.in this issue

1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5

Yusef Komunyakaa Visits UWG

Call for Recycling Volunteers

Awards Day Award Recipients

Fulbright Grant Sends Recent UWG Grad to Slovakia

UWG Students Take Part in Prestigious Writing Workshop

Cheers

Course Descriptions

Spring 2010

Spring 2010 Courses


NOTE: Courses are subject to change depending on enrollment and faculty teaching assignments. Please check BANWEB for more current information on the availability of all courses.

English 1101 and 1102 are prerequisites for all courses from ENGL 2110 through 4386.

A “W” designation after a section number of a 3000- or 4000-level course signifies that the course is a Discipline Specific Writing (DSW) course. DSW accepts as a guiding principle the idea that writing is a valuable tool for learning and communication. Therefore, the components of a course so designated are designed to help you learn the material and communicate what you have learned. Students are required to take two “W” courses for the undergraduate degree.


ENGLISH CLASSES
FILM CLASSES
XIDS CLASSES

ENGL 2050-01: Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life, Prof. Jane McClain
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 205

Description: Effective communicators are more productive, have enhanced career opportunities, enjoy more fulfilling relationships, earn more respect, and have more fun! The good news is that you already have the tools you need to become a great communicator; it’s just a matter of learning how to use them consciously and masterfully…in other words, learning how to “self-stage.”

In Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Everyday Life, we will study and practice practical communication skills—creativity, quick thinking, risk taking, lateral thinking, active listening, subtext mastery, self-awareness—and apply them to virtually every interaction you encounter outside the classroom: One-on-One Conversations, Public Presentation, Debate and Argumentation, Conflict Resolution and Confrontation Skills, Stress Management, Team Building, and Impression Management. By the end of the semester, students will have had first-hand experience in all of these areas, and, more importantly, will know exactly how to continue honing and perfecting those skills long after.

Requirements: formal solo presentations, group projects and presentations, panel discussions/debates, vocabulary-building exercises, role-playing and improvisation exercises, journaling, and, of course, active, informed participation in each class session.

ENGL 2050-02: Self Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life, Prof. Dorothy Byrom
From the Inside Out
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Pafford 306Building

Description: Self Staging teaches students to use lateral thinking skills in order to better present their authentic selves in today’s world. Those skills enable them to think more objectively while involved in true-to-life experiences. Self Staging prepares students to deal with public presentation, internal and external stress, conflict resolution, building a functional team, and impression management. Through the text readings and in-class improvisational exercises, students engage mentally and physically in these vital aspects of successful living.

Texts: Lipoma, Lori and Michael, Self-Staging from the Inside Out. Students will also need to spend approximately $5 for materials during the semester.

Requirements: Sophomore level students with a desire to step outside their comfort zones and experience new levels of confidence.

ENGL 2050-03: Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life, Prof. Jade Kierbow
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, Pafford 308

Description: Effective communicators are more productive, have enhanced career opportunities, enjoy more fulfilling relationships, earn more respect, and have more fun! The good news is that you already have the tools you need to become a great communicator; it’s just a matter of learning how to use them consciously and masterfully…in other words, learning how to “self-stage.”

In Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Everyday Life, we will study and practice practical communication skills—creativity, quick thinking, risk taking, lateral thinking, active listening, subtext mastery, self-awareness—and apply them to virtually every interaction you encounter outside the classroom: One-on-One Conversations, Public Presentation, Debate and Argumentation, Conflict Resolution and Confrontation Skills, Stress Management, Team Building, and Impression Management. By the end of the semester, students will have had first-hand experience in all of these areas, and, more importantly, will know exactly how to continue honing and perfecting those skills long after.

Requirements: formal solo presentations, group projects and presentations, playing Apples to Apples, cage fighting with your classmates using Sock’em Boppers, role-playing and improvisation exercises, watching YouTube, journaling, eavesdropping on others’ public cell phone conversations and, of course, active, informed participation in each class session.

Texts and Materials: Lipoma, Lori and Michael, Self-Staging from the Inside Out. Students will also need to spend approximately $10 on materials needed for presentations and in-class exercises.

ENGL 2060-01: Intro to Creative Writing, Dr. Katherine Chaple
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 206

Required for the minor in Creative Writing.

Description: But all art is sensual . . . . It is directly, that is, of the senses, and since the senses do not exist without an object for their employment all art is necessarily objective. It doesn’t declaim or explain, it presents.—William Carlos Williams

English 2060 is an introduction to fiction and poetry writing. The aim of this class is for the student to acquire a familiarity with the tools and forms of poetry and fiction and to apply those to both creative and academic work. In addition to a study the crafts of both fiction and poetry through reading and lecture, we will also be exploring and discussing where poems and stories come from—the inspirational element of writing. You will be expected to produce works in both genres, and we will workshop your creative efforts in class.

Texts: Janet Burroway & Elizabeth Stuckey-French Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft (7th Edition); Chad Davidson & Gregory Fraser Writing Poetry: Creative and Critical Approaches; R. V. Cassill (Editor), Joyce Carol Oates (Editor) The Norton Anthology of Contemporary Fiction (Paperback).

Requirements: Daily readings and exercises, journals, participation, written contributions to the workshop, midterm examination, and a final portfolio of polished writing.

ENGL 2060-02: Intro to Creative Writing, Prof. Amy Ellison
https://grim.westga.edu/www/spring/engl.ugs.htm
No description available.

Required for the minor in Creative Writing.

ENGL 2060-03: Intro to Creative Writing, Prof. Brent House
Why I Write: Writing & Writing about Writing
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Humanities 206

Required for the minor in Creative Writing.

Description: Writing is seldom a linear process; more often writing is discursive, developing and disrupting textual formations. In this course we will trace patterns of texts that have shaped the writing of our predecessors, our present, and our peers.

Texts: Chad Davidson and Gregory Fraser, Writing Poetry: Creative and Critical Approaches; Philip Gerard’s Writing Creative Nonfiction; Julie Checkoway’s Creating Fiction

Requirements: Students will produce genre-defined portfolios of reflective, interpretive, and creative writing.

ENGL 2110-01: World Literature, Dr. Patrick Erben
The World Traveler’s Guide to World Literature
MW 12:30pm-1:45 pm, Pafford 308

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: I have to be honest—travel is one of my greatest passions. Growing up in Germany, many foreign countries were only a few hours away. Nothing thrills me more than exploring another country with guidebook, dictionary, and—a great work of literature that opens a window into the culture, intellect, achievements, emotions, fears, prejudices, and beliefs of its people. In this class, I will take you on a trip to places I’ve visited or lived in by highlighting some of the greatest works of literature ever written around the world. We will visit the epic beginnings of Ancient Greece and Rome, the cultural crossroads of the Levant and Mesopotamia, the castles of medieval Germany, the churches and palaces of Renaissance Italy, the Spain of the Reconquista and early empire, Mexico during the Spanish conquest, the France of Louis XV and the Enlightenment philosophers, the Germany of neo-classicism and early Romanticism, Prague and the modern Czech Republic, Nazi Germany and its aftermath, and post-colonial Africa. We will supplement our literary explorations with the art, music, and maybe even the cuisine of some of those countries.

Texts: The Longman Anthology of World Literature, Compact Edition; Mark Mathabane, Kaffir Boy.

Requirements: Lively participation, regular quizzes, one oral presentation on historical/cultural/biographical context of a literary work, 3 short analytical papers, mid-term and final exams.

ENGL 2110-o2: World Literature, Dr. Chad Davidson
Literary Underworlds
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Paffod 308

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: Using Dante’s Inferno as a pivotal text, we will look at classical and contemporary representations of the underworld as they appear in such Western-culture cornerstones as Homer’s Odyssey and Virgil’s Aeneid, as well as in the work of contemporary authors such as Chinua Achebe and Anchee Min. Central to our exploration will be the concepts of the hero’s journey, the quest for enlightenment, the fascination with sin, and the notion of justice—both the divine and the figuratively medieval.

Texts: Achebe, Chinua, Things Fall Apart; Dante, Inferno; Homer, Odyssey; Kafka, Franz, The Metamorphosis; Min, Anchee, Red Azalea; Virgil, Aeneid; plus supplementary reading to be handed out in class.

Requirements: participation, weekly quizzes, one five-page essay, midterm and final exams.

ENGL 2120-01: British Literature, Prof. Phil Purser
From Beowulf to Byron: The Monstrous in British Literature
MW2:00pm-3:15pm, Pafford 308

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: A survey of important works of British literature.

Texts: Broadview Anthology of British Literature: Concise Volumes A & B

Requirements: 3 out-of-class essays, mid-term exam, final exam.

