in this issue

1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9

News & Events

English Expo a Success

Eclectic Release Party

Undergrad Conference

Bridging Distances, One Classroom at a Time

Toto Pulls Curtain on Hipchen

People News

Prof. Reinhard Retiring

In Memoriam: Dr. James W. Mathews

Paul Guest Wins Whiting

English Graduate Chooses a Masters Program

National Magazine Publishes Larrew

Kendra Parker Accepted for Ph.D. Program

Student Poets Garner National Acclaim

Students Share Their Conference Experiences

Student Work Accepted at National Conference

Hultquist Joins Faculty

In Every Issue

Job Spotlight on Amy Lavender

Cheers

Course Descriptions

Summer 2008

Fall 2008

 

 

Fall 2008 Courses


NOTE: Courses are subject to change depending on enrollment and faculty teaching assignments. Please check BANWEB for more current information on the availability of all courses.

English 1101 and 1102 are prerequisites for all courses from ENGL 2110 through 4386.

A “W” designation after a section number of a 3000- or 4000-level course signifies that the course is a Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) course. WAC accepts as a guiding principle the idea that writing is a valuable tool for learning and communication. Therefore, the components of a course so designated are designed to help you learn the material and communicate what you have learned. Students are required to take two “W” courses for the undergraduate degree.


  XIDS ENGL 4000-level
  XIDS 2100: Arts and Ideas ENGL 4/5106: Studies in Genre
 

ENGL 4/5108: Studies in the Novel
  FILM ENGL 4/5109: Film as Literature
  FILM 2080 ENGL 4/5125: Colonial & Early American Lit
  FILM 2100 ENGL 4/5145: Victorian Literature
    ENGL 4/5170: African-American Literature
  ENGL 2000-level ENGL 4/5188: Individual Authors
  ENGL 2050: Self Staging ENGL 4/5210: Advanced Creative Writing
  ENGL 2060: The Creative Voice ENGL 4238: Methods for Teaching Secondary ENGL
  ENGL 2110: World Literature ENGL 4286: Teaching Internship
  ENGL2120: British Literature ENGL 4295: Reading & Lit in Sec. Ed Classrooms
  ENGL 2130: American Literature ENGL 4/5300: Studies in the English Language
  ENGL 2180: Studies in African-American Literature ENGL 4384: Senior Seminar
  ENGL 2190: Studies in Lit by Women ENGL 4/5385: Special Topics
  ENGL 2300: Practical Criticism
 

ENGL 6000-level
  ENGL 3000-level ENGL 6105: Seminar in British Literature I
  ENGL 3200: Intermediate Creative Writing ENGL 6120: Seminar in American Literature II
  ENGL 3405: Professional and Technical Writing ENGL 6385: Seminar in Special Topics

XIDS


XIDS 2100

 

XIDS 2100-01: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Jason Kesler
The Creative Process
MWF 10:00am-10:50am, Pafford 307

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: thedefinite article1 a — used as a function word to indicate that a following noun or noun equivalent is definite or has been previously specified by context or by circumstance b — used as a function word to indicate that a following noun or noun equivalent is a unique or a particular member of its class c — used as a function word before nouns that designate natural phenomena or points of the compass d — used as a function word before a noun denoting time to indicate reference to what is present or immediate or is under consideration [. . .]

creativeadj1 : marked by the ability or power to create : given to creating 2 : having the quality of something created rather than imitated : IMAGINATIVE 3 : managed so as to get around legal or conventional limits ; also : deceptively arranged so as to conceal or defraud

processn1 a : PROGRESS, ADVANCE b : something going on : PROCEEDING 2 a (1) : a natural phenomenon marked by gradual changes that lead toward a particular result (2) : a natural continuing activity or function b : a series of actions or operations conducing to an end; esp : a continuous operation or treatment esp. in manufacture

(definitions taken from Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Based upon the above definitions, a multitude of questions arise. Is there a definitive set of activities one can perform to produce a new object that has never existed before? Is creativity a natural function of all human beings, or is it conferred upon a fortunate (or unfortunate) few by some supernatural being? Is there a destructive aspect to the creative process? Is there even such a thing as creativity, or are we simply denying that we are imitating what we experience and rearranging an ever increasing collection of influences? By studying notable scientists, artists, religious and secular texts . . . and yes, even by studying ourselves, we will confront these questions and others to come to a better understanding of the creative process – what it is, where it comes from, who is responsible for it, why it is so vital to our existence, and how it can be used, misused and abused. Students will be responsible for reading and responding to various texts, as well as evaluating their own experiences with the creative process. In addition, students will critique, in a constructive and responsible manner, the creative processes of their classmates.

Texts: Ghiselin, Brewster ed. The Creative Process:Reflections on Invention in the Arts and Sciences. Csikszentmihalyi, Mihalyi. Creativity: Flow and the Creative Process.

Requirements: Students will be required to keep a journal recording their reactions to the course readings, group workshops, and their personal creative processes; present on the creative process of an artist of their own choosing; take a midterm; and submit a final creative project accompanied by critical essay.

XIDS 2100-03: Arts and Ideas, STAFF
The Creative Process
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Pafford 307

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

XIDS 2100-05: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Josh Grant
Modernism: Modern Love
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, Pafford 109

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: Many words in the Modern Era carry a lot of baggage with them from previous cultures, and the word love has, perhaps, hauled more baggage into the twentieth and twenty-first centuries than any other word. In fact, love has come to have such a variety of meanings to so many different people that it is almost impossible for people who are participating in a conversation about it to know if they are actually talking about the same thing. Because of all these different meanings, all of this extra baggage, the word love is in danger of being relegated to modern vernacular's "unclaimed baggage" department. In this course on modern love, we will undertake the sometimes tedious and not always glamorous job of checking love’s baggage at the gate in order to see if it can still fly with the weight of all of its history on board.

We will examine how individuals and whole societies have constantly redefined the concept of love in the West, tracing its metamorphic journey from the Classical Period through the Middle Ages and into the Modern Era. In other words, throughout the semester, we will unpack the various ideas associated with this loaded word in order to discover some of the underlying motivations that led various cultures to alter the way they viewed or reacted to this particular emotion. We will, moreover, examine each little artifact of love from the past in relation to its place in our own culture, exploring questions such as “Who do we allow to be the more definitive voices on the subject, and from whose voices are they borrowing? Plato? Augustine? Ovid? Troubadour poets? Capellanus? Shakespeare? Casanova? Stendhal? Schopenhauer? Proust? Freud? Biologists? The Beatles? EHarmony? Reality television? Ourselves?” In other words, we will work to identify the roles these earlier theories of amore play in the contemporary wardrobe that we call love.

Texts: Love: Emotion, Myth, & Metaphor (Robert C. Solomon); The Symposium (Plato); A Natural History of Love (Diane Ackerman); a selection of works that will be on reserve in the library.

Requirements: Weekly listserv postings, five cultural events, two response papers, a creative project, a midterm, and a final exam.

XIDS 2100-07: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Stephanie Hollenbeck
The Monstrous and the Grotesque
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, Pafford 308

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

XIDS 2100-08: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Melanie Jordan
The Monstrous and the Grotesque
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Pafford 105

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

XIDS 2100-09: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Mandi Campbell
The Monstrous and the Grotesque
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 209

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: In this class, we will consider how cultural, social, political and religious influences work to construct humankind’s collective fears. As we study an array of gothic novels and contemporary horror films, we will come to understand that the “monsters” in these texts are personifications of common fears and that the stories themselves are hyperbolized versions of decidedly less grotesque, though debatably less frightening, realistic situations.

Texts: Darryl Jones, Horror: A Thematic History in Fiction and Film and Mary Shelley, Bram Stoker and Robert Louis Stevenson, Frankenstein, Dracula, and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (published as a single volume). You also will be required to watch an array of contemporary horror films. (Films TBA.)

