in this issue

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News & Events

T-shirts and Totes

1

Undergrad Conference

1

Author Edson to Visit
Alexander Awarded
Toto Pulls Curtain on..
Internships a Plus
Career Services Helps
Eclectic Wins Award

Faculty & Staff News

New Professor Profile

1

Umminger's COASTING

3

Alumni News

A Katrina Story

Life After West Georgia

5

Job Spotlight on Snow
   

Course Descriptions

 

7

Fall 2006

8

Fall 2006 Courses


NOTE: Courses are subject to change depending on enrollment and faculty teaching assignments. Please check BANWEB for more current information on the availability of all courses.

English 1101 and 1102 are prerequisites for all courses from ENGL 2110 through 4386.


A “W” designation after a section number of a 3000- or 4000-level course signifies that the course is a Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) course. WAC accepts as a guiding principle the idea that writing is a valuable tool for learning and communication. Therefore, the components of a course so designated are designed to help you learn the material and communicate what you have learned. Students are required to take two “W” courses for the undergraduate degree.


 

XIDS

4/5000-level

 

XIDS 2100: Arts and Ideas

ENGL 4/5106: Studies in Genre

ENGL 4/5108: Studies in the Novel

 

2000-level

ENGL 4/5109: Film as Literature

 

ENGL 2050: Self Staging

ENGL 4/5115: Renaissance Literature

 

ENGL 2080: Intro to the Art of Film

ENGL 4/5125: Colonial and Early American Lit

 

ENGL 2110: World Literature

ENGL 4/5145: Victorian Literature

 

ENGL 2120: British Literature

ENGL 4/5160: Twentieth-Century American Lit

 

ENGL 2130: American Literature

ENGL 4/5170: African-American Literature

 

ENGL 2180: Studies in African-American Lit

ENGL 4/5180: Studies in Regional Literature

 

ENGL 2190: Studies in Literature by Women

ENGL 4/5185: Studies in Literature by Women

 

ENGL 2300: Practical Criticism

ENGL 4/5188: Individual Authors

ENGL 4/5210: Advanced Creative Writing

 

3000-level

ENGL 4/5295: Rdng & Lit in Secondary English Classrooms

 

ENGL 3200: Creative Writing

ENGL 4/5300: Studies in the English Language

 

ENGL 3400: Advanced Comp: Creative Nonfiction

ENGL 4/5310: Studies in Literary Theory

 

ENGL 3405: Professional and Technical Writing

ENGL 4384: Senior Seminar

ENGL 4/5385: Special Topics

 

 

6000-level

ENGL 6385: Seminar in Special Topics



XIDS


XIDS 2100

XIDS 2100-01: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Debra MacComb
Representing American Womanhood
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 206

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: Through the analysis of representations in the literary and visual arts of both the high and popular cultures, this course will examine a range of identities, images and ideologies associated with the American woman from the early Republic to the modern period.

Texts: Chopin, The Awakening, Fern, Ruth Hall, Foster, The Coquette, Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.

Requirements: Active and informed participation in class discussion, two midterm exams, and a group media report.

XIDS 2100-02: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Lori Lipoma
Myth and Religion
MW 1:50pm-3:10pm, Pafford 307

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: Hercules, Sundiata, Thor, Gilgamesh-- these heroes leap to mind when we think of mythology, yet myths are more than just stories of deities and fantastic beings from other people’s religions. They are simultaneously the most particular and the most universal feature of civilization, and they help each of us understand and face common concerns as well as aspire to new heights; indeed, Joseph Campbell calls mythology “the wonderful song of the soul’s high adventure.”

In XIDS 2100 “Myth and Religion,” we’ll study common themes throughout world myths and religions—including creation, birth and death, great floods, initiation, hero, cosmology, deities, and transformation myths—as they appear in the rich traditions of cultures worldwide. Moreover, we’ll hear from speakers who will tell us about the world religious traditions which they practice, including Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, Baha’i, African Traditional Religion, Wicca, Islam, and Zoroastrianism. (3 credits)

Texts: Armstrong, Karen: A Short History of Myth; Leeming, David Adams. The World of Myth; Class coursepack.