English 2120-02: British Literature, Dr. Lisa Crafton
It’s Alive’: Monsters and Others in British Literature
TR 9:30am-10:45am. Pafford 308

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: In this course we will read selected British literature texts from medieval to contemporary times with an emphasis on the issue of the monstrous. What makes monsters? How do writers from specific cultural moments define the Other as monstrous or savage, and what does this reveal about their own sense of themselves? How does the Gothic as a genre represent psychological, sexual, and political monstrosities? While we will encounter figures from the medieval Green Knight to contemporary bog people, we will also emphasize film variations of the Frankenstein story—from the little known 1910 silent film to Young Frankenstein to Bladerunner—and ask how each filmic representation speak to its own era, in terms of questions about criminality, God, sexuality, and technology.

Texts: Norton Anthology of British Literature (bound with Frankenstein), Endgame, and online readings on reserve, including Julian of Norwich, Chaucer (interlinear translation), Heaney, Woolf, Gordimer, and a theoretical introduction to postcolonial literature.

Requirements: Active discussion, 2 response essays, midterm and final.

ENGL 2120-03: British Literature, Dr. Fran Chalfant
The Uses of the Past
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, Humanities 208

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: A survey of important works of British literature. Required for English majors. This course will slightly revise Winston Churchill’s comment, “Those who do not know history will repeat its mistakes,” as “Writers who can draw from past models with respect to genres, poetic form, and character types often strongly enrich their own work.” This course will reveal how the classical heroic epic, pastoral elegy, and tragedy; the Anglo-Saxon heroic poem; the medieval romance and ballad, Shakespearean tragedy and metaphysical poem all were utilized by later poets and prose writers, a process in this course culminating with the late 20th century poet Stevie Smith’s utilization of Coleridge’s “Kubla Khan.”

Texts: The Longman Anthology of British Literature, plus handouts downloaded from website.

Requirements: Active participation in class; four tests, including a mid-term and final (all writing-based); plus two out of class analytical research papers (five pages each) employing the MLA format.

ENGL 2120-04: British Literature, Prof. Lawton A. Brewer
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, Pafford 206

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description:  The official description of the course consists of the following statement: A survey of important works of British literature. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Area C.2. Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102.

Daunting indeed is the challenge inherent in those brief words, “A survey of important works of British Literature.” British Literature captures and reflects every Western cultural development from fragmented Germanic tribal affiliations to the rise and decline of a multi-ethnic Empire to a re-fragmented UK and beyond. Insular but not isolated, British literature continues to exert enormous influence on the way the West sees itself in relation to the rest of the world. Conversely, other nations and peoples turn to British Literature in order to decipher the development of much that is important in modern thinking. We begin with the doomed but heroic ideal of Beowulf. Then, we proceed to a consideration of almost every significant human value and virtually every significant social issue through the works of writers that include Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Wordsworth, Dickens, Christina Rossetti, Tennyson, the Brontës, Hardy, Conrad, Woolf, and others. A thorough reading of British literature requires commitment to gaining some understanding of the social and historical context that produced it in each of its periods of development. Aside from these broader perspectives, however, British Literature takes on a powerful private dimension to any reader when he or she engages each work personally and directly. Ultimately, this engagement, this process of intellectual and often emotional response, forms the main objective of this class.

Texts: Broadview Anthology of British Literature, Concise Volume A; Broadview Anthology of British Literature, Concise Volume B; The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, Anne Brontë, Broadview Press. These three texts will be available in a package. ISBN: 97817704700552

Requirements: 3 essays, 3 exams, 3-5 quizzes, participation and intermittent in-class activities.

ENGL 2120-25H: British Literature-Honors, Dr. Meg Pearson
Exploring Englishness
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, TLC 1204

May count for credit in Core Area C. Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register. 

Description: Traveling through more than 500 years of English literature is a journey unto itself. This class will explore how English authors incorporate the motif of the quest into a variety of genres ranging from chivalric romance to travel literature to epic poetry to science fiction. Through the readings, the course will interrogate whether these journeys ever discover a truly English or British national literature.

Texts: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Utopia, The Blazing World, historical travel narratives, Jekyll and Hyde, Translations (Norton Major English Authors and Norton Critical Edition of More’s Utopia)

Requirements: Active discussion, two response essays, midterm and final.

ENGL 2120-26H: British Literature-Honors, Dr. Margaret E. Mitchell
A Monstrous Tradition
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 1204

May count for credit in Core Area C. Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register. 

Description: This course will provide a sweeping history of British literature, touching down in all major periods and genres. We will pay particular attention to representations of monstrosity in the British literary tradition, a condition that raises questions about identity and exile, self-invention and destruction, fear and desire.

Texts: The Tempest, Shakepeare; Frankenstein, Mary Shelley; Great Expectations, Charles Dickens; Mrs. Warren’s Profession, George Bernard Shaw; Never Let Me Go, Kazuo Ishiguro. Additional texts will be available on electronic reserve.

Requirements: Quizzes, response papers, oral presentations, research paper, midterm, final exam, class participation.

ENGL 2130-01: American Literature, Dr. Josh Masters
American Literature, Backwards and Forwards
MW 5:30pm-6:45pm, Pafford 308

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: This survey of American literature traces the development of such themes as nature, nationhood, law, gender, race, and identity in our national culture, from first contact to the present day. However, rather than marching across the centuries with the mission of conquering our nation’s literary history, we will “light out for the territories” in a somewhat unconventional fashion. The subtitle of the course, “American Literature, Backwards and Forwards,” is meant to suggest both the intertextual and the transhistorical nature of the class. The writers and texts we will examine speak to shared concerns that reach across American history, and we will imagine the writers engaged in a dialogue and exchanging ideas through their literary works. Section One of the course, “Inventing America,” will examine the idea of American nationhood, from its Puritanical origins to its postmodern reformulations, in the poetry and prose of William Bradford, Benjamin Franklin, Walt Whitman, Langston Hughes, and John Berryman. Section Two, “Americans in Chains,” will consider the legacy of slavery in the American imagination, featuring an eighteenth-century autobiography by Olaudah Equiano, a nineteenth-century short story by Herman Melville, and a late twentieth century novel by Toni Morrison. Section Three, “The First American Other,” will explore the role Native Americans have played in shaping American history and literature, beginning with short works by Christopher Columbus, Bernal Diaz, and George Catlin, and culminating in a postmodern novel by the Laguna Pueblo writer Leslie Marmon Silko. Finally, in Section Four, “The Questing American,” we will consider the Romantic tradition of the American quest narrative—rooted in the need to flee from the America we have collectively invented. Edgar Allan Poe’s 1838 novel Arthur Gordon Pym, Scott Bradfield’s 1986 novel The History of Luminous Motion, and Sean Penn’s 2007 film Into the Wild all feature an American youth in search of an alternative American self.

Required Texts (in order of appearance): Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano; Herman Melville, Benito Cereno; Jean Toomer, Cane; Toni Morrison, Sula; Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony; Edgar Allan Poe, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket; Scott Bradfield, The History of Luminous Motion (not available through bookstore); Sean Penn, Into the Wild (film on reserve); (Shorter works will be available on electronic reserve as PDFs.)

Requirements: Students will write several short papers, a medium length essay, and a research paper. In addition, students must earn a passing reading-quiz average, attend class without fail, and participate in round-table discussions.

ENGL 2130-02: American Literature, Prof. Brandy L. James (Robinson)
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, Pafford 308

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: On defining the creation of identity, American essayist, novelist, and playwright James Arthur Baldwin comments, “An identity would seem to be arrived at by the way in which the person faces and uses his experience.” Baldwin’s statement encompasses far-ranging ideas and introduces questions that have historically characterized American literature: How have Americans characterized their own identities at different points in time, and how have historical events, cultural phenomena, social environments, and personal experiences become meshed with and changed these identities? To what extent does the American landscape, either as a physical or symbolic space, attribute to this definition? Is the definition “American” even a valid identity? As we closely examine these questions by examining the various literary genres that span almost four centuries, we will focus on how language and writing has been used to construct and alter the meaning of “American identity.” In addition, we will also delve into the formation of identity from the perspectives of race, gender, and social class and examine how each has been used for this purpose.

Texts: Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby ISBN: 0684801523;  Hawthorne, Nathaniel. The Scarlet Letter ISBN: 0486280489;  Baym, Nina, Ed. The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter Sixth Edition ISBN: 0393979695.

Requirements: several response essays, a mid-term (cumulative), and a final exam essay

ENGL 2130-03: American Literature, Dr. Debra MacComb
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 208

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: This course will develop a range of enduring themes that have characterized American literature: the encounter with and appropriation of nature; the crafting of an identity that attempts to reconcile the desires of the individual with the needs of society; the individual’s ability to chart his own path to success; the “problem” of the socio-cultural “other”; and the tension between the public and private spheres. In exploring these themes, we will read a variety of canonical and non-canonical texts to examine the authorial strategies that developed over time which make these works aesthetically as well as historically pertinent.

