in this issue

1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10

News & Events

Awards Day Recap

Eclectic Now Accepting Submissions

Poetry Gala Review

Univ. Writing Center Adds Staff, Begins Assessment

Snyder Retirement Party

2007 Undergrad Conference Presenters

Voice Your Concerns

Toto Pulls Curtain on David Newton

Thinking of Pursuing a Graduate Degree?

People News

Studying Abroad: Nick McRae Czechs In

Kimily Willingham Leaves Legacy Behind

Student Presents Paper to Board of Regents

Lisa Crafton Named Outstanding Teacher

Masters Takes Helm of Grad Program

New Professor in English Education

In Every Issue

Job Spotlight on Christina Hogan

New Faculty and Staff

Cheers

Course Descriptions

Spring 2008

 

 

Spring 2008 Courses


NOTE: Courses are subject to change depending on enrollment and faculty teaching assignments. Please check BANWEB for more current information on the availability of all courses.

English 1101 and 1102 are prerequisites for all courses from ENGL 2110 through 4386.

A “W” designation after a section number of a 3000- or 4000-level course signifies that the course is a Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) course. WAC accepts as a guiding principle the idea that writing is a valuable tool for learning and communication. Therefore, the components of a course so designated are designed to help you learn the material and communicate what you have learned. Students are required to take two “W” courses for the undergraduate degree.


 

XIDS

4/5000-level

  XIDS 2100: Arts and Ideas

ENGL 4/5106: Studies in Genre

 

 

ENGL 4/5125: Colonial and Early American Lit

  FILM

ENGL 4/5130: Eighteenth-Century British Lit

  FILM 2100: History and Theory of Film

ENGL 4/5155: Twentieth-Century British Lit

  FILM 2080: Intro to the Art of Film

ENGL 4/5160: Twentieth-Century American Lit

   

ENGL 4/5180: Studies in Regional Literature

 

2000-level

ENGL 4/5188: Individual Authors

  ENGL 2000: American Speech

ENGL 4/5210: Advanced Creative Writing

 

ENGL 2050: Self Staging

ENGL 4/5300: Studies in the English Language

 

ENGL 2110: World Literature

ENGL 4384: Senior Seminar

 

ENGL 2120: British Literature

 
 

ENGL 2130: American Literature

6000-level
 

ENGL 2180: Studies in African-American Literature

ENGL 6105: Seminar in British Literature I
 

ENGL 2300: Practical Criticism

ENGL 6120: Seminar in American Literature II
    ENGL 6385: Seminar in Special Topics
 

3000-level

 
  ENGL 3160: Philosophy in Literature and Film  
 

ENGL 3200: Creative Writing

 
 

ENGL 3400: Advanced Comp: Creative Nonfiction

 
 

ENGL 3405: Professional and Technical Writing

 

XIDS


XIDS 2100

 

XIDS 2100-01: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Brooke Parks
The Creative Process
MWF 11:00am-11:50am, Humanities 208

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: Why do people create? Is creativity something we’re wired for? Do we learn it? Can we learn it? Can all of us engage in the creative process? Are there rules for the creative process? What can we learn from the creative processes of others? In exploring the creative process, we’ll look at ways artists from various cultural and historical backgrounds have approached these questions -- and how we might use their answers to help shape our own creative processes. Our job in this course is two-fold: To experience our own creative process through various projects AND to learn to discuss the process in a critical way. We’ll accomplish these jobs in a variety of ways: we’ll study the creative work of artists (writers, painters, sculptors, photographers, etc.), we’ll create (and workshop) our own works in various media, we’ll immerse ourselves in what others have said about the creative process, and we’ll work on our own critical statements regarding the creative process. Come prepared: Our work (and play) in this course will be rigorous.

Texts: Hugo, The Triggering Town; Shahn, The Shape of Things; various texts made available on Course Reserves. Please note: In addition to these texts, students will need other art supplies throughout the semester. These supplies will likely vary from student to student, so we’ll discuss specifics in class.

Requirements: Attendance at (and reviews of) five cultural events, a midterm exam, a range of critical and creative projects throughout the semester, a final project with both a creative component (your own art) and a critical component (a distillation of various artistic concepts and an explanation of how they are applied to your work).

XIDS 2100-01D: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Mandi Campbell
The Monstrous and the Grotesque
Days and time of class: This class will largely be conducted on WebCT Vista; however, we will meet on Wednesday, January 9 th from 5:30-6:45 in TLC 1301 to discuss the class format and the use of WebCT Vista. We will also be meeting for the midterm and final exams (date, time, location of these exams TBA).

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: In this class, we will consider how cultural, social, political and religious influences work to construct humankind’s collective fears. As we study an array of gothic novels and contemporary horror films, we will come to understand that the “monsters” in these texts are personifications of common fears and that the stories themselves are hyperbolized versions of decidedly less grotesque, though debatably less frightening, realistic situations.

Texts: Darryl Jones, Horror: A Thematic History in Fiction and Film and Mary Shelley, Bram Stoker and Robert Louis Stevenson, Frankenstein, Dracula, and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (published as a single volume). You also will be required to watch an array of contemporary horror films. (Films TBA.)

Requirements: Weekly listserv postings, two short response papers, midterm and final exams.

XIDS 2100-02: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Patricia Burgey
The Bible and Artistic Interpretations: Apocalyptic Invasion
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 209

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: Our culture has been invaded with apocalyptic warnings, which stem from our Western Judeo-Christian origins. More specifically, the roots of our chaotic view of the end of the world appear in the Book of Revelation. This intertextual borrowing inundates our culture with apocalyptic imagery and ideology. First, this class will explicate and analyze the Book of Revelation in order to understand its structural and symbolic order. Then, we will look at how different aspects of our culture have incorporated these orders and codes into their frameworks. We will look at many types of texts, including art, advertising, music, literature, film, television, philosophy and politics, together with their respective theoretical analyses.

Texts: The Theology of the Book of Revelation by Richard Bauckman, ISBN 978-0-521-35691-6; Pocket Guide to the Apocalypse by Jason Boyett, ISBN 978-0-9760357-1-8; A Beginner’s Guide to the Humanities by Philip E. Bishop, 2 nd Edition, ISBN 978-0-132213844; Terrorist by John Updike, ISBN 978-03-345-49391-0

Requirements: Active Participation, Midterm, Final, Research Paper, Attend and write response-papers on five cultural events.

XIDS 2100-04: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Maria Doyle
The Social Meanings of Comedy
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, Pafford 308

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: When we say that something is "no laughing matter," we mean that it is serious and therefore carries more weight than the flip and flimsy trivialities of life. But jokes are usually directed at someone or something; thus comedy serves as a potent vehicle for the criticism, and thus potential reformation, of society. In this sense laughter – as a corrective, as critique or even as escape valve – does indeed "matter." Beginning with an exploration of basic comic patterns and techniques, this course will go on to explore the interrelation of two central purposes of comic art: how comedy seeks to create an ideal, harmonious society and the methods it uses to attack the problems of the world. Course texts will cover a broad range of forms – from Norman Rockwell's art to David Sedaris's essays, from Shakespeare's plays to the satire of The Daily Show – exploring how these disparate writers and media draw upon similar comic devices (such as wit, repetition and exaggeration of word, image and action) to achieve various "comic" ends.

Texts: William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream, David Sedaris, Holidays on Ice, Jonathan Swift, "A Modest Proposal," Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest, Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse Five. Films: Little Miss Sunshine, When Harry Met Sally, Waking Ned Devine, Thank You for Smoking

Requirements: Analytical reading journal, periodic quizzes, final group presentation project

XIDS 2100-05: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Lori Lipoma
The Graphic Novel: Alchemy of Words and Images
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, Pafford 308

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: Before its reemergence in popular culture, graphic literature was found in the ancient Sumerian, Egyptian, and Mayan civilizations, in the Bayeux Tapestry, and even in medieval biblical illuminated texts. Since the late 1980s, critics and scholars have recognized the graphic novel as a complex and dynamic form of communication, literature, and art; moreover, filmmakers regularly pay tribute to this art form via a constant stream of film adaptations.

The graphic novel presents a new horizon in critical study; we will learn, therefore, to become theorists in our own right as we describe and interpret the interplay of words and images that produce this art form. We will hear from guest speakers who are scholars of historical sequential art, as well as those who create graphic novels for a living. We’ll study some of the most stirring and beautiful work contemporary literature has to offer, and perhaps most importantly, we will create some “alchemical” works of our own.

Texts: Lynda Barry, One! Hundred! Demons! Alison Bechdel, Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic; Will Eisner, Contract With God and Other Tenement Stories; Miriam Engleberg, Cancer Made Me a Shallower Person; Scott McCloud, Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art. Frank Miller, et. al. Batman: The Dark Knight Returns DC Comics, 1997; Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis : The Story of a Childhood. Art Spiegleman, Maus: A Survivor’s Tale; J. Michael Straczynski, et. al, The Amazing Spiderman: Revelations. John Wagner and Vince Lock: A History of Violence; Ware, Chris, ed. McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern Issue 13. Films:American Splendor and Crumb NOTE: All these titles are available used

Requirements:Student Presentations – 10%; Reading Responses – 30% (5 @ 6% each); Adaptation Project – 20%; Minicomics Project – 20%; Final Exam – 15%;Class Participation – 5%.

