in this issue
1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7

Hill Returns to Classroom

Hendricks Named Interim Chair

2008 Undergraduate Conference Presenters

Awards Day Award Recipients

Toto Pulls the Curtain on Dr. Donohoe

Kendra Parker Blog Update

Finding a Career Took Me an Around the World Journey

Ever Considered Teaching Abroad?

McRae Selected to Attend Prestigious Seminar for Poets

In Every Issue

Job Spotlight

Cheers

Course Descriptions

Spring 2009

Spring 2009 Courses


NOTE: Courses are subject to change depending on enrollment and faculty teaching assignments. Please check BANWEB for more current information on the availability of all courses.

English 1101 and 1102 are prerequisites for all courses from ENGL 2110 through 4386.

A “W” designation after a section number of a 3000- or 4000-level course signifies that the course is a Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) course. WAC accepts as a guiding principle the idea that writing is a valuable tool for learning and communication. Therefore, the components of a course so designated are designed to help you learn the material and communicate what you have learned. Students are required to take two “W” courses for the undergraduate degree.


XIDS ENGL 3400: Pedagogy and Writing
XIDS 2002: What Do You Know About Comedy? ENGL 3405: Professional and Technical Writing

XIDS 2100: Arts and Ideas

 
  ENGL 4/5000-level
FILM ENGL 4/5106: Studies in Genre
FILM 2080: Intro to the Art of Film ENGL 4/5108: Studies in the Novel
FILM 2100: History and Theory of Film ENGL 4/5109: Film as Literature
ENGL 4/5130: Eighteenth-Century British Lit
ENGL 2000-level ENGL 4/5135: British Romanticism
ENGL 2050: Self-Staging ENGL 4/5140: American Romanticism
ENGL 2060: Intro to Creative Writing ENGL 4/5180: Studies in Regional Lit
ENGL 2110: World Literature ENGL 4/5188: Individual Authors
ENGL 2120: British Literature ENGL 4/5210: Advanced Creative Writing
ENGL 2130: American Literature ENGL 4286: Teaching Internship

ENGL 2180: Studies in African-American Lit

ENGL 4/5300: Studies in the English Language
ENGL 2190: Studies in Lit by Women ENGL 4384: Senior Seminar

ENGL 2300: Practical Criticism

 
 
ENGL 3000-level ENGL 6000-level
ENGL 3200: Intermediate Creative Writing ENGL 6110: Seminar in American Lit I
ENGL 3300: Studies in American Culture ENGL 6115: Seminar in British Lit II
ENGL 3350: Intro to Africana Studies ENGL 6385: Seminar in Special Topics

XIDS

XIDS 2002-01: What Do You Really Know About Comedy, Dr. Lori Lipoma
Comedy, Transgression, and Cosmopolitanism
TR 12:30pm-1:20pm, Pafford 308

Satisfies Area B2 of the core.

Description: Comedy holds the key to peaceful co-existence in our turbulent, mind-boggling, ever-encroaching global society? Who knew??!?!

Kwame Anthony Appiah argues that as we discover new areas of global interconnectedness and diversity, we are simultaneously having to confront and navigate the deep cultural and ideological differences that divide us. Appiah provides a model for how we can learn to balance the demands of society and the needs of the individual. Through our own “imaginative engagement,” Appiah argues that cosmopolitanism balances our "obligations to others" with the "value not just of human life, but of particular human lives."

In this course, we will discover that one way we can learn to live in this difficult practice of imaginative engagement is through laughter. Comedy helps us to cope with fear and stress, think critically about our lives and our world, and lead individual lives, retaining our own distinctiveness, while still functioning amid the conflicts of global citizenship.

In “Comedy, Transgression, and Cosmopolitanism,” we will first study Appiah’s theories, then humor theory, and finally, we’ll examine the intersection of both within some of the funniest writing, stand-up, TV, and movies we’ve ever seen.

Theoretical Readings: Appiah, Kwame Anthony. Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers. NY: W. W. Norton, 2007; Limon, John. Stand-up Comedy in Theory, or, Abjection in American; Morreall, John. “Humor in the Holocaust: Its Critical, Cohesive, and Coping Functions.” 27 th Annual Scholars' Conference on the Holocaust and the Churches.”; Zelvys, V. I. “Obscene Humor: What the Hell?” Journal of Humor 3:3, 1990; Excerpts from Arthur Koestler, Act of Creation, Michel Foucault “Transgression,” and Julia Kristeve, “The Abject.”

Primary Texts (the good stuff): Course pack of comedic short stories and plays; Films and television shows: Talledega Nights; Team America, World Police; Deconstructing Harry; Dave Chapelle Show, Monty Python’s Life of Brian; Da Ali G Show, Why We Laugh: Black Comedians on Black Comedy; Stand-up Comedy: Demetri Martin: Demetri Martin: Person; The Muslim Funnymentalists; Louis CK: Shameless (HBO); Eddie Izzard: Dressed to Kill; Girls’ Night Out Comedy Tour; Richard Pryor: Live in Las Vegas; Eddie Murphy: Delirious.

Assessment: Brief response papers, student presentations, and final exam.

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XIDS 2100-01: Arts and Ideas, Dr. Lisa Propst
Race and Representation
MW 12.30pm-1.45pm, Pafford 308

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: This course explores how conceptions and representations of race have developed in different places and periods. The course will probe the intersections between race, gender, and sexuality and the relationships between modes of representing race and modes of action and policy-making. It will help provide you with strategies for interrogating categories of race. Everyone in the class will take part in building the course by collectively choosing an overarching topic within this theme and selecting the core texts for the reading list.

The course will start by theorizing, historicizing, and globalizing race and offering “snapshots” of topics from which the class can choose a focal point.

These topics may include: Rhetoric(s) of race in the current U.S. election campaign and/or political campaigns in various countries. Relationships between race and social institutions -- for example, the justice system, the healthcare system, the education system. Race-related violence – for example, lynching, genocides, etc. Anti-racist movements – for example, the American civil rights movement, South African anti-apartheid activism, etc. Racial spectacles -- for example, how racial and gender identities are constructed by public spectacles, from events that garner public attention such as the Clarence Thomas trial, to exhibits such as the 1924 British Empire Exhibition, to cinema and stage performances. Cultural tourism and the ways in which tourists, travel companies, etc. construct the visited “Other,” within and outside the U.S.

Texts: John Solomos, ed., Theories of Race and Racism: A Reader (2000); a selection of texts collectively chosen by the class, including fiction, film, speeches, essays, and visual art.

Requirements: a text-based group presentation; two individual presentations; a text-based paper; a collaborative artistic project; 5 cultural events; reading quizzes and informal response papers; class participation.

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XIDS 2100-02: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Jason Kesler
The Creative Process
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 208

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: thedefinite article 1 a — used as a function word to indicate that a following noun or noun equivalent is definite or has been previously specified by context or by circumstance b — used as a function word to indicate that a following noun or noun equivalent is a unique or a particular member of its class c — used as a function word before nouns that designate natural phenomena or points of the compass d — used as a function word before a noun denoting time to indicate reference to what is present or immediate or is under consideration [. . .]

creative adj 1 : marked by the ability or power to create : given to creating 2 : having the quality of something created rather than imitated : IMAGINATIVE 3 : managed so as to get around legal or conventional limits ; also : deceptively arranged so as to conceal or defraud

process n 1 a : PROGRESS, ADVANCE b : something going on : PROCEEDING 2 a (1) : a natural phenomenon marked by gradual changes that lead toward a particular result (2) : a natural continuing activity or function b : a series of actions or operations conducing to an end; esp : a continuous operation or treatment esp. in manufacture

definitions taken from Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Based upon the above definitions, a multitude of questions arise. Is there a definitive set of activities one can perform to produce a new object that has never existed before? Is creativity a natural function of all human beings, or is it conferred upon a fortunate (or unfortunate) few by some supernatural being? Is there a destructive aspect to the creative process? Is there even such a thing as creativity, or are we simply denying that we are imitating what we experience and rearranging an ever increasing collection of influences? By studying notable scientists, artists, religious and secular texts . . . and yes, even by studying ourselves, we will confront these questions and others to come to a better understanding of the creative process – what it is, where it comes from, who is responsible for it, why it is so vital to our existence, and how it can be used, misused and abused. Students will be responsible for reading and responding to various texts, as well as evaluating their own experiences with the creative process. In addition, students will critique, in a constructive and responsible manner, the creative processes of their classmates. As always, be prepared . . . to have some serious fun.

Texts: Ghiselin, Brewster ed. The Creative Process:Reflections on Invention in the Arts and Sciences. Csikszentmihalyi, Mihalyi. Creativity: Flow and the Creative Process.

Requirements: Students will be required to keep a journal recording their reactions to the course readings, group workshops, and their personal creative processes; present on the creative process of an artist of their own choosing; take a midterm; and submit a final creative project accompanied by critical essay.

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XIDS 2100-03: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Amy L. Ellison
The Creative Process
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Pafford 308

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: Edward Hopper said, “My aim in painting has always been the most exact transcription possible of my most intimate impression of nature.” He also stated that what he “wanted to do was to paint sunlight on the side of a house.” The first quote seems to deal with feelings and emotional response, while the second seems practical and simple in the extreme; are these two descriptions as divergent as they first appear? What drives artists to create? What principles, if any, govern the creative process? What is it about creativity and creative people that we admire and envy? Is creativity really an individualistic attribute or is it systemic in nature? Is creativity an “either/or” situation? Are some people simply “hardwired” for creativity?

We will attempt to answer these questions as well as engage in activities meant to spark our own creative potentials. In many ways, our task is unenviable since we will constantly challenge overly romanticized notions of the lone artist, the prodigy, and the “natural” talent. The course will also introduce you to the rigors and pleasures of creative endeavors through workshopping and hands-on creative engagement in various media. Finally, with the aid of a critical study dedicated to creativity, we will work towards constructing a critical discourse regarding the nature of the creative process. Sound like a lot? It is. Be prepared to work (and play) extremely hard.

Texts: Texts: Hugo, Richard. The Triggering Town. Csikszentmihalyi, Mihalyi. Creativity: Flow and the Creative Process.

Requirements: Maintenance of a journal; regular creative and critical writing exercises; attend and write about five cultural events; midterm; final project of three creative works accompanied by a critical essay.