Requirements: Three Tests:  15% each = 45%; Two 2-1/2 to 3-page response papers:  30% cumulative (Paper #1 = 10%; Paper #2 = 20%.); Reading quizzes: 5%; Final Exam:  20%

XIDS 2100-03: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Angela Insenga
Modernism
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, Pafford 109

Satisfies Area C1 of the Core.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

XIDS 2100-04: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Stacey Morin
The Monstrous and the Grotesque
MWF 11:15am-12:10pm, Pafford 307

Satisfies Area C1 of the Core.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

XIDS 2100-05: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Patricia Reinhard
Photography and Short Stories
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 1116

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: Photography and Short Stories will study the dialogic relationship between photographic images and short stories. Fraternal twins separated at birth, the modern short story and the photographic image have flourished, one form shadowing the other, since their origins in the mid-nineteenth century. This course will analyze the synergistic effect created by photographic images and short fiction when they are scrutinized through the dual lenses of perspective and point of view. Both disciplines present sketches, slices of perspective that concentrate on a single or unique effect. In their uses and manipulations of point of view, both disciplines appear infinitely malleable and wildly flexible as artists continually craft and redefine the ways in which a story or an image can be “told.” Our study of the synergy between short fiction and image will begin with Eudora Welty, an artist who serves as the literal and physical embodiment of the interpenetration of these two disciplines. As a young woman, Welty worked for the Works Progress Administration in a job that allowed her access to places and people throughout her home state. Before she wrote, Welty photographed—recorded on film her sojourn through Mississippi’s eighty-two counties. Closely reading a Welty short story and several of her images will enable students to formulate a set of terms and concepts that are shared by both disciplines. Welty’s fiction and images, along with these specific terms and concepts descriptive of both disciplines, provide the springboard to all that follows—dozens of online photographic images, thirteen stories, and Susan Sontag’s On Photography, Roland Barthes’s Camera Lucida, and John Berger’s About Looking.

Texts: Susan Sontag’s On Photography, Roland Barthes’s Camera Lucida, and John Berger’s About Looking; a course packet of thirteen short stories, an online portfolio of photographic images, and additional selected essays on photography.

Requirements: Students will write three essays on topics derived from the themes and concepts in the texts. These essays will be approximately 1000 words and will require secondary sources. Weekly informal response writing intended to generate ideas and concepts explored in greater depth and detail in the essays will be assigned. This writing is designed as write to learn exercises and offers students a free space in which to begin exploring the texts. A group/collaborative oral assignment in which students will select a specific photograph or series of images and a short story and present a report on them to the class. A midterm and a final exam.

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ENGL 2000-level


ENGL 2050
 

ENGL 2050: Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life, Profs. Lori Lipoma and John Sturgis
Section 01 (Lipoma): MWF 9:05am-10:00am,  Pafford 307
Section 02  (Lipoma): MWF 10:10am-11:05am,  Pafford 307
Section 04 (Sturgis): TR 11:00am-12:15pm, Pafford 308
Section 05 (Sturgis): TR 12:30-1:45, Pafford 308

May count for credit in Core Area B. Same as THEA 2050.

Description: Effective communicators are more productive, have enhanced career opportunities, enjoy more fulfilling relationships, earn more respect, and have more fun!   The good news is that you already have the tools you need to become a great communicator; it’s just a matter of learning how to use them consciously and masterfully…in other words, learning how to “self-stage.” 

In Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Everyday Life, we will study and practice practical communication skills—creativity, quick thinking, risk taking, lateral thinking, active listening, subtext mastery, self-awareness—and apply them to virtually every interaction you encounter outside the classroom:  One-on-One Conversations, Public Presentation, Debate and Argumentation, Conflict Resolution and Confrontation Skills, Stress Management, Team Building, and Impression Management.   By the end of the semester, students will have had first-hand experience in all of these areas, and, more importantly, will know exactly how to continue honing and perfecting those skills long after.

Requirements: formal solo presentations, group projects and presentations, panel discussions/debates, vocabulary-building exercises, role-playing and improvisation exercises, journaling, and, of course, active, informed participation in each class session.

ENGL 2050-03: Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life, Prof. Maren Henry
MW 5:30pm-6:50pm, Pafford 307

May count for credit in Core Area B. Same as THEA 2050.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 2080
 

ENGL 2080-01 Intro to the Art of Film, Prof. Muriel Cormican
MW 1:50pm-3:10pm, Humanities 131

Description: As Socrates might have said, the unexamined film is not worth watching! So this course is designed to enhance your experience and enjoyment of films by introducing you to the discipline of film studies and the tools, vocabulary and frameworks necessary for “reading” film from a variety of critical perspectives.