Requirements: TBA

XIDS 2100-10: Arts and Ideas, STAFF
Myth and Religion
MWF 10:00am-10:50am, Pafford 109

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

XIDS 2100-11: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Lisa Propst
Jewish Literature and Culture
MWF 9:00am-9:50am, Humanities 209

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: This course explores the interrelationships among Jewish American history, fiction, film, painting, and photography. It considers how the experiences of Jewish artists and writers have shaped their works and how these art works, in turn, have contributed to diverse conceptions of Jewish American identity. The course moves from Eastern European legacies to experiences of immigration, acculturation, and self-invention. Within this context, our readings and discussions will focus on people’s abilities to create alternative realities through acts of imagination -- redefining themselves, rewriting their lives, and producing new histories for their loved ones and rivals. These acts of invention can be survival strategies, both literal and psychological: means of escaping danger through trickery or of finding hope under bleak conditions. These fantasies can also be destructive, enabling people to ignore the demands of the world around them or to manipulate others.

Texts (May be subject to change): Saul Bellow, Seize the Day; Cynthia Ozick, The Puttermesser Papers; Philip Roth, American Pastoral ; Jonathan Safran Foer, Everything is Illuminated; Electronic reserves, art and photography slides, and 2-3 films.

Requirements: One 4-5 page textual analysis essay; Two exams (midterm and final); Group creative project with related individual reflection; Attendance at 5 cultural events and written reflections; In-class writing and short homework assignments; Class participation.

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FILM

FILM 2080
 

ENGL 2080-01: Introduction to the Art of Film, Prof. Stacey Morin
MWF 9:00am-9:50am, Pafford 307

Required for Film Studies minor.

Description: In this course students will consider the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. Students will watch a wide range of films from a variety of historical moments in film history. Students will have the chance to explore issues such as framing, photographic space, film shot, editing, sound, genre, narrative form, acting style, and lighting in the context of wider discussions of the weekly films. This is an introductory course, and assumes no prior knowledge of film. Students will be evaluated primarily on the basis of a shot-by-shot analysis, segmentation analysis, individual and group projects and two exams.

Texts: Corrigan, Timothy and Patricia White. The Film Experience: An Introduction.

Requirements: Quizzes, a shot-by-shot analysis, segmentation analysis, individual and group projects, and two exams.

ENGL 2080-02: Introduction to the Art of Film, Prof. Stacey Morin
MWF 11:00am-11:50am, Pafford 307

Required for Film Studies minor.

Description: In this course students will consider the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. Students will watch a wide range of films from a variety of historical moments in film history. Students will have the chance to explore issues such as framing, photographic space, film shot, editing, sound, genre, narrative form, acting style, and lighting in the context of wider discussions of the weekly films. This is an introductory course, and assumes no prior knowledge of film. Students will be evaluated primarily on the basis of a shot-by-shot analysis, segmentation analysis, individual and group projects and two exams.

Texts: Corrigan, Timothy and Patricia White. The Film Experience: An Introduction.

Requirements: Quizzes, a shot-by-shot analysis, segmentation analysis, individual and group projects, and two exams.

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FILM 2100
 

FILM 2100-01 History and Theory of Film, Prof. Barbara Brickman
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, TLC 1200

Required for Film Studies minor.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

FILM 2100-02 History and Theory of Film, Prof. Barbara Brickman
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, TLC 1200

Required for Film Studies minor.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 2000-level

ENGL 2050
 

ENGL 2050: Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life
Section 01 (Prof. Lori Lipoma): MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Pafford 307
Section 02 (Prof. Maren Henry): MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 209
Section 05 (Prof. John Sturgis): TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, Pafford 105
Section 06 (Prof. John Sturgis): TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Pafford 308

May count for credit in Core Area B1. Same as THEA 2050.

Description: Effective communicators are more productive, have enhanced career opportunities, enjoy more fulfilling relationships, earn more respect, and have more fun! The good news is that you already have the tools you need to become a great communicator; it’s just a matter of learning how to use them consciously and masterfully…in other words, learning how to “self-stage.”

In Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Everyday Life, we will study and practice practical communication skills—creativity, quick thinking, risk taking, lateral thinking, active listening, subtext mastery, self-awareness—and apply them to virtually every interaction you encounter outside the classroom: One-on-One Conversations, Public Presentation, Debate and Argumentation, Conflict Resolution and Confrontation Skills, Stress Management, Team Building, and Impression Management. By the end of the semester, students will have had first-hand experience in all of these areas, and, more importantly, will know exactly how to continue honing and perfecting those skills long after.

Requirements: formal solo presentations, group projects and presentations, panel discussions/debates, vocabulary-building exercises, role-playing and improvisation exercises, journaling, and, of course, active, informed participation in each class session.

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ENGL 2060
 

ENGL 2060-01: The Creative Voice, Prof. Brooke Parks
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, Pafford 208

Required for Creative Writing minor beginning Fall 2008.

Description: In this course we will immerse ourselves in the creative voices of a wide range of writers while we develop and explore our own creative voices. Some tools we might use as we stretch our voices: love letters to remote controls, childhood floor plans, “translations,” parodies, formal constraints, collage texts and altered books, exquisite corpse characters, untaken pictures, and more. We will also study the intersections of creativity and critical practice, become familiar with workshop methodologies (including the critiquing and communication skills they require), and gain an appreciation for and an understanding of the structures of public readings and recitations of creative and critical work. Come prepared to read, write, and stretch energetically and often.

Texts: The Poet’s Companion, by Kim Addonizo and Dorianne Lux; The Story and Its Writer Compact: An Introduction to Short Fiction (7 th Edition), by Ann Charters; two other texts to be discussed the first day of class; and additional readings made available electronically.

Requirements: Voicing Exercises (in-class and out-of-class); Short Essays; Workshop; Attendance at Literary Events; Recitations; and a Final Portfolio.

ENGL 2060-03: The Creative Voice, Prof. Katie Chaple
MW 5:30pm-6:45pm, Humanities 208

Required for Creative Writing minor beginning Fall 2008.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2060-04, The Creative Voice, Prof. Paul Guest
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 1112

Required for Creative Writing minor beginning Fall 2008.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 2110
 

ENGL 2110-01: World Literature, Prof. Lisa Propst
TR 7:00pm-8:15pm, Pafford 308

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: This course analyzes narratives about changing cultural identities and meetings between cultures. It addresses texts spanning four continents and more than 3000 years – from tales of mythic Greek journeys to Celtic legends to contemporary literature from Africa, Asia, and the Americas. These narratives chart what Salman Rushdie describes as “the transformation that comes of new and unexpected combinations of human beings, cultures, ideas, politics, movies, songs.” They trace people’s efforts to translate the customs of one society into the language and ideas of another. They ask how people’s identities change when they are separated from familiar places and mementoes. As the course unfolds, we will consider the place of these narratives in literary history and ask what it means to classify a group of texts as “world literature.”

Texts:William Shakespeare, The Tempest; Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea; Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart ; Electronic reserves including excerpts from Homer, Dante, the Old and New Testaments, medieval Celtic legends, and contemporary world writings;

Requirements: Two 5-6 page essays; two exams (midterm and final); in-class writing exercises, quizzes, peer editing, and short homework responses; class participation

ENGL 2110-25H: World Literature-Honors, Prof. Meg Pearson
Coming Home: The World's Odyssey
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, TLC 2237

Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: Many argue that we tell all our stories using just a few plots. Surely one of the most important archetypal tales involves returning home.

This section of World Literature takes as its focal point the Odyssey, an epic detailing the voyage home of a clever man. More specifically, it is a poem about survival: surviving war, surviving tests, surviving violence, and surviving the homecoming itself. Not surprisingly, the Odyssey is one of the most influential texts ever composed. It has been adapted, reworked, and reconsidered since its inception. This course will read the Odyssey in its entirety, and then examine international adaptations of this story, the character of Odysseus, and the poem's considerations of what "home" means. Every culture, even our own, must reckon with warfare and its aftermath, both on the battlefield and on the domestic front. Together, we will find out how the world comes home.