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XIDS 2100-05: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Josh Grant
Modernism: Modern Love
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Pafford 308

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: Many words in the Modern Era carry a lot of baggage with them from previous cultures, and the word love has, perhaps, hauled more baggage into the twentieth and twenty-first centuries than any other word. In fact, love has come to have such a variety of meanings to so many different people that it is almost impossible for people who are participating in a conversation about it to know if they are actually talking about the same thing. Because of all these different meanings, all of this extra baggage, the word love is in danger of being relegated to modern vernacular's "unclaimed baggage" department. In this course on modern love, we will undertake the sometimes tedious and not always glamorous job of checking love’s baggage at the gate in order to see if it can still fly with the weight of all of its history on board.

We will examine how individuals and whole societies have constantly redefined the concept of love in the West, tracing its metamorphic journey from the Classical Period through the Middle Ages and into the Modern Era. In other words, throughout the semester, we will unpack the various ideas associated with this loaded word in order to discover some of the underlying motivations that led various cultures to alter the way they viewed or reacted to this particular emotion. We will, moreover, examine each little artifact of love from the past in relation to its place in our own culture, exploring questions such as “Who do we allow to be the more definitive voices on the subject, and from whose voices are they borrowing? Plato? Augustine? Ovid? Troubadour poets? Capellanus? Shakespeare? Casanova? Stendhal? Schopenhauer? Proust? Freud? Biologists? The Beatles? EHarmony? Reality television? Ourselves?” In other words, we will work to identify the roles these earlier theories of amore play in the contemporary wardrobe that we call love.

Texts: Love: Emotion, Myth, & Metaphor (Robert C. Solomon); The Symposium (Plato); A Natural History of Love (Diane Ackerman); a selection of works that will be on reserve in the library.

Requirements: Weekly listserv postings, five cultural events, two response papers, a creative project, a midterm, and a final exam.

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XIDS 2100-N01: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Stephanie Hollenbeck
The Monstrous and the Grotesque
Online; first class meets Thursday, Jan. 8 5:30pm-8:00pm in TLC 1301

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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FILM

FILM 2080-01: Introduction to the Art of Film, Prof. Patricia Burgey
MW 9:30am-10:45am, Pafford 308

Required for Film Studies minor.

Description: In this course, students will consider the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. Students will watch a wide range of films from a variety of historical moments in film history. Students will have the chance to explore issues such as framing, photographic space, film shot, editing, sound, genre, narrative form, acting style, and lighting in the context of wider discussions of the weekly films. This introductory course assumes no prior knowledge of film. Students will be evaluated primarily on the basis of a shot-by-shot analysis, marketing analysis and presentation, individual and group work and two exams.

Texts: Corrigan, Timothy and Patricia White. The Film Experience: An Introduction. Films will be announced on the first day of class.

Requirements: Quizzes, in-class daily and group work, a shot-by-shot analysis, marketing analysis and presentation, and two exams.

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FILM 2080-02: Introduction to the Art of Film, Prof. Jane McClain
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 208

Required for Film Studies minor.

Class Description: In this course, students will consider the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. Students will watch a wide range of films from a variety of historical moments in film history. Students will have the chance to explore issues such as framing, photographic space, film shot, editing, sound, genre, narrative form, acting style, and lighting in the context of wider discussions of the weekly films. This introductory course assumes no prior knowledge of film. Students will be evaluated primarily on the basis of a shot-by-shot analysis, marketing analysis and presentation, individual and group work and two exams.

Texts: Corrigan, Timothy and Patricia White. The Film Experience: An Introduction.

Requirements: Quizzes, in-class daily and group work, a shot-by-shot analysis, marketing analysis and presentation, and two exams.

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FILM 2080-LCM: Introduction to the Art of Film, Prof. Stacey Morin
MW 11:00am-12:15pm, Pafford 109

Required for Film Studies minor.

Description: In this course students will consider the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. Students will watch a wide range of films from a variety of historical moments in film history. Students will have the chance to explore issues such as framing, photographic space, film shot, editing, sound, genre, narrative form, acting style, and lighting in the context of wider discussions of the weekly films. This is an introductory course, and assumes no prior knowledge of film. Students will be evaluated primarily on the basis of a shot-by-shot analysis, marketing analysis and presentation, individual and group work and two exams.

Texts: Corrigan, Timothy and Patricia White. The Film Experience: An Introduction.

Requirements: Quizzes, in-class daily and group work, a shot-by-shot analysis, marketing analysis and presentation, and two exams.

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FILM 2100-L2M: History and Theory of Film, Dr. Lori Lipoma
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, Pafford 308

Required for Film Studies minor.

Description: In this course, we will explore major developments in film history, theory, and criticism. We will study several different film movements in the development of the art form and examine basic ideas in film theory. Through viewing, discussing, and writing about a variety of film movements and historical periods, we will develop an understanding of the cultural, industrial, and political contexts for some of most significant debates about film.

We’ll read about and watch films from a variety of periods and movements: classical Hollywood cinema, including the comics (Charles Chaplin, Frank Capra, The Marx Brothers, and W.C. Fields), and the masters of mood (Orson Welles and Alfred Hitchcock); German Expressionism and Realism (Nosferatu, Triumph of the Will), Soviet Formalism, the French and Italian New Wave (Fellini, Rossellini, Cocteau, etc.;), recent national cinemas (including England, China, Belgium, and India), as well as the contemporary worldwide film industry, including DVD and digital.

Text: Mast, Gerald, and Bruce Kawin. A Short History of the Movies. NY: Pearson Education, Inc., 2007.

Assessment: Brief response essays, midterm and final exams, and informed, engaged class participation will comprise students’ semester grades.

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ENGL 2000-level

ENGL 2050-01: Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life, Prof. Jade Kierbow
MW 11:00am-12:15pm, Humanities 209

May count for credit in Core Area B1. Same as THEA 2050.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 2050-02: Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life, Dr. Aleksondra Hultquist
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 209

May count for credit in Core Area B1. Same as THEA 2050.

Description: We’ll be exploring performance personae in this class, with the ultimate goal of your creating a professional persona for yourself. The first project entails reading, interpreting, and performing ready-made personae from Shakespeare’s sonnets. In the second unit, you will create an outlandish character based on yourself (a clown or comedic persona). Finally, you will develop a professional persona, based on your personality and interests that you can use in circumstances such as interviews, presentations, and other professional situations.

Texts: Shakespeare’s sonnets, Electronic reader containing articles

Requirements: 3 presentations, 3 short papers

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ENGL 2050-03: Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life, Dr. Meg Pearson
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, Humanities 209

May count for credit in Core Area B1. Same as THEA 2050.

Description: Effective communicators are more productive, have enhanced career opportunities, enjoy more fulfilling relationships, earn more respect, and have more fun! The good news is that you already have the tools you need to become a great communicator; it’s just a matter of learning how to use them consciously and masterfully…in other words, learning how to “self-stage.”

In Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life, we will study and practice practical communication skills—creativity, quick thinking, risk taking, lateral thinking, active listening, subtext mastery, self-awareness—and apply them to virtually every interaction you encounter outside the classroom: One-on-One Conversations, Public Presentation, Debate and Argumentation, Conflict Resolution and Confrontation Skills, Stress Management, Team Building, and Impression Management. By the end of the semester, students will have had first-hand experience in all of these areas, and, more importantly, will know exactly how to continue honing and perfecting those skills long after.

Requirements: formal solo presentations, group projects and presentations, panel discussions/debates, vocabulary-building exercises, role-playing and improvisation exercises, journaling, and, of course, active, informed participation in each class session.

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ENGL 2050-04: Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life, Prof. Dorothy Byrom
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, Humanities 208

May count for credit in Core Area B1. Same as THEA 2050.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 2060-01: Introduction to Creative Writing, Prof. Paul Guest
MW 9:30am-10:45am, TLC 1110

Required for Creative Writing minor.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 2060-02: Introduction to Creative Writing, Dr. Katherine Chaple
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Pafford 307

Required for Creative Writing minor.

Description:

But all art is sensual . . . . It is directly, that is, of the senses, and since the senses do not exist without an object for their employment all art is necessarily objective. It doesn’t declaim or explain, it presents.

—William Carlos Williams

English 2060 is an introduction to fiction and poetry writing. The aim of this class is for the student to acquire a familiarity with the tools and forms of poetry and fiction and to apply those to both creative and academic work. In addition to a study the crafts of both fiction and poetry through reading and lecture, we will also be exploring and discussing where poems and stories come from—the inspirational element of writing. You will be expected to produce works in both genres, and we will workshop your creative efforts in class.

Texts: Janet Burroway & Elizabeth Stuckey-French Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft (7 th Edition); Kim Addonizio & Dorianne Laux The Poet’s Companion: A Guide to the Pleasures of Writing Poetry; Jeff Knorr An Introduction to Poetry: The River Sings; additional online readings.

Requirements: Daily readings and exercises, participation, written contributions to the workshop, midterm examination, and a final portfolio of polished writing.

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ENGL 2060-03: Introduction to Creative Writing, Dr. Margaret Mitchell
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Humanities 205

Required for Creative Writing minor.

Description: This class will provide an introduction to the writing of fiction and poetry.  Students will explore their creative potential while studying craft—the strategies and techniques that give form to imagination. Readings in poetry and short fiction will strengthen your familiarity with the contemporary literary landscape and encourage you to situate your own emerging voice among those of other writers. Workshops will allow you to benefit from intense discussions of your own work and that of other students. We will emphasize revision; by the end of the semester you will have produced a polished portfolio of your best work.

Course Texts : TBA

Requirements: : Frequent writing assignments, portfolio of revised work, 2 short critical essays, responses to student work, writing journal.

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ENGL 2060-04: Introduction to Creative Writing, Dr. Gregory Fraser
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, Humanities 209

Required for Creative Writing minor.

Description: This introductory course is devoted to the practice of writing as a creative act. Expect to read a good deal of poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and drama; count on engaging in critical discussions of contemporary aesthetic principles; and be prepared to offer your own creative writing for group commentary. You must be willing to set aside regular time for writing, and must construct a comprehensive portfolio or your work by the end of the semester. Ultimately, this course sets out to help you access your imagination through writing and assess creative works by both aspiring and established authors.

Texts: The Best American Short Plays 2000-2001 (Glubke); Writing Poetry: Creative and Critical Approaches (Davidson-Fraser); In the Garden of North American Martyrs (Wolff); plus handouts to be distributed in class.

Requirements: Weekly readings, exercises, and homework assignments; written contributions to workshop; periodic quizzes; a final portfolio of polished writing, including a critical preface.