XIDS 2100-07: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Patricia Reinhard
Photography and Short Stories
TR 2:00pm-3:15 pm, TLC 1116

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: Photography and Short Stories will study the dialogic relationship between photographic images and short stories. Fraternal twins separated at birth, the modern short story and the photographic image have flourished, one form shadowing the other, since their origins in the mid-nineteenth century. This course will analyze the synergistic effect created by photographic images and short fiction when they are scrutinized through the dual lenses of perspective and point of view. Both disciplines present sketches, slices of perspective that concentrate on a single or unique effect. In their uses and manipulations of point of view, both disciplines appear infinitely malleable and wildly flexible as artists continually craft and redefine the ways in which a story or an image can be “told.” Our study of the synergy between short fiction and image will begin with Eudora Welty, an artist who serves as the literal and physical embodiment of the interpenetration of these two disciplines. As a young woman, Welty worked for the Works Progress Administration in a job that allowed her access to places and people throughout her home state. Before she wrote, Welty photographed—recorded on film her sojourn through Mississippi’s eighty-two counties. Closely reading a Welty short story and several of her images will enable students to formulate a set of terms and concepts that are shared by both disciplines. Welty’s fiction and images, along with these specific terms and concepts descriptive of both disciplines, provide the springboard to all that follows—dozens of online photographic images, thirteen stories, and Susan Sontag’s On Photography, Roland Barthes’s Camera Lucida, and John Berger’s About Looking.

Texts: Susan Sontag’s On Photography, Roland Barthes’s Camera Lucida, and John Berger’s About Looking; a course packet of thirteen short stories, an online portfolio of photographic images, and additional selected essays on photography.

Requirements: Students will write three essays on topics derived from the themes and concepts in the texts. These essays will be approximately 1000 words and will require secondary sources. Weekly informal response writing intended to generate ideas and concepts explored in greater depth and detail in the essays will be assigned. This writing is designed as write to learn exercises and offers students a free space in which to begin exploring the texts. An individual oral presentation/assignment in which students select a specific photograph or series of images and a short story and report on them to the class is required. Finally, a final essay exam and attendance at five cultural events are also requirements of the class.

XIDS 2100-08: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Debra MacComb
Representing American Women
T 5:30pm-8pm, Humanities 207

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: Through the analysis of representations in the literary and visual arts of both the high and popular cultures, this course will examine a range of identities, images and ideologies associated with the American woman from the early Republic to the modern period.

Texts: Chopin, The Awakening, Fern, Ruth Hall, Foster, The Coquette, Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; James, Daisy Miller.

Requirements: Active and informed participation in class discussion, two midterm exams, and a group media report

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FILM

FILM 2080
 

FILM 2080-L2M: Introduction to the Art of Film, Prof. Stacey Morin
MWF 11:00am-11:50am, Pafford 307

Description: In this course students will consider the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. Students will watch a wide range of films from a variety of countries and historical moments in film history. Students will have the chance to explore issues such as framing, photographic space, film shot, editing, sound, genre, narrative form, acting style, and lighting in the context of wider discussions of the weekly films. This is an introductory course, and assumes no prior knowledge of film. Students will be evaluated primarily on the basis of weekly postings, a shot-by-shot analysis, and exams.

Texts: Corrigan, Timothy and Patricia White. The Film Experience: An Introduction.

Requirements: Weekly postings, quizzes, a shot-by-shot analysis, and two exams.

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FILM 2100
 

FILM 2100-01: History and Theory of Film, Prof. Barbara Brickman
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, Humanities 312

Description: This course will explore major developments in film history, theory, and criticism. Students will become familiar with several different film movements in the development of the art form and will be introduced to basic ideas in film theory. Through a variety of film movements and historical periods, students will develop an understanding of the cultural, industrial, and political contexts for some of most significant debates about film. Specific topics covered will include Russian formalism, the history of classical Hollywood cinema, the French New Wave, recent global cinemas, as well as alternatives to Hollywood in the United States. Class time will be divided between discussion of the historical movements and critical texts and the application of those texts to a primary cinematic text. Students will be evaluated on the basis of weekly postings, participation in discussion, essay exams, and formal writing opportunities.

Texts: Wexman , Virginia Wright. A History of Film, 6th Edition

Requirements: 3 short essays, short response papers, midterm and final essay exams

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ENGL 2000-level

ENGL 2000
 

ENGL 2000-01: American Speech, Prof. David Newton
TR 11:00am–12:15pm, Humanities 206

May count for credit in Core Area B1.

Description: This course is designed to heighten your critical awareness of how you and others use the English language in everyday spoken discourse. The goals of this course are: 1) to help you become more aware of how your speech—the varieties of English that you use in different settings—influences your personal life and shapes your potential for professional success; 2) to provide you with the critical and practical skills needed to become an effective speaker in different personal and professional settings. To accomplish these goals we will explore how English speakers in America negotiate the expectations of different speech communities they belong to—both personal and professional—and how the evaluation of speech differences (our own, as well as others) in our professional work and personal lives is informed by historical, social, cultural, educational, economic, and political conditions.  Consequently, this course will emphasize the practical as well as the theoretical applications of speech analysis. You will learn how to organize and present speeches related to different academic and professional situations, and in the process you will become more aware of how judgments about language affect your ability to communicate successfully with others.

Texts: A course packet of readings, assignments, and presentation exercises will be available from the University Bookstore.

Requirements: Attendance; active participation in classroom workshops and practice presentations; homework assignments; quizzes; four (4) formally-evaluated speech presentations.

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ENGL 2050
 

ENGL 2050: Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life, Profs. Lori Lipoma and Maren Henry
Section 01 (Lipoma): MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Pafford 307
Section 02 (Lipoma): MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, Pafford 307
Section 03 (Henry): TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, Pafford 109
Section 04 (Sturgis): TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Pafford 307

May count for credit in Core Area B1. Same as THEA 2050.

Description: Effective communicators are more productive, have enhanced career opportunities, enjoy more fulfilling relationships, earn more respect, and have more fun! The good news is that you already have the tools you need to become a great communicator; it’s just a matter of learning how to use them consciously and masterfully…in other words, learning how to “self-stage.”

In Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Everyday Life, we will study and practice practical communication skills—creativity, quick thinking, risk taking, lateral thinking, active listening, subtext mastery, self-awareness—and apply them to virtually every interaction you encounter outside the classroom: One-on-One Conversations, Public Presentation, Debate and Argumentation, Conflict Resolution and Confrontation Skills, Stress Management, Team Building, and Impression Management. By the end of the semester, students will have had first-hand experience in all of these areas, and, more importantly, will know exactly how to continue honing and perfecting those skills long after.

Requirements: formal solo presentations, group projects and presentations, panel discussions/debates, vocabulary-building exercises, role-playing and improvisation exercises, journaling, and, of course, active, informed participation in each class session.


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ENGL 2110
 

ENGL 2110-01: World Literature, Prof. Lisa Propst
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Pafford 308

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.


Description: This course analyzes narratives about changing cultural identities and meetings between cultures. It analyses texts spanning four continents and more than 3000 years – from tales of mythic Greek journeys to Celtic legends to contemporary literature from Africa, Asia, and the Americas. These narratives chart what Salman Rushdie describes as “the transformation that comes of new and unexpected combinations of human beings, cultures, ideas, politics, movies, songs.” They trace people’s efforts to translate the customs of one society into the language and ideas of another. They ask how people’s identities change when they are separated from familiar places and mementoes. As the course unfolds, we will consider the place of these narratives in literary history and ask what it means to classify a group of texts as “world literature.”

Texts: William Shakespeare, The Tempest; Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea; Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart; Electronic reserves including excerpts from Homer, and Dante, the Old and New Testaments, medieval Celtic legends, and contemporary world writings.

Requirements: Two 5-6 page essays; Two in-class exams; In-class writing exercises, quizzes, peer editing, and short homework responses; Class participation.

ENGL 2110-25H: World Literature-Honors, Prof. Chad Davidson
Resurrecting the Classics
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 1204

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2. Honors students only.

