MEDT 7464

INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY INTO THE CURRICULUM

3 Semester Hours

 

Semester/ Year:

Fall 2000

Instructor:

Dr. William R. Wiencke

Office Location:

144 Education Annex

Office Hours:

Monday – 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Tuesday – 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Thursday – 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM & 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

(Note: College & University committee meetings are sometimes scheduled during office hours. It is wise to call ahead to be certain I am available)

Telephone:

(770) 836-4436 - Office

(770) 838-0003 - Home (Please, not after 9:00 PM)

E-mail:

Distance Support

wwiencke@westga.edu

http://www.westga.edu/~distance/webct3/main/help.html

http://webct.westga.edu:7900/webct/public/home.pl

http://www.westga.edu/~library/depts/offcampus/

http://www.westga.edu/~library/info/library.shtml

http://www.westga.edu/~distance/

 

Fax:

(770) 838-3088

COURSE DESCRIPTION

(No prerequisites) Techniques for incorporating technology into the curriculum based on current learning theories. Cooperative planning and teaching between the teacher and the media specialist and infusion of information skills into classroom activities will be stressed. This course is GSAMS 90% and Face to Face 10%. WebCT is used as a course supplement.

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

Through this course students will demonstrate progress in the achievement of two NBPTS proposals that form the conceptual framework for advanced preparation programs in the College of Education. This course will enable the student to begin the development of a portfolio that could be submitted for National Board certification.

Proposition 3. Educators are responsible for managing and monitoring student learning. Students will design strategies and plans for integrating technology into learning.

Proposition 4. Educators will think systematically about their practice and learn from experience. The graduates will apply what is known about learning theory and current technologies to plan learning experiences for their students.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

Students will:

  1. review the history of technology in education and it has impacted current trends in educational policy (Roblyer & Edwards, 1999; Heinich, Molenda, Russell, & Smaldino, 1996; Driscoll, 1994; Duffy & Jonassen, 1992);
  2. review learning theories and how they effect planning for instruction (Roblyer & Edwards, 1999; Driscoll, 1994; Duffy & Jonassen, 1992);
  3. demonstrate competencies in evaluating instructional courseware (Roblyer & Edwards, 1999; Driscoll, 1994; Duffy & Jonassen, 1992);
  4. review and evaluate lesson plans that incorporate various technologies (Roblyer & Edwards, 1999; Grabe & Grabe, 1996; Driscoll, 1994; Heller,1994; Duffy & Jonassen, 1992);
  5. develop an instructional unit which meets a defined need and incorporates technology as an integral component (Roblyer & Edwards, 1999; Grabe & Grabe, 1996; Driscoll, 1994; Heller,1994; Duffy & Jonassen, 1992).

TEXTS, READINGS, AND INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES

Required Text:

Roblyer, M. D. & Edwards, J. (1999). Integrating educational technology into teaching (2nd ed.) Columbus, OH: Prentice Hall. ( http://www.bookstore.westga.edu/ )

References:

Driscoll, M. P. (1994). Psychology of learning for instruction. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Duffy, T. M., & Jonassen, D. H. (1992). Constructivism and the technology of instruction: A conversation. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

ERIC Review: Inclusion, 4(3). (Fall, 1996)

Heinich, R., Molenda, M., Russell, J. D., & Smaldino, S. E. (1996). Instructional media and technologies for learning. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Merrill.

Heller, N. (1994). Projects for new technologies in education. Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.

Various issues of Technology Connection, Book Links, and School Library Media Activities Monthly.

ASSIGNMENTS, EVALUATION PROCEDURES, AND GRADING POLICY

Assignments:

Each student is expected to attend all classes, be prepared for each class by doing the assigned readings in advance, and have the appropriate materials required for specific class activities. If you have a valid reason for missing class, please call or email your instructor in advance so that appropriate plans can be made for you to obtain the information presented. Unexcused and excessive absences will lower a student’s course grade. Late assignments for which there is no legitimate reason will be assessed up to a 25% penalty.

Projects

The following are general descriptions of the projects required for the course. A more detailed description will be provided with each project assignment. Please see the Class Outline for specific due dates.