Texts: Timothy Corrigan and Patricia White The Film Experience: An Introduction and reading package prepared by instructor

Requirements: journal / 3-4 position papers / quizzes / final paper

ENGL 2080-02 : Introduction to the Art of Film, Prof. Barbara Brickman
TR 3:30pm-4:445pm, Humanities 312

Description: In this course students will consider the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. Students will watch a wide range of films from a variety of countries and historical moments in film history. Students will have the chance to explore issues such as framing, photographic space, film shot, editing, sound, genre, narrative form, acting style, and lighting in the context of wider discussions of the weekly films. This is an introductory course, and assumes no prior knoweldge of film. Students will be evaluated primarily on the basis of weekly postings, a shot-by-shot analysis, and exams. Weekly screenings will be offered.

Texts: Corrigan, Timothy and Patricia White. The Film Experience: An Introduction

Requirements: Weekly postings, quizzes, a shot-by-shot analysis, and two exams

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ENGL 2110
 

ENGL 2110-01: World Literature, Prof. Maria Doyle
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Humanities 206

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: From the strong walls of Gilgamesh’s Uruk to the twists and turns of Borges’ modern labyrinth, this course will stop at major points of interest on the map of world literature as we know it. Exploring a variety of European and non-European texts, from the first written epic to the late twentieth century, the course will examine the question of the relationship between the public world – of cultures, of laws, of civic institutions – and the private world of emotional, intellectual and spiritual life, with particular attention to the way that writers have imagined the overlap between these spaces. Discussions will introduce you to selections from a variety of literary texts (such as Dante’s Inferno, Lady Murasaki’s Tale of Genji, Ovid’s Metamorphoses and Dostoevsky’s Notes from Underground) and will familiarize students with the defining characteristics of major genres, cultures and time periods.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces (expanded edition in one volume)

Requirements: 2-3 short papers, periodic reading questions, midterm and final exams

ENGL 2110-25H: World Literature, Prof. Micheal Crafton
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, TLC 2237

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: The purpose of this course is to consume the world. Well, maybe that is a slight exaggeration. Let’s say the purpose is to survey literary and cultural documents from around the world starting with the earliest extant materials, usually the Sumerian epic poem Gilgamesh, and working our way by leaps and bounds up to the modern period, usually a contemporary poet such as Seamus Heaney or perhaps a film. Although we shall try our best to view this literature in a historical and political context, we will be hard pressed to be very detailed due to the astonishing breadth of this survey. Given the fact that we will be moving quickly through a lot of cultures, we shall hold to two constants: one, mythology as a grammar for comparative analysis; two, literacy as the fundamental skill of skills that we shall practice.  The myths that we shall survey are typically myths of various heroes (gods, goddesses, warriors, tricksters, and wisdom figures), employed in a variety of archetypal plots (creation, protection, deliverance, questing and testing). The literacy tasks will be an assortment of the following: oral responses in class, oral presentation as a group, short answer writing on exams, and short essays written out of class.

Texts: Maynard Mack, ed., The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces. Norton, 1997 ( ISBN: 0393971430 ); Karen Armstrong. A Short History of Myth. Edinburgh: Canongate, 2005. (ISBN 0-7394-6390-x)

Requirements: Active engagement in class discussion, two short essays, oral presentation, midterm, and final exam.

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ENGL 2120

 

ENGL 2120-01: British Literature, Prof. Bonnie Adams
The Major Authors
MWF 11:15am-12:10 pm, Humanities 208

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: We will examine not only the significant works of British authors, but we will also discuss the corresponding literary periods as well, spanning from The Middle Ages to The Twentieth Century. Students will examine these works within the context of their cultural importance; we will discuss at length how these works both shaped and reflected their cultures. As we progress, we will also examine how cultural ideals (regarding such issues as politics, education, war, gender relations, religion, and the individual) have evolved over the course of British history.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, The Major Authors

Requirements: Students must have completed English 1101 and 1102 with a grade of “C” or higher.

ENGL 2120-02: British Literature, Prof. Meg Pearson
Undiscovered Countries
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 209

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: These authors and stories explore other worlds in order to better understand their own. Most of these tales emphasize the journey of heroes or heroines into alien or supernatural territory, where they must do battle, discover love, and realize their own true natures. Through the readings, the course will take up themes of fantasy, travel, heroism, love, evil and otherness, gender and culture, and the relationship between self and community.

Texts: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Othello, Comus, Oroonoko, Frankenstein, Brave New World, Indian Ink, and excerpts from Gulliver's Travels, Elizabeth Gaskell's Gothic Tales, and Cavendish's Blazing World.