Texts to include: Homer, Odyssey; Magaret Atwood, The Penelopiad; Derek Walcott, The Odyssey: A Stage Version.

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 2120
 

ENGL 2120-01: British Literature, Prof. Bonnie Adams
MWF 9:00am-9:50am, Pafford 308

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2120-02: British Literature, STAFF
MW 5:30pm-6:45pm, Humanities 206

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2120-03: British Literature, Prof. Lisa Crafton
It’s Alive: Monsters and Others in British Literature
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm Humanities 206

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: In this course we will read selected British literature texts with an emphasis on the issue of the monstrous. What makes monsters? How do writers from specific cultural moments define the Other as monstrous or savage, and what does this reveal about their own sense of themselves? How does the Gothic as a genre represent psychological, sexual, and political monstrosities? While we will read significant texts of British literature from medieval to contemporary contexts, we will focus especially on film variations of the Frankenstein story, from the little known 1910 silent film to Young Frankenstein and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Finally, using music and current films, we will consider how art from different contexts represents this recurring figure of the monstrous.

Texts: Longman Anthology of British Literature, Frankenstein, Endgame

Requirements: Active class discussion, brief response essays, midterm and final.

ENGL 2120-25H: British Literature-Honors, Prof. Aleksondra Hultquist
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, TLC 2237

Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: The purpose of this course for you to be familiar with the major literary styles, movements, and authors of British literature from the Early Modern period (c. 1500-1800). Since discussions about the politics of canon formation in the 1980s and 1990s, the survey course has come to embody the challenges of what is considered “necessary” reading for every time period. This course offers not only “canonical” readings but also introduces you to the literatures that offer counter examples to the more traditional texts. We’ll also explore several facets of the cultural literary context of the time through short excursions in history, art, and music.

Texts: Longman Anthology of British Literature, third edition (Vols 1B and 1C); Jane Austen Mansfield Park (Penguin edition); Electronic Reserves: Behn The Rover; selections from The Spectator and The Female Spectator. Recommended Texts: A Pocket Style Manual, fifth edition by Diana Hacker; Writing About Literature: A Portable Guide by Janet E. Gardner.

Requirements: Three 2-3 analytical response papers, Midterm Exam, Final Paper and Presentation (7-10 pages).

ENGL 2120-26H: British Literature-Honors, Prof. Emily Hipchen
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, TLC 1204

Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 2130

 

ENGL 2130-01: American Literature, Prof. Gwen Davidson
MWF 10:00am-10:50am, Pafford 308

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2130-02: American Literature, Prof. Patrick M. Erben
MW 2:00-3:15pm, Paff 308

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: During the American Revolution, the French immigrant writer J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur wrote a series of fictional letters in which he famously asked “What then is the American, this new man?” Of course, the quest for a unique American identity occupied the country during its war for independence, yet this question has been a recurring theme throughout American literature and culture. In a time when “American values” are often hailed as unassailable truths and various forms of dissent or difference are branded—once again—as “un-American,” this survey of American literature tries to shed light on the complex history of this idea. By reading texts ranging from the colonial period to the present, we will use American literature as a tool to understand the contested nature of American identity and to question the use of “American” as a static and unchangeable quality.

Texts: Cabeza de Vaca, Relacíon; Benjamin Franklin, The Autobiography; Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Emily Dickinson, selected poetry; Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; August Wilson, Fences.

Requirements: Regular attendance, active participation, weekly reading quizzes, midterm and final exams, two response essays.

ENGL 2130-03: American Literature, Prof. Brandy L. James
TR 9:30am-10:45am, TLC 1116

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: On defining the creation of identity, American essayist, novelist, and playwright James Arthur Baldwin comments, “An identity would seem to be arrived at by the way in which the person faces and uses his experience.” Baldwin’s statement encompasses far-ranging ideas and introduces questions that have historically characterized American literature: How have Americans characterized their own identities at different points in time, and how have historical events, cultural phenomena, social environments, and personal experiences become meshed with and changed these identities? To what extent does the American landscape, either as a physical or symbolic space, attribute to this definition? Is the definition “American” even a valid identity? As we closely examine these questions by examining the various literary genres that span almost four centuries, we will focus on how language and writing has been used to construct and alter the meaning of “American identity.” In addition, we will also delve into the formation of identity from the perspectives of race, gender, and social class and examine how each has been used for this purpose.

Texts: Fitzgerald, F. Scott.  The Great Gatsby; Hawthorne, Nathaniel.  The Scarlet Letter; Baym, Nina, Ed. The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter Sixth Edition

Requirements: See Syllabus (http://www.westga.edu/~bjames)

ENGL 2130-25H American Literature-Honors, Prof. Josh Masters
American Literature, Backwards and Forwards
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 2237

Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description:This honors survey of American literature traces the development of such themes as nature, nationhood, law, gender, race, and identity in our national culture, from first contact to the present day. However, rather than marching across the centuries with the mission of conquering our nation’s literary history, we will “light out for the territories” in a somewhat unconventional fashion. The subtitle of the course, “American Literature, Backwards and Forwards,” is meant to suggest both the intertextual and the transhistorical nature of the class. The writers and texts we will examine speak to shared concerns that reach across American history, and we will imagine the writers engaged in a dialogue and exchanging ideas through their literary works. Section One of the course, “Inventing America,” will examine the idea of American nationhood, from its Puritanical origins to its postmodern reformulations, in the poetry and prose of William Bradford, Benjamin Franklin, Walt Whitman, Langston Hughes, and John Berryman. Section Two, “Americans in Chains,” will consider the legacy of slavery in the American imagination, featuring an eighteenth-century autobiography by Olaudah Equiano, a nineteenth-century short story by Herman Melville, an early twentieth-century epic poem by Jean Toomer, and a late twentieth century novel by Toni Morrison. Section Three, “The First American Other,” will explore the role Native Americans have played in shaping American history and literature, beginning with short works by Christopher Columbus, Bernal Diaz, and George Catlin, and culminating in a postmodern novel by the Laguna Pueblo writer Leslie Marmon Silko. Finally, in Section Four, “The Questing American,” we will consider the Romantic tradition of the American quest narrative—rooted in the need to flee from the America we have collectively invented. Edgar Allan Poe’s 1838 novel Arthur Gordon Pym, Russell Banks’s 1995 novel Rule of the Bone, and Sean Penn’s 2007 film Into the Wild all feature an American youth in search of an alternative American self

Texts (in order of appearance): Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano; Herman Melville, Benito Cereno; Jean Toomer, Cane; Toni Morrison, Sula; Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony; Edgar Allan Poe, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket; Russell Banks, Rule of the Bone; Sean Penn, Into the Wild (film on reserve); (Shorter works will be available on electronic reserve as PDFs.);

Requirements:Students will write several short papers, a medium length essay, and a research paper. In addition, students must earn a passing reading-quiz average, attend class without fail, and participate in round-table discussions.

ENGL 2130-26H: American Literature-Honors, Prof. David Newton
TR 9:30am-10:45am, TLC 2237

Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: This course will introduce you to some of the writers and literary works that have made significant contributions to the development of literature in America. The works we will read encompass a historical period that covers almost four centuries, beginning with the earliest years of European exploration and settlement of the Americas and concluding with the contemporary era. However, our investigation will push us well beyond a survey of these different literary works and toward a more sophisticated awareness of their textual, cultural, and historical interrelationships. Specifically, we will examine how American literature is related to the historical and cultural development of America as a nation. We will also explore how different writers have struggled to understand and attempted to define through their writing what America is and what it means to be an American. Consequently, our reading will be guided by a series of critical questions: How have Americans defined individual, cultural or national identity at different moments in our history as a nation? Does a national and/or individual identity that is uniquely "American" exist? What qualities or characteristics constitute individual and/or national identity? What roles do the historical past, personal experiences, and social environments or conditions play in defining who we are? To what extent has the American landscape as a geographic or symbolic space contributed to the formation of American identity? As we examine these questions, we will focus on the various ways that language—especially writing—has been used to shape or construct individual and national identity in America. As we will discover, language is an essential resource for defining others and ourselves. We will also explore the question of identity from the perspectives of race, gender, and social class and examine how such categories have been used in the formation of identity in America.