Description: When Derek Walcott—a Nobel-prize-winning poet from the small Caribbean Island of St. Lucia—set out to write the definitive epic of his native world, where did he turn? He traveled all the way back to the beginnings of Western literature and titled his poem Omeros, resurrecting Homer’s classic the Odyssey. When Chinese author Anchee Min portrayed the destructive potential of Mao’s cultural revolution, she tapped into some of the central themes of Virgil’s great epic of Roman civilization, the Aeneid. And when Leslie Marmon Silko—a Southwestern Laguna-Pueblo—wanted to conjure the despair and suffering of her people, she turned to imagery from Dante’s classic exploration of dystopia in the Inferno. This course, then, will examine some of the classics of Western literature in an attempt to show how contemporary writers from around the world turn to, radicalize, revolutionize, borrow from, and in some cases overtly challenge, texts from antiquity to the Middle Ages. Not only will we look at how contemporary world authors resurrect and react to these touchstone Western works, but you yourself will try your hand at similar acts of literary resuscitation. In short, you will receive instruction not only on how to create lively interpretations of some of the greatest literature the world has ever produced but will also engage in creative productions of your own making. The classics, we contend, are not dead. Contemporary writers thrive—even depend upon—them, and this course is devoted to that dynamic relationship.

Texts: Dante, Inferno; Homer, The Odyssey; Anchee Min, Red Azalea; Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony; Virgil, The Aeneid; Derek Walcott, Omeros; plus various handouts to be distributed in class.

Requirements: Daily participation, three critical papers, and a final portfolio of writing.

ENGL 2110-26H: World Literature-Honors, Prof. Gregory Fraser
Resurrecting the Classics
TR 2:00pm-3:15 pm, HUM 206

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2. Honors students only.

Description: When Derek Walcott—a Nobel-prize-winning poet from the small Caribbean Island of St. Lucia—set out to write the definitive epic of his native world, where did he turn? He traveled all the way back to the beginnings of Western literature and titled his poem Omeros, resurrecting Homer’s classic the Odyssey. When Chinese author Anchee Min portrayed the destructive potential of Mao’s cultural revolution, she tapped into some of the central themes of Virgil’s great epic of Roman civilization, the Aeneid. And when Leslie Marmon Silko—a Southwestern Laguna-Pueblo—wanted to conjure the despair and suffering of her people, she turned to imagery from Dante’s classic exploration of dystopia in the Inferno. This course, then, will examine some of the classics of Western literature in an attempt to show how contemporary writers from around the world turn to, radicalize, revolutionize, borrow from, and in some cases overtly challenge, texts from antiquity to the Middle Ages. Not only will we look at how contemporary world authors resurrect and react to these touchstone Western works, but you yourself will try your hand at similar acts of literary resuscitation. In short, you will receive instruction not only on how to create lively interpretations of some of the greatest literature the world has ever produced but will also engage in creative productions of your own making. The classics, we contend, are not dead. Contemporary writers thrive—even depend upon—them, and this course is devoted to that dynamic relationship.

Texts: Dante, Inferno; Homer, The Odyssey; Anchee Min, Red Azalea; Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony; Virgil, The Aeneid; Derek Walcott, Omeros; plus various handouts to be distributed in class.

Requirements: Daily participation, three critical papers, and a final portfolio of writing.

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ENGL 2120
 

ENGL 2120-02: British Literature, Prof. Alan Clinton
MW 5:30pm-6:45pm, Pafford 308

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F.

Description: This class will give you a chance to read some of the major works of British Literature from the medieval period through the 20 th century. In addition to extensive reading of primary texts, we will also explore questions of canonicity and the historical contexts in which these texts were written.

Texts: Anonymous, Beowulf, 0451527402, Signet Classics; Anonymous, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, 0451528182, Signet; Shakespeare, William, King Lear, 019832054X, Oxford University Press; Pope, Alexander, The Dunciad, 1419160362, Kessinger; Stoker, Bram, Dracula, 0743477367, Pocket Books; Browning, Robert, My Last Duchess and Other Poems, 0486277836, Dover; Woolf, Virginia, Jacob’s Room, 0156457423, Harvest Books; Doolittle, Hilda, Helen in Egypt, 0811205444, New Directions; In addition, we will be obtaining some readings from library databases and electronic reserve.

Requirements: One individual presentation, 3 short papers, and 2 exams.

ENGL 2120-04: British Literature, Prof. Meg Pearson
Exploring Englishness
TR 3:30-4:45, Pafford 308

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F.

Description: The Norton Anthology of English Literature suggests that "most nations define what they are by defining what they are not." This survey will consider this notion of negative self-definition in a vast array of texts that range over several centuries. Most of these stories emphasize the journey of heroes or heroines into alien territory, where they experience conflict with a malignant other, discover love (sometimes romantic, sometimes spiritual), and come to apprehend their own true natures. We will determine whether we can characterize these literatures as distinctly English or British.

Texts: Will include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Doctor Faustus, Gulliver's Travels, Doctor Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Translations

Requirements: Active discussion, two response essays, midterm and final.

ENGL 2120-25H: British Literature-Honors, Prof. Angela Insenga
“Needing the Monster”: The Grotesque and Fantastic in British Literature
MW 3:30-4:45, TLC 1204

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F. Honor students only.

Description: Philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche's warning that “Whoever battles with monsters had better see that it does not turn him into a monster [and that] if you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you" is not one that applies to artists who bravely plumb the depths to create monsters of their own. Our class, a survey of British literature, will investigate such creatures born of authors' minds. Taking as our general premise that humanity "needs" its hobgoblins, we will focus on artistic creations that pit humans against demons, both real and metaphorical, and ask ourselves what purposes such grotesque figures serve in their various cultural incarnations.

Major Assignments: Two short response essays, Two comprehensive exams, One ten minute in-class presentation, Daily reading quizzes/thinking on paper exercises

Texts: Beowulf ; Canterbury Tales, selected; Titus Andronicus ; Rime of the Ancient Mariner; "Goblin Market"; Dracula; Heart of Darkness; Film: The Village. The class will also view and discuss scenes from the following films: Julie Taymor’s Titus, Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, and the new film by Robert Zemeckis, Beowulf.

English 2120-26H: British Literature-Honors, Prof. Lisa Crafton
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, TLC 2237.

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F. Honor students only.

Description: "I Must Create a System or be Enslav'd by Another Man's," warns Romantic poet/painter William Blake. In this study of British literature, we will read selected texts, medieval to contemporary, with an emphasis on the dynamic between individuals and communities (geographical, familial, social, cultural, political). Beginning with contemporary poet Seamus Heaney’s essay on Wordsworth, we’ll consider how a “sense of place” is transmitted through art works 200 years apart and how contemporary readings shape our understanding of literature from the past. We will analyze diverse texts of fiction, drama, poetry, film, and music which nevertheless offer recurrent themes; for example, conflicts between spiritual and material culture from medieval mystic Julian of Norwich to U2 and the compelling power of what Heaney will call "the tribe" in Irish literature.

Texts: Longman Anthology of British Literature, Frankenstein, Endgame, and online readings on reserve, including Julian of Norwich, Chaucer (interlinear translation), Heaney, Woolf, Gordimer, and a theoretical introduction to postcolonial literature.

Requirements: Active discussion, group oral report, 2 response essays, midterm and final.

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ENGL 2130
 

ENGL 2130-01: American Literature, Prof. Gwen Davidson
MWF 10:00am-10:50am, Pafford 308

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F.


Description: In this course we will examine American relationships with nature and with the idea of the “frontier.” We will consult a variety of American texts—from the cultured “European” Northeast to the often romanticized “wild” West—to view how different regions formed identity in relation to both national geography and mental borders. Furthermore we will pay specific attention to literature that depicts the challenge of interpreting natural world in the shadow of its existing ideologies. In the process, we will discuss how barriers, both physical and psychological, shaped cultural and racial relations, and how the frontier became a dividing line between society and wilderness.

Texts: Class anthology (authors include Rowlandson, Franklin, Irving, Douglass, Thoreau, Hurston, Bishop, and Ginsberg); Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; DeLillo, White Noise

Requirements: One short essay, one long essay, two take-home tests, participation
.

ENGL 2130-02: American Literature, Prof. Patrick Erben
“What is An American”?
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Pafford 109

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F.

Description: During the American Revolution, the French immigrant writer J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur wrote a series of fictional letters in which he famously asked “What then is the American, this new man?” Of course, the quest for a unique American identity occupied the country during its war for independence, yet this question has been a recurring theme throughout American literature and culture. In a time when “American values” are often hailed as unassailable truths and various forms of dissent or difference are branded—once again—as “un-American,” this survey of American literature tries to shed light on the complex history of this idea. By reading texts ranging from the colonial period to the present, we will use American literature as a tool to understand the contested nature of American identity and to question the use of “American” as a static and unchangeable quality.

Texts: Cabeza de Vaca, Relacíon; Benjamin Franklin, The Autobiography; Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Emily Dickinson, selected poetry; Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; August Wilson, Fences.

Requirements: Regular attendance, active participation, reading quizzes, midterm and final exam, three analytical essays.

ENGL 2130-03: American Literature, Prof. Brandy James
TR: 11:00am-12:15pm, TLC 1116

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F.