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ENGL 2060-25H: Introduction to Creative Writing-Honors, Dr. Chad Davidson
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, TLC 1204

Required for Creative Writing minor. Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register.

Description: This course serves as an introduction to the art of creative writing—from learning to craft your own literary productions, to gaining the critical skills necessary in assessing works by established authors. Students will study authors from a wide range of historical and cultural contexts, and learn to model their artistic endeavors on the works of publishing practitioners. Students will also become familiar with workshop methodologies, which emphasize close peer interaction and foreground appropriate assessment skills among writers and thinkers. Finally, students will gain an appreciation and understanding of the connections between personal experience and creativity, and the reception of literary arts in the public domain.

Text: The Best American Short Plays 2000-2001, Mark Glubke, ed; Wolff, In the Garden of North American Martyrs; Writing Poetry: Creative and Critical Approaches.

Requirements: daily participation and exercises, attendance at a literary event, and a final portfolio of original writing with a critical preface.

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ENGL 2110-01: World Literature, Prof. Leigh Dillard
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 208

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

This introductory survey of world literature interrogates sites of converging opinions, cultures, and modes of expression as voiced through poetry, drama, novel, and visual narrative.

Texts: Longman Anthology of World Literature, The Compact Edition (2008).

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 2110-02: World Literature, Dr. Maria Doyle
In the Labyrinth: Of Mazes, Monsters and the Search for Meaning
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, Humanities 208

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: In the city of Crete the labyrinth was a maze built to hide the half-bull, half-human Minotaur, a monster that was evidence of the royal household's faithlessness. Both the labyrinth itself and the monster at its center have multiple meanings – traveling the maze is a dangerous enterprise but navigating it successfully allows the traveler to unearth truths that can themselves be both dangerous and liberating. In this course, we will explore a variety of mazes, journeys into worlds of ghosts, monsters and mysteries, asking in the process what those journeys reveal about the complex and sometimes risky search for "truth." Readings will be drawn from a variety of time periods and cultural contexts, including the classical tradition of Greece and Rome as well as works from Europe, the Middle East, Asia and South America; selections will include Homer's Odyssey, Ovid's Metamorphoses, The 1001 Nights, Goethe's Faust, The Ramayana, Dante's Inferno and the stories of Jorge Luis Borges.

Texts: The Longman Anthology of World Literature (Compact Edition)

Requirements: Two short (3-5 page) out-of-class essays, midterm and final exams, active participation in classroom discussions and online activities

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ENGL 2110-25H: World Literature-Honors, Dr. Patrick Erben
“The World Traveler’s Guide to World Literature
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, TLC 1204

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2. Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register.

Description: I have to be honest—travel is one of my greatest passions. Growing up in Germany, many foreign countries were only a few hours away. Nothing thrills me more than exploring another country with guidebook, dictionary, and—a great work of literature that opens a window into the culture, intellect, achievements, emotions, fears, prejudices, and beliefs of its people. In this class, I will take you on a trip to places I’ve visited or lived in by highlighting some of the greatest works of literature ever written around the world. We will visit the epic beginnings of Ancient Greece and Rome, the cultural crossroads of the Levant and Mesopotamia, the castles of medieval Germany, the churches and palaces of Renaissance Italy, the Spain of the Reconquista and early empire, Mexico during the Spanish conquest, the France of Louis XV and the Enlightenment philosophers, the Germany of neo-classicism and early Romanticism, Prague and the modern Czech Republic, Nazi Germany and its aftermath, and post-colonial Africa. We will supplement our literary explorations with the art, music, and maybe even the cuisine of some of those countries.

Texts: The Longman Anthology of World Literature, Compact Edition ; The Nibelungenlied (Penguin Classics); The Tin Drum (DVD).

Requirements: aLively participation, regular quizzes, one oral presentation on historical/cultural/biographical context of a literary work, 3 short analytical papers, mid and final exams.

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2120-01: British Literature, Dr. Emily Hipchen
Monsters and Martyrs
MW 8:00am-9:15am, Pafford 308

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: In this survey of British literature we’ll be reading about monsters such as Beowulf and martyrs such as Victor Frankenstein, participating as voyeurs in the burning, maiming, and blessing, watching as normal folks like us, befuddled and benighted, drive these outsiders out of their minds, out of town, into their graves, and into stories whose ultimate lessons are deeply ambiguous. Why is one murderer good, but another one bad; one child molester evil and the other inspired? What are the ethics, the politics, of that decision? What historical events and real people influenced the perspective of these pieces, and how do world events create the anxieties whose alleviation requires we good British citizens find folks to fill these roles (or maybe fit folks to these roles whether they will or not, by chopping, bending, and stretching)?

Texts: Among others, works by Shakespeare and Chaucer and Milton, of course, but also William Blake, Seamus Heaney, Christina Rossetti, Mary Shelley, Angela Carter, Martin McDonagh, Andrew Lloyd Weber, Arthur Conan Doyle.

Requirements: Required daily attendance and participation, online quizzes, three short answer and essay tests, a presentation, and one ten-page research project.

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ENGL 2120-02: British Literature, Dr. Meg Pearson
Exploring Englishness
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Humanities 208

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: The Norton Anthology of English Literature suggests that "most nations define what they are by defining what they are not." This survey will consider this notion of negative self-definition in a vast array of texts that range over several centuries. Most of these stories emphasize the journey of heroes or heroines into alien territory, where they experience conflict with a malignant other, discover love (sometimes romantic, sometimes spiritual), and come to apprehend their own true natures. We will determine whether we can characterize these literatures as distinctly English or British.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Major Authors. 8 th ed.

Requirements: Active discussion, two response essays, midterm and final.

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ENGL 2120-03: British Literature, Dr. Micheal Crafton
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm Humanities 208

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: In this hold-on-to-your-hat, breath-taking, roller coaster ride of a survey of the entire history of British Literature from the earliest stages of the Anglo-Saxon period to contemporary poetry, including both major figures and some minor, we will attempt to read the literature in light of historical and political contexts and in light of genre and mode, so Beowulf and heroic epic, Chaucer and satire, Shakespeare and historical drama, and many more including early voices of women writers, lyrical revolutionaries, and mystical visionaries.

Texts: M. H. Abrams and Stephen Greenblatt, gen. eds . The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Major Authors 7th ed. One Volume (The Middle Ages to the Present) Norton, 2001, ISBN 0-393-96150-8.; M. H. Abrams and Geoffrey Harpham, A Glossary of Literary Terms. Wadsworth, 2008 ISBN-10: 1413033903 . (or a rough equivalent).

Requirements: There will be two short papers and two exams as well as daily reading quizzes and opportunities for participation.

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ENGL 2120-25H: British Literature, Dr. Angela Insenga
MW 11:00 a.m.-12:15pm, TLC 1204

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2. Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register.

Description: In the fifth act of Othello, when the character of the same name implores his listeners to remember him as a man who loved "not wisely but too well," he admits fully to what anyone smitten with another has felt to some degree: jealousy. Of course, most of us do not become "perplex'd in the extreme" like the ill-fated Moor, and we don't face quite so vicious an enemy as Iago. Shakespeare's play is neither the first nor the last to take up the story of disquieted lovers. In fact, the theme of amorous malcontents perseveres in literature—and in life—and our course will use it as a backdrop to examine significant trends and achievements throughout several British literary periods.

Requirements: Major assignments include two short essays, a mid-term and final examination, daily reading quizzes or "thinking on paper" pieces, and one short presentation.

Texts: Required texts include Tristan and Iseult by J. Bedier and Hilaire Belloc; Othello by William Shakespeare; selected 17th century poetry by John Donne and Andrew Marvell; Fantomina, or Love in a Maze by Eliza Haywood; selected Victorian poetry by Matthew Arnold, Robert Browning, and Christina Rossetti; Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë; and Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf.

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ENGL 2120-26H: British Literature-Honors, Dr. Gregory Fraser
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 1204

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2. Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register.

Description: This course introduces students to representative works of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon era to the twentieth century. In addition to exploring questions of genre, literary periodization, and socio-historical context, we will also concentrate on effective methods of producing Honors-level written interpretations of complex literary texts.

Text: The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Majors Authors, 8th edition, packaged with CD-ROM.

Requirements: Periodic homework and short writing assignments; two interpretative essays of at least five pages each; final essay of at least eight pages; final exam; active participation in class discussions.

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ENGL 2130-01: American Literature, Dr. Debra MacComb
MW 9:30am-10:45am, Humanities 208

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: This course will develop a range of enduring themes that have characterized American literature: the encounter with and appropriation of nature; the crafting of an identity that attempts to reconcile the desires of the individual with the needs of society; the individual’s ability to chart his own path to success; the “problem” of the socio-cultural “other”; and the tension between the public and private spheres. In exploring these themes, we will read a variety of canonical and non-canonical texts to examine the authorial strategies that developed over time which make these works aesthetically as well as historically pertinent.

Texts: Possible texts include: The Account of Mary Rowlandson and Other Indian Captivity Narratives; Franklin, The Autobiography; Foster, The Coquette; Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; Hawthorne, The House of the Seven Gables; Twain, Pudd’nhead Wilson; Mason, In Country; other shorter works or poetry and prose available online.

Requirements: Active, informed and regular participation in class discussion; two short essays (3-4 pages); a midterm and final (cumulative) exam; weekly reading questions.

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ENGL 2130-02: American Literature, Prof. Gwen Davidson
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 208

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: This survey will introduce and compare major literary movements in America, from the 17th Century to the present, with a concentration on shifts in American cultural ideology. In the process, we will continue to ask what factors define our complex and dynamic American identity. Our exploration will begin by scrutinizing Puritan thought, with Mary Rowlandson’s seventeenth century captivity narrative. In response to Rowlandson, we will read Sherman Alexie, who concentrates on the legacy of Puritan colonization, and its lasting effects on Native Americans. The next unit will start with Benjamin Franklin’s ideology of success, and then move forward in time to study shifts in and criticism of Franklin’s principles, with perspectives from Mark Twain, D.H. Lawrence, William Carlos Williams, and Allen Ginsberg. We will continue to question colonial foundations, with a specific emphasis on deconstructing racial binaries, studying Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, Toni Morrison, and Percival Everett. Finally, we will examine Thoreau’s relationship with the nature through the lens of American Romanticism. In response, we will read Don DeLillo’s White Noise, which provides a postmodern revision of Thoreau’s America.