Texts: Some of the authors/works we will read include John Smith (True Relation); Anne Bradstreet, poems; Benjamin Franklin, The Autobiography (excerpts); DeCrevecoeur, Letters from an American Farmer (excerpts) Emerson, “Nature” (excerpts); Thoreau, Walden (excerpts); Douglas, Narrative of an American Slave; William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom!; Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Elizabeth Bishop, poems; Adrienne Rich, poems; Louise Erdrich, Love Medicine (excerpts); and Bobbie Ann Mason, In Country.

Requirements: Regular attendance and active and informed participation in class discussion, daily reading quizzes, class presentations, and four critical essays (minimum of four pages in length each).

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ENGL 2180

 

ENGL 2180-01: Studies in African-American Literature, STAFF
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 209

May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 2190

 

ENGL 2190-01: Studies in Literature by Women, Prof. Debra MacComb
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 207

May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: The overarching theme of the class will focus on a woman’s “place” – in the domestic and/or the public sphere; in the family; in the literary marketplace—as well as the strategies women authors have employed to create an aesthetic space to interrogate such categories. This course will include woman’s voices from Africa, New Zealand and the Caribbean as well as The United States and Britain; it will cover traditional genres (novels, stories, poems, essays, plays) as well as non-traditional ones (diaries, letters, speeches) from centuries past as well as the present.

Texts: Women’s Worlds, Warhol-Down, Price-Herndel, et al, eds.

Requirements: Active and informed participation in class and online discussions, an oral report on a work by an author not discussed in class, two short essays, a midterm and final exam.

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ENGL 2300

 

ENGL 2300-01: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Stacy Boyd
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 205

Registration requires permission. Email Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu) for permission. Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Description: Practical Criticism introduces students to the English major and critical approaches in literary studies, with particular attention to research and methodology. We will use short stories, essays, film, and poetry to hone our skills in interpretation, criticism, and analysis. In the process of becoming better writers and readers of texts, we will learn to utilize several critical lenses through which to view texts. These lenses will help to bring our own analysis into better focus.

Texts: Charles Bressler’s Literary Criticism: An Introduction to Theory and Practice and Joseph Gibaldi’s MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (6th edition). Other theoretical, critical and literary material will be made available electronically.

Requirements: Active participation; frequent writing exercises and quizzes; two short essays and one longer research essay

ENGL 2300-02: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Alison Umminger
MW 3:30pm-4:45, Humanities 205

Registration requires permission. Email Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu) for permission. Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2300-03: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Alison Umminger
MW 5:30pm-6:45, Humanities 205

Registration requires permission. Email Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu) for permission. Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2300-04: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Randy Hendricks
TR 9:30am-10:45 am, Humanities 205

Registration requires permission. Email Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu) for permission. Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Description: A prerequisite for upper-division work for the English major, this course is an introduction to a variety of critical approaches in literary study. In addition to instruction on literary research methods and tools, students will get plenty of practice reading and evaluating articles that examine literary works from different critical perspectives as well as writing about literature utilizing multiple reading strategies. We will use Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour” as a primary text for the first part of the semester. When we have examined this short story from a variety of approaches, we will deepen our study by turning to Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights, considering a variety of critical interpretations of the novel and using it as a subject for research papers.

Texts: Charles Bressler, Literary Criticism: An Introduction to Theory and Practice; Kate Chopin, “The Story of an Hour” (online); Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights (must have Bedford-St. Martin’s Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism edition).

Requirements: 3 short papers, a research paper, final exam.

ENGL 2300-05: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Mitzi McFarland
“Interpretation is not the art of construing but the art of constructing.”— Stanley Fish
‘The Art of Constru(ct)ing’: Practical Criticism and Research Methodology
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 208

Registration requires permission. Email Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu) for permission. Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Description: A prerequisite for upper-division English studies, this course introduces students to representative methods of critical analysis that inform contemporary literary and cultural studies. Whereas much of meaning depends on the sorts of questions we ask of a text, our readings—surveying a number of theoretical schools of thought—will immerse students in the sorts of questions that can be asked of a given work. Ultimately we will come to see the infinitely varied and complex ways that our questions are themselves shaped by culture, ideology, and normative discursive practices (what Professor Bruce Harvey calls “the scripts that script us”). By this, students will become more deft readers of literary texts and their contexts (theoretical and historical) as well as develop greater facility in analytical skills. Hopefully, through the process of articulation, we will deepen our understanding of the aesthetic, literary, psychological, and socio-historical facets out of which texts are both generated and interpreted.

In all our discussions we will give attention to questions raised by contemporary literary theory (Why read? What should we read? How should we read?). However our central focus on “practical criticism” will involve the application of various approaches and methodologies to the explication—that is, to the interpretation and understanding of particular texts. This course, then, is essentially a process course, where students can gain ample practice—through written and oral reports—in research methods, critical frameworks, and the close examination and analysis of texts.

Texts: Bressler, Charles. Literary Criticism: An Introduction to Theory and Practice. 4 th ed. Prentice-Hall, 2006. ISBN: 0131534483; Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 6 th ed. MLA, 2003. ISBN: 0873529863; Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street. Vintage, 1984. ISBN: 0-679-73477-5; Supplemental online readings – poems mainly– provided online; Highly recommended: Baldick, Chris. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms. Oxford UP, 2004. ISBN: 0198608837.

Requirements: 3 shorter analytical essays, a research paper (including proposal, required drafts, peer reviews, and an annotated bibliography), one oral presentation (film and critical theory discussion), final exam.

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ENGL 3000-level


ENGL 3200

 

ENGL 3200-01W: Intermediate Creative Writing, Prof. Randy Hendricks
Fiction
TR 12:30-1:45, TLC 1204

Prereq: ENGL 2060. May be taken to satisfy the Writing and Language (Major Area C) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Students in this course will have many opportunities to write and submit for critique various types of short fiction and learn to read as writers read--with an eye, ear, and blood pulse for the techniques and effects fiction writers bring to their work. Class meetings will consist of workshops with oral and written critiques of the work of other writers in the class and scrupulous analysis of texts from the anthology, supplemented by writing exercises based on models

Texts: Oates, Telling Stories: An Anthology for Writers

Requirements: A portfolio that contains 2 original revised stories (40% of final grade) and 6 formal critiques of stories by other students in the class (40% of final grade). Participation—measured by attendance, preparation for class, participation in discussion, meeting deadlines, and completion of assigned writing exercises, etc. (20% of final grade).

English 3200-02W: Intermediate Creative Writing, Prof. Gregory Fraser
Poetry
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 209

Prereq: ENGL 2060. May be taken to satisfy the Writing and Language (Major Area C) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Strong poetry grows from, converses with, and revises other strong poetry. With that in mind, we will read and discuss the work of established poets who write in a variety of styles, from a range of cultural and aesthetic backgrounds. In group workshop sessions, students will offer constructive comments to, and receive them from, their peers. We will foster an atmosphere of energetic dialogue designed to help students grow as writers and situate their poetic efforts within the wider universe of poems written in or translated into English.

Texts: Walsh, Under the Rock Umbrella: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry; Joseph, Imitation of Life

Requirements: Regular readings and exercises, weekly memorizations of poetry, oral and written contributions to workshop, and a final portfolio of polished writing, including a critical preface.

ENGL 3200-1HW: Intermediate Creative Writing-Honors, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell
Fiction
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, TLC 1204

Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register. Prereq: ENGL 2060. Honors course. May be taken to satisfy the Writing and Language (Major Area C) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This class will provide an intermediate level immersion in the writing of fiction, seeking a balance between the imagination and the discipline that are both essential to crafting good stories. Readings in short fiction will improve your familiarity with the contemporary literary landscape and encourage you to situate your own emerging voice among those of other writers. Workshops will allow you to benefit from intense discussions of your own work and that of other students. You will explore a variety of literary forms, techniques, and strategies and seek to adapt them effectively to your own work. We will emphasize revision; by the end of the semester you will have produced a polished portfolio of your best work along with a critical introduction.