Description: On defining the creation of identity, American essayist, novelist, and playwright James Arthur Baldwin comments, “An identity would seem to be arrived at by the way in which the person faces and uses his experience.” Baldwin’s statement encompasses far-ranging ideas and introduces questions that have historically characterized American literature: How have Americans characterized their own identities at different points in time, and how have historical events, cultural phenomena, social environments, and personal experiences become meshed with and changed these identities? To what extent does the American landscape, either as a physical or symbolic space, attribute to this definition? Is the definition “American” even a valid identity? As we closely examine these questions by examining the various literary genres that span almost four centuries, we will focus on how language and writing has been used to construct and alter the meaning of “American identity.” In addition, we will also delve into the formation of identity from the perspectives of race, gender, and social class and examine how each has been used for this purpose.

Texts: F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Nina Baym, The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter Sixth Edition.

Requirements: Daily Quizzes and Writing Responses: 10% (Quizzes, announced and unannounced, along with in-class and out-of-class writing responses will be given weekly; the assignments may take the form of short explications or brief analytical responses to questions on  the text being discussed); Response Essays: 50% (Several 2 1/2 page essays dealing with analyses of chosen literary works and based on a range of topics from class discussion); Mid-Term: 20% (The mid-term exam, which is cumulative, includes identifications, explication, and concise analyses of passages from texts we have read and discussed in class); Final: 20% (The final exam will be administered in the form of a take-home essay).

ENGL 2130-04D: American Literature, Prof. Mandi Campbell
This class will largely be conducted on WebCT Vista; however, we will meet on Wednesday, January 9 th from 3:30-4:45 in TLC 1301 to discuss the class format and the use of WebCT Vista. We will also be meeting for the midterm and final exams (date, time, location of these exams TBA).

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F.

Description: This survey course will examine canonical and non-canonical texts that perpetuate American myths and challenge traditional American ideals. In each text, we will trace common American themes such as the questioning of social constructs and religious values, the role of nature and home in American life, and the individual’s desire to construct an “authentic” identity.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of American Literature , Shorter 6 th edition; The Scarlet Letter; The Great Gatsby

Requirements: Weekly listserv postings, three short analytical responses, midterm and final exams.

ENGL 2130-05: American Literature, Prof. Debra MacComb
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Humanities 208

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F.

Description: This course will develop a range of enduring themes that have characterized American literature: the encounter with and appropriation of nature; the crafting of an identity that attempts to reconcile the desires of the individual with the needs of society; the individual’s ability to chart his own path to success; the “problem” of the socio-cultural “other”; and the tension between the public and private spheres. In exploring these themes, we will read a range of 18 th-20 th century texts to examine the authorial strategies that developed over time which make these works aesthetically as well as historically pertinent.

Texts: Franklin, The Autobiography; Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Chopin, The Awakening; Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Mason, In Country; Morrison, Jazz; various handouts posted to Web CT.

Requirements: Active and informed participation, midterm and final exams, two 4-5 page essays.

English 2130-25H: American Literature-Honors, Prof. Randy Hendricks
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, TLC 1204

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F. Honor students only.

Description: In this class we will devote much of our time to reading, discussing, and writing about a number of classic texts in American literature: Franklin’s Autobiography, Cooper’s The Last of the Mohicans, Hawthorne’s The Scarlet LetterDouglass’s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Thoreau’s Walden, Whitman’s and Dickinson’s poems, Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. The major focus will be on the way in which these texts, through their forms, themes, and language, echo and even parody each other as they record a cultural/literary debate on the issue of American identity with its related questions of what constitutes an American self, what constitutes America success, and how independent one actually can be. We will use the examples to work toward a definition of the qualities beyond “written in America” that make a work of literature “American.” Additional shorter readings, or “satellite” texts, from an anthology will supplement the primary ones.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of American Literature, The Last of the Mohicans, The Scarlet Letter, The Great Gatsby

Requirements: mid-term and comprehensive final exams, short analytical papers research (term) paper.

ENGL 2130-26H: American Literature-Honors, Prof. Barbara Brickman
TR 12:30pm- 1:45pm, TLC 1204

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F. Honor students only.

Description: This survey of important works in American literature will address several issues central to the conception of “American” identity: the encounter with and/or exploitation of the natural world; the quest for an independent, unified, and/or original self; the differentiation of the self from a series of “others” (or the production of “otherness”); and the conflicts and negotiations between social demands and values and the individual self. The readings for the course will consist of both canonical texts, such as The Scarlet Letter, and texts challenging the mainstream, such as Jean Toomer’s Cane. Furthermore, three cinematic texts, Last of the Mohicans (Mann, 1992), Do the Right Thing (Lee, 1989), and The Virgin Suicides (Coppola, 1999), will complicate and complement the class’s literary instances of “Americanness.”

Texts: Benjamin Franklin, The Autobiography; Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Nathaniel Hawthorne,The Scarlet Letter; Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Henry James, Daisy Miller; Sherwood Anderson, Winesburg, Ohio; F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Jean Toomer, Cane Flannery O’Connor, A Good Man Is Hard to Find Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49

Requirements: 3 short essays, one presentation, midterm and final essay exams.

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ENGL 2180
 

ENGL 2180-01: Studies in African-American Literature, Prof. Stacy Boyd
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Pafford 107

May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: This survey course introduces the student to the literature that writers of African American heritage created from its beginning in Colonial America to 1960. The course will examine a number of writers, issues, genres, styles, and themes; furthermore, it will analyze the historic, socio--political and cultural forces which helped to shape the African American experience. The course will also emphasize interlocking race, gender, and class perspectives, whenever applicable, for analyzing literary works.

Text: Norton Anthology of African American Literature

Requirements: Normally daily reading quizzes, presentation, two critical essays, a midterm, and a final.

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ENGL 2300
 

ENGL 2300-01: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Rebecca Harrison
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, TLC 1109

EDUCATION STUDENTS ONLY. Registration requires permission. Email Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu) for permission. Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Description: An introduction to critical theory, Engl 2300 provides the English major with a solid foundation of theoretical approaches to reading literature, analyzing texts, and engaging in worthwhile research. As a collaborative liberal arts research community, this course will aid students in developing critical lenses and individual approaches to the advanced study of texts by focusing on female sexuality and captive bodies in literature, and how paradigms of confinement enforce or transgress national, cultural, and political agendas. We will begin with a representation of a past community through a critical case study of Kate Chopin’s The Awakening , examine comparative approaches through Jane Campion’s The Piano, and culminate in Margaret Atwood’s dark vision of the future in The Handmaid’s Tale. Additional films and art will regularly supplement the assigned texts.

Texts: Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale; Charles Bressler, Literary Criticism: An Introduction to Theory and Practice, Jane Campion, The Piano; Kate Chopin, The Awakening (Bedford/St. Martin's Case Studies, 2 nd Ed.); Jonathan; Joseph Gibaldi, MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (6th Ed); reserve reading as assigned.

Requirements: Reading quizzes, a group presentation, 2 response essays, a multi-staged research project, and a final exam.


ENGL 2300-02: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Stacy Boyd
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 206

Registration requires permission. Email Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu) for permission. Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Description: Practical Criticism introduces students to the English major and critical approaches in literary studies, with particular attention to research and methodology. We will entertain the following questions: What and how should we read? Is it possible to arrive at a single correct interpretation? How are texts related to other texts and to their related historical contexts? We will use short stories, essays, and perhaps some poetry to hone our skills in interpretation, criticism, and analysis. In the process of becoming better writers and readers of texts, we will learn to utilize several critical lenses through which to view texts. These lenses will help to bring our own analysis into better focus.

Texts: Charles Bressler’s Literary Criticism: An Introduction to Theory and Practice and Joseph Gibaldi’s MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (6th edition). Other theoretical, critical and literary material will be made available electronically.
Requirements: Active participation; frequent writing exercises and quizzes; two short essays and one longer research essay.

Engl 2300-03: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Patrick Erben
Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Literary Criticism But Were Afraid to Ask
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, TLC 1109

Registration requires permission. Email Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu) for permission. Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Description: Like any discipline or profession, literary research and criticism are governed by theories, tools, conventions, and discourses that can seem intimidating at first. This course will help you discover that the tools of critical reading and analysis, criticism, research, and argumentative writing are not only fun (say: intellectually stimulating) but also useful for other disciplines and—gasp!—life outside academia. Together we will discuss and learn several theoretical approaches to literature, practice tools of literary criticism, conduct research in primary and secondary sources, and, finally, apply all that to a coherent and interesting literary argument. Above all, we will look at theory and criticism not so much as static categories applied rigidly to literary texts (“a deconstructionist reading of…”) but rather as jumping boards for our individual and creative explorations of literature and its relationship to art, history, culture, politics, and other forms of human interaction.

Tying into the current fascination with the TV show “Lost,” this course will use as case studies two texts concerned with the idea of being stranded on (or escaping to) a lonely island. In studying Shakespeare’s The Tempest and Melville’s Typee, we will ask, among other things, how our encounter with “Others” reflects on ourselves, what separation from society reveals about human nature, and, basically, what we would do if we had a “fresh start.”

Texts: William Shakespeare, The Tempest; Herman Melville, Typee; Charles E. Bressler, Criticism: An Introduction to Theory and Practice , and selected poetry distributed by the instructor .