Texts: Rowlandson, The Account of the Captivity; Franklin, The Autobiography; Foster, The Coquette; Sedgwick, Hope Leslie; Douglass, Narrative of the Life; Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin; Twain, Huckleberry Finn; Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Silko, Ceremony; Mason, In Country.

Requirements: Active and informed participation in class discussion, weekly reading responses, two short essays (3-4 pages), midterm and final exam.

ENGL 2130-04: American Literature, Prof. Kevin Murphy
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, Pafford 305

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: As a survey of American literature from the point of contact and colonization to the contemporary moment, this class will introduce students to the major literary movements and paradigms (such as Colonialism, Puritanism, Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism) that inform and sometimes confine our perceptions of this body of work.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of American Literature Shorter Seventh Edition (One Volume) and White Noise by Don DeLillo

Requirements: three essays, a midterm, and a final exam

ENGL 2130-05: American Literature, Prof. Carrie McWhorter
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Pafford 206

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: In a world where our focus is constantly on the future and people often communicate in 140 characters or less, what can we learn from those who put pen to paper in the past, providing a record in both fiction and non-fiction of the history, culture, and essential human experiences that make up the tapestry of American life? We will seek the answer to this question through our readings and study this semester. Through the lens of literature, we will examine the threads of this American tapestry and consider how our country’s past, present and future are intricately and irreversibly connected.

Texts: Nina Baym, et al., eds. The Norton Anthology of American Literature. Shorter Seventh Edition. New York: W.W. Norton, 2008. ISBN: 978-0-393-93057-3 (paperback), other readings and brief audio/video clips linked within CourseDen, and films on reserve at the library

Requirements: This section of American Lit will be technology-intense, with several classes meeting online through CourseDen. Class participation will be evaluated based on class discussions in the face-to-face meeting, as well as through participation in online discussion assignments. Three exams and two analytical essays also are required.

ENGL 2130-25H: American Literature-Honors, Dr. David Newton
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, Pafford 307

May count for credit in Core Area C. Honors course. Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register. 

Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce you to some of the writers and literary works that have made significant contributions to the development of literature in America. The works we will read encompass a historical period that covers almost four centuries, from the earliest years of English settlement in the New World and to the contemporary era. However, our investigation will push us well beyond a survey of these different literary works and toward a more sophisticated awareness of their various textual, cultural, and historical interrelationships. Specifically, we will examine how American literature is related to the historical and cultural development of America as a nation. We will also explore how different writers have struggled to understand and attempted to define through their writing what America is and what it means to be an American.

Consequently, our reading will be guided by a series of critical questions: How have Americans defined individual, cultural or national identity at different moments in our history as a nation? Does a national and/or individual identity that is uniquely American exist? What qualities or characteristics constitute individual and/or national identity? What roles do the historical past, personal experiences, and social environments or conditions play in defining who we are? To what extent has the American landscape as a geographic or symbolic space contributed to the formation of American identity?

As we examine these questions, we will focus on the various ways that language—especially writing—has been used to shape or construct individual and national identity in America. As we will discover, language is an essential resource for defining others and ourselves. We will also explore the question of identity from the perspectives of race, gender, and social class and examine how such categories have been used in the formation of identity in America. \

Texts: Major works will include Ben Franklin’s Autobiography, Frederick Douglass, Narrative of an American Slave, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Toni Morrison, A Mercy, and Stephanie Meyer, Twilight. Other representative works (poetry, essays, and short fiction) will feature such writers as Anne Bradstreet, Hector St. John de Crevecoeur, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Emily Dickinson, Sarah Orne Jewett, Alice Walker, Louise Erdrich, Sherman Alexie, Elizabeth Bishop, and Yusef Komunyakaa, among others.

Requirements: Regular attendance and active participation in class discussion, weekly quizzes, class presentations, and three major critical essays.

ENGL 2130-26H: American Literature-Honors, Dr. Alison Umminger
https://grim.westga.edu/www/spring/engl.ugs.htm
No description available.

May count for credit in Core Area C. Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register. 

ENGL 2180-01: Studies in African American Literature, Dr. S. Boyd
https://grim.westga.edu/www/spring/engl.ugs.htm
No description available.

May count for credit in Core Area C.

ENGL 2190-01: Studies in Literature by Women, Dr. Rebecca Harrison
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, TLC 1116

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: This class will investigate significant literary works by women writers and the emergence of a transatlantic American female aesthetic rooted in a state of and resistance to captivity. As Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar have written, women writers often experienced social constraints concerning gender where the female body (physical and textual) was told to “suffer and be still, to bleed and endure” (No Man’s Land 113). In resistance to these white, patriarchal constructs of female virtue and proper roles for women, many American women authors—consciously or not—wrote against the containment of female creativity, desire, and compulsory heterosexuality. Sometimes this resistance is subversive and geared towards raising consciousness and practicing discernment; at other times, it is full revolt.

After examining the highly politicized early American captivity narrative, a genre dominated by the experiences of women as captives, writers, and readers, this course will follow the transformation of captivity tropes (literal and metaphorical) and the employment of the female body in its evolution in the American literary and cultural landscape. In addition to selected poetry and polemical texts, we will explore sentimental and historical fiction and film.

Texts: TBA.

Requirements: Reading quizzes, active participation, two analytical essays, and two comprehensive exams.

ENGL 2300-01 and 02: Practical Criticism: Research and Methods, Prof. Mitzi McFarland
Section 01 (MW 12:30-1:45) and Section 02 (MW 2-3:15), Pafford 309

Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Requires permission of the academic coordinator. Email sholland@westga.edu for permission. Not offered during summer session.

Description: “Deconstruction” is a word that gets used in Newsweek. Scritti Pollitti, a pop group, publishes its lyrics under the copyright of “Jouissance Music,” borrowing a term that French critic Roland Barthes used to describe the pleasure of reading. Critic Thomas McLaughlin even recalls a time when he overheard a basketball coach say that his team had learned to “deconstruct a zone defense.”

Just what is all this theory talk? And why should we study it in a literature course?

Whether we are aware of it or not, resist it or welcome it, theory is absorbed into the fabric of our cultural and literary discourse. It is inherent in human perception, in our presuppositions and attitudes toward life. Even the most resistant reader makes theoretical decisions – conscious or not – about what kinds of texts to value most, how to read and study literature, what elements of plot, character, and language to focus on (or to overlook). We make theoretical decisions all the time that seem so “obvious,” so self-evident, that they’re not always recognized as theoretical or as decisions.

This course takes as its basic premise the idea that theory is inextricable from practice. Like it or not, we are always already “in theory.” In all our discussions, then, we will give attention to questions raised by contemporary literary theory: Why read? What should we read? How should we read? However, our central focus on “practical criticism” will involve the application of various approaches and methodologies to the explication – that is, to the interpretation and understanding of particular texts. This course is essentially a process course, where students can gain ample practice – through written and oral reports – in research methods, critical frameworks, and the close examination and analysis of texts. Hopefully, through the process of articulation, we will deepen our understanding of the aesthetic, literary, psychological, and socio-historical facets out of which texts are both generated and interpreted.

Texts: Parker, Robert Dale. How to Interpret Literature: Critical Theory for Literary and Cultural Studies. Oxford UP, 2008. ISBN: 978-0-19-533470-8; Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 6 th ed. MLA, 2003. ISBN: 0873529863; Cisneros, Sandra. The House on Mango Street. Vintage, 1984. ISBN: 0-679-73477-5; Yang, Gene Luen. American Born Chinese. First Second; Revised edition, 2006. ISBN: 978-1-59643-152-2; Highly recommended: Baldick, Chris. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms. Oxford UP, 2004. ISBN: 0198608837.

Requirements : 3 shorter analytical essays, a research paper (including proposal, required drafts, peer reviews, and an annotated bibliography), one oral presentation (film and critical theory discussion), final exam.

ENGL 2300-03: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Dr. Lisa Crafton
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Pafford 309

Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Requires permission of the academic coordinator. Email sholland@westga.edu for permission. Not offered during summer session.

Description: As a prerequisite for upper-division English studies, this course provides an introduction to representative critical approaches to literature. As English majors, the methods we all use to frame our interpretation of any text make us practicing literary critics, whether we know it or not. This course enables students to develop and articulate interpretations from a variety of theoretical approaches; we will investigate the historical development and key assumptions and methodologies of a select group of theories, but more importantly in their application to texts. Our case studies will be the film Fight Club and Toni Morrison’s novel Sula. Students will write essays from 3 different critical perspectives on short selections from various genres (short fiction, nonfiction, poems, films) we have read together in class (at least one on Shelley). Students’ final work will be a documented research paper and an oral presentation on contemporary film, music, or art.