Texts: Pearson Custom Anthology of American Literature (print-on-demand); Percival Everett, Erasure; Don DeLillo, White Noise.

Requirements: in-class essay exams, three short essays, quizzes, class discussion

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ENGL 2130-N01: American Literature, Prof. Stephanie Hollenbeck
Online; first class meets Tuesday, Jan. 13 5:30pm-8:00pm in TLC 1301

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 2130-25H: American Literature-Honors, Dr. S. Boyd
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, TLC 1204

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2. Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register.

Description: Through the examination of a number of materials engaging issues of identity, this course will pay close attention to the ways in which authors have constructed and deconstructed American identities. Specifically, we will consider how selected works define America, how America defines itself, and how Americans have defined themselves. We will spend considerable time thinking about how race and its intersections with gender, sexuality and class complicate the formulation of a particularly American identity.

Texts: TBA

Requirements: short response papers, quizzes, oral presentation, a midterm exam or essay, and a final essay or exam.

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ENGL 2130-26H: American Literature-Honors, Dr. Alison Umminger
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, TLC 1204

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: This survey class on American literature centers upon the theme: “The Search for Identity: The American Experience in Black and White.” The first week will read Toni Morrison’s short story “Recitatif,” and discuss cultural assumptions about race, gender, and identity. We will then move back in time and work our way forward, starting our reading of longer texts with Ben Franklin and Frederick Douglass’s autobiographies, examining the tension between how an individual shapes his own identity, and how the larger culture determines how an individual’s identity will be shaped. We will then move to look at Harriet Jacobs’ autobiography, complicating questions of race with the intersecting rubric of gender norms and their hold on women.  Rounding out our discussion of the nineteenth century will be a number of short readings, including sections of Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass,” Emerson’s “Self-Reliance,” Melville’s “Benito Cereno,” and the longer text of Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn. Our discussion of twentieth century literature will begin with Jean Toomer’s Cane, and will include a discussion of the two major literary movements of this time: Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance. We will also read poetry by Langston Hughes and Claude McKay, as well as novels by Faulkner and Larsen.  The course will conclude with the neo-slave narrative, Octavia Butler’s Kindred, as part of a larger discussion of postmodernism. While race figures prominently in many of these readings, we will also be attentive to gender and sexuality, community and tradition as important factors in creating American identity and American literature. You will be expected to write one essay, take two hourly exams, and complete a number of short responses. Active reading and participation is expected. I will also give you periodic reading quizzes.

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ENGL 2130-27H: American Literature-Honors, Dr. Barbara Brickman
W 5:30pm-8:00pm, TLC 1204

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: This survey of important works in American literature will address several issues central to the conception of “American” identity: the encounter with and/or exploitation of the natural world; the quest for an independent, unified, and/or original self; the differentiation of the self from a series of “others” (or the production of “otherness”); and the conflicts and negotiations between social demands and values and the individual self. The readings for the course will consist of both canonical texts, such as The Scarlet Letter, and texts challenging the mainstream, such as Jean Toomer’s Cane. Furthermore, four film texts, Last of the Mohicans (Mann, 1992), Do the Right Thing (Lee, 1989), and The Virgin Suicides (Coppola, 1999), will complicate and complement the class’s literary instances of “Americanness.”

Texts:Benjamin Franklin, The Autobiography; Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Mark Twain, Pudd’nhead Wilson; Henry James, Daisy Miller; Sherwood Anderson, Winesburg, Ohio; Jean Toomer, Cane; Flannery O’Connor, A Good Man Is Hard to Find; Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club;

Requirements:3 short essays, one presentation, midterm and final essay exams

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ENGL 2180-01: Studies in African-American Literature, Prof. Mandi Campbell
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Pafford 109

May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: This survey course will focus on narrative techniques employed in a variety of African-American writings. Beginning with a slave narrative and ending with a contemporary novel, we will trace a long tradition of storytelling and examine how African-American writers use the power of narrative voice to construct both individual and communal identities. In addition to understanding the impact that these writers have on the African-American community, we also will consider how the voices that have emerged from this literature contribute to America’s evolving sense of a national identity.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of African American Literature

Requirements: Weekly reading quizzes and responses, three short analytical essays, midterm and final exams

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ENGL 2190-01: Studies in Literature by Women, Dr. Margaret E. Mitchell
Exile and Domesticity in Women’s Writing
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 208

May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: John Stuart Mill wrote that “if women had lived in a different country than men…they would have a literature of their own.” This course is based on the premise that women do in fact have a literature of their own, and one worth studying. Nevertheless, Mill’s remark raises intriguing questions about women’s literature and its connection to place, national identity…and, of course, men. Virginia Woolf cast the issue in a different light when she declared, “As a woman I have no country. As a woman my country is the whole world.” Implicit in both statements is a complex, even problematic relationship between women and place—nations, countries, states. The idea of “home,” for women, has often been more closely associated with domesticity—home in the most personal sense—than in terms of broader political bodies. If, as Woolf claims, women have no country, is that a condition of exile or freedom—or both? How do the often violent transformations that tend to recur in these texts relate to ideas of nation, space, and belonging? What kinds of forces are women writers responding to, and what kinds of worlds do they forge? In this class we’ll explore these and related questions while reading works by important British and American women writers from the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries.

Texts: Wuthering Heights, Emily Brontë; To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf; The Awakening, Kate Chopin; Parable of the Sower, Octavia Butler; White Teeth, Zadie Smith; Look At Me, Jennifer Egan. Selected short works or critical excerpts will be made available electronically.

Requirements: Reading quizzes, two essays, oral presentation, midterm, final exam.

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ENGL 2300-01: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Dr. Lisa Crafton
MW 9:30am-10:45am, Humanities 206

Registration requires permission. Email Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu) for permission. Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Description: As a prerequisite for upper-division English studies, this course provides an introduction to representative critical approaches to literature. As English majors, the methods we all use to frame our interpretation of any text make us practicing literary critics, whether we know it or not. This course enables students to develop and articulate interpretations from a variety of theoretical approaches; we will investigate the historical development and key assumptions and methodologies of a select group of theories, but more importantly in their application to texts. Our case studies will be the film Fight Club and Shelley’s novel Frankenstein , to which almost every critical approach (new historicist, psychoanalytic, queer theory, feminist et al) has been applied! Students will write essays from 3 different critical perspectives on short selections from various genres (short fiction, nonfiction, poems, films) we have read together in class (at least one on Shelley). Students’ final work will be a documented research paper and an oral presentation on contemporary film, music, or art.

Texts: Barry, Beginning Theory; Abrams, Glossary of Literary Terms ; Shelley, Frankenstein , Gibaldi, MLA Handbook for Writers, select poems/stories and films on electronic reserve.

Requirements: class participation, 3 critical essays, documented research paper (with proposal, annotated bibliography, drafts and peer reviews), oral report on critical approach to contemporary film/music.

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ENGL 2300-02: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Dr. Aleksondra Hultquist
MW 5:30pm-6:45pm, Humanities 209

Registration requires permission. Email Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu) for permission. Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Description: The purpose of this class is to teach students how to talk, think, research, and write like an English major. Students will first establish basic literary methods such as literary vocabulary, close reading, and interpretation. From there, students will have an introduction to some basic literary theory, with special concentrations on specific theories such as Structuralism, Feminism/Gender studies, and Cultural Criticism. The main focus of the class will be to practice using the above skills sets to write critical analytical papers specific to the discipline of literary studies.

Texts: The Tempest by William Shakespeare; The Awakening by Kate Chopin; MLA Handbook for Writers;Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory; A critical theory text; Various poems and critical readings on electronic reserve.

Requirements: Three 3-4 page papers, in class midterm exam, a presentation, and one 10-12 page paper

ENGL 2300-03: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Mitzi McFarland
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, TLC 1204

Registration requires permission. Email Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu) for permission. Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Class Description: “Deconstruction” is a word that gets used in Newsweek.  Scritti Pollitti, a pop group, publishes its lyrics under the copyright of “Jouissance Music,” borrowing a term that French critic Roland Barthes used to describe the pleasure of reading. Critic Thomas McLaughlin even recalls a time when he overheard a basketball coach say that his team had learned to “deconstruct a zone defense.”

Just what is all this theory talk? And why should we study it in a literature course?  

Whether we are aware of it or not, resist it or welcome it, theory is absorbed into the fabric of our cultural and literary discourse. It is inherent in human perception, in our presuppositions and attitudes toward life. Even the most resistant reader makes theoretical decisions – conscious or not – about what kinds of texts to value most, how to read and study literature, what elements of plot, character, and language to focus on (or to overlook). We make theoretical decisions all the time that seem so “obvious,” so self-evident, that they’re not always recognized as theoretical or as decisions.

This course takes as its basic premise the idea that theory is inextricable from practice. Like it or not, we are always already “in theory.” In all our discussions, then, we will give attention to questions raised by contemporary literary theory: Why read? What should we read? How should we read? However, our central focus on “practical criticism” will involve the application of various approaches and methodologies to the explication – that is, to the interpretation and understanding of particular texts. This course is essentially a process course, where students can gain ample practice – through written and oral reports – in research methods, critical frameworks, and the close examination and analysis of texts. Hopefully, through the process of articulation, we will deepen our understanding of the aesthetic, literary, psychological, and socio-historical facets out of which texts are both generated and interpreted.

Texts: Bressler, Charles. Literary Criticism: An Introduction to Theory and Practice. 4 th ed. Prentice-Hall, 2006. ISBN: 0131534483; Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 6 th ed. MLA, 2003. ISBN: 0873529863; Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street. Vintage, 1984. ISBN: 0-679-73477-5; Supplemental online readings – poems mainly– provided online; Highly recommended: Baldick, Chris. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms. Oxford UP, 2004. ISBN: 0198608837.

Requirements : 3 shorter analytical essays, a research paper (including proposal, required drafts, peer reviews, and an annotated bibliography), one oral presentation (film and critical theory discussion), final exam.

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ENGL 2300-04: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Dr.. Micheal Crafton
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 206

Registration requires permission. Email Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu) for permission. Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Description: A prerequisite for upper-division work for the English major, this course is an introduction to a variety of critical approaches in literary study. In addition to instruction on literary research methods and tools, students will get plenty of practice reading and evaluating articles that examine literary works from different critical perspectives as well as writing about literature utilizing multiple reading strategies. We will be reading a variety of literary genre to help us read with literary theory and we will spend a good deal more time on the long Coleridge poem and especially the critical essays written about the poem that are included in this particular text.