Requirements: Regular attendance, active participation, 2 analytical essays, one oral presentation, a longer argumentative and research-based paper.

ENGL 2300-04: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Joshua Masters
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, Pafford 107

Registration requires permission. Email Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu) for permission. Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Description: Practical Criticism introduces students to the English major and the discipline of literary studies. In it you will develop the analytical, writing, and research skills necessary to succeed in the major. The course will also introduce you to three interrelated critical approaches to the study of literature and culture: new historicism, gender theory, and minority discourse/cultural studies. The primary focus, however, is refining your skills in writing thesis-driven critical essays, and thus the theory will always be employed in the service of your own original ideas and arguments about particular works of literature. My goal is that you leave this class knowing what it means to be “an English major (or minor)” and that you develop the reading, writing, and analytical necessary to be a really good one. And, that you learn how to write really cool and interesting papers. Three collections of short stories will provide the literary material that inspires our interpretation, analysis, and critical writing.

Texts:James Baldwin, Going to Meet the Man;Raymond Carver, Where I’m Calling From;Flannery O’Connor, The Complete Stories.(All theoretical and critical material will be on electronic reserve in the library.)

Requirements: Students must maintain a reading-quiz average of 65% or higher, turn in a series of process-based writing assignments, two five-page papers, and an eight to ten-page final project.

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ENGL 3000-level

ENGL 3160
 

ENGL 3160-01W: Philosophy in Literature and Film, Prof. Janet Donohoe
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 205

Description: Literature and film are often the most fruitful genres for thinking about philosophical themes. Through analysis of these media we can begin to address philosophical questions outside of straightforward philosophical treatises. This semester this course will address the themes of knowledge and tradition in philosophical and literary texts as well as in film. We will attempt to grasp how authors understand the relation of tradition to what we know and how we know it. We ask these questions in an effort to come to a deeper understanding of ourselves as human beings and our own relationship to our traditions.

Requirements: in-class writing projects, essay midterm and final exams, and a final paper of 3000-36000 words.

Texts: Sophocles’s Antigone, Plato’s The Trial and Death of Socrates, The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco, and Arcadia by Tom Stoppard. Other shorter texts will be made available through Docutek and films will be on reserve in the library.

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ENGL 3200
 

ENGL 3200-01W: Creative Writing, Prof. Emily Hipchen
MWF 9:00am-9:50am, TLC 2237

No more than two [2] 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course is designed to introduce students to basic skills for writing creatively in at least three genres: in this course, fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. We’ll be looking at published texts in each genre and producing pieces weekly for workshops based on student writing.

Texts: Include short stories by Angela Carter, William Faulkner, and Brian Kessler, among others; poetry by Langston Hughes, Wislawa Szymborska, and Dale Ritterbusch, among others; and creative nonfiction by Alex Haley, Art Spielgelman, and Augusten Burroughs, among others.

Requirements: Required daily attendance and participation; willingness to participate in workshops and produce at least eighteen pages of typed responses to other students’ work in addition to one’s own creative texts; a writing/response journal; and a final portfolio with six original pieces and meta-text.

ENGL 3200-02 Creative Writing, Prof. Sandra Novack(-Gottshall)
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 206

No more than two [2] 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.

Description: The best way to become a good writer is to read good literature. It sounds simple, doesn’t it? Yet often we read as consumers and/or critics instead. People who enjoy reading love to immerse themselves in other worlds without thinking about the hard-earned work that takes place on the page, work that creates and evokes a feeling of transcendence. It's no wonder our identification with fiction or poetry so often compels us to create our own worlds; yet, to do this, we need to think and read differently—as writers—with a more critical eye for understanding those aspects of craft that shape and build satiating works of art.

This course provides an introduction to the reading and writing of fiction and poetry, with attention to craft and the creation of original works as well as discussion of contemporary literature. I expect that you will write a lot during our time together. Because that is what publishing writers do, too. I expect that you will provide significant input for each story or poem discussed. You will also write a three-to-four page craft analysis in response to an already-published work in the genre of your choosing. The general aim of all these practices is to develop as a writer; when you learn to engage critically with other texts you also learn to better approach your own works-in-progress. Another major component of this course is revision. Not only will you be practicing it, but we will also be talking about it for the purpose of strengthening and refining general writing skills.

Texts: Best American Short Stories 2007, edited by Stephen King; The Anchor Book of New American Short Stories, edited by Ben Marcus; Fiction Writer’s Workshop by Josip Novakovich; The Making of a Poem: A Norton Anthology of Poetic Forms, edited by Mark Strand and Eavan Boland; and The Selected Poetry of Yehuda Amichai, translated by Chana Bloch and Stephen Mitchell.

Requirements: the creation of a story at least ten pages in length, along with a subsequent major revision; three original poems, along with a subsequent revision of each; a craft analysis; exercises and journal entries, as assigned; manuscript critiques; submission of a portfolio containing all work completed during our time together. If you cannot be present, this is not the class for you. If you’d like to chat or find out more about me, I encourage you to e-mail novackgottshalls@bellsouth.net.

ENGL 3200-03W: Creative Writing, Prof. Katherine Chaple
TR 9:30am-10:45am, TLC 2237

No more than two [2] 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: But all art is sensual . . . . It is directly, that is, of the senses, and since the senses do not exist without an object for their employment all art is necessarily objective. It doesn’t declaim or explain, it presents. —William Carlos Williams

English 3200 is an introduction to fiction and poetry writing. The aim of this class is for the student to acquire a familiarity with the tools and forms of poetry and fiction and to apply those to both creative and academic work. In addition to a study the crafts of both fiction and poetry through reading and lecture, we will also be exploring and discussing where poems and stories come from—the inspirational element of writing. You will be expected to produce works in both genres, and we will workshop your creative efforts in class.

Texts: Janet Burroway & Elizabeth Stuckey-French Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft (7 th Edition); Kim Addonizio & Dorianne Laux The Poet’s Companion: A Guide to the Pleasures of Writing Poetry; Mark Haddon The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time; additional online readings.

Requirements: Daily readings and exercises, participation, written contributions to the workshop, midterm examination, and a final portfolio of polished writing.

ENGL 3200-04: Creative Writing, Prof. Paul Guest
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 1204

No more than two [2] 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 3200-05W: Creative Writing, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, TLC 1204

No more than two [2] 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This class will provide an introduction to the writing of fiction and poetry.  Students will explore their creative potential while studying craft—the strategies and techniques that give form to imagination. Readings in poetry and short fiction will strengthen your familiarity with the contemporary literary landscape and encourage you to situate your own emerging voice among those of other writers. Workshops will allow you to benefit from intense discussions of your own work and that of other students. We will emphasize revision; by the end of the semester you will have produced a polished portfolio of your best work along with a critical introduction.

Texts: TBA

Requirements: Portfolio of revised work, critical introduction, short critical essay, occasional directed responses, writing journal.

ENGL 3200-01HW: Creative Writing-Honors, Prof. Alison Umminger

MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 208

No more than two [2] 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement. Honor students only.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 3400
 

ENGL 3400-01W: Advanced Composition: Creative Nonfiction, Prof. Emily Hipchen
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 2237

Prerequisite: ENGL 2130, HIST 2111 or 2112. Required for the minor in American Studies. Same as HIST 3300. No more than two [2] 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Some people think creative nonfiction is an oxymoron (“How can something be imagined and true?”); some people think it’s a tautology (“Isn’t all nonfiction creative?”). What are these texts that seem to have begun being written sometime in the 1960s and are now in the forefront of the news in controversies over the “truth” of texts like Augusten Burrough’s Running with Scissors—or James Frey’s A Million Little Pieces that had Oprah calling in to Larry King and apologizing for what she said the next day in an hour’s vilification of Frey and his editors? How do you write CNF at all, let alone responsibly, ethically, beautifully? — This is what we’ll be talking about, and doing.

Texts: The first half of this class will be dedicated to getting acquainted with the genre: we’ll read In Cold Blood, Roots, We Tell Ourselves Stories in Order to Live and collections of essays by writers such as John MacPhee, Philip Lopate, David Sedaris, Augusten Burroughs, and Hollis Gillespie. The second half of the course is dedicated to student production of CNF and discussion of student pieces in a workshop environment.

Requirements: Required daily attendance and participation; willingness to participate in workshops and produce at least eighteen pages of typed responses to other students’ work in addition to one’s own creative texts; three reading tests; a writing/response journal; and a final portfolio with meta-text.

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ENGL 3405
 

ENGL 3405-01W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. Crystal R. Shelnutt
MW 2:00pm–3:15pm, TLC 1110

May be taken for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: English 3405-01W will introduce basic rhetorical concepts that students need for myriad professional situations. Such principles, and an analysis of the professional and technical climates under which many of our documents will be produced, will provide assistance in responding to a variety of workplace needs. This class will provide students opportunity for intensive practice in composing powerful audience-driven documents in a variety of real-world business, professional, and technical contexts. Students will also learn how to make effective business-related presentations supported with appropriate documentary and visual aids, as well as collaborate on technical research and reporting.