Texts: Barry, Beginning Theory; Abrams, Glossary of Literary Terms; Gibaldi, MLA Handbook for Writers, Morrison, Sulan, and select poems/stories and films on electronic reserve.

Requirements: class participation, 3 critical essays, documented research paper (with proposal, annotated bibliography, drafts and peer reviews), oral report on critical approach to contemporary film/music.

ENGL 2300-04: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Dr. Chad Davidson
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, Humanities 206

Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Requires permission of the academic coordinator. Email sholland@westga.edu for permission. Not offered during summer session.

Description: This course serves as introduction to representative critical approaches in literary studies, with particular attention to research and methodology. Along the way, we will strengthen our interpretive skills and learn how meaning is manufactured jointly by author, text, reader, and culture.

Texts: Culler, Jonathan, Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction; Fitzgerald, F. Scott, The Great Gatsby; Hansberry, Lorraine, A Raisin in the Sun; Min, Anchee, Red Azalea; plus supplementary reading to be handed out in class.

Requirements: participation, weekly quizzes, four research-based essays.

ENGL 3160-01W: Philosophy in Literature and Film, Dr. Janet Donohoe
MWF 1:00pm-1:50pm, Pafford 105

Same as PHIL 3160. No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. DSW course.

Description: Philosophical ideas can be presented in surprising places. Through analysis of literature and film we can begin to recognize philosophical themes in genres other than straightforward philosophical treatises. This semester this course will address the philosophical themes of knowledge and tradition in philosophical and literary texts as well as in film. We will attempt to grasp how authors understand the relation of tradition to what we know and how we know it. We ask these questions in an effort to come to a deeper understanding of ourselves as human beings and our own relationship to our traditions.

Texts: Sophocles’s Antigone, Plato’s The Trial and Death of Socrates, Eco’s The Name of the Rose, Stoppard’s Arcadia. Additional shorter readings by Hawthorne, Heidegger, and Derrida will be made available in a course reader. We will view the following films. “A Man for All Seasons” by Fred Zinnemann, “Modern Times” by Charlie Chaplin, “Thin Blue Line” by Errol Morris, and “The Apostle” by Robert Duvall.

Requirements: response papers and in-class writing assignments, in-class written midterm exam, final paper of 2100-3000 words, in-class written final exam.

ENGL 3200-01W Intermediate Creative Writing-Nonfiction, Dr. Emily Hipchen
https://grim.westga.edu/www/spring/engl.ugs.htm
No description available.

Prerequisite: ENGL 2060. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.
DSW course.

ENGL 3200-02W Intermediate Creative Writing- Poetry, Prof. Brooke Parks
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Pafford 309

Prerequisite: ENGL 2060. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. DSW course.

Description: In ENGL 3200, we’ll explore the contexts of and possibilities for poetry. In this “grand tour” of the genre, you’ll read widely from a diverse group of poets; our tour will be organized according to the modes, or conventions, of poetry — the “things poems do.” At the same time, you’ll practice writing poetry yourselves — experimenting with many of these conventions through the processes of brainstorming, drafting, revising, compiling portfolios, etc. — and you’ll share much of that poetry with your classmates during workshop sessions.

Texts: Collins, Picnic, Lightning; Howe, The Good Thief; Matthews, After All; the other course readings will be available online, and will need to be printed out and brought to class.

Requirements: Regular reading and writing exercises, group presentations, oral and written contributions to workshop, and a final portfolio of polished work (including a critical preface).

ENGL 3200-03W Intermediate Creative Writing-Fiction, Dr. Alison Umminger
https://grim.westga.edu/www/spring/engl.ugs.htm
No description available.

Prerequisite: ENGL 2060. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. DSW course.

ENGL 3300-01W: Studies in American Culture, Dr. Lori Lipoma
Comedic Representations of Satan in American Culture
TR 2:00pm-3:15 pm, Pafford 307

Prerequisite: ENGL 2130, HIST 2110 or 2112. Same as HIST 3300. No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. DSW course.

Description: In this course, we will consider a problem that Andrew Delbanco identifies in The Death of Satan: How Americans have Lost the Sense of Evil, in which he argues that “a gulf has opened up in our culture between the visibility of evil and the intellectual resources available for coping with it”; has our postmodern culture, he asks, “emptied” the concept of evil of all meaning? Humor theorists John Morreall and V.I. Zilvys, on the other hand, argue that contemporary humor—even when it’s transgressive—is one of the most effective strategies for coping with evil, conflict, or adversity, especially in the endless complexities of our pluralistic national and global culture. As an introduction to American studies, therefore, we will examine Satan-comedy as a symptom of culture: its roots in our history and evolution in our literature and art. In so doing, we will attempt to answer three overriding questions for the course: What does “Satan-comedy” reveal about our religious and cultural fears, and the ways in which we confront them? What deeper meanings about our ongoing struggle with the problem of evil might we derive from such a paradoxical approach? Does such humor trivialize our experience, or might it be a means by which we can reorder our own perceptions of evil, morality, and value systems in collision?

Texts: Coursepack of Supplementary Readings (available at Book Store) includes selections by Cotton Mather, Elizabeth Reis, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Stephen Vincent Benet, Mark Twain, V. I. Zilvys, John Morreall, Andrew Delbanco. Batchelor, Stephen. Living With the Devil: A Meditation on Good and Evil. ISBN: 1594480877. Publisher: Riverhead Trade

Requirements: Five response papers 1-1/2 to 2 pages (10% ea—50% total); class discussion leading (5%); research presentation (15%); research project 8-10 pages (30%).

ENGL 3350-01W: Introduction to Africana Studies, Dr. S. Boyd
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 206

Required for the minor in Africana Studies. Same as HIST 3350. No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. DSW course.

Description: This multidisciplinary course introduces students to the field of Africana (African American) Studies by surveying some of the major areas of development in historical studies, literary studies, social sciences, and the arts. Beginning with the birth of Black Studies out of the black student movement, the course will then explore topics within the following categories: 1) African and Diaspora—i.e., the history of ancient African civilizations and the consequences of the transatlantic slave trade; 2) expressive arts and culture-i.e., oral, musical, and literary creativity; 3) identities, ideologies, and institutions-i.e., the black freedoms struggle, gender, sexuality, and class issues within Black religious and social institutions. We will conclude the semester with discussion of contemporary issues such as reparations, affirmative action, hip hop, and Barack Obama.

Texts: All readings will be on electronic reserve.

Requirements: presentations, quizzes, essays, attendance at cultural event, extensive research project

ENGL 3400-01W: Pedagogy and Writing, Dr. Angela Insenga
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, TLC 1204

No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. DSW course. Required for certification in Secondary English Education for those who entered the program in fall 2008 or later. Those who entered before fall 2008 may choose to take ENGL 3405.

Description: Pedagogy [ped-uh-goh-jee, -goj-ee]–noun, plural -gies. 1. The function or work of a teacher; teaching. 2. The art or science of teaching; education; instructional methods.

Most English Education majors spend the better part of their college years engaged in close reading, interpreting, and producing various types of writing. There comes a time, however, when teachers-in-training turn their attention towards the work of learning instructional strategies. When we raise our hands in classes to ask what, how, and even why we teach, we signal this large shift.

This pedagogy-centered course begins to address these questions.

Because we become better teachers when we continue to practice the skills of close reading and the craft of writing, we will first talk much about our own writing practices, namely those methods we can detect in the instruction we’ve received and their effect on our learning. We will write, rewrite, and write again in an effort to hone our skills recursively. Then, we will turn our attention to current trends and instructional methods deployed in secondary English/Language Arts by not only reading and analyzing primary texts but also the assumptions that inform classroom practice. To deepen our understanding of the myriad pedagogical possibilities in English Studies, the course requires observations of other teachers at work in composition and literature, and students will have the opportunity to attend a community literacy event after studying the text that inspired it.

Texts:  Teaching Writing in Middle and Secondary Schools, by Jim Blasingame and John H. Bushman; To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee; The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. by Sherman Alexie; My Own True Name: New and Selected Poems for Young Adults, by Pat Mora; The Conceptual Framework, from UWG’s Professional Education Unit and the College of Education (nothing to buy).

Requirements:  2, 3-4 page essays. 10 and 15%; Pedagogy Project 35%; Participation and Professionalism 10%; Daily Work 10%; Observations and Observation Narratives 20%.