Texts: Making Shapely Fiction , Jerome Stern, and a selection of contemporary short fiction.

Requirements: Active participation in workshops, frequent writing exercises, reading and writing journal, substantial portfolio of revised fiction.

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ENGL 3400

 

English 3400-01W: Pedagogy and Writing , Prof. Gregory Fraser
Blurring Borders: Current Approaches to Teaching Creative and Critical Writing
T 5:30pm-8:00 pm, Humanities 209

May be taken to satsisfy the Writing and Language (Major Area C) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course is designed to help students become well-rounded, flexible practitioners of language arts—thinkers who can simultaneously produce creative writing, persuasively interpret the creative works of established authors, and teach others how to perform these vital and interrelated activities. The readings, assignments, and workshops will strive to aid students in their enrichment as creative writers, critical analysts, and language-arts educators. Students will learn to move confidently in many creative and critical directions, and position themselves to pursue a wide range of career options including teaching, professional writing, and related endeavors. Students will also become conversant in contemporary theories about the making, interpretation, and teaching of literature.

Texts: Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Frost, The Collected Poems; Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun; Min, Red Azalea; plus course packet and selected readings distributed through Docutek, including critical works by Gloria Anzaldúa, Homi Bhabha, Mihaly Czikszentmihalyi, Paulo Freire, Mary Louise Pratt, Victor Turner , and others.

Requirements: Regular creative and critical writing exercises; one five-page critical essay; teaching presentation with lesson plan; final research-based project framed in consultation with the professor.

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ENGL 3405

 

ENGL 3405-01W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. Crystal R. Shelnutt
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 1109

May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: English 3405-01w will introduce basic rhetorical concepts that students need for myriad professional situations. Such principles, and an analysis of the professional and technical climates under which many of our documents will be produced, will provide assistance in responding to a variety of workplace needs. This class will provide students opportunity for intensive practice in composing powerful audience-driven documents in a variety of business, professional, and technical contexts. Students will also learn how to make effective business-related presentations supported with appropriate documentary and visual aids, as well as collaborate on technical research and reporting.

Texts: Alred, Gerald J. Charles T. Brusaw, and Walter E. Oliu. The Business Writer’s Handbook, Eighth Edition. Bedford/St. Martin’s. ISBN: 9780312436124; Graves , Heather and Roger Graves. A Strategic Guide to Technical Communication. Broadview Press. ISBN: 9781551118149; Course Packet.

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 3405-02W Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. John Sturgis
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, TLC 1110

May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 4/5000-level


ENGL 4/5106

 

ENGL 4/5106-01W: Studies in Genre, Prof. Alison Umminger
Comedy
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 209

Required for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken to satisfy the Genre and Theory 1 or 2 (Major Area B1 or B2) requirement. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 4/5106-02W: Studies in Genre, Prof. Emily Hipchen
Autobiography
TR 8:00am-9:15am, Humanities 208

Required for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken to satisfy the Genre and Theory 1 or 2 (Major Area B1 or B2) requirement. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 4/5106-03W: Studies in Genre, Prof. Randy Hendricks
Fiction
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 208

Required for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken to satisfy the Genre and Theory 1 or 2 (Major Area B1 or B2) requirement. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Using both practical and theoretical approaches to the interpretation of prose fiction, and with attention to the history and evolution of fictional forms, we will devote the semester to reading, discussing, and writing about several short stories and other short forms (fairy tales, comedy sketches, etc.) of fiction and one novel. We’ll study classic and recently published works from North and South America, Eastern and Western Europe, Africa, and Asia. Students can expect to learn the terms associated with close analysis of fiction and to become familiar with some of the more important theoretical statements that have defined and shaped fiction. Detailed written responses to reading assignments will help students prepare for class and lead to more formal writing assignments.

Texts: Bohner and Grant, Short Fiction: Classic and Contemporary, Sixth Edition; Brontё, Wuthering Heights, Bedford Case Studies on Contemporary Criticism, Second Edition

Requirements: (1) a reading notebook: reading responses, a number of short papers, and independent analysis of one contemporary short story (2)  final exam, (3) one short paper, (4) one longer paper requiring use of multiple sources and appropriate documentation.

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ENGL 4/5108

 

ENGL 4/5108-01W Studies in the Novel, Prof. Debra MacComb
American
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, Humanities 208

May be taken to satisfy the American Literature I or II (Major Area A3 or A4) requirement. Students may take both the British and the American versions for credit. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course will focus on representative novels that have significantly influenced the development of the American novel with some discussion of precursor genres (spiritual and criminal biographies and autobiographies, travel writing, captivity narratives, romances, etc.).  This course will also examine different theoretical positions accounting for the nature and evolution of the genre and the changing relationship between the novel and the reading public.

Texts: Cooper, The Pioneers; Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom!; James, The Portrait of a Lady; Johnson, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man; Morrison, Jazz; Pyncheon, The Crying of Lot 49; Rowson, Charlotte Temple; Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin; McKeon, Theory of the Novel: A Historical Approach

Requirements: Active and informed participation in class and online discussions, 2 brief (2-3 pages) response essays, prospectus and documented essay (8-10 pages), final exam

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ENGL 4/5109

 

ENGL 4/5109-01W: Film as Literature, Prof. Barbara Brickman
American Independent Film
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 1200

May be taken to satisfy the Genre and Theory 1 or 2 (Major Area B1 or B2) requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course will examine the history and development of American independent cinema as well as the social, aesthetic, and industrial questions raised by that cinema. Debating the differences between “independent” and “mainstream” practices and products, the course will develop an understanding of production, distribution, and exhibition practices for both types of American film and discuss their inter-relations or interdependencies on each other. Issues relating to both formal components and innovations as well as narrative structures and devices will inform our discussion of the “independent” aesthetic. Finally, the end of the semester will be devoted to a few key filmmakers in the post-1980s incarnation of “independent” filmmaking who will act as case studies to illustrate points from our semester-long discussion. Possible films for the course include Within Our Gates, Don’t Look Back, A Woman Under the Influence, Shock Corridor, She’s Gotta Have It, sex, lies & videotape, Clerks, Rushmore, and Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story.

Texts: Levy, Emanuel. Cinema of Outsiders: The Rise of American Independent Film; Merritt, Greg. Celluloid Mavericks: A History of American Independent Film

Requirements: Three short essays, presentations, one exam, and one research paper

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ENGL 4/5125

 

ENGL 4/5125-01W: Colonial and Early American Literature, Prof. Patrick M. Erben
Early America in Narrative and Art
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Paff 308

May be taken to satisfy the American Lit I (Major Area A3) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course reads and interprets the representation of early America in both narrative (fiction, non-fiction, poetry) and art (painting, sculpture, print illustrations, and other forms of artistic and material expression). We will see how both literary and artistic forms of expression collaborated in creating a concept of America in the European imagination (period of conquest and exploration), allowed Americans to form an identity in distinction from Europe (Revolutionary period), and how the new United States both glorified and contested westward expansion, Native American genocide, and slavery. We will compare pre-Columbian and post-contact Native American art with European representations of the supposedly “savage” and “heathen” peoples of the Americas; we will learn how Revolutionary art and literature exulted independence, while “subaltern” groups such as women, African Americans, and Native Americans gave voice to their discontent; and we will see how artists and writers of the early 19 th century simultaneously bemoaned the “disappearance” of the Indian while enticing western settlement with vistas of endless lands and stunning sunsets. This course emphasizes strategies of visual, semiotic, and literary analysis, and thus tries to attract students from literature as well as art, art history, and history backgrounds. Pending funding, we will go on excursions to two nationally renowned art museums with significant holdings in early American art: The Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory (“Art of the Ancient Americas”) and the Westervelt-Warner Museum of American Art in Tuscaloosa, AL.