Texts: Charles Bressler, Literary Criticism: An Introduction to Theory and Practice. 4 th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson, 2007. ISBN-10: 0131534483; Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient MarinerCase Studies in Contemporary Criticism) (Paperback), ed. Paul Fry. Palgrave Macmillan, 1995. (must have Bedford-St. Martin’s). ISBN-10: 0312112238; M. H. Abrams and Geoffrey Harpham, A Glossary of Literary Terms. Wadsworth, 2008. ISBN-10: 1413033903 . (or a rough equivalent); Joseph Gibaldi, MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (Paperback). 6 th ed. MLA, 2003, ISBN-10: 0873529863.

Requirements: 3 short papers, a research paper, final exam.

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ENGL 3000-level

ENGL 3200-01W: Intermediate Creative Writing, Dr. Emily Hipchen
Creative Nonfiction
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Pafford 309

Prereq: ENGL 2060. May be taken to satisfy the Writing and Language (Major Area C) requirement. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Some people think creative nonfiction is an oxymoron (“How can something be creative and true?”); some people think it’s a tautology (“Isn’t all nonfiction creative?”). What is this stuff that seems to have begun being written sometime in the 1960s and is now in the forefront of the news with controversies over the “truth” in texts like James Frey’s A Million Little Pieces that had Oprah calling in to Larry King and apologizing for what she said the next day in an hour’s vilification of Frey and his editors? How do you write it at all, let alone responsibly, ethically, beautifully? The first half of this class will be dedicated to getting acquainted with the genre: we’ll read In Cold Blood, The Hunger of Memory, Roots, and two collections of essays by writers like James MacPhee, Philip Lopate, Dorothy Allison and Michele Tea. The second half of the course is dedicated to student production of CNF and discussion of student pieces in a workshop and practicum environment. Assignments include journals, workshop pieces and responses, a midterm portfolio, and a final portfolio with critical preface.

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ENGL 3200-02W: Intermediate Creative Writing, Dr. Amy Cuomo
Screenwriting
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Martha Munro 105

Prereq: ENGL 2060. May be taken to satisfy the Writing and Language (Major Area C) requirement. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 3300-01W: Studies in American Culture, Prof. Lori Lipoma
Funny as Hell: Satan in American Culture
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Pafford 204

Prereq: ENGL 2130, HIST 2110 or 2112. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies Required for the minor in American Studies. Same as HIST 3300. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: In this course, we will consider a problem that Andrew Delbanco identifies in The Death of Satan: How Americans have Lost the Sense of Evil, in which he argues that “a gulf has opened up in our culture between the visibility of evil and the intellectual resources available for coping with it”; has our postmodern culture, he asks, “emptied” the concept of evil of all meaning? Humor theorists John Morreall and V.I. Zelvys, on the other hand, suggest that contemporary humor—even when it’s transgressive—is one of the most effective strategies for coping with evil or adversity, especially in our endlessly complex pluralistic culture. We will consider, therefore, what if any new meanings we can make of the problem of evil when we juxtapose it with contemporary Satan-comedy.

Our study will begin with a brief look at traditional representations of Satan in the New World from the Puritans to the present. In parallel, we’ll examine contemporary philosophical and critical essays about theories of comedy and humor, and the ways in which they help us navigate the uncertainties and fears of contemporary life. From the perspective of these theoretical lenses, therefore, we’ll spend the balance of the course discussing and writing about humorous texts from several genres—film, television, stage plays, and graphic novel—that feature Satan as a comic protagonist. Finally, we will analyze these texts in an attempt to answer three overriding questions for the course: What does “Satan-comedy” reveal about our religious and cultural fears, and the ways in which we confront them? What deeper meanings about our ongoing struggle with the problem of evil might we derive from such a paradoxical approach? Does such humor trivialize our experience, or might it be a means by which we can reorder our own perceptions of evil, morality, and a growing complexity of value systems in collision?

Texts, Films, and Course Pack Readings: Benet, Stephen Vincent. “The Devil and Daniel Webster.”
Byrnes, Pat. What Would Satan Do?: Cartoons About Right, Wrong, and Very, Very, Wrong. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. 2005.
Carey, Mike. Lucifer Vol. 1: Devil in the Gateway. NY: Vertigo. 2001. 1563897334
Deconstructing Harry. Woody Allen, dir., Woody Allen, Robin Williams, Judy Davis, perf. Paramount, 1997.
DeVito, John A. The Devil’s Apocrypha: There are Two Sides to Every Story. Lincoln, NB: Writers Club Press, 2002.
“Do The Handicapped Go to Hell? Parts I and II” South Park, #410 and 411. Comedy Central, New York. 2000.
Hawthorne, Nathaniel. “Young Goodman Brown.” Literature:  The Human Experience, 8th edition.  Richard Abcarian, et. al, eds.  NY: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 55-93. 2002.
Landover Baptist Church: Unsaved Unwelcome! www.landoverbaptist.com.
Reis, Elizabeth. “Popular and Ministerial Visions of Satan.” Damned Women: Sinners and Witches in Puritan New England. Cornell UP, 1997.
South Park: Bigger, Longer, Uncut. Dir. Trey Parker. Perf. Trey Parker, Matt Stone, Mary Kay, Isaac Hayes. Paramount Pictures, 1999.
Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby. Adam McKay, dir. Will Ferrell, Sasha Baron Cohen, John C. Reilly, perf. Sony Pictures, 2006.
Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny. Liam Lynch, dir. Jack Black, Kyle Gass, and Dave Grohl, perf. New Line Cinema, 2006.
Timbers, Alex. Hell House. New Destiny Christian Church: Hell House Ministries.
Twain, Mark: Letters from the Earth: Uncensored Writings by Mark Twain. Bernard DeVoto, ed. NY: Harper Perennial Modern Classics; Perennial edition, 2004.
--------- “That Day in Eden: Passages from Satan’s Diary.” The Complete Essays of Mark Twain. Charles Neider, ed. NY: Doubleday, 1963. 668-672.

Requirements: Reading/viewing Responses:  five @ 10% each = 50%; Oral Presentation/Leading Class Discussion: 10%; Midterm Exam: 20%; Final Project: 20%.

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ENGL 3350-01: Introduction to Africana Studies, Dr. S. Boyd
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, Pafford 308

Required for the minor in Africana studies. Same as HIST 3350.

Description: This multidisciplinary course introduces students to the field of Africana (African American) Studies by surveying some of the major areas of development in historical studies, literary studies, social sciences, and the arts.  Beginning with the birth of Black Studies out of the black student movement, the course will then explore topics within the following categories: 1) African and Diaspora—i.e., the history of ancient African civilizations and the consequences of the transatlantic slave trade; 2) expressive arts and culture-i.e., oral, musical, and literary creativity; 3) identities, ideologies, and institutions-i.e., the black freedoms struggle, gender, sexuality, and class issues within Black religious and social institutions.  We will conclude the semester with discussion of contemporary issues such as reparations, affirmative action, hip hop, and Barack Obama.

Texts: All readings will be on electronic reserve.

Requirements: Usually presentations, quizzes, essays, attendance at cultural event.

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ENGL 3400-01W: Pedagogy and Writing, Dr. Angela Insenga
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 1204

May be taken to satsisfy the Writing and Language (Major Area C) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Pedagogy [ped-uh-goh-jee, -goj-ee]–noun, plural -gies. 1. The function or work of a teacher; teaching. 2. The art or science of teaching; education; instructional methods.

Most students spend the better part of their college years engaged in close reading and producing various types of writing. There comes a time, however, when teachers-in-training must turn a great deal of attention towards the hard work of becoming a teacher. This change occurs when we raise our hands in classes to ask what,how, and even why we instruct. This course begins to address these questions.

Because we become better teachers when we continue to practice the skills of close reading and the craft of writing, we’ll first talk much about our own writing practices, namely those methods we can detect in the instruction we’ve received and their effect on our learning. We’ll write, rewrite, and write again in an effort to hone our skills recursively. Then, we’ll turn our attention to current trends and instructional methods deployed in secondary English/Language Arts by not only reading and analyzing primary texts but also the theory that informs classroom practice. To deepen our understanding of the myriad pedagogical possibilities in English Studies, observations of other teachers at work in composition and literature classes will also be required.

Major assignments include two essays, periodic reading quizzes or “thinking on paper” pieces, one short presentation, observation of other composition or literature classes and written reflections about those observations, and a Pedagogy Project, due at the end of the semester.

Required texts include Fever, 1793 by Laurie Halse-Anderson; A Separate Peace by John Knowles; My Own True Name: New and Selected Poems for Young Adults by Pat Mora; Critical Encounters in High School English: Teaching Literary Theory to Adolescents by Deborah Appleman; and Teaching Writing in Middle and Secondary Schools by Jim Blasingame and John H. Bushman.

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ENGL 3405-01W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. Crystal R. Shelnutt
MW 9:30am-10:45am, TLC 1109

May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: English 3405-01w will introduce basic rhetorical concepts that students need for myriad professional situations. Such principles, and an analysis of the professional and technical climates under which many of our documents will be produced, will provide assistance in responding to a variety of workplace needs. This class will provide students opportunity for intensive practice in composing powerful audience-driven documents in a variety of business, professional, and technical contexts. Students will also learn how to make effective business-related presentations supported with appropriate documentary and visual aids, as well as collaborate on technical research and reporting.

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 3405-02W: Professional and Technical Writing, Dr. Melanie Jordan
TR 9:30am-10:45am, TLC 1109

May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Intensive practice in composing powerful audience-driven documents in a variety of real-world business, professional, and technical contexts. Students will also learn how to make effective business-related presentations supported with appropriate documentary and visual aids.

Texts: TBA

Requirements: A series of professional documents which will be compiled eventually as a portfolio; a presentation, and a final project which will include stages of completion (from proposal to finished “product.”). The requirements may also include mock interviews.

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ENGL 3405-03W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. John Sturgis
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, TLC 1109

May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: The concept of the profession of Technical Writing has evolved from an auxiliary function practiced by necessity into a full blown primary profession that includes virtually every imaginable industry and service oriented business on the planet. Successfully marketed products and services cannot exist without complete written descriptions, specifications, functional instructions, promotional materials, and other supporting documentation. The ever-changing rhetorical situations that surround the creation of these documentary instruments provide the exploratory field for this course. Participants will discover absolutely new ways to employ their writing abilities and to stretch their understanding of their own writing processes by generating an entirely original set of documents based on real-time requirements and standards of practice.

