library. (n.d.). Williamsport, PA: Brodart.

Barron, A. E. & Orwig, A. E. (1995). New technologies for education: A beginner's guide (2nd ed.). Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited, Inc.

Bucher, K. T. (1994). Computers & technology in school library media centers. Worthington, OH: Linworth Publishing, Inc.

Derfler, F. J., Jr. & Freed, L. (1996). How networks work (2nd ed.). Emeryville, CA: Ziff-Davis.

Eddings, J. (1994). How the internet works. Emeryville, CA: Ziff-Davis.

Eppelheimer, L. (1993). MARC: Making it manageable. Caledonia, MN: Winnebago Software.

Lowe, D. (1998). Networking for dummies (3rd ed.). Foster City, CA: IDG.

Murphy, C. (1990). Online catalogs in school library media centers: A planning guide. Chicago, IL: ALA.

Murphy, C. (1992). Automating school library catalogs: A reader. Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.

Piepenburg, S. (1999). Easy MARC: A Simplified Guide to Creating Catalog Records for Library Automation (3rd ed.). Castle Rock, CO: F & W Assoc.

Ryder, R. J. & Hughes, T. (1997). Internet for educators. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill.

Saffady, W. (1991). Automating the small library. Chicago, IL: ALA.

Simpson, C. M. (1995). Internet for library media specialists. Worthington, OH: Linworth Publishing, Inc.

Winnebago Software. (1993). Guide to library automation: A step by step introduction (2nd ed.). Caledonia, MN: Winnebago Software.

Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (1991). Small library automation: Information and issues. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.

Current educational media and technology magazines dealing with technology and school media centers (School Library Journal, Electronic Learning, T.H.E. Journal, Media and Methods, etc.)

 

ASSIGNMENTS, EVALUATION PROCEDURES, AND GRADING POLICIES

 

Assignments:

 

Students are expected to attend all class sessions, to be prepared for each class by doing the assigned readings in advance, and to have the appropriate materials required for class activities. If you have a valid reason for missing class, please contact the instructor in advance so appropriate plans can be made for you to obtain the information that was presented. More than one unexcused absence will lower a student's cumulative course grade by 5 points per absence.

 

1. Technology Information Presentation (Group project, supports Propositions 3, 5, and Objectives 1, 3, 4, and 7 ). Each group will research and present a brief (30 minute) informational report on one of the topics listed below. Projects will be graded based on content (information accuracy, comprehensiveness); presentation effectiveness (creativity, organization, communication, visuals); and written materials. Written materials will include

病 class handout containing information relevant to the topic,

病 presentation content outline (submitted to the instructor prior to the presentation), and

病 summary of each group member's contribution to the project.

 

Presentation Date & Topic

Feb 12: Computer Network Security

Feb 26: Hardware Peripherals for Automation Systems (I.e., bar code readers, wands, etc.)

March 12: Automated Ordering & Acquisition (via CD-ROM, online, etc.)

April 2: a. Patron Privacy Issues (& relationship to Automation Systems)

b. Satellite Systems & Video distribution systems (Hardware)

e. GPTV, GSAMS, Virtual High School services and resources for P-12 (Software)

 

2. Technology Training Presentation (Group project, supports Proposition 5 and Objectives 2, 3, 6, and 8). Each group will develop a training workshop and materials for students, faculty, or media center staff covering some component of an automation system, use of technology-based reference materials, or one component of an automation system. Each project must include at least one job aid (sign, brochure, etc.) that will help the target audience recall and do what they have learned. The workshop plan and job aid should incorporate standard instructional design principles (audience and content analysis, clear objectives, appropriate instructional strategies, evaluation component). Each group will be allotted 30 minutes to present their training plan and supporting materials. Projects will be graded based on content (accuracy, comprehensiveness, design); presentation effectiveness (creativity, organization, communication, visuals); and written materials.

 

Written materials will include

病 class handout summarizing the project and materials,

病 complete project packet (lesson/workshop plans, sample materials, job aids, and outline of class presentation) for the instructor, and

病 summary of each group member's contribution to the project.