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2120-03: British Literature, Prof. Debra Bourdeau
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Pafford 308
Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2120-25H: British Literature-Honors, Prof. Emily Hipchen
MW 1:50pm-3:10pm, TLC 1204

Honors students only. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: This survey of British literature will concentrate on literary manifestations of cultural anxieties—that is, fear. We’ll be reading scary texts and scared texts, about terrified and terrible people who walk mystified into the darkest of basements without a flashlight, a gun, or a functioning brain cell; and more importantly, about what they fear/hope waits them in the dark—the bogey-monsters, the maniacs, themselves. We’ll discuss, among other things, manifestations of xenophobia, agoraphobia, triskadecaphobia in works that legislate, demonize, assassinate, commit genocide, perpetrate global war. . .

Texts: Among others, works by Shakespeare and Chaucer and Milton, of course, but also William Blake, J. R. R. Tolkein, Christina Rossetti, Mary Shelley, Angela Carter, Ted Hughes, Andrew Lloyd Weber, and Tom Stoppard.

Requirements: Required daily attendance and participation, occasional quizzes, three short answer and essay tests, two short papers, and one research project.

ENGL 2120-26H: British Literature-Honors, Prof. Nina Leacock
TR 12:30PM-1:45PM, TLC 2237

Honors students only. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: This survey traces a tradition that is "ours" in a wonderfully complex way. As Americans, we study British Literature for reasons of both political history and language tradition that we share with English-language readers on every continent. Paradoxically, "our British past" connects us to a contemporary global culture that is equally ours. In this course, we will read exemplary texts from the major periods (Anglo-Saxon to Modern and Post-modern) as "belonging" to both past and present, not forgetting to consider the processes of literary periodization and canon formation that make this possible.

Texts: Likely texts include The Norton Anthology of British Literature: The Major Authors and two short novels, probably Northanger Abbey (Austen) and To the Lighthouse (Woolf).

Requirements: Active participation, reading quizzes and exams, class presentations, and analytical essays.

ENGL 2120-27H: British Literature-Honors, Prof. Robert Snyder
Codes/Representation/Irony
TR 2:00pm-3:15 pm, TLC 1204

Honors students only. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: The lexical definitions of “code” signify two seemingly divergent things: first, a collection of principles, even rules, for normalizing or regulating conduct; and, second, a system of signals, including words, for transmitting messages that require secrecy. One denotation suggests the idea of publicly desirable values; the other hints at the necessity for private, occulted, or privileged discourse. Certainly the history of British literature is replete with codes of the former kind—e.g., heroism, chivalry, romantic love, religious orthodoxy, monarchic authority, individual virtue, citizenship, familial obligation. At the same time, however, it offers abundant examples of the impulse to question, challenge, or subvert such codified ideals, usually through the play of irony. Our focus in this course will be the ambivalence of overt versus covert representation in British literature, ranging from its earliest beginnings to the present and focusing particularly on how texts position us as readers in relation to the codes they articulate.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of English Literature (Major Authors), 8th edition; William Shakespeare, King Lear (Penguin); Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Frankenstein (Penguin).

Requirements: Active participation in dialogue, several short essays, oral report, two tests, and final exam.

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ENGL 2130

 

ENGL 2130-01: American Literature, Prof. Brandy James
MW 1:50pm-3:10pm, TLC 1116

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: On defining the creation of identity, American essayist, novelist, and playwright James Arthur Baldwin comments, “An identity would seem to be arrived at by the way in which the person faces and uses his experience.” Baldwin’s statement encompasses far-ranging ideas and introduces questions that have historically characterized American literature: How have Americans characterized their own identities at different points in time, and how have historical events, cultural phenomena, social environments, and personal experiences become meshed with and changed these identities? To what extent does the American landscape, either as a physical or symbolic space, attribute to this definition? Is the definition “American” even a valid identity? As we closely examine these questions by examining the various literary genres that span almost four centuries, we will focus on how language and writing has been used to construct and alter the meaning of “American identity.” In addition, we will also delve into the formation of identity from the perspectives of race, gender, and social class and examine how each has been used for this purpose.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter 6 th edition; The Scarlet Letter; The Great Gatsby

Requirements: see online syllabus at www.westga.edu/~brobinso

ENGL 2130-02: American Literature, Prof. Mitzi McFarland
The Making of an American: Conversations Past and Present
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, Pafford 307