Texts: (Provisional entry) Alred, Gerald J., Charles T. Brusaw, and Walter E. Oliu. The Technical Writer’s Companion. Third Edition. Boston: Bedford / St. Martin’s. 2002. ISBN 0-312-25978-6. (Subject to change).

Requirements: Students will execute a variety of different writing tasks under a variety of rhetorical situations established by the assignments package: Resumes, cover letters, business letters, and writing samples will be combined into a job search Presentation Package delivered at the midterm. A completed Research Project covering a subject of the student’s own choice will result in a Formal Report and Presentation delivered at the end of the semester.

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ENGL 4/5000-level

ENGL 4/5106-01W: Studies in Genre, Dr. Chad Davidson
Poetry
MW 5:30pm-6:45pm, Pafford 308

Required for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken to satisfy the Genre and Theory 1 or 2 (Major Area B1 or B2) requirement. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course is devoted to an intense and trans-historical study of the ways in which poems mean. We will explore the intersections of poetry, history, and culture, and how they help to define one another. We will spend the majority of our time unpacking poems in class, achieving both a more nuanced sense of poetics and a deeper understanding of how poetry affects, and is affected by, history and culture. Ultimately, the goal of this course is to arm you with competence and confidence in reading poetry from multiple historical periods and cultural contexts, and to give you some of the tools necessary to write critically about what you find there.

Text: The Norton Anthology of Poetry (Paperback) Shorter Edition, Margaret Ferguson, et al. (editors) ISBN: 0-393-97921-0

Requirements: daily participation, periodic memorizations of poetry, two critical-writing projects, and two exams.

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English 4/5106-02W: Studies in Genre, Dr. Maria Doyle
Drama
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 206

Required for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken to satisfy the Genre and Theory 1 or 2 (Major Area B1 or B2) requirement. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Literally, a play is a piece of literature written in dialogue and meant for performance, but the larger question that this course will explore is the more important issue of why a writer might choose this particular form of expression: what’s the value of putting real actors in a room with a real audience, and how does this shape the way a writer presents his or her ideas? Rather than attempting a complete survey of a genre that has been around for well over two millennia, this course will organize its exploration around a set of archetypal Greek models -- the human fall of Oedipus, the rebellion of Antigone and the frenzied destruction of Euripides’s Bacchae -- using analysis of these plays to inform a reading of major developments in modern theater, from Tennessee Williams’s modern gothic to Tom Stoppard's parodic absurdism and August Wilson’s stage chronicle of African-American experience. Discussions will provide students with a vocabulary for reading British, American and world drama as literature –its connection to larger literary, political and social movements – and as theater – its relation to performance conventions and stage spaces. Students will attend a production in Atlanta as part of their course material.

Texts: Sophocles, Oedipus Rex and Antigone, Euripides, The Bacchae, William Shakespeare, King Lear, J.M. Synge, The Playboy of the Western World, Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire, Vaclav Havel, Largo Desolato, August Wilson, Fences, Caryl Churchill, Top Girls, Wole Soyinka, Death and the King's Horseman, Tom Stoppard, The Real Inspector Hound

Requirements: For undergraduates, two short papers, midterm and final exam, final research project, active discussion participation. Graduate students will complete additional secondary reading and a longer research project including a substantial annotated bibliography.

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ENGL 4/5108 01W: Studies in the Novel, Dr. Margaret E. Mitchell
British
TR 11:00am-12:15pm Humanities 205

May be taken to satisfy the British Literature 2 (Major area A2) requirement. Students may take both the British and the American versions for credit. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:

The generic skeleton of the novel is still far from having hardened, and we cannot foresee all its plastic possibilities.

--Mikhail M. Bakhtin, The Dialogic Imagination

Since the emergence in the eighteenth century of what came to be known as the novel, theorists have sought to define this elusive genre—its rules, its characteristics, its ideological function, its relationship to reality. The novel itself complicates this process, as Bakhtin suggests in the quotation above, by relentlessly shape-shifting. The boundary between what a novel is and what it is not remains unfixed. In this class we will begin by charting the “rise” of the British novel (the novel is always described as rising—like a dynasty, or a rebellion, both useful analogies) in the eighteenth century. We will trace its ascendancy in the nineteenth century (in the form of what Henry James famously called “loose baggy monsters”), and pursue it into the twentieth century and the radical experiments of the Modernists. We’ll finish with a look at the contemporary novel, considering where the genre is headed and what forces drive its endless reinvention.

Texts: Moll Flanders, Daniel Defoe; Evelina, Fanny Burney; Great Expectations, Charles Dickens; Adam Bede, George Eliot; To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf; Howards End, E.M. Forster; White Teeth, Zadie Smith. Selected theoretical and critical readings will be made available electronically.

Requirements: Response papers, reading quizzes, research paper, midterm.

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ENGL 4/5109-01W: Film as Literature, Dr. Joshua Masters
African American Cinema
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Pafford 308

May be taken to satisfy the Genre and Theory 1 or 2 (Major Area B1 or B2) requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course will investigate how the imagery, poetics, and politics of race have played out, and panned out, in the history of American film. Our focus will be African American cinema—which can be loosely defined as films written and/or directed by African Americans,—but we will also consider the unique contours of its texts against the larger backdrop of Hollywood’s representation of African Americans. The course will begin with a survey of what Toni Morrison calls “the Africanist presence” in films produced, and chiefly consumed, by white Americans. We will look specifically at D.W. Griffith’s Birth of a Nation (1915), Douglas Sirk’s Imitation of Life (1959), and Stanley Kramer’s Guess Whose Coming to Dinner (1967), followed by Spike Lee’s Bamboozled (2000), a ferocious satire of white productions of blackness in American popular culture. We will then return to the origins of the African American cinematic tradition with Oscar Micheaux’s Within Our Gates (1920), and then fast-forward to the “Blaxploitation” films of the seventies, with Mario Van Peeble’s Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song (1971) and the white-produced Blacula (1972) serving as our primary example. We will then examine the shift towards urban realism in such films as Charles Burnett’s Killer of Sheep (1977), Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing (1989), and John Singleton’s Boyz n the Hood (1991), and conclude by looking at contemporary black cinema, including Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust (1991), Marc Levin’s and Saul Williams’ Slam (1998), Malcolm Lee’s Undercover Brother (2002), and Tyler Perry’s Daddy’s Little Girls (2007).

Texts: All the films listed above will be on reserve in the library, and a series of critical readings will be on electronic reserve, so you won’t actually have to buy anything for the class.

Requirements: Active participation in class, a passing quiz grade, one oral presentation, a five page essay, and a final research paper.

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ENGL 4/5130-01W: Eighteenth-Century British Literature, Dr. Aleksondra Hultquist
Literature and Culture of the Public Sphere
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 209

May be taken to satisfy the British Literature 1 (Major Area A1) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Habermas argues that the eighteenth century is the first time in the modern period in which we see an entity that could be called “the public” (what we understand now as “public opinion” or a “public image”). As the locus of this theory, eighteenth-century literature and culture have been the site of much debate about ideas of public and private representations and the usefulness (or not) of looking at the eighteenth-century in this way. In this course, we will begin with some short readings by Habermas himself, and then extend his definition to various genres of the period, with special emphasis on the cultural/history context of the Restoration and early-eighteenth century. We’ll be analyzing genres that clearly demonstrate ideas about “the public” and “the private”—periodicals, poetry, drama, and visual art. Selections will include works from John Dryden, Samuel Pepys, Aphra Behn, John Wilmot, earl of Rochester, Daniel Defoe, Joseph Addison and Richard Steele, Eliza Haywood, Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, William Hogarth, John Gay, Joshua Reynolds, and Frances Burney.

Texts: Norton Anthology of English Literature (Volume C—The Restoration and Eighteenth-Century); Evelina by Frances Burney; Moll Flanders by Daniel Defoe; Various readings on Docutek.

Requirements: Three 3-4 page papers, one 10-12 page paper, 2 presentations (one group, one individual).

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ENGL 4/5135-01W: British Romanticism, Dr. Lisa Crafton
MW 11:00am-12:15pm, Humanities 206

May be taken to satisfy the British Literature 2 (Major Area A2) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Romanticism/Revolution—the spirit of Romanticism is defined by the political/cultural revolutions of the time and the self-conscious break with inherited literary tradition. As Blake says, “I must Create a System or be Enslav’d by another Man’s.” Yet this revolutionary activism is accompanied by an equally strong passion for imaginative power: Shelley’s desire to escape into the "still cave of the witch Poesy," Coleridge’s hallucinogenic Kubla Khan, Keats’ magical poet/snake Lamia. We will explore a diverse selection of Romantic texts—from imaginative visions to graphic renditions of history—with special attention to the genre of gothic, from Coleridge’s skeleton ship to Shelley’s monstrous bodies to Austen’s manipulation of gothic to suit her gender satire. In all, we will explore Romantic contexts with regard to political, cultural, sexual, and spiritual liberation and the equally subversive Romantic imagination.

Texts: British Literature 1780-1830, Frankenstein, Northanger Abbey, and readings on electronic reserve.

Requirements: Class discussion, 2 response essays, research paper, midterm, take-home final.

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ENGL 4/5140-01W: American Romanticism, Dr. Patrick Erben
Radical Romanticisms
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Humanities 206

May be taken to satisfy the American Literature 1 (Major Area B1) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Dickinson—if a list of these 19 th-century American authors makes you yawn, this course will help you wake up to the fresh and radical ideas of a generation of writers who tried to rouse their contemporaries from the dusty remains of Puritanism, the complacent acceptance of slavery, the mindless imitation of European literature and culture, the smug belief in the exceptionalism of American liberty, the debasing of human sexuality as filth, and—above all—the inability to think independently. Women writers such as Margaret Fuller and Fanny Fern as well as escaped slaves such as Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, moreover, fueled the spirit of discontent and radical change from the “margins.” In this course, we will study how the new art forms, philosophies, and social movements emerging from this period affected 19 th century America, but we will also explore how they have influenced writers and activists across the ages. When Thoreau famously postulated “Let your life be a counter-friction to stop the machine,” he also inspired activists from Mahatma Gandhi to Martin Luther King. So, this spring, come along and take a dip in the cool waters of “Walden Pond.”

Texts: Norton Anthology of American Literature, 7 th ed., vol. B (1820-1865).