Class handouts (one for each student) should be distributed to each site prior to the presentation according to the guidelines described for the technology information presentation.

 

Suggested Topics: OPAC searching for students or teachers, Using the OPAC to check out materials for students or teachers, creating and modifying MARC records for media aides, CD-ROM reference for students or teachers, Network Access/Use for students or teachers, WWW for students or teachers.

 

3. Exams. (Individual, supports Propositions 3 and 5 and Objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8). Each student will complete two written exams, one at midterm and one at the conclusion of the semester. The exams will consist of a variety of questions to assess the student's ability to recall and apply a variety of networking and automation technology information.

 

4. Networking Project. (Individual and Group Components, supports Proposition 3 and Objective 1). Individually, each student will obtain or draw a network diagram as it currently exists for a real school media center, and will identify significant features of the network. Working in groups, students will design and spec a network for a hypothetical media center.

 

5. Marc Records. (Individual, supports Propositions 3 & 5). Each student will create original MARC records for a print, video, and computer software resource.

 

6.   Internet Filtering Debate. (Individual and Group, supports Proposition 5 and Objective 2). Individually, students will read articles related to the pros and cons of internet filtering in media centers. In assigned groups, students will compile a bibliography for the debate position assigned to their group and debate the pros and cons of filtering with another group in a WebCT chat room. Following the debate, students will individually write a one page position paper on the issue.

 

7. Class activities and participation. Students will be informally observed for contributions to class discussion and participation in other class activities (face to face and online). Students will be expected to log on for a minimum of two sessions for each on-line class "meeting."

 

Evaluation Procedures:

 

Students will be evaluated in following areas:

 

1. Technology Information Presentations............................ 10%

2. Technology Training Presentation................................... 15%

3. Written examinations...................................................... 40%

(First exam = 20% and Second exam = 20%)

4. Networking Project....................................................... 15%

(Individual component = 10%, Group component = 5%)

5. Marc Records............................................................... 5%

6. Filtering Debate............................................................. 10%

7. Class activities & participation........................................ 5%

 

All assignments will be evaluated on the basis of accuracy, comprehensiveness, creativity and presentation.

Grading Policy:

The grading standards below are used for all class projects and examinations:

A= 92-100%, B= 82-91%, C= 70-81%, and F= 69% and below.

 

TENTATIVE CLASS OUTLINE

 

Jan 8 (Newnan) Course overview, intro to WebCT

Jan 15 MLK Holiday - No class, but work on WebCT!

Jan 22 (WebCT) PCs & troubleshooting, basic terms

Jan 29 (GSAMS) Computer networks: architecture, cabling, protocols, operations

Feb 5 (GSAMS) Designing computer networks

Feb 12 (GSAMS) Comparing networks, network security, Exam 1 (on WebCT)

Feb 19 (WebCT) Planning for automation, automation system overview

Feb 26 (GSAMS) Automation system components: hardware & software

March 5 (WebCT) Using automation systems

March 12 (GSAMS) RFPs, Upgrading automation systems

March 19 Spring Break!

March 26 (WebCT) Internet issues for media specialists

April 2 (GSAMS) Technology issues for media specialists, Staff Development, Part I

April 9 (GSAMS) Introduction to MARC Bibliographic

April 16 (GSAMS) Creating MARC records (Carver will have to come to Newnan)

April 23 (GSAMS) More MARC, Exam 2 (on WebCT)

April 30 (GSAMS) Teaching Students, Faculty & Staff to Use Technology (Presentations I)

May 7 (GSAMS) Teaching Students, Faculty & Staff to Use Technology (Presentations II)

 

WebCT classes will be conducted using WebCT, http://webct.westga.edu

Internet access will be required!!! Assigned readings for all classes and general class information will also be posted on WebCT.