Texts: Alred, Gerald J. Charles T. Brusaw, and Walter E. Oliu. The Business Writer’s Handbook, Eighth Edition. Bedford/St. Martin’s. ISBN: 9780312436124; Graves, Heather and Roger Graves. A Strategic Guide to Technical Communication. Broadview Press. ISBN: 9781551118149;Wurman, Richard Saul. Information Anxiety 2. Que: Indianapolis. ISBN: 0-789724103.

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 3405-02W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. John Sturgis
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, TLC 1109

May be taken for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.


Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 4/5000-level

ENGL 4/5106
 

ENGL 4/5106-01W: Studies in Genre, Prof. Maria Doyle
Drama
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 205

Required for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken to satisfy the Genre and Theory 1 or 2 (Major Area B1 or B2) requirement. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Literally, a play is a piece of literature written in dialogue and meant for performance, but the larger question that this course will explore is the more important issue of why a writer might choose this particular form of expression: what’s the value of putting real actors in a room with a real audience, and how does this shape the way a writer presents his or her ideas? Rather than attempting a complete survey of a genre that has been around for well over two millennia, this course will organize its exploration around a set of archetypal Greek models -- the human fall of Oedipus, the rebellion of Antigone and the frenzied destruction of Euripides’s Bacchae -- using analysis of these plays to inform a reading of major developments in modern theater, from Tennessee Williams’s modern gothic to Tom Stoppard’s parodic absurdism and August Wilson’s stage chronicle of African-American experience. Discussions will provide students with a vocabulary for reading British, American and world drama as literature –its connection to larger literary, political and social movements – and as theater – its relation to performance conventions and stage spaces. Students will attend a production in Atlanta as part of their course material.

Texts: Sophocles, Oedipus and Antigone, Euripides, The Bacchae, William Shakespeare, King Lear, J.M. Synge, The Playboy of the Western World, Bertolt Brecht, Mother Courage and Her Children, Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire, Brian Friel, Faith Healer, Caryl Churchill, Top Girls, Tom Stoppard, The Real Inspector Hound, August Wilson, Fences

Requirements: For undergraduates, two short papers, oral presentation, midterm and final exam, final research project. Graduate students will complete additional secondary reading and a longer research project including a substantial annotated bibliography.

ENGL 4/5106-02W: Studies in Genre, Prof. Gregory Fraser
Poetry
TR 11:00am-12:15 pm, Humanities 205

Required for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken to satisfy the Genre and Theory 1 or 2 (Major Area B1 or B2) requirement. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This class will proceed under the assumption that the very notion of a literary “genre” is an unstable category whose definitions shift under historical, ideological, and aesthetic pressures. Consequently, we will begin not with the question, “What is poetry?” but instead try to articulate, “What is poetry at these specific periods of time; in these particular cultural circumstances; under these conflicting ideological conditions; in the light of these specific artistic practices?” In short, we will study the ways in which poets have produced texts that both reflect and refract the prevailing views of their literary and social contexts. To facilitate our study of this flexible, “blurry-bordered” genre, we will examine the historical conditions and power relations under which given texts were written; review the manifestos of several poets; and apply the contemporary reading practices of various textual theorists. Most significantly, however, we will focus on reliable, repeatable methods of writing confidently about poetry.

Text: The Norton Anthology of Poetry (Paperback) Shorter Edition, Margaret Ferguson, et al. (editors) ISBN: 0-393-97921-0

Requirements: periodic graded homework assignments; one formal essay of at least five pages in length; one formal essay of at least eight pages in length; final exam.

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ENGL 4/5125
 

ENGL 4/5125-01W: Colonial and Early American Literature, Prof. Patrick Erben
Early American Poetry and Poetics: From Bradstreet to Dickinson and Beyond
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Pafford 308

May be taken to satisfy the American Lit I (Major Area A3) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course will provide a broad survey of the colonial beginnings and 19 th-century development of American poetry. It is specifically recommended for all literature majors in general as well as creative writing students who would like to study the origins and innovations of the American tradition in poetry.

The colonial and ante-bellum period in American literature is usually thought of as an age of prose and a prosaic age. While producing manifold accounts of exploration, contact, conquest, settlement, and independence, early Americans seemed to have had little time for the self-reflection necessary to write poetry. Yet an American tradition in poetry emerged long before Dickinson and Whitman. Indeed, when Anne Bradstreet published and symbolically became The Tenth Muse, Lately Sprung up in America (1650), American poets began to explore a wide variety of forms and topics. Ranging from the heroic poetry of conquest, to meditative and spiritual poetry, to revolutionary epics, and political satires, early American poetry took on the daunting task of finding a language to express the often ineffable beauty, violence, faith, and desire of the New World and its many people. Going beyond a national, English-only focus, the course will also survey works by French, German, and Spanish immigrant writers, as well as the colonial beginnings of the African American tradition in poetry. More than any other genre of literature in early America, poetry allowed women writers to flourish, especially through the informal circulation of their writings in manuscript form. Thus, the course will also highlight how changing literary tastes as well as a modern preoccupation with publication obscured the poetical accomplishments of early Americans, especially those women who produced poetry in informal settings and circulated their work among like-minded friends. In short, we may explore and play with the following clichee: Who are the founding fathers and founding mothers of American poetry?

Texts:American Poetry: The Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries (Library of America); American Poetry: The Nineteenth Century, Vol. 1: Philip Freneau to Walt Whitman (Library of America); The Poems of Emily Dickinson (Belknap Press); other poetry and contextual readings distributed by the instructor.

Requirements: regular attendance; engaged reading and preparation; intelligent and regular participation; two short analyses (one formalist/new critical, one cultural/historicist); one inter-textual reading (comparing an early American poem with a contemporary American poem concerned with the same theme or issue); a 12-15 page research paper.

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ENGL 4/5130
 

ENGL 4/5130-01W: Eighteenth-Century British Literature, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell
Masquerade, Menace, and Meaning in the Eighteenth Century
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 206

May be taken to satisfy the Brit Lit I (Major Area A1) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: In Restoration and eighteenth-century England, the rise of the middle class threatened to reshape established notions of social identity, while definitions of gender and sexuality were arguably both fluid and contested. In important ways, then, it was a period of dramatic social change. In this class we will examine the ways in which the cultural fears, hopes and anxieties that arose from these uncertainties are reflected in much of the literature of the period, from the frank bawdiness of restoration and eighteenth-century drama to the emergence of a new, unwieldy, still-developing form, the early novel. We will pay particular attention to the eighteenth century’s fascination with masquerade, which dramatizes the instability of human identity and may function as a subversive strategy or a cover for violence—and sometimes does both within the same text.

Requirements: Short paper, research paper, oral presentation, occasional responses, quizzes, active participation.

Texts: Pamela , Samuel Richardson; Evelina , Frances Burney; Moll Flanders , Daniel Defoe; Mysteries of Udolpho, Ann Radcliffe; The Rover , Aphra Behn; She Stoops to Conquer , Oliver Goldsmith; English Society in the Eighteenth Century, Roy Porter; Additional readings will be available electronically.

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ENGL 4/5155
 

ENGL 4/5155-01W: Twentieth-Century British Literature, Prof. Maria Doyle
MW 5:30pm-6:45pm, Humanities 208

May be taken to satisfy the Brit Lit II (Major Area A2) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Early in the twentieth century, W.B. Yeats asserted in “The Second Coming” that “things fall apart; the centre cannot hold.” By the century’s end, Tom Stoppard’s play Arcadia would posit: “We shed as we pick up, like travelers who must carry everything in their arms, and what we let fall will be picked up by those behind.” The movement from modernist disillusionment to postmodern fluidity will serve as a framework for our discussion of a century engrossed in the question of how things fall apart even as they move forward. Exploring anarchist bombers and evening parties, existential wastelands and postmodern fairy tales, this course will ask how the shifting currents of history – including the breakup of the British Empire, the politics of World Wars I and II and the rise of the British welfare state -- have also fractured literary time, cultural meaning and the definition of Britishness itself. Classes will explore a variety of literary forms including short stories, plays, novels and poems from across the period.

Texts: Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent, Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway, James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, selected poems of Thomas Hardy and W.B. Yeats, George Orwell, Animal Farm, Samuel Beckett, Endgame, Angela Carter, Wise Children, Salman Rushdie, East, West, Seamus Heaney, North

Requirements: For undergraduates, two short papers, oral presentation, midterm and final exam, final research project. Graduate students will complete additional secondary reading and a longer research project including a substantial annotated bibliography.