  1. Technology Plan Critique (Individual): Obtain a copy of the technology plan or related document and compare the current (actual) role of technology and the anticipated role presented in the plan.
  2. Georgia Reform (Individual): Governor Barnes is proposing changes in the evaluation of student progress and tying accountability to the results. Describe a model that best supports the Governor’s Goals.
  3. Standards (Individual): Review the ISTE Standards and performance indicators located at the NETS/ISTE WEB site: http://cnets.iste.org/ . Compare the performance indicators listed for the grade level at your school with the current capabilities of your students. For those indicators which are not met, describe an intervention which could enable your students to achieve them. Be sure to list and describe specific obstacles which would prevent their achievement.
  4. Courseware Evaluation (Individual): From the resources available at your school, select a non-game courseware package and review it based upon the criteria presented in Figure 4.14 of the book.
  5. Lesson Plan (Individual): Select an example lesson plan from the book, CD-ROM, or the Internet which utilizes one of the productivity tools reviewed in Chapter 5. Follow the directions in the lesson plan, producing the required assignment. Critique the lesson as to its effectiveness and the appropriate use of the technology. Modify the lesson to improve any of the deficiencies discovered. Remember, there is always room for improvement. Reference the NTES performance indicators accomplished by the lesson.
  6. Lesson Plan (Individual): Select an example lesson plan from the book, CD-ROM, or the Internet which utilizes one of the productivity tools reviewed in Chapter 6. Follow the directions in the lesson plan, producing the required assignment. Critique the lesson as to its effectiveness and the appropriate use of the technology. Modify the lesson to improve any of the deficiencies discovered. Remember, there is always room for improvement. Reference the NTES performance indicators accomplished by the lesson.
  7. Lesson Plan (Individual): Select an example lesson plan from the book, CD-ROM, or the Internet which utilizes one of the productivity tools reviewed in Chapter 8. Follow the directions in the lesson plan, producing the required assignment. Critique the lesson as to its effectiveness and the appropriate use of the technology. Modify the lesson to improve any of the deficiencies discovered. Remember, there is always room for improvement. Reference the NTES performance indicators accomplished by the lesson.
  8. Lesson Plan (Individual): Develop a lesson which would utilize one or more of the emerging technologies presented in Chapter 9.
  9. Final Project (Group): Plan and develop an instructional unit which actively incorporates technology as a necessary component. Follow the five steps outlined in Figure 2.7. Each group will select or be assigned a different subject area from those listed below. Groups will present plan to class in final weeks of semester. Presentation must utilize technology

Evaluation Procedures:

The student will be evaluated in the following way:

Individual Projects

8 @ 5%

40%

Group Project

 

35%

Final Exam

 

25%

Projects will be evaluated according to criteria given with the assignment. Exams will be evaluated according to the accuracy of each individual answer.

Grading Policy

The following grading scale will be used:

A = 90 - 100%, B = 80 - 89%, C = 70 - 79% and F = Below 70%.

CLASS OUTLINE

Date

Class Activity

Assignment(s)

Turn In

1.1

8-24

Course Overview/Distance Technologies

Read: 1-23

2.1

8-31

Educational Technology in Context

Read: 28-42

3.1

9-7

Planning and Implementation

Read: 48-73

4.1

9-14

Learning Theories & Integration Models

Read: http://cnets.iste.org/

Project 1

5.1

9-21

Standards/INTEC

Read: 77-108

Project 2

6.1

9-28

Instructional Software

Read: 112-161

Project 3

7.1

10-5

Productivity Tools

Read: 165-186

Project 4

8.1

10-12

Multimedia & Hypermedia

Read: 191-225

Project 5

9.1

10-19

Internet & Distance Teaching

Read: 228-235

Project 6

10.1

10-26

Emerging Technologies

Read: 239-317

Project 7

11.1

11-2

Project Presentations

Project 8

12.1

11-9

Project Presentations

13.1

11-16

Project Presentations

14.1

11-23

HOLIDAY

15.1

11-30

Project Presentations

Final

12-14

**Final Exam**

 

Students are expected to adhere to the highest standards of academic honesty. Plagiarism occurs when a student uses or purchases ghostwritten papers. Is also occurs when a student utilizes the ideas of or information obtained form another person without giving credit to that person. If plagiarism or another act of academic dishonesty occurs, it will be dealt with in accordance with the academic misconduct policy as stated in The Uncatalog, Undergraduate Catalog, and Graduate Catalog.