Requirements: Lively participation, regular quizzes, one oral presentation, one short paper, one research paper, exploring how American Romanticism reverberates in 20 th-century and present-day culture.

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ENGL 4/5180-01W: Studies in Regional Literature, Dr. Debra MacComb
The West
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 209

May be taken to satisfy the American Literature 2 (Major Area B2) requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:

“I see now that this has been a story of the West, after all—Tom and Gatsby, Daisy and Jordan and I, were all Westerners . . .”

F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

Taken in light of Frederick Jackson Turner’s assessment that the West’s “significance” lay in its capacity to arouse utopian expectations, Nick Caraway’s rather opaque conclusion about his Long Island summer makes more sense: indeed, perhaps more than any other regional literature, that of the American West exists as a mental rather than geographical territory. That is, while the values associated with “the” West—limitless possibility, natural justice, vast wealth, Adamic renewal—have remained constant, the physical space denoted has shifted—well, west—from the Atlantic settlements of the seventeenth century across the North American continent and beyond in the twentieth. This course will focus on works shaped by the idea of the West, from narratives of captivity, exploration, settlement and enterprise in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to those which, in the twentieth century, redefine, subvert or parody the dominant themes and conventions of the genre.

Texts: Possible texts include Cather, The Professor’s House; Kirkland, A New Home: Who’ll Follow?; Grey, Riders of the Purple Sage; Twain, Roughing It; Wister, The Virginian; Jackson, Ramona; Didion, Play it as it Lays; narratives of exploration, settlement, captivity.

Requirements: Active, informed and regular participation in class discussion; two brief (2-3 page)response papers; weekly reading questions; midterm and/or final exam; research prospectus and documented essay (8-10 pages).

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English 4/5180-02W: Studies in Regional Literature, Dr. Maria Doyle
Modern Ireland
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 206

May be taken to satisfy the British Literature 2 (Major Area A2) requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Before U2, Riverdance and the Savannah Saint Patrick's Day Parade, the hero Cuchulain single-handedly defended the entire province of Ulster against an army for seven days and mad Sweeney leaped from tree to tree singing. Mythic figures such as these have done a great deal to inform the development of Irish writing in the twentieth century, and this course will examine how Irish writers have drawn upon these and other conceptions of "traditional" Irishness to create an image of a modern Ireland that could free itself from British colonial domination. From a young man who becomes a hero by claiming to have killed his father (The Playboy of the Western World) to a group of young Dubliners who want to sing like James Brown (The Commitments), course texts will explore the variety of forces, both internal and external, that have contributed to shaping a sense of Irish national identity in the last century. Class discussions will introduce students to major events in modern Irish history – the early twentieth century independence movement, the Northern "Troubles", the emergence of the newly robust Celtic Tiger – and will situate major writers like W.B. Yeats, James Joyce and Seamus Heaney within an Irish tradition while also exploring how they see themselves negotiating between Ireland and broader movements within British, and more recently American, literature and culture.

Texts will include Augusta Gregory's translation of the Cuchulain cycle, W.B. Yeats's poems and plays, James Joyce's Dubliners, John Millington Synge's The Playboy of the Western World, Seamus Heaney's Sweeney Astray and selected poems, Brian Friel's Translations, Marina Carr's By the Bog of Cats…, Roddy Doyle's The Commitments and the films Bloody Sunday (dir. Paul Greengrass, 2002) and Once (dir. John Carney, 2006).

Requirements: Periodic quizzes and on-going reading questions/responses, final research project, final exam. Graduate students will complete additional secondary reading and a longer research project including a substantial annotated bibliography.

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ENGL 4/5188-02W: Individual Authors, Dr. David Newton
Edgar Allan Poe
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, TLC 1116

May be taken to satisfy the American Literature 1 (Major Area B1) requirement. Fulfills the Individual Authors requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Much like the haunted landscapes and figures found in his poems and tales, Edgar Allan Poe lurks at the margins of the American literary imagination. While critical debates about the literary value of his poems and stories persist, many writers—both European and American—have publicly acknowledged Poe as a seminal literary and theoretical influence. Along with his innovative contributions to poetic theory, to the short story, and to the gothic, Poe is an early contributor to many important contemporary fields of genre fiction, such as detective fiction, horror, science fiction and fantasy. Poe's influence also extends to literary theory; for example, his short story, “The Purloined Letter,” has been the focus of theoretical readings by Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, and others. However, Poe is one of the few American writers whose significant extends beyond the academy and into popular culture. References to Poe or adaptations of his stories frequently appear on television in crime, detective, and science-fiction shows. Dramatic readings and parodies of his works are popular fare at Halloween and have even been featured on The Simpsons. Sports teams, restaurants, beer, and even professional wrestlers bear names that reflect his continuing influence.

In this course, we will trace the development of Poe’s career as a writer, primarily through a series of critical readings of his poems and prose works. We will also read Poe’s most important works on poetic and literary composition, as well as his reviews of other writers, to gain a better appreciation for his contributions as a literary critic and as an editor of several important nineteenth-century magazines and journals. While we will situate Poe within the historical context of the nineteenth century, we will also explore how and why Poe’s influence extends to contemporary literary and popular culture, especially to such popular genres as science fiction, mystery and detection, and horror. Since so many of Poe’s literary works have been read through highly inaccurate biographical and psychological interpretations of his life, we also will read—along with his poems and stories—a recent critical biography of Poe that provides a more accurate appraisal of the relationship between his life and works.

Texts: Poe, Selected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe. (Norton Critical Edition, 2004);

Hutchisson, Poe (University of Mississippi Press, 2005);

We will also read some contemporary genre fiction and/or view some science fiction and horror films to analyze Poe’s continuing influence on American culture.

Requirements: For undergraduates, active participation in class discussions, daily reading quizzes, several short response papers, 2 critical essays (one on a poem and one on a prose work), in-class presentations, and research paper (8 pages). For graduate students, all of the requirements listed above as well as an annotated bibliography (10 sources), and a more extensive 12 page research paper. WAC Requirement: This is writing intensive course. By successfully completing this course, you can receive WAC (Writing Across the Curriculum) credit toward graduation. The goals of WAC are to encourage students to use writing as a way to learn, to show students how to write effectively in their disciplines and to improve students' writing skills. All students majoring in disciplines in the School of Arts and Sciences are required to satisfy the WAC requirements for WAC to graduate: These requirements include at least two 3000/4000 level W courses for a total of 6 hours with at least 3 of these hours in the major. Additional WAC certification is also available. See the current undergraduate catalog for details.

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ENGL 4/5188-03W: Individual Authors, Dr. Meg Pearson
John Milton
TR 2:00pm-3:15 pm, Humanities 209

May be taken to satisfy the British Literature 1 (Major Area A1) requirement. Fulfills the Individual Authors requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: For future teachers, poets, and scholars, a course focusing on John Milton offers tangible benefits. Participants in this class will become more comfortable with one of the major English writers before entering the classroom. As a poet, Milton has few peers and no superior. He added more new words to the English language than Shakespeare!

Milton is one of the few authors to have had the delicious audacity to "justify the ways of God to man." He was a brilliant and rebellious poet and a political firebrand who argued in the seventeenth century for no-contest divorce, for regicide, and for freedom for publication. Even the canonical masterpieces of his late career are risky business. Works like Paradise Lost, composed after Milton had lost his sight and was compelled to recite his poems from memory to his daughters, offer complex and even sympathetic portrayals of Biblical villains like Satan and Delilah. Let's wish Milton a happy 400 th birthday by doing just what he would have wanted: reading closely, thinking carefully, and questioning freely.

Texts to include: Comus, Paradise Lost, Paradise Regain’d, Samson Agonistes, Areopagitica

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 4/5210-01W: Advanced Creative Writing, Dr. Emily Hipchen
Creative Nonfiction (Life Writing)
MW 9:30am-10:45am, Pafford 309

Prerequisite: ENGL 3200. May be taken to satisfy the Writing and Language (Major Area C) requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Come get a life. On paper.

This class is structured in workshops that begin in week two, and alternate with assigned readings from Norma Cantu, Joan Didion, David Eggers, Jack Kerouac, Karen McElmurray, David Sedaris, Lorna Sage, Lauren Slater, William Styron, Hunter Thompson, Tookie Williams, among others. Requirements and assignments include weekly journals, mandatory outside-of-class writing group meetings, workshop pieces and responses, and a final portfolio with critical preface.

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ENGL 4286-01: Teaching Internship, Dr. Rebecca Harrison
Mondays 5:30pm-7:00pm, TLC 1110

Registration requires permission. Contact Dr. Insenga (ainsenga@westga.edu) for permission. Pre-requisites for registration: admission to the Teacher Education Program, application at the Field Experience Office, and a conference with an English Education advisor.

Description: The internship for secondary education certification primarily involves teaching English for one semester in a public school under the supervision of an experienced, qualified English teacher. Weekly seminars conducted by experienced English faculty are an integral part of the student teaching experience and will model and provide interns with numerous and varied opportunities to plan, deliver, evaluate, and revise educational strategies. Such a learning environment, based on developing best practices through sound pedagogical modeling, will serve as part of an ongoing and comprehensive portfolio assessment process. Students will assemble capstone portfolios of their personal and professional work as evidence of their advancement.

Texts: TBA

Requirements: Six mandatory field observations, including lesson plans with standards. A polished, final portfolio containing necessary professional artifacts such as a resume, teaching philosophy, effect on instruction, portfolio introduction, case study responses, and the observation & response block. Active seminar participation is a must.

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ENGL 4/5300-01 Studies in the English Language, Dr. David W. Newton
English Grammar
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, Pafford 307

May be taken to satisfy the Writing and Language (Major Area C) requirement. Required for certification in Secondary English Education. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Description: In this course, we will explore the structure or grammar of the English language and work toward understanding the principles or rules that make it work. This course is primarily designed for English majors who seek to improve the grammatical proficiency of their writing and for future teachers at the secondary and college level. However, this course also has applications for students entering business and industry, science and medical fields, law and politics, media and public relations, or anyone who recognizes the essential human value of language and who understands how the ability to use language contributes to personal and professional success in life. After all, when you are talking to friends, asking someone out on a date, debating sports or politics, buying clothes at the mall, or writing a paper, you are using the structures and principles of English grammar, even when your sentences are not grammatical! However, knowing a language and knowing about the language are different kinds of knowledge. Even the ability to speak grammatically correct sentences in no way guarantees that a speaker knows enough about English to explain what makes those sentences grammatical. This course is designed to help you achieve that knowledge. We will refer frequently to Standard English, and, certainly, one of the benefits of this course is that it will help you refine your written and verbal language skills. However, this is not simply a course about grammatical correctness; instead, this course is designed to help you understand how the English language functions, what structures and rules are behind the sentence constructions that you and others create every day. To accomplish this task, we will learn some basic linguistic and grammatical concepts, and we will learn how to analyze (and diagram) different sentence constructions. We will also learn how elements of the language (verbs, nouns, sentence structure, pronouns, etc.) emerged and changed over time to create the language we use today.