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ENGL 4/5160
 

ENGL 4/5160-01W: Twentieth-Century American Literature, Prof. Joshua Masters
Modern American Fiction in Black and White
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 228

May be taken to satisfy the American Lit II (Major Area A4) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course, subtitled “Modern American Fiction in Black and White,” will explore the myths, themes, and political controversies that have shaped the development of modern American fiction and film, with a particular eye towards the troubled status of racial identity in the American imagination. As we survey such literary movements as Realism, Modernism, and Post-modernism, we will pay attention to the way that new literary forms and movements responded to dramatic social and historical events and shifting cultural attitudes about race, particularly our attitudes towards the categories of “whiteness” and “blackness.” We will also consider the role of American fiction, including film, in shaping those attitudes. The works we will read demonstrate a wide a range of perspectives and narrative techniques, and each suggests new ways to imagine the status of the individual, the boundaries of nationhood, and the meaning of such categories as race, ethnicity, class, and gender in America. While examining the works’ shared interests in history, identity, and human agency, we will also bear in mind the unique nature of the individual writers and their texts.

Texts: (in order of appearance) Mark Twain’s Pudd’nhead Wilson, James Weldon Johnson’s Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon, Charles Johnson’s Middle Passage, Russell Banks’s Rule of the Bone. Several critical readings will be on electronic reserve, and three films will be on reserve at the library: Birth of a Nation, Imitation of Life, and Bamboozled.

Requirements: Students must maintain a reading-quiz average of 65% or higher, turn in a series of process-based writing assignments, two five-page papers, and an eight to ten-page final project.

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ENGL 4/5180
 

ENGL 4/5180-01: Studies in Regional Literature, Prof. David Newton
Southern Literature
TR 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm, Pafford 302

May be taken to satisfy the American Lit II (Major Area A4) requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Traditionally, the study of Southern literature has focused on how literary modes of representation reflect the unique histories and cultures that comprise the region. In this course, we will take a different (yet related) genre-based approach. As Lucinda MacKethan writes in “Genres of Southern Literature,” “the South can be said to have its own literary genres—its particular sets of forms or organizing motifs—as much as it has a history and manners.” Organizing the course in this way will allow us to examine relationships among a number of literary traditions and genres that have been codified by MacKethan and other scholars: The literatures of slavery (plantation fiction, slave narratives, and contemporary revisions or adaptations of these genres); the literatures of pastoral (literature of nostalgia or local color, civil war fiction, southern agrarianism, and southern modernism); and counter-pastoral literature (dialect humor, counter-pastoral fiction, and the southern grotesque). In pursing this work, we will focus on the South not as a monolithic region but as a diverse cultural space--ranging from the plantations of Virginia and Mississippi, to the pineywoods of South Georgia and Florida, to the mountains of Appalachia—where differences in social class, race, gender, language, and religion profoundly shape how writers understand such perennial themes as the Lost Cause (the mythologies/nostalgia of the past), race relations (from slavery and Reconstruction to Civil Rights and beyond), the myth of the plantation (and the agrarian idealism that emerges from it), and gender (conceptions of manhood and the feminine ideal, as well as the value of home and family). We will also contextualize our understanding of the South as a region by incorporating voices and perspectives from outside the region, so we can more fully appreciate how the South is imagined as a region and how it has influenced writers and cultural histories outside or its geographical borders.

Texts: William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom!; Flannery O’Connor, Everything that Rises Must Converge,; Richard Wright, Uncle Tom’s Children; Julia Dash, Daughters of the Dust; John Pendleton Kennedy, Swallow Barn; Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin; A required course packet of shorter readings will be available for purchase at the University Bookstore.

Requirements: Regular attendance and active and informed participation in class discussion, reading quizzes, class presentations, two critical essays, a research prospectus, and a final 8 page research paper. In addition to these requirements, graduate students will complete an annotated bibliography of secondary sources and a final 12 page research paper (in lieu of the undergraduate research paper).

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ENGL 4/5188
 

ENGL 4/5188-01W: Individual Authors, Prof. Micheal Crafton
Chaucer: Medieval and Modern
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 228

May be taken to satisfy the Brit Lit 1 (Major Area A1) requirement. Fulfills the Individual Authors requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Geoffrey Chaucer is the most famous English poet associated with the Middle Ages. His poetry is usually the only poetry that some students have been forced to read in “Old English.” (Technically, it is Middle English, but who’s counting.) There is a good reason for that. He is, as Robert MacNeil said in the PBS series The Story of English, the first writer of genius in the English language. So we will read the work of this poet genius, mostly the Canterbury Tales, in its medieval context, a context that we will build out of references to other writers, but also art, architecture, religion, and material conditions of the time. On the other hand, I will argue, Chaucer is something of a modern, an early modern, to be sure. The psychologically nuanced narrators that he creates for some of his Canterbury Tales constitute really the beginnings of modern English narrative, and we will have a look at modern renditions of Chaucer to see how these beginnings are represented in a contemporary medium.

Texts: Chaucer, Canterbury Tales (Norton); Chaucer, Troilus and Criseyde (Penguin); Boethius, Consolation of Philosophy (Penguin); De Lorris and de Meun, Romance of the Rose ( Oxford).

Requirements: One short paper, one longer research paper, mid-term, final, oral presentations.

ENGL 4/5188-02W: Individual Authors, Prof. Debra MacComb
Mark Twain
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, Humanities 208

May be taken to satisfy the American Lit II (Major Area A4) requirement. Fulfills the Individual Authors requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Samuel Clemens is the only significant American author to be known by his pen name, Mark Twain. As author, humorist and celebrity, “Mark Twain” was a brand-name enterprise that included popular travel writing, coast-to-coast lecturing, door-to-door subscription book sales, a publishing house, and speculations in various inventions. “Mark Twain” conjures up diverse and frequently contradictory images, however: a funny man with talent for literature of the “low” sort; a serious author who despaired of being forever typed a “humorist”; a satirist whose subtle meanings were frequently overlooked; a writer of beloved children’s books. With no hope of offering a definitive “Mark Twain,” this course will nevertheless provide an overview of his career as it is informed by the tradition known as realism and as it inscribes—in its trenchant representations of antebellum nostalgia, post-reconstruction race relations, and gilded-age capitalism—the complex character of America during the years 1865-1910.

Texts: Roughing It, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Puddn’head Wilson, Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, Diaries of Adam and Eve, Great Short Works of Mark Twain (ed. Justin Kaplan).

Requirements: Informed, active participation; reading journal; 2-3 short (2-page) responses; 8-10 page documented essay; final exam.

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ENGL 4/5210
 

ENGL 4/5210-01W: Advanced Creative Writing, Prof. Emily Hipchen
Creative Nonfiction
MW 12:30-1:45, TLC 2237

Prerequisite: ENGL 3200. May be taken to satisfy the Writing and Language (Major Area C) requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: What does it mean to enter the field of creative nonfiction, to write for publication in CNF, The Fourth Genre, The Atlantic, or The New Yorker? In this course, we’ll be looking at recently published CNF by John McPhee, Hollis Gillespie, David Sedaris, Joan Didion, Susan Orlean, and a raft of other successful writers in the genre to find those practices and habits of mind that will make your writing better and more marketable.

Texts: Include Me Talk Pretty One Day, Bleachy-Haired Honky Bitch, We Tell Ourselves Stories to Live, The Bullfighter Checks Her Makeup, and two works by Lee Gutkind, the Godfather of Creative Nonfiction.

Requirements: Required daily attendance and participation; participation in workshops as a reader/critic and a writer; a journal with responses to prompts, research ideas, and craft analyses; weekly reading reports on magazines or journals that support CNF; one final polished essay, with cover letter, for submission to a journal or magazine your reading reports have suggested would be likely to take the piece; a final portfolio with meta-text.

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ENGL 4/5300
 

ENGL 4/5300-01: Studies in the English Language, Prof. David Newton
English Grammar
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, Humanities 208

May be taken to satisfy the Writing and Language (Major Area C) requirement. Required for certification in Secondary English Education. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Description: In this course, we will explore the structure or grammar of the English language and work toward understanding the principles or rules that make it work. This course is primarily designed for English majors who seek to improve the grammatical proficiency of their writing and for future teachers at the secondary and college level. However, this course also has applications for students entering business and industry, science and medical fields, law and politics, media and public relations, or anyone who recognizes the essential human value of language and who understands how the ability to use language contributes to personal and professional success in life. After all, when you are talking to friends, asking someone out on a date, debating sports or politics, buying clothes at the mall, or writing a paper, you are using the structures and principles of English grammar, even when your sentences are not grammatical! However, knowing a language and knowing about the language are different kinds of knowledge. Even the ability to speak grammatically correct sentences in no way guarantees that a speaker knows enough about English to explain what makes those sentences grammatical. This course is designed to help you achieve that knowledge. We will refer frequently to Standard English, and, certainly, one of the benefits of this course is that it will help you refine your written and verbal language skills. However, this is not simply a course about grammatical correctness; instead, this course is designed to help you understand how the English language functions, what structures and rules are behind the sentence constructions that you and others create every day. To accomplish this task, we will learn some basic linguistic and grammatical concepts, and we will learn how to analyze (and diagram) different sentence constructions. We will also learn how elements of the language (verbs, nouns, sentence structure, pronouns, etc.) emerged and changed over time to create the language we use today.