Texts: Northon Anthology of American Literature, 7 th edition, Volume A: Beginnings to 1820; electronic versions of art; critical texts through e-reserve; regional art museums and repositories.

Requirements: Active participation, weekly reading quizzes, midterm and final exams, 2 short analyses (one literary, one visual), and one larger research project (including archival research in digital databases).

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ENGL 4/5145

 

ENGL 4/5145-01W: Victorian Literature, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 206

May be taken to satisfy the Brit Lit II (Major Area A2) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course will consider Victorian literature as a response to the social, political, and cultural ideals and anxieties that marked nineteenth-century Britain. Surveying fiction and poetry as well as non-fiction, from the “social problem novel” of the “hungry forties” to the mid-century sensation novel and fin-de-siècle aestheticism, we will explore these texts as literary responses to Victorian concerns about class boundaries, definitions of gender, crime, science, and empire, just to name a few. We will examine not only the cultural wishes and fears reflected in Victorian literature, but the ways in which each work seeks to structure and resolve them.

Texts: Mary Barton, Elizabeth Gaskell (Oxford World Classics); Oliver Twist, Charles Dickens (Penguin); New Grub Street, George Gissing; Lady Audley’s Secret, Mary Elizabeth Braddon (Penguin); Selected Poems of Robert Browning (Penguin Classics); Goblin Market and other poems , Christina Rossetti (Dover).

Requirements: Active participation, quizzes, oral presentations, two essays (one a longer research-based paper), responses, final exam. Graduate students will be expected to do additional critical readings, write a longer research paper, and take a leading role in class discussions.

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ENGL 4/5170

 

ENGL 4/5170-01W: African-American Literature, Prof. S. Boyd
MW 5:30pm-6:45pm, Humanities 206

May be taken to satisfy the American Lit II (Major Area A4) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course will examine major trends, authors, and texts central to the development of African-American literature novels, serial poetry, short stories, and drama. The politics of race, gender, sexuality, class, and region will play major roles in our analysis. Indeed, the dynamics of inter-textual exchange—the ways in which texts invoke and revise previous works (the ways in which they “riff” on one another)—will also inform our exploration. And, of course, the ways in which texts derive meaning through extra-textual references and associations (African American music or folk culture for example) will also shape our reading of African American literature and its place/role in literary studies.

Texts: Passing, Nella Larsen; short stories by Zora Neale Hurston; short stories by Richard Wright; Invisible Man, Ralph Ellison; In My Father’s House, Ernest Gaines; Maude Martha, Gwendolyn Brooks; Thomas and Beulah, Rita Dove; The Oxherding Tale, Charles Johnson; The Color Purple, Alice Walker; Paradise, Toni Morrison; and a play by August Wilson.

Requirements: Response papers, presentations, a longer literature project, daily quizzes.

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ENGL 4/5188

 

ENGL 4/5188-01W: Individual Authors, Prof. Chad Davidson
Sylvia Plath
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, Pafford 105

May be taken to satisfy the American Lit II (Major Area A4) requirement. Fulfills the Individual Authors requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: The life and work of Sylvia Plath remain among the most captivating and troubling of the latter half of the twentieth century. Her famous “October poems” of 1962, written four months before her suicide, still occupy a prominent space in the contemporary American poetic landscape, and raise difficult questions regarding the convergence of artistic creation and cathartic release. Rather than eschew such sordid realms of celebrity and violence, however, we will attempt to confront the problematic fascination with “the cult of suicide.” We will begin by contextualizing this live-fast-die-young mentality within still-prevailing Romantic notions of the tragic artist, which in America reached poetic climax among Plath’s milieu. We will inspect closely Plath’s poems, prose, and journals; examine work by contemporaries John Berryman and Anne Sexton (both of whom also committed suicide); and along the way familiarize ourselves with the ascendancy of “confessional” poetry. We will also approach Plath’s writing as a staging ground for more contemporary notions of gender and sexuality. Her turbulent marriage to English Poet Laureate Ted Hughes and his “editing” of her posthumous prose and collected poems, for example, has become emblematic of ongoing discourses regarding women poets within a largely patriarchal tradition. In such a context, Plath recalls poets such as Emily Dickinson and Muriel Rukeyser, even as she anticipates, and provides for, “neoconfessionals” such as Sharon Olds and Marie Howe. And it is within this trajectory that we will seek to situate the important life and work of Sylvia Plath.

Texts (by Sylvia Plath): The Bell Jar. New York: Harper Perennial, 2006; The Collected Poems. New York: Harper Perennial, 1981; The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath. New York: Anchor, 2000; plus additional essays, poems, stories, and critical matter to be distributed through Docutek.

Requirements:Daily participation and three critical papers, including a final term paper with documented research.

ENGL 4/5188-02W: Individual Authors, Prof. Lisa Crafton
William Blake
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Humanities 209

May be taken to satisfy the Brit Lit II (Major Area A2) requirement. Fulfills the Individual Authors requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: "I must Create a system or be Enslav'd by another man's," asserts William Blake in an extravagant statement of individual freedom and protest against cultural oppression. As revolutionary, Blake's poetry engages the reader in defiant rejection of the forces of political, cultural, and sexual oppression. Yet, Blake's visionary writings assert that full liberation must include regeneration of "the doors of perception," and study of his work encompasses philosophy, psychology, theology as well as cultural critique. Blake’s works offer a panorama of virtually all of the sometimes contradictory traits we label as "Romantic," from philosophical and theological revolution (All Religions Are One, Everlasting Gospel) to revolutionary politics (The French Revolution, America, to radical critique of economic and cultural oppression, especially restrictions on sexuality (Songs of Innocence and Experience, Visions of the Daughters of Albion, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell) to visionary prophecy (Europe, Urizen, Los, Milton). A powerful influence on radical and visionary art, Blake speaks through the music in Van Morrison and U2; he inspired the 1995 Jim Jarmusch film Dead Man where Johnny Depp plays an accountant named William Blake who journeys west to a town called Machine but instead finds Native-American spirituality a liberating force. In this course, we will share an intensive study of Blake's poetry and visual art (using an impressive Web archive) as we study his texts in relation to his revolutionary context as well as contemporary revisions of Blake in music and film, pursuing the connection Blake makes between "revolution" and "revelation."

Texts: William Blake, Norton Critical ed.

Requirements: Active class discussion, brief response essays, midterm, final, research paper.

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ENGL 4/5210

 

ENGL 4/5210-01W: Advanced Creative Writing, Prof . Gregory Fraser
Poetry
R 5:30pm-8:00pm, Humanities 209

Prerequisite: ENGL 3200. May be taken to satisfy the Writing and Language (Major Area C) requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Designed to help advanced students refine their talents as makers of poetry, this course offers a sustained look at five major living poets from diverse backgrounds and experiences. We will work on experimental methods of generating verse and build upon the critical reading and commenting skills that students have developed in previous creative-writing classes. Students will learn to situate their work in the contemporary poetic moment and engage with the larger poetry cultures in the Atlanta metro area.

Texts: Fairchild, Art of the Lathe; Joseph, Imitation of Life; Kim, Notes from the Divided Country; Komunyakaa, Pleasure Dome; Rich, Diving into the Wreck

Requirements: Regular readings and exercises, weekly memorizations of poetry, oral and written contributions to workshop, and a final portfolio of polished writing, including a critical preface.

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ENGL 4238

 

ENGL 4238-01: Methods for Teaching Secondary English, Prof. Angela Insenga
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 208

Registration requires permission. Contact Dr. Insenga (ainsenga@westga.edu) for permission to register. Pre-requisites for registration: admission to the Teacher Education Program, application at the Field Experience Office, and a conference with an English Education advisor.