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: Throwing the gauntlet at patriarchal roles for women, Toni Morrison’s heroine Sula enumerates a quintessential theme in American discourse: “I don’t want to make somebody else.  I want to make myself.” The search for self and place, both within and without the community, will be our focal point for exploring a range of questions that have characterized American literature: How have Americans defined individual, cultural or national identity at different moments in our history as a nation?  Does a national and/or individual identity that is uniquely “American” exist?  What characteristics constitute individual and/or national identity?  What roles do the historical past, personal experiences, and social environments or conditions play in defining who we are?  And to what extent has the American landscape as a geographic or symbolic space contributed to the formation of American identity? As we examine these questions, we will assess the importance of language in rhetorically shaping, mediating and constructing individual, national, and literary “American-ness.”  We will also explore the role of race, gender, and class in forming American identities as well as the criterion enacted for the inclusion or exclusion of these categories. Through careful study and close reading of the texts, we will probe the notion of literary value (“What makes a text American?” and “What is an American masterpiece?”) as we foray multiple genres and look at some of the aesthetic, literary, psychological, and socio-historical facets out of which texts are both generated and interpreted.

Texts: Benjamin Franklin’s The Autobiography, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, Sandra Cisneros’s The House on Mango Street

Requirements: 3 out-of-class essays; a midterm and final exam

ENGL 2130-03: American Literature, Prof. Debra MacComb
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 207

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: This course will develop a range of enduring themes that have characterized American literature: the encounter with and appropriation of nature; the crafting of an identity that attempts to reconcile the desires of the individual with the needs of society; the individual’s ability to chart his own path to success; the “problem” of the socio-cultural “other”; and the tension between the public and private spheres. In exploring these themes, we will consider how American authors “speak” to each other, endorsing, correcting, and even rejecting previous ideas and ideals. Finally, we will also examine the authorial strategies that developed over time which make these works aesthetically as well as historically pertinent.

Texts: Franklin, The Autobiography, Parts I and II; Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Whitman, selections from Leaves of Grass; Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Mason, In Country.

Requirements: Active and informed participation in class discussions, brief weekly writing assignments; midterm and final exams, two short essays (3-4 pages each).

ENGL 2130-25H: American Literature-Honors, Prof. Randy Hendricks
MWF 11:15am-12:10pm, TLC 2237

Honors students only. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: In this class we will devote much of our time to reading, discussing, and writing about a number of classic texts in American literature: Franklin’s Autobiography, Cooper’s The Last of the Mohicans, Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter Douglass’s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Thoreau’s Walden, Whitman’s and Dickinson’s poems, Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. The major focus will be on the way in which these texts, through their forms, themes, and language, echo and even parody each other as they record a cultural/literary debate on the issue of American identity with its related questions of what constitutes an American self, what constitutes America success, and how independent one actually can be. We will use the examples to work toward a definition of the qualities beyond “written in America” that make a work of literature “American.” Additional shorter readings, or “satellite” texts, from an anthology will supplement the primary ones.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of American Literature, The Last of the Mohicans, The Scarlet Letter, The Great Gatsby

Requirements: mid-term and comprehensive final exams, short analytical papers research (term) paper.

ENGL 2130-26H: American Literature-Honors, Prof. Alison Umminger
MW 12:20pm-1:40pm, TLC 2237

Honors students only. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: This survey class on American literature centers upon the theme: “The Search for Identity: The American Experience in Black and White.” The first week will read Toni Morrison’s short story “Recitatif,” and discuss cultural assumptions about race, gender, and identity. We will then move back in time and work our way forward, starting our reading of longer texts with Ben Franklin and Frederick Douglass’s autobiographies, examining the tension between how an individual shapes his own identity, and how the larger culture determines how an individual’s identity will be shaped. We will then move to look at The Scarlet Letter and Harriet Jacobs’ autobiography, complicating questions of race with the intersecting rubric of gender norms and their hold on women. Rounding out our discussion of the nineteenth century will be a number of short readings, including sections of Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass,” Emerson’s “Self-Reliance,” Melville’s “Benito Cereno,” and the longer text of Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn. Our discussion of twentieth century literature will begin with Jean Toomer’s Cane and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, and will include a discussion of the two major literary movements of this time: Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance. We will also read poetry by Langston Hughes and T.S. Eliot, and the novella Passing by Nella Larsen. Moving into mid-century, we will read Faulkner’s Light in August and Carson McCullers’s Member of the Wedding. The course will conclude with the neo-slave narrative, Ishamel Reed’s Flight to Canada, as part of a larger discussion of postmodernism. While race figures prominently in many of these readings, we will also be attentive to gender and sexuality, community and tradition as important factors in creating American identity and American literature.