 

ACADEMIC HONESTY

 

Students are expected to adhere to the highest standards of academic honesty. Plagiarism occurs when a student uses or purchases ghost-written papers. It also occurs when a student utilizes the ideas of or information obtained from another person without giving credit to that person. If plagiarism or another act of academic dishonesty occurs, it will be dealt with in accordance with the academic misconduct policy as stated in The UnCatalog,Undergraduate Catalog , and Graduate Catalog .

 

 

 

 


 

 

MED 832 Project Information Sheet

 

1. Technology Information Presentation (Group project, Weight 10%)

Each group will research and present a brief (15 minute) informational report on one of topics listed below. Projects will be graded based on content (information accuracy, comprehensiveness); presentation effectiveness (organization, communication); and written materials. Written materials will include a class handout containing information relevant to the topic (and appropriate for inclusion in the Technology Handbook), a presentation content outline (submitted to the instructor prior to the presentation), and a summary of each group member's contribution to the project. Handouts (one per student) should be distributed to each site prior to the presentation.

 

Presentation Date & Topic

****January 22

a. Monitoring & Internet filtering software, off-line Internet solutions (such as Web Whacker)

b. Internet Search Engines, basic Internet search techniques

****January 29

a. Video distribution systems

b. Satellite services and resources (GPTV etc.), GSAMS resources for P-12

****February 12

a. Automation system peripherals

b. Media center/public library cooperation (automation & technology related)

****February 19

a. Automated/on-line ordering and acquisition

b. Automation system overdue reporting capabilities, school survey of overdue procedures

****February 26

a. Dial-in and Internet access to OPACs

b. Automated media and textbook management programs

 

2. Technology Training Development and Presentation (Group project: Weight 20%)

Each group will develop a training workshop and materials for students, faculty, or media center staff covering some aspect of Internet use, use of technology-based reference materials, or one component of an automation system. Each project must include at least one job aid (sign, brochure, etc.) that will help the target audience recall and do what they have learned. The workshop plan and job aid should incorporate standard instructional design principles (audience and content analysis, clear objectives, appropriate instructional strategies, evaluation component). Each group will be allotted 30 minutes to present their training plan and supporting materials. Projects will be graded based on content (accuracy, comprehensiveness, design); presentation effectiveness (organization, communication); and written materials. Written materials will include a class handout summarizing the project and materials (again, appropriate for the Technology Handbook), a complete project packet and set of materials for the instructor, and a summary of each group member's contribution to the project. Class handouts (one for each student) should be distributed to each site prior to the presentation.

 

Suggested Topics: WWW for students or teachers, e-mail for students or teachers, OPAC searching for students or teachers, Checking out materials for students or teachers, CD-ROM reference for students or teachers, Network Access/Use for students or teachers.

 

3. Media Center Technology Handbook (Individual project: Weight 30%)

Each student will compile a media center technology notebook. The notebook should include sections on computer networks, video distribution systems and resources, Internet, automation systems, and technology training. Other sections may be included as needed. Class notes, materials, handouts, etc. should be incorporated into the handbook as appropriate for future "ready reference." Other readings or materials you collect independently during the quarter related to these topics should also be added. The following must also be included in the appropriate sections of the handbook:

1. A diagram of your selected school's computer network, with components identified and software licensing information described.

2. A list of Internet Service Providers and fees for your area.

3. Acceptable Use Policy criteria and sample AUPs.

4. An in-depth evaluation of an OPAC. You select the system, review the manual, go through the tutorial if one is available. Complete the OPAC evaluation form which will be distributed in class and write a short, descriptive critique indicating strengths and weaknesses of the system you selected. Pay attention to the OPAC interface, and whether it is appropriate for the audience it is being used with. In addition, investigate the kinds of displays, reports, bibliographies, and statistics you can retrieve from the system, and include as many different printouts as you can. Annotate the printouts (explaining headers, abbreviations, or other information that may be unclear).

5. MARC records for a book, a video, and a piece of computer software. These records must be generated using Mitinet or through original cataloging on your automation system.

 

The notebooks will be graded for content, accuracy, comprehensiveness, and organization. The OPAC evaluation will count 60% of the notebook grade, the MARC records will count 20%, and the remaining components will count 20%.