ENGL 3405-01W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. Crystal R. Shelnutt
MW 2:00pm-3:15 pm, TLC 1110

No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. DSW course.

Description: English 3405-01W will introduce students to basic rhetorical concepts that govern a multitude of professional and technical situations.

Highlighting the importance of the writing process, this course will concentrate on the fundamental topics and principles within professional writing communities in order to train students in effective and persuasive communication.

Students will gain intensive practice in composing powerful audience-driven documents—from gathering information through primary and secondary research to the planning and organizing of these workplace communiqués. Covering a wide range of technical communication—from letters, memos, and job application materials to definitions, descriptions, and instructions—this course provides practical and pertinent instruction in the professional standards which students will encounter in their future careers.

Moreover, students will learn how to craft effective business-related presentations supported with appropriate documentary and visual aids, as well as collaborate on research and reporting projects.

Texts: Technical Communication, 9th ed. Mike Markel. Bedford/St. Martin. ISBN#: 978-0-312-55532-0

Requirements: Successful completion of English 1101 and English 1102

ENGL 3405-02W: Professional & Technical Writing , Prof. C. Bowie
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, TLC 1110

No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. DSW course.

Description: This course will focus primarily on ways to write, structure, and present technical and professional documents. The class will discuss rhetorical concepts and communication protocols appropriate in formal settings, such as the workplace or the academic environment, and produce several types of documents required for functionality and success in these settings. These documents may include (but are not limited to) job applications, resumés, memos, e-mail, formal letters, researched presentations, and other documents which must be produced, drafted, revised, and exchanged within a professional or business environment. Students must be prepared to collaborate with others inside as well as outside the classroom, be aware of the appropriate audience of every formal document, and be able to produce pristine copies of the required professional forms assigned.

Texts: Alred, Gerald J. Charles T. Brusaw, and Walter E. Oliu. The Business Writer’s Handbook (9th ed., Rev.) . St. Martin’s. ISBN 9780312575106; Course packet; technical writing handbook TBD.

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 3405-03W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. John Sturgis
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, TLC 1109

No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. DSW course.

Description: The concept of the profession of Technical Writing has evolved from an auxiliary function practiced by necessity into a full blown primary profession that includes virtually every imaginable industry and service oriented business on the planet. Successfully marketed products and services cannot exist without complete written descriptions, specifications, functional instructions, promotional materials, and other supporting documentation. The ever-changing rhetorical situations that surround the creation of these documentary instruments provide the exploratory field for this course. Participants will discover absolutely new ways to employ their writing abilities and to stretch their understanding of their own writing processes by generating an entirely original set of documents based on real-time requirements and standards of practice.

Texts: (Provisional entry) Alred, Gerald J., Charles T. Brusaw, and Walter E. Oliu. The Technical Writer’s Companion. Third Edition. Boston: Bedford / St. Martin’s. 2002.

ISBN 0-312-25978-6. (Subject to change).

Requirements: Students will execute a variety of different writing tasks under a variety of rhetorical situations established by the assignments package: Resumes, cover letters, business letters, and writing samples will be combined into a job search Presentation Package delivered at the midterm. A completed Research Project covering a subject of the student’s own choice will result in a Formal Report and Presentation delivered at the end of the semester.

ENGL 4/5106-01W: Studies in Genre-Fiction, Prof. Randy Hendricks
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 208

DSW course. Satisfies Major area B1 or B2 on the progarm sheet. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters.

Description: Using both practical and theoretical approaches to the interpretation of prose fiction, and with attention to the history and evolution of fictional forms, we will devote the semester to reading, discussing, and writing about several short stories and other short forms (fairy tales, comedy sketches, etc.) of fiction and one novel. We’ll study classic and recently published works from North and South America, Eastern and Western Europe, Africa, and Asia. Students can expect to learn the terms associated with close analysis of fiction and to become familiar with some of the more important theoretical statements that have defined and shaped fiction. Detailed written responses to reading assignments will help students prepare for class and lead to more formal writing assignments.

Texts: Bohner and Grant, Short Fiction: Classic and Contemporary, Sixth Edition; Brontё, Wuthering Heights, Bedford Case Studies on Contemporary Criticism, Second Edition

Requirements: (1) a reading notebook: reading responses, a number of short papers, and independent analysis of one contemporary short story (2) final exam, (3) one short paper, (4) one longer paper requiring use of multiple sources and appropriate documentation.

ENGL 4/5106-02W: Studies in Genre-Poetry, Dr. Melanie Jordan
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Pafford 307

DSW course. Satisfies Major area B1 or B2 on the program sheet. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters.

DescriptionAn examination of the formal, social, cultural and historical contexts of poetry as well as the theoretical concerns that underlie its analysis.

This course is an intense study of how poetry works and how it means. We will examine poetics and the ways in which poetry is affected and intersected by history and culture. The course aims to incorporate multiple aesthetics and poetic approaches. While the bulk of the poets we study will be nineteenth- and twentieth-century British and American poets, we will also examine poets outside those categories. The class will focus daily on close reading and interpretation; the major projects will require rigorous critical writing.

Text: The Norton Anthology of Poetry (paperback) Shorter Edition. Eds. Margaret Ferguson, et al.

Requirements: five memorizations, four critical writing projects, daily grades

ENGL 4/5106-03W: Studies in Genre-Drama, Dr. Maria Doyle
TR 5:30pm-6:45 pm, Pafford 307

DSW course. Satisfies Major area B1 or B2 on the program sheet. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters.

Description: Literally, a play is a piece of literature written in dialogue and meant for performance, but the larger question that this course will explore is the more important issue of why a writer might choose this particular form of expression: what’s the value of putting real actors in a room with a real audience, and how does this shape the way a writer presents his or her ideas? Rather than attempting a complete survey of a genre that has been around for well over two millennia, this course will organize its exploration around a set of archetypal Greek models -- the human fall of Oedipus, the rebellion of Antigone and the frenzied destruction of Euripides’s Bacchae -- using analysis of these plays to inform a reading of major developments in modern theater, from Tennessee Williams’s modern gothic to Tom Stoppard's parodic absurdism and August Wilson’s stage chronicle of African-American experience. Discussions will provide students with a vocabulary for reading British, American and world drama as literature –its connection to larger literary, political and social movements – and as theater – its relation to performance conventions and stage spaces. Students will attend a production in Atlanta as part of their course material.

Texts: Sophocles, Oedipus Rex and Antigone, Euripides, The Bacchae, William Shakespeare, King Lear, J.M. Synge, The Playboy of the Western World, Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire, Vaclav Havel, Largo Desolato, August Wilson, The Piano Lesson, Margaret Edson, Wit, Wole Soyinka, Death and the King's Horseman, Tom Stoppard, The Real Inspector Hound

Requirements: For undergraduates, two short papers, periodic quizzes, final research project, final exam, active discussion participation. Graduate students will complete additional secondary reading and a longer research project including a substantial annotated bibliography.

ENGL 4/5109-01W: Film as Literature, Dr. Barbara Brickman
The 1970s American Renaissance
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 1200

DSW course. Satisfies Major area B1 or B2 on program sheet. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Description: This course will explore the explosion of innovative filmmaking in the United States in the late 1960s and early 1970s know as the “American Renaissance” in film, or “New American Cinema.” The films and directors associated with this new wave of American filmmaking often reflect on the social turmoil and political debates that began in the 1960s student movements and concluded in the harsh disillusionment brought by the end of the Vietnam War and the Watergate scandal. We will discuss the political and social import of these films, as well as the end of this era of filmmaking in which the “New Hollywood” blockbuster brought back the business imperatives and mythic function of popular cinema in the U.S. Possible films include: Bonnie and Clyde, Jaws, Shaft, Taxi Driver, The Godfather: Part II, Girlfriends, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Star Wars, M*A*S*H, Chinatown, The Last House on the Left, Grey Gardens

Texts: Cook, Lost Illusions: American Cinema in the Shadow of Watergate and Vietnam

Requirements: discussion leading, three short essays, exam, research project

ENGL 4/5120-01W: Seventeenth-Century British Literature, Dr. Meg Pearson
Revenge, Revolution(s), and Restoration
TR 9:30am-10:45am Humanities 208

DSW course. Satisfies Major area A1 on the program sheet.

Description: The seventeenth century in Britain featured the Gunpowder Plot, Irish and Scottish rebellion, witch trials, civil war, foreign conspiracies, regicide, and unceasing religious dissent. From this roiling stew of upheaval emerges some of the darkest but also the most stirring poetry and prose in the English language. We will follow the massive shifts in English history and literature over the course of one hundred years: from bloody revenge tragedy to fevered political philosophy, through epic works seeking to justify the ways of God to man to cavalier poetry in search of illicit rendezvous. There is no single seventeenth century; this class explores instead the multitude of experiences and transformations that pushed Britain from the Renaissance into the Enlightenment and Empire.