Requirements: You will be expected to write two longer essays, one at mid-term and one at semester’s end, complete a number of short responses, and give at least one presentation on the material covered. Active reading and participation is expected.

ENGL 2130-27H: American Literature-Honors, Prof. Patrick M. Erben
MW 1:50pm-3:10pm, TLC 2237

Honors students only. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: In spite of a stunning variety of aesthetic sensibilities and cultural voices, American literature seems to hold at its core three fundamental concerns: the relationship between human and non-human environments, the emergence and definition of the self as both part of and independent from community, and the encounter/confrontation with cultural, racial, or sexual difference. Throughout the semester, we will explore these themes within several “canonical” and “non-canonical” texts. This common distinction, in turn, reveals the high ideological and cultural stakes involved in literary production and interpretation. Why have we come to regard very specific responses to these issues or problems—as well as certain literary styles—as quintessentially “American,” while considering others as marginal? What makes Benjamin Franklin’s account of his rise to wealth and public stature more typically “American” than William Apess’s struggle with alcoholism or Fanny Fern’s fictionalized account of her success in a male literary market? In surveying American literature from colonial times to the 20 th century, this course traces the ideas and styles that make works distinctively “American” and questions the principles under which such an ideal is constructed.

Texts: Mary Rowlandson, Narrative of the Captivity; Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography; William Apess, A Son of the Forest; Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Fanny Fern, Ruth Hall; Walt Whitman, “Song of Myself” and other poems; Emily Dickinson, selected poems; Mark Twain, Huck Finn; F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; August Wilson, Fences; Gary Snyder, Turtle Island.

Requirements: Active participation, three short analytical essays, brief oral presentation, midterm and final exams.

ENGL 2130-28H: American Literature-Honors, Prof. David Newton
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 2237

Honors students only. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: This course will introduce you to some of the writers and literary works that have made significant contributions to the development of literature in America. The works we will read encompass a historical period that covers almost four centuries, beginning with the earliest years of European exploration and settlement of the Americas and concluding with the contemporary era. However, our investigation will push us well beyond a survey of these different literary works and toward a more sophisticated awareness of their textual, cultural, and historical interrelationships. Specifically, we will examine how American literature is related to the historical and cultural development of America as a nation. We will also explore how different writers have struggled to understand and attempted to define through their writing what America is and what it means to be an American. Consequently, our reading will be guided by a series of critical questions: How have Americans defined individual, cultural or national identity at different moments in our history as a nation? Does a national and/or individual identity that is uniquely "American" exist? What qualities or characteristics constitute individual and/or national identity? What roles do the historical past, personal experiences, and social environments or conditions play in defining who we are? To what extent has the American landscape as a geographic or symbolic space contributed to the formation of American identity? As we examine these questions, we will focus on the various ways that language—especially writing—has been used to shape or construct individual and national identity in America. As we will discover, language is an essential resource for defining others and ourselves. We will also explore the question of identity from the perspectives of race, gender, and social class and examine how such categories have been used in the formation of identity in America.

Texts: Works we read will include Franklin, The Autobiography; Thoreau, Walden; Douglas, Narrative of an American Slave; Twain, Huck Finn; Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; and Erdrich, Love Medicine; and Mason, In Country. Short stories and poems will be assigned from electronic (online) editions or placed on reserve in the library. We will also view (outside of class) a couple of films related to the study of American literature and culture.

Requirements: Regular attendance and active and informed participation in class discussion, daily reading quizzes, class presentations, and four analytical essays.

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ENGL 2180
 

ENGL 2180-01: Studies in African-American Literature, Staff
MW 12:20pm-1:40pm, Pafford 308

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2180-02: Studies in African-American Literature, Staff
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Pafford 308

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA



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ENGL 2190
 

ENGL 2190-01: Studies in Literature by Women, Prof. Alison Umminger
MW 3:20pm-4:40pm, Humanities 206

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 2300
 

ENGL 2300-01: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Lisa Crafton

MW 12:20pm-1:40pm, Humanities 206

Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Requires permission of the department’s academic coordinator. Not offered during summer session.