Description: This course seeks to connect theory and practice in order to generate sound pedagogical strategies for the teaching of high school English. Through study of primary and secondary texts, teachers-in-training will learn about and observe instructional approaches and deepen their understanding of the foundations on which such methods are built. As a result of such investigation, students will begin to fashion teaching selves through their recursive discussions, concentrated scholarly research, analytical writing, repeated field observation, and practical implementation. Major assignments include field observation, a weekly reflection journal, a unit plan with micro-lessons, a major scholarly project, and a capstone portfolio of work with an encapsulating introduction.

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ENGL 4286

 

ENGL 4286: Teaching Internship
Section 01 (Prof. Stacy Boyd) T 5:30pm-7:00pm, Humanities 206
Section 02 (Prof. Rebecca Harrison) T 5:30pm-7:00pm, Humanities 206
Section 03 (Prof. Jane McClain) T 5:30pm-7:00pm, Humanities 206
Section 04 (Prof. Tricia Burgey) T 5:30pm-7:00pm, Humanities 206

Registration requires permission. Contact Dr. Insenga (ainsenga@westga.edu) for permission. Pre-requisites for registration: admission to the Teacher Education Program, application at the Field Experience Office, and a conference with an English Education advisor.

Description: The internship for secondary education certification primarily involves teaching English for one semester in a public school under the supervision of an experienced, qualified English teacher. Weekly seminars conducted by experienced English faculty are an integral part of the student teaching experience and will provide interns with numerous and varied opportunities to plan, deliver, evaluate, and revise educational strategies. Such a learning environment, based on developing best practices through sound pedagogical modeling, will serve as part of an ongoing and comprehensive portfolio assessment process. Students will assemble capstone portfolios of their personal and professional work as evidence of their advancement.

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ENGL 4295

 

ENGL 4295-01: Reading and Literature in Secondary English Classrooms, Prof. Angela Insenga
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 208

Required for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken to satisfy the Genre and Theory 1 or 2 (Major Area B1 or B2) requirement.

Description: Mandated goals for this class include examining primary and secondary materials related to the study of adolescent literature. The instructor is also asked to help teachers-in-training learn to induce “lifelong reading habits” in students. Further, class activities must help us to gain knowledge of ways to bridge distances between those texts recognized as classics—the “must read” books they don’t always want to read—and texts categorized as “Young Adult literature”—those which are overtly crafted to relate to students’ lives.

But considering what we know about the current state of education, what we know about student reading abilities and habits, and what we know about the political and social frameworks teachers occupy, how do we work to achieve such formidable objectives?

This fall semester, we will work to meet our course’s goals by beginning with the notion that students must learn to read the world—their world—as a text. For instance, by deploying the same heuristics to theorize about such varied cultural artifacts as Hannah Montana, The Great Gatsby, Stargirl, and MySpace, we can model for ourselves and students the idea that study is not limited to school and will not always end with a grade. In doing so, we help pupils become arbiters of their culture.

Along with examining the world-as-text concept to meet our course’s purposes, we will explore various cognitive theories related to language acquisition, reading, and adolescent development. Finally, we will turn to Young Adult texts and classics from various genres to begin formulating ways to move ourselves and our future students from concrete to abstract thinking, talking, and writing about literature.

Requirements: a discussion-generating class presentation, a take-home mid-term examination, a weekly reflection journal, and a tripartite, scholarly project.

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ENGL 4/5300

 

ENGL 4/5300-01: Studies in the English Language, Prof. Micheal Crafton
History of the English Language
MW 5:30pm-6:45pm, Humanities 131

May be taken to satisfy the Writing and Language (Major Area C) requirement. Required for certification in Secondary English Education. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Description: Why do we spell might with a gh and yet we don't pronounce it? What in the world does "Ye olde sworde shoppe" mean? If Shakespeare is not written in Old English, then what is? We shall answer a few of these and other questions in this a survey of the major periods of the development of the English Language from pre-Old English to Present Day English and some varieties therein. Some attention will be paid the basics of linguistic analysis and the relationship between language and social change. By the end of the quarter, students will understand: the basic concepts of comparative linguistics; the most significant external historical causes of change in the English language; the key internal changes in the history of English; the pronunciation of Old English and Middle English, at least well enough to teach high school students; the fundamental difference between the grammars of Old English and Modern English; the concept of dialect or variety in English; the difference between grammar and usage and the difference between prescriptive, descriptive, and scientific grammars.

Text: A History of the English Language 5th edition (Paperback) by Albert C. Baugh, Thomas Cable Routledge (2002) ISBN: 0415280990

Requirements: A few short quizzes, a short response paper or two, a larger student project that will be research based and documented, and a brief oral presentation.

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ENGL 4384
 

ENGL 4384-01W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Patrick M. Erben
Sacred Sex: Religion and Eroticism in Literature
MW 5:30pm-6:45pm, TLC 2237

Registration requires permission of Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu). Required for all English majors. Cannot be taken until ENGL 1101, 1102, and core area F have been completed with a minimum passing grade of C. A minimum of 18 hours of upper-level English courses must also have been completed with no grade lower than C. Not offered during summer session. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: As the capstone course to the English major, the Senior Seminar allows you to shine! This course is designed as a chance for our soon-to-be minted graduates to demonstrate their intellectual curiosity, their mastery of critical vocabulary, their analytical and rhetorical skills, and—above all—their joy for pursuing original and challenging projects of literary and cultural inquiry.

This particular incarnation of the course focuses on the manifold intersections between religion and sexuality in literature and culture. Although institutionalized religion—then and now—frequently limited, prescribed, suppressed, or even vilified human sexuality, literature has consistently explored the many qualities both have in common: the desire for union (with a partner or God), passion and irrational drives, fear, pain and suffering—to name but a few. Indeed, erotic desire has often been harnessed to heighten the longing for the divine, especially in a religion that revolves around the body and suffering of the godhead. In turn, religious beliefs have been used to exclude allegedly devious sexualities and deploy “normal” practices for the sake of controlling the politics of race, gender, and nation.

Texts: Primary texts include writings from/by the Old and New Testament (especially “The Song of Songs”); Julian of Norwich; John Donne; George Herbert; Edward Taylor; Puritan sermons, advice literature, and diaries; Count Zinzendorf/Moravian Church, hymnody and writings on sexuality; Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale; selected episodes from the HBO series Big Love; and selected art from various periods. Secondary texts include selections from Bataille, Erotism; Bynum, Fragmentation and Redemption; Goldberg, Sodometries; Rambuss, Closet Devotions; Fogleman, Jesus is Female; Godbeer, Sexual Revolution in Early America.

Requirements: Regular attendance, active participation, reading quizzes, brief response essay, analysis of critical text, seminar paper for inclusion in anthology, peer editing.

ENGL 4384-02W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Lisa Crafton
Madwoman in the Attic: Tricksters in Literature and Film
TR 9:30am-10:45am. TLC 2237

Registration requires permission of Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu). Required for all English majors. Cannot be taken until ENGL 1101, 1102, and core area F have been completed with a minimum passing grade of C. A minimum of 18 hours of upper-level English courses must also have been completed with no grade lower than C. Not offered during summer session. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Thi s capstone course, a culmination of study in the English major, allows students to examine a critical/theoretical issue within the discipline and use their coursework and literary interests to choose a research project which will become part of a published anthology of essays from the class. This semester, we will explore the ways in which trickster figures (representing madness, witchcraft, or the supernatural) function in literary texts. In virtually all cultures, tricksters (ubiquitous shape-shifters who dwell on borders, at crossroads, and between worlds) are both folk heroes and wanderers on the edges of the community, at once marginal and central to the culture. Tricksters challenge the status quo and disrupt perceived boundaries, which is why Smith argues for their particular functions in contemporary ethnic American writers. Using Smith’s Writing Tricksters: Mythic Gambols in Ethnic American Literature, we will focus on the central functions of these characters in the construction of identity and culture. We will apply these arguments to race and gender in Morrison’s Sula and Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior. We will then extend the argument beyond ethnic writers in terms of how social nonconformity is constructed as madness in the film Girl Interrupted and how the figure of “witchcraft” functions in Churchill’s play Vinegar Tom. Finally, we may ponder how the literary forms themselves act as trickster narratives for readers. Student projects may be on any literary/filmic text in which trickster figures (potentially represented as ghosts, witches, or madwomen/madmen) figure in the construction of identity within a given culture.