Texts: Vitto, Cindy. Grammar by Diagram: Understanding English Grammar through Traditional Sentence Diagraming. 2 nd Edition. Broadview Press, 2006. The workbook that accompanies this edition is also required.

Requirements: Reading assignments, homework and workbook exercises, class presentations and exercises, and four major examinations.

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ENGL 4384-01W: Senior Seminar, Dr. Debra MacComb
Marriage and the Form of Fiction
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, Pafford 309

Registration requires permission of Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu). Required for all English majors. Cannot be taken until ENGL 1101, 1102, and core area F have been completed with a minimum passing grade of C. A minimum of 18 hours of upper-level English courses must also have been completed with no grade lower than C. Not offered during summer session. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Because marriage is so central to both private and public life, it has served as a mainstay of literary representation, both as a thematic concern and as an organizing device. As Tony Tanner has observed, “marriage is the all-subsuming, the all containing contract. It is the structure that maintains the Structure,” of both society and literary expression. Joseph Allen Boone similarly notes the intersection of social and literary matters, arguing that the representation of romantic marriage serves as “the ultimate signifier of personal and social well-being,” while the stabilizing formal structures of linearity and closure which characterize such plots encode and reinforce the cultural ideal. Students in this seminar will examine the ways in which marriage—both as a social institution and as a structuring device—is represented in a range of literary texts, posing questions about the ways that such representations operate to reinforce, modify or subvert cultural ideals expressed in/by marriage: the equation of stability with permanence, the efficacy of hierarchical order and centralized power, the necessary separation of public and private spheres, and the polarization of gender roles.

Texts: Austen, Pride and Prejudice; James, The Portrait of a Lady; Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; other literary, critical and theoretical texts available online or on library reserve.

Requirements: Active, informed and regular participation in seminar discussion, including leading seminar discussion on a critical or theoretical reading assignment; three short (2-3 page) response papers; a research prospectus; a documented essay for the seminar anthology; contribution to the editorial board’s work, including peer review and editing.

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ENGL 4384-02W: Senior Seminar, Dr. Micheal Crafton
Cross-Dressing Media: Literature into Film and Film into New Media
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, TLC 1204

Registration requires permission of Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu). Required for all English majors. Cannot be taken until ENGL 1101, 1102, and core area F have been completed with a minimum passing grade of C. A minimum of 18 hours of upper-level English courses must also have been completed with no grade lower than C. Not offered during summer session. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This capstone course, a culmination of study in the English major, allows students to examine a critical/theoretical issue within the discipline and use their coursework and literary interests to choose a research project which will become part of a published anthology of essays from the class. This semester we will use the concept of “remediation” as our organizing conceit. Remediation is the name given the phenomenon of one media trying to improve upon another medium and then results therefore. What happens to a novel when it becomes a film? Or when a film becomes a play into a film or a film into a play, as is happening recently? How does the computer and hypermedia affect these transformations? What can we say about computer or video games that seem to remediate a movie or book? I will focus the first half of the semester on remediations of the King Arthur legend.

Texts: Jay Bolter and Richard Grusin, Remediation: Understanding New Media. MIT Press, 2000. ISBN-10: 0262522799; Mike Ashley, ed. The Mammoth Book of King Arthur: Reality and Legend, the Beginning and the End--The Most Complete Arthurian Sourcebook Ever (Paperback). Running Press, 2005. ISBN-10: 0786715669; T. H. White, The Once and Future King (Paperback). New York: Ace Trade, 1996. ISBN-10: 0441003834; Chretien de Troyes, Lancelot: The Knight of the Cart (Paperback), Burton Raffel, Trans. Yale University Press, 1997. ISBN-10: 0300071213; Anonymous, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Chaucer, Wife of Bath’s Tale.

Requirements: Class discussion, individual and group oral reports, two response essays, substantive research project, including prospectus, abstract, and annotated bibliography.

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ENGL 6000-level

ENGL 6110-01: Seminar in American Literature I, Dr. Randy Hendricks
Herman Melville: Then and Now
W 5:30pm-8:00pm PM, TLC 2237

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description:

“Mr. Typee is interesting in his aspect—quite. . . . I am not sure that I do not think him a very great man.” Sophia Hawthorne on Herman Melville, 1849

“But I was talking about the “Whale.’ As the fishermen say, ‘he’s in his flurry’ when I left him some three weeks ago. I’m going to take him by his jaw, however, before long, and finish him up in some fashion or other. What’s the use of elaborating what, in its very essence, is so short-lived as a modern book? Though I wrote the Gospels in this century, I should die in the gutter.” Melville to Nathaniel Hawthorne, while composing Moby-Dick, 1851

“Herman Melville Crazy” title of New York Day Book review of Melville’s Pierre, or the Ambiguities, 1852

“Melville, as he always does, began to reason of Providence and futurity, and of everything that lies beyond human ken, and informed me that he had 'pretty much made up his mind to be annihilated' -- that is, that there is no afterlife -- but still he does not seem to rest in that anticipation. . . . He can neither believe, nor be comfortable in his disbelief; and he is too honest and courageous not to try to do one or the other.” Nathaniel Hawthorne, 1856

" Herman has taken to writing poetry. You need not tell anyone, for you know how such things get around." Elizabeth Shaw Melville to her mother, 1859

"There has died and been buried in this city…a man who is so little known, even by name, to the generation now in the vigor of life that only one newspaper contained an obituary account of him, and this was but of three or four lines." New York Times, on Melville’s death in 1891.

“A mystic who hated mysticism.” Robert Penn Warren on Melville, 1967

In this seminar we will trace Melville’s career from travel/adventure writer to philosophical novelist to master of the magazine short story (“Bartleby, the Scrivener,” “Benito Cereno”) to poet and back again to fiction (Billy Budd). We will consider the extent to which his metaphysical flights and unusual literary forms strained his relations with an initially enthusiastic reading public in his own time and served as the basis for the restoration of his reputation for readers with modernist critical values in the twentieth century. And we will spend a good deal of time examining what might be described as a critical scramble for Melville during the past thirty years or so. Complaints in his own time and ours that Melville taxes his readers too hard will initiate for us an investigation of the extent to which his unusual forms were his comment on his times and a consideration of the role that not only a writer’s but a reader’s milieu plays in determining an author’s value and relevance. Immersion in Melville criticism will coincide with close scrutiny of primary texts as students generate discussion through their own writings.

Texts: Paperback editions of Typee, White Jacket, Moby-Dick, Pierre, The Confidence Man, The Piazza Tales, Selected Poems, and Billy Budd.

Requirements: Biweekly presentation of discussion points or questions, a research paper (15 pages) grounded in Melville criticism; critiques of papers by fellow seminar members.

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ENGL 6115-01 Seminar in British Literature II, Dr. Lisa Crafton
M 5:30pm-8:00pm, TLC 1204

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description: The Romantic era in England is bounded by revolutions—American, French, and Industrial—and has a critical legacy of revolutionary subversion of political, cultural, aesthetic, and sexual tyranny. From Blake’s “I must Create a System or be Enslav’d by another Man’s” to Wollstonecraft’s “Marriage had Bastilled me for life,” many Romantic writers stage their positions in theatrical poses, all the while claiming a kind of authenticity of emotion (Wordsworth’s ‘spontaneous overflow of powerful feeling”). Recent theory on Romantic theatricality/spectacle will frame our discussions of the ways in which these writers 1) propose ideas of selfhood, 2) engage in political and cultural critique through metaphors of theatricality and staging; and 3) represent gender roles as especially theatricalized. Is it possible to reinvent a notion of an “authentic self” out of metaphors of the theater? Is staging a self a coercive or a liberatory act? Austen will provide us a test case of these notions in both her parody of gothic and her self-conscious representation of theater. We will use Romantic poetry, nonfiction and film excerpts from contemporary adaptations in our explorations of these topics.

Texts: Blake, Selected Poems; Wordsworth, Lyrical Ballads, Wollstonecraft Maria, or the Wrongs of Woman; Mary Shelley Frankenstein; Austen, Northanger Abbey, Mansfield Park; Online selections: Coleridge and critical excerpts from Pascoe, Romantic Theatricality; Burroughs, Closet Stages, Craft-Fairchild, Masquerade and Gender

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ENGL 6385-01: Seminar in Special Topics, Dr. Alison Umminger
Studies in Genre—Noir and its Social Context: Lessons Learned on the Dark Side of the Street
T 5:30pm-8:00pm, TLC 1204

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description: Noir is both a literary and cinematic style that dominated the artistic landscape in the 30s and 40s, as well as a malleable and insightful lens for social criticism – used to illuminate the dark side of class, sexuality, gender, and race. We will examine its ongoing use as a style of expression to cast light on “truths” of society which lie beneath the stark prose and lingering shadows. This class will move from classic film and literary noir – through the sociopathic, the homoerotic, the twistedly feminine, the racially ambiguous, the Hollywood-gone-wrong, the perils of childhood, all the way through the posthuman permutations of noir found in Blade Runner and The Fortunate Fall. Each week will pair a literary text with a film in order to illumine both critical and stylistic issues featured in the work. Students should come away with a better understanding of largely American, but also international uses of the genre and its importance as a twentieth, and twenty-first century art form. We will use James Narremore’s critical work on Noir, as well as a pair of anthologies for supplemental critical materials.

Texts: Double Indemnity, The Maltese Falcon, In a Lonely Place, The Talented Mr. Ripley, Day of the Locust, Passing, If He Hollers Let Him Go, Confidential Agent, The Bad Seed, The Fortunate Fall, Fight Club, and Out as well as a critical anthology.

Films: Double Indemnity, Out of the Past, Mildred Pierce, Strangers on a Train, Mulholland Drive, Devil in a Blue Dress, Native Son, The Third Man, Night of the Hunter, Blade Runner, Gilda, and The Last Seduction.

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