Description: As a prerequisite for upper-division English studies, this course provides an introduction to representative critical approaches to literature. As English majors, the methods we all use to frame our interpretation of any text make us practicing literary critics, whether we know it or not. This course enables students to develop and articulate interpretations from a variety of theoretical approaches; we will investigate the historical development and key assumptions and methodologies of a select group of theories, but more importantly in their application to texts. Our case study will be Shelley’s Frankenstein, to which almost every critical approach (new historicist, psychoanalytic, queer theory, feminist et al) has been applied! This study will allow students to write essays from 3 different critical perspectives on short selections from various genres (short fiction, nonfiction, poems, films) we have read together in class (at least one on Shelley). Students’ final work will be a documented research paper and an oral presentation on contemporary film , music, or art.

Texts: Barry, Beginning Theory, 2 nd ed.; Abrams, Glossary of Literary Terms; Shelley, Frankenstein, Gibaldi, MLA Handbook for Writers; film Fight Club, select short poems and stories.

Requirements: reading quizzes, 3 critical essays, documented research paper (with proposal, annotated bibliography, drafts and peer reviews), oral report on critical approach to contemporary film/music.

ENGL 2300-02: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell
MW 5:30pm-6:50pm, Humanities 208

Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Requires permission of the department’s academic coordinator. Not offered during summer session.

Description: This course is designed as an introduction to the English major, and will emphasize both critical and writing skills. You will become acquainted with some of the most important contemporary critical approaches to literature—including new historicism, gender criticism, and cultural criticism—and you will learn how to employ these approaches in your own thinking and writing. You will also work both in and out of class to develop effective strategies for structuring, developing, and refining thesis-driven critical essays. Two novels and some contemporary short stories will provide rich material for analysis, interpretation, and critical writing.

Texts: Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction, Ed. Jonathan Culler; Frankenstein: Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism, Mary Shelley (Ed. Johanna Smith, Bedford); The Grass is Singing, Doris Lessing (HarperPerennial); Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, Ed. Michael Martone; MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 6 th edition, Ed. Gibaldi.

Requirements: Active participation; frequent writing exercises; 2 short papers and one longer research paper; quizzes, oral research presentation.

ENGL 2300-03: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Tom Dvorske
Learning Literature/Teaching Literature
MW 12:20pm-1:40pm, Pafford 204

Education students only. Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Requires permission of the department’s academic coordinator. Not offered during summer session.

Description: This course is an introduction to the terms and methods of literary criticism and research. We will begin by asserting and deconstructing our own “native” assumptions about literature and criticism, then move toward an examination of leading theoretical assumptions and critical practices as well as applying those ideas to specific literary texts. In the final phase of the class, we will look at how literary theory can inform classroom practice and the teaching of literature in high school and middle grades education.

Texts: Dobie, Ann B. Theory into Practice (1 st Ed. Thomson-Wadsworth, 2002); Harmon & Holman, A Handbook to Literature (10 th ed. Prentice-Hall, 2006); Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (6 th ed. MLA, 2003); Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart (Anchor Books, 1994); Kincaid, Jamaica. Annie John (FSG, 1997). Golding, William. Lord of the Flies (Mass Market, 1959).

Requirements: 3 analysis papers; reading responses; research project (prospectuses, annotated bibliography, research essay), presentations, quizzes, exams.

ENGL 2300-04: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Barbara Brickman
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, Humanities 206

Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Requires permission of the department’s academic coordinator. Not offered during summer session.

Description: As a prerequisite for upper-division English studies, this course provides an introduction to various methods of critical analysis. Students will be encouraged to develop and articulate interpretations from a variety of theoretical approaches and, hopefully, in the process of articulation, come to recognize how these perspectives broaden our understanding of diverse texts.

While theoretical approaches such as reader-response or psychoanalytic criticism will provide the underlying methods of analysis, the central task of the course is the act of applying them to literary (and a few filmic) texts. Beginning with an introduction to the different approaches to critical analysis as applied to one literary text (Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw), we will transfer the skills learned in that introduction to a series of other texts (short stories, films, etc.) before concluding with the final research project.

Texts: Henry James, The Turn of the Screw (Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism Edition); Vladimir Nabakov, Lolita; Jonathan Culler, Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction; and the MLA Handbook

Requirements: 3 shorter analytical essays, a research paper (including proposal, required drafts, peer reviews, and an annotated bibliography), one oral presentation/leading of class discussion, final exam


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ENGL 3000-level


ENGL 3200

 

ENGL 3200-01W: Creative Writing, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell
MW 12:20pm-1:40pm, Humanities 208

Fulfills an English major requirement (Area C, Language and Writing). No more than two (2) 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This class will provide an introduction to the writing of fiction and poetry. Readings in poetry and short fiction will strengthen your familiarity with the contemporary literary landscape and encourage you to situate your own emerging voice among those of other writers. Workshops will allow you to benefit from intense discussions of your own work and that of other students. You will explore a variety of literary forms, techniques, and strategies and seek to adapt them effectively to your own work. We will emphasize revision; by the end of the semester you will have produced a polished portfolio of your best work along with a critical introduction.