Texts: Works will include poetry, political tracts, plays and prose by such authors as John Donne, Francis Bacon, John Milton, Margaret Cavendish, Aphra Behn, and John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester

Requirements: Two short Papers, Take-home midterm, Long Paper

English 4/5140-01W: American Romanticism, Dr. Patrick Erben
Radical Romanticisms
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, Pafford 109

DSW course. Satisfies Major area A3 on the program sheet.

Description: Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Dickinson—if a list of these 19th-century American authors makes you yawn, this course will help you wake up to the fresh and radical ideas of a generation of writers who tried to rouse their contemporaries from the dusty remains of Puritanism, the complacent acceptance of slavery, the mindless imitation of European literature and culture, the smug belief in the exceptionalism of American liberty, the debasing of human sexuality as filth, and—above all—the inability to think independently. Women writers such as Margaret Fuller and Fanny Fern as well as escaped slaves such as Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, moreover, fueled the spirit of discontent and radical change from the “margins.” In this course, we will study how the new art forms, philosophies, and social movements emerging from this period affected 19th century America, but we will also explore how they have influenced writers and activists across the ages. When Thoreau famously postulated “Let your life be a counter-friction to stop the machine,” he also inspired activists from Mahatma Gandhi to Martin Luther King. So, this spring, come along and take a dip in the cool waters of “Walden Pond.”

Texts: Norton Anthology of American Literature, 7th ed., vol. B (1820-1865).

Requirements: Lively participation, regular quizzes, one oral presentation, one short paper, one research paper (exploring how American Romanticism reverberates in 20th-century and present-day culture).

ENGL 4/5150-01W: American Realism and Naturalism, Dr. Debra MacComb
The Civil Wars
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 208

DSW course. Satisfies Major area A3 on the program sheet.

Description: This course examines the American literary arts based in an aesthetic of accurate, unromanticized observation/representation of life and nature that flourished between the Civil War and WWI. Students are expected to develop a vocabulary of realist/naturalism theory and technique and an understanding of the ideologies underlying their practice. Integral to the study of the period and its dominant aesthetic will be an introduction to a number of social, political and philosophical developments such as the American Civil War, the rise of the middle class, the unrest of the working class, the increasing segregation of the races, the rise of regional identities, the burgeoning consumer culture, the influence of Darwinian theories of survival and determinism, new technologies, reform movements in education, business and the workplace, and the emergence of the “New Woman.”

Texts: Cahan, Yekl; Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition; Crane, The Red Badge of Courage; James, The American; Jewett, The Country of the Pointed Firs; London, The Call of the Wild; Twain, Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court; Wharton, Ethan Frome.

Requirements: Active and informed participation in class discussion, weekly reading questions, two short essays (2-3 pages), prospectus and documented essay (8-10 pages), final exam.

ENGL 4/5185-01W: Studies in Literature by Women, Dr. Lisa Crafton
TR 11:00am-12:15pm Pafford 307

DSW course. Satisfies Major area A2 on the program sheet. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Description: The contemporary novel and film The Hours reclaims and renews Virginia Woolf ’s Mrs. Dalloway (originally titled The Hours). The novel about three women searching for meaning and connection at three different places and times blurs the lines between life and literature; if we are all really as interconnected as he (and Woolf ) would have us believe, are we really so neatly separated from the fictional characters we resemble or create? These questions will help shape our study of British women writers in context. This course explores a diversity of literature by British women writers, from medieval mystic Julian of Norwich (who offers the maternal female body as analogy to God) to Mary Shelley (whose characters grapple with “body” of any material sort) to Nadine Gordimer (who represents the female body as a site of conflict including race, class, and gender in relations in South Africa). Course readings will require us to consider allegorical, spiritual renderings of the body as in Julian or the conflict between spiritual and sexual in the poetry of Rosetti; we will explore the intersection of the female body with social/political/cultural norms in Behn, Wollstonecraft, Shelley, Austen, and Gordimer. Finally, we will read Woolf ’s A Room of One’s Own and Mrs. Dalloway in the context of the contemporary text The Hours and the question of a “tradition” of women writers.

Texts: Behn, The Rover; Wollstonecraft, Maria, or the Wrongs of Woman; Shelley, Frankenstein; Austen, Mansfield Park; Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Cunningham, The Hours; Texts on electronic reserve: Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe, Amelia Lanier, Christina Rosetti, and Nadine Gordimer.

Requirements: Active participation in class; brief response essays; midterm and final exams; 10 page documented paper.

ENGL 4/5188-01W: Individual Authors-Tennessee Williams, Dr. Maria Doyle
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 231

DSW course. Satisfies Major area A4 on the program sheet. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to fulfill the major's Individual Author's requirement.

Description: As a pivotal figure in the maturation of American theater, Tennessee Williams produced a drama whose distinct, often lyrical voice challenged audiences with its frank exploration of the intricacies of sexual desire, its increasing aura of brutality and its refusal to provide neat resolutions to moral and cultural dilemmas. This course will allow students to examine Williams’s repressed belles, disillusioned philosophers and corroded psychological landscapes with an eye to understanding the lines of influence that helped to shape his dramas and the relevance of that work during his period of greatest productivity, from his first major success with The Glass Menagerie in 1945 through the 1960s. Students will have the opportunity for extended discussion of individual plays, as the syllabus will couple exploration of the dramas themselves – their language, cultural background and performance history – with additional contextualizing readings, including selections from Williams's short stories, from classical mythology and from other writers who influenced his work; we will also discuss some more contemporary theatrical versions (and revisions) to Williams's plays and the intricacies of adapting the plays for film, a process complicated by conservative Hollywood production codes that often mandated changes to the original texts. Other topics of discussion will include the mythic and ritual dimensions of Williams's theater and critical controversies over his representation of gender, race and sexuality, particularly as these are linked to the conceptualization of a changing America and a changing American South.

Texts: Tennessee Williams, The Glass Menagerie, A Streetcar Named Desire, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Orpheus Descending, Camino Real, Summer and Smoke, Night of the Iguana, along with selected short stories and film adaptations; students will also read selections from Euripides, Ovid, August Strindberg, D. H. Lawrence and Rainer Maria Rilke to assess their influence on Williams's work.

Requirements: For undergraduates, an ongoing analytical journal, periodic quizzes, final research project and final exam. Graduate students will complete additional secondary reading and a longer research project including a substantial annotated bibliography.

ENGL 4/5210-01W: Advanced Creative Writing-Poetry, Dr. Chad Davidson
W: 5:30pm-8:00pm, Pafford 309

Prerequisite: ENGL 3200 (same genre). DSW course. Satisfies Major area C on the program sheet. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Description: This class will focus on the generation and revision of poetic material through intensive, process-oriented strategies. More than merely create works of art, we will be interested in designing and implementing a sustainable writing practice. We will foster an atmosphere of energetic dialogue between each other’s work and the wider corpus of poems written in, or translated into, English. Additionally, we will study intimately a host of contemporary poets, many of whom will actually visit our class and give readings to the wider campus. The course will culminate in a final portfolio of original poems (including a critical preface) predicated on a deep, semester-long engagement with poetry.

Texts: Bond, Bruce, Blind Rain; Davidson and Fraser, Writing Poetry: Creative and Critical Approaches; Estes, Angie, Tryst; Fagan, Kathy, Lip; Hayes, Terrance, Wind in a Box; Poch, John, Dolls; Trethewey, Natasha, Native Guard; plus supplementary reading to be distributed in class.

Requirements: participation, intensive journaling, workshop criticism, daily calisthenics, final portfolio of original work, with critical preface.

ENGL 4286-01: Teaching Internship, Dr. Rebecca Harrison
Tuesdays 5:30pm-7:00pm, TLC 1112

Contact ainsenga@westga.edu for permission to register. Admission to TEP and application for internship required. 

Description: The internship for secondary education certification involves teaching English for one semester in a public school under the supervision of an experienced, qualified English teacher. Weekly seminars are an integral part of the student teaching experience and will model and provide interns with numerous and varied opportunities to plan, deliver, evaluate, and revise educational strategies. Such a learning environment, based on developing best practices through sound pedagogical modeling, will serve as part of an ongoing and comprehensive portfolio assessment process. Students will assemble capstone portfolios of their personal and professional work as evidence of their advancement.

Texts: Provided electronically.

Requirements: An active Foliotek account. Six mandatory field observations, including lesson plans with standards. A polished, final portfolio containing necessary professional artifacts such as a resume, teaching philosophy, effect on instruction, portfolio introduction, and case study responses. Active seminar participation is a must.