Text: Vitto, Cindy. Grammar by Diagram: Understanding English Grammar through Traditional Sentence Diagraming. Broadview Press, 2006. (ISBN: 1-55111-778-9); A course packet of supplemental exercises and materials is required and will be available at the University Bookstore for purchase.

Requirements: Reading assignments, homework exercises, class presentations, and four major examinations.

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ENGL 4384
 

English 4384-01W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Alison Umminger
Bodies and Boundaries – Reading the Body/Challenging Culture
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, TLC 2237

Registration requires permission of Susan Holland ( sholland@westga.edu). Required for all English majors. Cannot be taken until ENGL 1101, 1102, and core area F have been completed with a minimum passing grade of C. A minimum of 18 hours of upper-level English courses must also have been completed with no grade lower than C. Not offered during summer session. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description and Texts: This senior seminar will (I hope) take some of the critical tools you’ve already acquired and tweak them slightly to look at bodies which challenge culturally determined definitions of “normal.” Starting with the movie “Freaks” (which literalizes the idea that a “freak” is never born, but always made), we will look at the sort of bodies that challenge “normalcy” as it is constructed at any given time. We will also look at the texts Geek Love, Middlesex, The Metamorphosis,, and The Member of the Wedding with an eye towards which bodies are most challenging (and/or threatening) to dominant ideologies, and how bodies that occupy liminal spaces challenge easy binaries (black or white, male or female, etc.). Students will (again, I hope) see how some of the race, gender, disability, and other criticism they have encountered can be tweaked to look at a group of texts through a slightly different lens. We will be using Rosemarie Garland Thomson’s collection of essays, Freakery, as a supplemental critical text.

Requirements: Class discussion, individual and group oral reports, two response essays, substantive research project, including prospectus, abstract, and annotated bibliography, and colloquia presentation.

ENGL 4384-02W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Meg Pearson
Imagining Nowhere: Utopian and Dystopian Fiction
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, TLC 2237

Registration requires permission of Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu). Required for all English majors. Cannot be taken until ENGL 1101, 1102, and core area F have been completed with a minimum passing grade of C. A minimum of 18 hours of upper-level English courses must also have been completed with no grade lower than C. Not offered during summer session. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Since Plato's Republic described a city-state where philosopher kings meted out impartial justice, every society in every time in every nation has sought to define their ideal place. Thomas More unwittingly named this genre with his 1516 "discovery" of a new island where the evils of private property and religious intolerance had been eradicated. Utopia came to define a genre even as it laughingly sang the praises of an island whose name sounded like "good place" but meant "no place."

This class investigates this literary phenomenon (and its alleged opposite, dystopia) and inquires as to its purpose. Even as these authors—Swift, Huxley, Orwell, and many others—seek to elude the confines of their own worlds, the texts document the reasons they wish to flee: poverty, crime, imminent war, oppressive political regimes, religious persecution, gender inequality, and the imperilment of liberty by technology to name but a handful. Examples of utopian literature may reveal a particular culture's social ambitions and its problems. May we read a social history through these fictions? Can we know a culture by what it fears the most?

We will read excerpts and complete utopian texts ranging over centuries—including More's Utopia, Margaret Cavendish's Blazing World, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, and Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash—as well as watch several film versions of utopian and dystopian imaginings such as Metropolis and The Village.

Texts: The Utopia Reader ed. Gregory Claeys and Lyman T. Sargent; Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash (1992); Course packet with criticism.

Requirements: Active participation in class, an oral report, two response essays, and substantive research project (including prospectus, abstract, and annotated bibliography), and a final presentation. The entire class will be responsible for assembling an editing an anthology of the research papers produced in this course.

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ENGL 6000-level

ENGL 6105
 

ENGL 6105: Seminar in British Literature I, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell
‘Frightful Indecencies’ and the Rewards of Virtue: Gender and Sexuality in the Eighteenth-Century Novel
T 5:30pm-8:00pm, TLC 2237

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description: From the moment Samuel Richardson’s diabolical Mr. B wrested a packet of letters from the bosom of his young servant Pamela and promptly broke their seal, critics and readers were alerted to the significance of intersections between the textual and the sexual, the text and the body. For Nancy Armstrong, gender and sexuality are not just possible lenses through which to examine the eighteenth-century novel but the key to understanding this new, contested, unwieldy genre. She argues that “narratives which seemed to be concerned solely with matters of courtship and marriage in fact seized the authority to say what was female”; moreover, she contends, “this struggle to represent sexuality took the form of a struggle to individuate wherever there was a collective body, to attach psychological motives to what had been the openly political behavior of contending groups, and to evaluate these according to a set of moral norms that exalted the domestic woman above her aristocratic counterpart.” This class will focus on the novel as the site of the “struggle” Armstrong describes: domestic novels, satirical spoofs, picaresque adventures, gothic tales—even a pornographic novel. Selections from such influential works as Armstrong’s Desire and Domestic Fiction, Foucault’s The History of Sexuality and Laqueur’s Making Sex will supplement primary readings.

Texts: Samuel Richardson, Pamela; Frances Burney, Evelina; Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders; John Cleland, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure; Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels; Ann Radcliffe, The Mysteries of Udolpho; Eliza Haywood, Anti-Pamela; Henry Fielding, Shamela; Charlotte Lennox, The Female Quixote; Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; Helene Moglen, The Trauma of Gender: A Feminist History of the English Novel. Additional critical and theoretical readings will be available electronically.

Requirements: Short paper, long paper, responses, oral presentation, active participation.

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ENGL 6120
 

ENGL 6120-01: Seminar in American Literature II, Prof. Stacy Boyd
The African American Novel
M 5:30pm-8:00pm, TLC 2237

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description: This seminar will engage the development of the African American literary tradition as it emerges in fiction. Because I see the construction of a tradition as a dynamic process influenced by political and material reality, I have chosen to proceed chronologically as we read select works within their historical contexts and discern against what they signify in an effort to articulate the forces which shape an African American literary tradition. While we will spend a considerable amount of time on the politics of race, gender, sexuality, class, region and religion as reflected in the historical and cultural moments of production, we will also spend a considerable amount of time discussing pedagogical strategies for these novels in particular and African American literature in general.

Texts: Beginning with an autobiographical novel, Our Nig (1859), by Harriet E. Adams Wilson, we will move chronologically in our study. Until the rediscovery of earlier novels, Our Nig was regarded as the “first” by an African American to be published in the United States. Other novels will include a novel of passing, The House Behind the Cedars (1900), by Charles Waddell Chesnutt; a coming-of-age novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937), by Zora Neale Hurston or Not Without Laughter (1930), by Langston Hughes; a naturalistic novel, The Street (1946) by Any Petry; an existential novel, Invisible Man (1952), by Ralph Ellison; a religious semi-autobiographical novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain (1953), by James Baldwin; a speculative novel, The Man Who Cried I Am (1967), by John A. Williams; a diaspora novel, Praisesong for the Widow (1983), by Paule Marshall; a historical novel, Beloved (1982), by Toni Morrison; a historical novel that seems to be in dialogue with Beloved suggesting the relativity of “ truth,” The Known World (2004), by Edward P. Jones; and finally a science fiction novel, Fledging (2005), by Octavia Butler.

Requirements: Consistent participation, a number of short writing assignments, a teaching presentation with handout, a seminar paper of 12-15 pages.

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ENGL 6385
 

ENGL 6385: Seminar in Special Topics, Prof. Chad Davidson
(Re)Inventing Nature: Literature and Ecology
W 5:30-8:00pm, TLC 2237

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description: This seminar will proceed on the assumption that how we discuss, write about, and ultimately treat, nature is culturally constructed and contingent upon dominant ideologies. We will focus on representations of nature in American literatures and beyond, and what those representations tell us about the cultural desires and fears that shape them. As part of our exploration, we will look at how nature is freighted with notions of the edenic, the picturesque, the pastoral, and the sublime. We will ask questions such as “How do various representations of nature intersect with postmodern theoretical discourses?” “To what extent does the way we think, and talk, about nature inform our own sense of cultural, national, and individual identity?” “What do myths of the landscape as “other” (“the savage,” “the untamed,” even “the female”) tell us about imperialism, colonialism, and gender politics?” We will even look at pop and consumer culture, film and television, for contemporary representations of the environment and what significances they hold in a world of ever diminishing “wild.”

Texts: Rachel Carson. Silent Spring. New York: Mariner, 1962; Greg Garrard. Ecocriticism. London: Routledge, 2004; Bohumil Hrabal. Too Loud a Solitude. New York: Harcourt, 1990; Marilynne Robinson. Housekeeping. New York: Picador, 1980; Leslie Marmon Silko. Ceremony. New York: Norton, 2006; plus various articles and poems available through Docutek. In addition, students must have access to the films Deliverance (John Boorman, 1972) and Red Desert (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1965).

Requirements: a range of informal and formal writing assignments and exercises including two short papers and a researched-based seminar paper.

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