Texts: Smith, Writing Tricksters: Mythic Gambols in Ethnic American Literature, Kingston, The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts, Morrison, Sula, Gilman, The Yellow Wallpaper, and film Girl Interrupted

Requirements: Class discussion, individual and group oral reports, two response essays, substantive research project, including prospectus, abstract, and annotated bibliography.

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ENGL 4/5385

 

ENGL 4/5385-01: Special Topics, Prof. Aleksondra Hultquist
18 th-Century British Literature: Amatory Fiction and the Novel
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 208

May be taken to satisfy the Brit Lit I (Major Area A1) requirement. Requires permission of the department chair to repeat.

Description: The novel didn’t always exist, and there are many theories about what made “prose fiction” a “novel”—a central part of the study of 18 th century literature. One of the more traditional ways to understand the development of the novel as a genre has been through the glorification of middle-class values, epitomized by Richardson’s Pamela, considered by many to be the “first” English novel. However, several critics have argued that Richardson’s novel was a reaction to a genre called Amatory Fiction, works that include tumultuous love affairs, cross-dressing and sword fighting instead of staid courtship and marriage. This course offers an alternative discourse of the novel. By reading amatory authors such as Aphra Behn, Delarivier Manley and Eliza Haywood (among others), we will examine how the 18 th century novel is a discussion of the boundaries between licit and illicit forms of feminine sexual desire.

Texts: Popular Fiction by Women 1660-1730: An Anthology edited by Paula Backscheider and John Richetti; Love in Excess by Eliza Haywood (Broadview edition); Pamela by Samuel Richardson (Oxford edition); Anti-Pamela by Eliza Haywood (Broadview edition); The History of Miss Betsy Thoughtless by Eliza Haywood (Broadview edition); Electronic Course Reserves: The Fair Jilt (Behn); The Wife’s Resentment (Manely); The City Jilt (Haywood)

Requirements: Three 2-3 page analytical response papers; Annotated Bibliography and Research assignment; Final Paper (10 pages)

ENGL 4385-02W: Special Topics, Prof. Debra MacComb
American Gothic
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 206

May be taken to satisfy the American Lit II (Major Area A4) requirement. Requires permission of the department chair to repeat. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: The gothic depends for its effects on the dark and stormy night, claustrophobic structures, mazelike pathways, violent and morbid passions; its deep structure, however, often concerns the anxiety that apparently normal, respectable and even friendly exteriors—whether human or institutional-- mask corruption and malign intention. Thus, early in the nation’s literary history, the gothic became the perfect form to express fears that American society, with its twinned ideologies of liberalism and individualism, had in fact continued the socio-political abuses associated with the hierarchical mother country from which it had ostensibly separated. Leslie Fiedler suggests the irony of an American gothic when he defines it as “a literature of darkness and the grotesque in a land of light and affirmation.” This course will explore two broad thematic categories central to American history and identity, race and gender, to discover the way both literary and filmic texts have attempted to expose the menacing cultural contradictions that erupt in the space between philosophic claim and actual practice.

Texts: TBA

Requirements: Active and informed participation in class and online discussions, 2 brief (2-3 pages) response essays, prospectus and documented essay (8-10 pages), final exam.

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ENGL 6000-level


ENGL 6105

 

ENGL 6105-01: Seminar in British Lit I, Prof. Meg Pearson
Age of Elizabeth: Shakespeare and Beyond
T 5:30pm-8:00pm, TLC 2237

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description: This course will examine the triumph of the public theaters during the reign of Elizabeth I (1558-1603). Her Majesty's delight in drama and her able employment of her own various theatrical personae were driving forces in creating this so-called "golden age" of English drama. Dramatists responded to their sovereign with a new genre—the history play—and an increased attention to writing and adapting material for the stage.

Texts: In addition to the Elizabethan works of Shakespeare—including his bestselling Venus and Adonis, several sonnets and, of course, his plays—we will read plays and poetry by his most important contemporaries, including John Lyly, Robert Greene, Thomas Kyd, Christopher Marlowe, and the Queen herself.

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 6120

 

ENGL 6120: Seminar in American Lit II, Prof. Josh Masters
The Novels of Toni Morrison and Cormac McCarthy
M 5:30pm-8:00pm, TLC 1204

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description: This course will examine the novels of Toni Morrison and Cormac McCarthy, arguably the two most important American literary figures of our era. At first glance they may seem an unlikely fit, with their National Book Awards and gigs on Oprah’s Book Club seemingly the only things they have in common. However, their shared interest in issues of race and American nationhood, slavery and human possibility, and history and historiography, coupled with their acknowledged debt to William Faulkner—Morrison through her narrative experimentations and McCarthy through his gothic Southern lyricism—suggests that a meaningful dialogue might be established between the two. Creating this dialogue will be one of the goals of the class, and we will therefore be reading Morrison’s and McCarthy’s novels next to one another as linked pairs that explore similar regional, thematic, or narratological territory. We will begin by looking at two novels whose plots turn on an infanticide (what fun!), Beloved and Outer Dark, or at least attempted infanticides, since both infants return to life and haunt their progenitors. We will then look at a pair of novels that feature questing male figures who travel south (one to the deep South and one to Mexico) in search of their origins and identities, Song of Solomon and The Crossing. We will continue in this regional vein in our next pairing, Paradise and Blood Meridian, both of which re-imagine and reinvent the idea (and the narrative possibilities) of the American West. The next pairing, Jazz and Suttree, will allow us to investigate the poetics of each author, particularly how their linguistic concerns inform their narratological concerns and vice-versa. This will be followed by a pair of apocalyptic novels that imagine how and why the world must end (again, what fun!), Sula and The Road, and we will conclude the class with the writers’ most recent works, Love and No Country for Old Men, in order to gage where Morrison and McCarthy have been and where they are now.

In preparation for class, students should read Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! and bring it to our first meeting.

Required Texts:(See above.)

Requirements: Preparation for, and active participation in, weekly discussions; 15-20 minute oral presentation; four short essays; a fifteen to twenty page research paper.

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ENGL 6385

 

ENGL 6385-01: Seminar in Special Topics, Prof. Chad Davidson
Blurring Borders: Current Approaches to Creative and Critical Writing
W 5:30pm-8:00pm, TLC 1204

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description: This course is designed to help you become well-rounded, flexible practitioners of language arts—thinkers who can simultaneously produce creative writing, persuasively interpret the creative works of established authors, and teach others how to perform both of these vital and interrelated activities. The readings, assignments, and workshop focus of the course strive to aid in your enrichment as a creative writer, a critical analyst, and a language-arts specialist all in one. You will learn to move confidently in many creative and critical directions, and to position yourself to pursue a wide range of professional options including teaching, writing, publishing and editing, journalism, and related endeavors. Along the way, you will become conversant in contemporary theories about the making, interpretation, and teaching of literature, specifically those that consider questions of creativity and hybridity. Ultimately, the skills you practice in class promise enormous benefits as you enter competitive fields rooted in the language arts. Whether you want to be a writer, a teacher, an editor, a lawyer, or any other professional whose success rests on mastery of language, this class seeks to make you a stronger writer and savvier creative-critical thinker.

Texts: Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Frost, The Collected Poems; Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun; Min, Red Azalea; plus course packet and selected readings distributed through Docutek, including critical works by Gloria Anzaldúa, Homi Bhabha, Mihaly Czikszentmihalyi, Paulo Freire, Mary Louise Pratt, Victor Turner , and many others.

Requirements: Regular creative and critical writing exercises; one five-page critical essay; teaching presentation with lesson plan; final research-based project to be framed in consultation with the professor.

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