ENGL 4/5300-01: Studies in the English Language-Grammar, Dr. David Newton
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Pafford 307

Satisfies Major area C on the program sheet. Required for certification in Secondary English Education. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Description: In this course we will explore the structure or grammar of the English language and work toward understanding the principles or rules that make it work. This course is primarily designed for English majors who seek to improve the grammatical proficiency of their writing and for future teachers at the secondary and college level. However, this course also has applications for students entering business and industry, science and medical fields, law and politics, media and public relations, or anyone who recognizes the essential human value of language and who understands how the ability to use language contributes to personal and professional success in life. After all, when you are talking to friends, asking someone out on a date, debating sports or politics, buying clothes at the mall, or writing a paper, you are using the structures and principles of English grammar, even when your sentences are not grammatical! However, knowing a language and knowing about the language are different kinds of knowledge. Even the ability to speak grammatically correct sentences in no way guarantees that a speaker knows enough about English to explain what makes those sentences grammatical. This course is designed to help you achieve that knowledge. We will refer frequently to Standard English, and, certainly, one of the benefits of this course is that it will help you refine your written and verbal language skills. However, this is not simply a course about grammatical correctness; instead, this course is designed to help you understand how the English language functions, what structures and rules are behind the sentence constructions that you and others create every day. To accomplish this task, we will learn some basic linguistic and grammatical concepts, and we will learn how to analyze (and diagram) different sentence constructions. We will also learn how elements of the language (verbs, nouns, sentence structures, pronouns, etc.) emerged and changed over time to create the language we use today.

Texts: Vitto, Cindy. Grammar by Diagram. Second Edition. Broadview Press, 2006; Vitto, Cindy. Grammar by Diagram Workbook. Broadview Press, 2008. NOTE: These textbooks can be purchased as a set at a reduced price from the bookstore. The ISBN for the bundled set is either 978-1-55402-925-9 or 1-55402-925-2.

Requirements: Daily reading and homework assignments from the textbook and workbook, periodic quizzes, and 4 major examinations. In addition to these requirements, graduate students will produce an annotated bibliography and a research paper that relates the study of grammar to their career or professional goals (education, law, literary studies, editing, writing, etc.).

ENGL 4384-01W: Senior Seminar, Prof. S. Boyd
Engendering Men: Constructions of American Masculinities
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, TLC 1204

Registration requires permission of Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu). Required for all English majors. Cannot be taken until ENGL 1101, 1102, and core area F have been completed with a minimum passing grade of C. A minimum of 18 hours of upper-level English courses must also have been completed with no grade lower than C. Not offered during summer session. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of DSW requirement.

Description: This capstone seminar is designed to give students an opportunity to use their writing and critical thinking skills toward the production of a seminar anthology. We will integrate literature, theory and writing, centering on the construction of American masculinities. With the rise of gender studies as a codified field of inquiry, the focus on masculinity makes possible the notion that men’s performance of their gender is not fixed in time nor fixed in the body. Feminist theorist Judith Butler has argued in Gender Trouble (1990) that gender is performed and the qualified boundaries of that performance must be continually reinforced because the performance is not natural to bodies. We have both positive and negative expectations of manhood, and masculinity, in turn, appears essential to what it means to be a man in the United States. Ironically, a particular type of anxiety attends to the performance of gender as men and women attempt to conform to hegemonic notions of femininity and masculinity.

Texts: selected critical works will be provided via course reserves

Requirements: Class discussion, response papers, presentations, substantive research project, including prospectus, abstract, and annotated bibliography.

ENGL 4384-02W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Joshua Masters
This Is the Way the World Ends: The Apocalypse in Literature and Film
Tuesdays 5:30pm-8:00pm, Pafford 309

Registration requires permission of Susan Holland ( sholland@westga.edu). Required for all English majors. Cannot be taken until ENGL 1101, 1102, and core area F have been completed with a minimum passing grade of C. A minimum of 18 hours of upper-level English courses must also have been completed with no grade lower than C. Not offered during summer session. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of DSW requirement.

Description: Alien invasions, viral outbreaks, the flood, the rapture, the second coming, the second ice age, the rise of the machines—these are just a few of the ways human beings have imagined their “end of days.” This class will pose the theoretically imposing question, “So, like, what’s up with that?” What do we tell ourselves about ourselves when we dream of the apocalypse? What are the social and political functions of these narratives in any given historical period? How do different cultures imagine the apocalypse, and what do these differences reveal? I am anxious to discover some answers to these questions, and not just because the end could indeed be upon us. If these questions interest you—as you reach the end of your undergraduate lives—then I hope you will join me in this tour of our darkest imaginings. We will read three contemporary novels, sample from the vast array of apocalyptic films—from Invasion of the Body Snatchers to The Planet of the Apes (Charleton Heston’s rather than Marky Mark’s) to The Matrix—and immerse ourselves in the critical and cultural theories that surround apocalyptic narratives.

Required Texts: Cormac McCarthy, The Road; Octavia Butler, Parable of the Sower; Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony; (All theoretical and critical material will be on electronic reserve in the library.)

Requirements: Active participation in class, an oral report, two response essays, a substantive research project (including prospectus, abstract, and annotated bibliography), and a final presentation.

ENGL 6115: Seminar in British Literature II, Dr. Margaret E. Mitchell
Victorians and Neo-Victorians: Choosing Our Ghosts
Thursdays 5:30pm-8:15pm, TLC 1204

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies. 

Description: What is it that we want from the Victorians? Why do they at once repel and fascinate us? Why do we persist in probing the underworld that even the Victorians themselves supposedly preferred to ignore (with the exception, of course, of those who studied it exhaustively)? Why did someone write to the Victorian Studies list serve several years ago asking for advice on how to stage a Jack the Ripper Halloween party, and why did the request spark such indignation? Can we formulate the answer to these questions as nearly as Foucault does when he asserts that “What sustains our eagerness to speak of sex in terms of repression is doubtless this opportunity to speak out against the powers that be”? What is the subtext of our ongoing dialogue with the Victorians—what are its political, sexual, and aesthetic underpinnings? These and other theoretical questions drive the emergent and vital field of Neo-Victorianism, which seeks to understand our perpetual engagement with the corseted, top-hatted nineteenth century. In this class we will enter into that conversation, alternating between Victorian novels and more recent texts that have, for various reasons, been dubbed “Neo-Victorian,” and investigating why—and how—the Victorians haunt us still.

Texts: The French Lieutenant’s Woman, John Fowles; The Meaning of Night, Michael Cox; Fingersmith, Sarah Waters; The Crimson Petal and The White, Michel Faber; In the Red Kitchen, Michele Roberts; Rebecca, Daphne du Maurier; The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, Anne Brontë; The Woman in White, Wilkie Collins; Bleak House, Charles Dickens; Ruth, Elizabeth Gaskell; Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Thomas Hardy; The Nether World, George Gissing. Critical reading will be placed on electronic reserve.

Requirements: Response papers, oral presentation, 15-20 page research paper, active participation.

ENGL 6120-01: Seminar in American Literature II, Dr. Debra MacComb
The Violence of Manners
Tuesdays 5:30pm-8:00pm, TLC 1204

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies. 

Description: The manners, the manners: where and what are they, and what have they to tell?
Henry James, The American Scene

A turn-of-the-century debate over the social, political and economic enfranchisement of women, African Americans and immigrants coincided with the emergence of the sciences of ethnography, anthropology and sociology and a burgeoning industry in etiquette books. This course proposes to read the American novel of manners against this context in order to examine representations of the coercive force exerted by mystified—but apparently “natural”—social practices/rituals. A number of period authors adopt the stance of the objective social scientist to reveal that manners cloak unspoken and unsuspected cultural interests inimical to the individual and, as such, operate as the “gentle, hidden form which violence takes when overt violence is impossible” in order to maintain those interests. The novels covered will consider the plight of the social “other” whose desire both “to be” and “to belong” is hopelessly confounded by the hieroglyphic world of manners.

Texts: James, The American; Wharton The House of Mirth and The Age of Innocence; Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition; Cahan, Yekl; Crane, The Red Badge of Courage; Larsen, Passing; London, The Call of the Wild; Veblen, The Theory of the Leisure Class; course reader.

Requirements: Informed participation in seminar discussions, weekly response papers (c. 1 page), oral report, research prospectus and essay (15-18 pages).

ENGL 6385: Seminar in Special Topics, Dr. Emily Hipchen
https://grim.westga.edu/www/spring/engl.grs.htm
No description available.

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies. 


FILM 2080-01: Introduction to the Art of Film, Prof. Patricia Burgey
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 208

This is an introductory course, and assumes no prior knowledge of film.

Description: In this course students will consider the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. Students will watch a wide range of films from a variety of countries and historical moments in film history. Students will have the chance to explore issues such as framing, photographic space, film shot, editing, sound, genre, narrative form, acting style, and lighting in the context of wider discussions of the weekly films. This is an introductory course, and assumes no prior knowledge of film.

Texts: Corrigan, Timothy and Patricia White. The Film Experience: An Introduction

Requirements: Weekly quizzes, analysis papers, and two exams

FILM 2100-01: History and Theory of Film, Dr. Barbara Brickman
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, TLC 1203

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 and 1102.

Description: This course will explore major developments in film history, theory, and criticism. Students will become familiar with several different film movements in the development of the art form and will be introduced to basic ideas in film theory. Through a variety of film movements and historical periods, students will develop an understanding of the cultural, industrial, and political contexts for some of most significant debates about film. Specific topics covered will include Russian formalism, the history of classical Hollywood cinema, the French New Wave, recent global cinemas, as well as alternatives to Hollywood in the United States.

Texts: Mast, A Short History of the Movies: Tenth Abridged Edition

Requirements: discussion leading, two short essays, quizzes, and exams


XIDS 2002-01: What Do You Know About Learning?, Dr. Lori Lipoma
Comedy, Transgression, and Cosmopolitanism
TR 12:30pm-1:20 pm, Pafford 208

Satisfies area B2 of the core.

Description: Comedy holds the key to peaceful co-existence in our turbulent, mind-boggling, ever-encroaching global society?

Who knew??!?!

Kwame Anthony Appiah argues that as we discover new areas of global interconnectedness and diversity, we are simultaneously having to confront and navigate the deep cultural and ideological differences that divide us. Appiah provides a model for how we can learn to balance the demands of society and the needs of the individual.

In this course, we will examine one path to practicing how to live in the difficult practice that Appiah calls “imaginative engagement”: Comedy. Cosmopolitanism and comedy both entail learning about borders and boundaries—where they are, what they are, the ways in which we and others are always transgressing them, and what we think and do when it happens. Moreover, comedy helps us to cope with fear and stress, learn how to think critically about our lives and our world, lead individual lives while retaining our own distinctiveness, and thrive amid the conflicts of global citizenship.

In “Comedy, Transgression, and Cosmopolitanism,” we will first study Appiah’s theories, humor theory and the abject, all while examining the intersection of all these ideas within some of the funniest writing, stand-up, TV, and movies we’ve ever seen.

Texts: Appiah, Kwame Anthony. Cosmpolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers

Requirements: Three 1-1/2 to 2-page response papers: 10% each / 30% cumulative; Oral presentation/leading class discussion: 20%; Midterm exam: 20%; Participation: 10%; Final: 20%

XIDS 2100-04: Arts and Ideas-The Creative Process, Prof. Jason Kesler
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, Pafford 206

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 and 1102. Required for the minor in Creative Writing. May be used to Satisfy area C1 of the core.

Description: the definite article 1 a — used as a function word to indicate that a following noun or noun equivalent is definite or has been previously specified by context or by circumstance b — used as a function word to indicate that a following noun or noun equivalent is a unique or a particular member of its class c — used as a function word before nouns that designate natural phenomena or points of the compass d — used as a function word before a noun denoting time to indicate reference to what is present or immediate or is under consideration [. . .]

creative adj 1 : marked by the ability or power to create : given to creating 2 : having the quality of something created rather than imitated : IMAGINATIVE 3 : managed so as to get around legal or conventional limits ; also : deceptively arranged so as to conceal or defraud

process n 1 a : PROGRESS, ADVANCE b : something going on : PROCEEDING 2 a (1) : a natural phenomenon marked by gradual changes that lead toward a particular result (2) : a natural continuing activity or function b : a series of actions or operations conducing to an end; esp : a continuous operation or treatment esp. in manufacture

(definitions taken from Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary)

Based upon the above definitions, a multitude of questions arise. Is there a definitive set of activities one can perform to produce a new object that has never existed before? Is creativity a natural function of all human beings, or is it conferred upon a fortunate (or unfortunate) few by some supernatural being? Is there a destructive aspect to the creative process? Is there even such a thing as creativity, or are we simply denying that we are imitating what we experience and rearranging an ever increasing collection of influences? By studying notable scientists and artists, religious and secular texts . . . and yes, even by studying ourselves, we will confront these questions and others to come to a better understanding of the creative process – what it is, where it comes from, who is responsible for it, why it is so vital to our existence, and how it can be used, misused and abused. Students will be responsible for reading and responding to various texts, as well as evaluating their own experiences with the creative process. In addition, students will critique, in a constructive and responsible manner, the creative processes of their classmates.

Texts: Ghiselin, Brewster ed. The Creative Process: Reflections on Invention in the Arts and Sciences. Csikszentmihalyi, Mihalyi. Creativity: Flow and the Creative Process.

Requirements: Students will be required to keep a journal recording their reactions to the course readings, group workshops, and creative processes; complete various creative exercises; take two examinations relating to the texts; and submit a final creative project accompanied by critical essay.

XIDS 2100-05: Arts and Ideas, Dr. Lisa Propst
Jewish American Literature and Culture
TR 9:00am-10:45am, Humanities 209

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 and 1102. Satisfies area C1 of the core.

Description:This course explores the interrelationships among Jewish American history, fiction, film, and visual arts. It considers how the experiences of Jewish artists and writers have shaped their works and how these art works, in turn, have contributed to diverse conceptions of Jewish American identity. The course moves from Eastern European legacies to experiences of immigration, acculturation, and self-definition. Within this context, our readings and discussions will focus on people’s efforts to define themselves through acts of imagination. Such acts of imagination can be destructive, enabling people to ignore the demands of the world around them or to manipulate others. They can also be survival strategies, both literal and psychological: means of escaping danger through trickery or of finding hope under bleak conditions.

Texts: Anzia Yezierska, Bread Givers; Philip Roth, American Pastoral; Art Spiegelman, Maus; Electronic reserves, art and photography slides, and 2-3 films.

Requirements: One 4-5 page textual analysis essay; Two exams (midterm and final); Group creative project with related individual reflection; Attendance at 5 cultural events and written reflections; In-class writing and short homework assignments; Class participation.

XIDS 2100-06: Arts and Ideas-Modernism: Modern Love, Prof. Josh Grant
https://grim.westga.edu/www/schedule.htm
No description available.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 and 1102. Satisfies area C1 of the core.

XIDS 2100-07: Arts and Ideas-The Monstrous and the Grotesque, Prof. Mandi Campbell
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, Pafford 204

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 and 1102. Satisfies area C1 of the core.

Description: In this class, we will consider how cultural, social, political and religious influences work to construct humankind’s collective fears. As we study an array of gothic novels and contemporary horror films, we will come to understand that the “monsters” in these texts are personifications of common fears and that the stories themselves are hyperbolized versions of decidedly less grotesque, though debatably less frightening, realistic situations.

Texts: Darryl Jones, Horror: A Thematic History in Fiction and Film; Noel Carroll, Philosophy of Horror: Or, Paradoxes of Heart; and Mary Shelley, Bram Stoker and Robert Louis Stevenson, Frankenstein, Dracula, and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (published as a single volume). You also will be required to watch an array of contemporary horror films. (Films TBA.)

Requirements: weekly journal postings; cultural event attendance and reports; group project; one short essay; midterm and final exams

XIDS 2100-08: Arts and Ideas-The Monstrous and Grotesque, Prof. Stephanie Henderson Hollenbeck
MWF 10:00am-10:50am, Pafford 305

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 and 1102. Satisfies area C1 of the core.

Description: We will trace the evolution of the horror genre by examining both classic and contemporary short stories, poems, novels, and films. By considering how cultural, social, political and religious influences work to construct collective fears of society, we will understand that the “monsters” in these texts are personifications of common fears and that the stories themselves are hyperbolized versions of decidedly less grotesque, though debatably less frightening, realistic situations.

Texts: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (These are all published as a single volume by Signet Classics). You will be required to read several short stories and poems, including but not limited to Flannery O’Connor’s “A Good Man is Hard to Find,” Sylvia Plath’s “Daddy,” Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper,” Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Fall of the House of Usher,” Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown” and Genesis from the Holy Bible. You will also be required to view the following films: Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992); Halloween (1978); Seven; 1408; Spiderman 3; Legends of the Fall; Requiem for a Dream; Mystic River; The Departed.

Requirements: Active participation in class discussion and activities, attendance and essay response to five (5) cultural events, weekly writings/activities, periodic quizzes, several in-class oral presentations, midterm and final exams.