Texts: Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction; The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry; A Poetry Handbook, Mary Oliver; Making Shapely Fiction, Jerome Stern.

Requirements: Active participation in workshops, frequent writing exercises, reading journal, substantial portfolio of fiction and poetry.

ENGL 3200-02: Creative Writing, Prof. Katie Chaple-Borton
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, Pafford 307

Fulfills an English major requirement (Area C, Language and Writing). No more than two (2) 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 3200-25HW: Creative Writing-Honors, Prof. Gregory Fraser
MW 1:50pm-3:10pm, Humanities 209

Honors students only. Fulfills an English major requirement (Area C, Language and Writing). No more than two (2) 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This class is devoted to the practice of writing as a creative act. Though 3200 is an introductory level course, expect to read an astonishing amount of poetry, fiction, plays, and criticism. Count on engaging in critical discussions regarding aesthetic principles and offering your own writing for the betterment of the class. You must be willing to set aside time daily for writing and must also construct a comprehensive portfolio at the end of the semester. Ultimately, the aim of the course is to enable you to access your imagination through writing, to judge critically works of literature from the vantage point of the author, and to come to terms with both the beautiful and the sublime.

Texts: The Best American Short Plays 2000-2001; Sudden Fiction; The Vintage Book of Contemporary World Poetry; plus various handouts to be distributed in class.

Requirements: Daily readings and exercises, memorization of twenty lines of poetry, participation, written contributions to the workshop, and a final portfolio of polished writing, including a critical preface.

ENGL 3200-26HW: Creative Writing-Honors, Professor Chad Davidson
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, TLC 1204

Honors students only. Fulfills an English major requirement (Area C, Language and Writing). No more than two (2) 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This class is devoted to the practice of writing as a creative act. Though 3200 is an introductory level course, expect to read an astonishing amount of poetry, fiction, plays, and criticism. Count on engaging in critical discussions regarding aesthetic principles and offering your own writing for the betterment of the class. You must be willing to set aside time daily for writing and must also construct a comprehensive portfolio at the end of the semester. Ultimately, the aim of the course is to enable you to access your imagination through writing, to judge critically works of literature from the vantage point of the author, and to come to terms with both the beautiful and the sublime.

Texts: The Best American Short Plays 2000-2001; Sudden Fiction; The Vintage Book of Contemporary World Poetry; plus various handouts to be distributed in class.

Requirements: Daily readings and exercises, memorization of twenty lines of poetry, participation, written contributions to the workshop, and a final portfolio of polished writing, including a critical preface.


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ENGL 3400
 

ENGL 3400-01: Advanced Composition: Creative Nonfiction, Prof. Emily Hipchen
MW 1:50pm-3:10pm, TLC 1204

Fulfills an English major requirement (Area C, Language and Writing). May be taken for certification in Secondary English Education.

Description: Some people think creative nonfiction is an oxymoron (“How can something be imagined and true?”); some people think it’s a tautology (“Isn’t all nonfiction creative?”). What are these texts that seem to have begun being written sometime in the 1960s and are now in the forefront of the news in controversies over the “truth” of texts like James Frey’s A Million Little Pieces that had Oprah calling in to Larry King and apologizing for what she said the next day in an hour’s vilification of Frey and his editors? How do you write CNF at all, let alone responsibly, ethically, beautifully? — This is what we’ll be talking about, and doing.

Texts: The first half of this class will be dedicated to getting acquainted with the genre: we’ll read In Cold Blood, The Hunger of Memory, Roots, and two collections of essays by writers like James MacPhee, Philip Lopate, Dorothy Allison and Michele Tea. The second half of the course is dedicated to student production of CNF and discussion of student pieces in a workshop environment.

Requirements: Required daily attendance and participation; willingness to participate in workshops and produce at least eighteen pages of typed responses to other students’ work in addition to one’s own creative texts; three reading tests; a writing/response journal; and a final portfolio with meta-text.

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ENGL 3405
 

ENGL 3405-01W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. Joseph Milford
MW 5:30pm-6:50pm, TLC 1109

Fulfills an English major requirement (Area C, Language and Writing). May be taken for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 3405-02W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. Debra Bourdeau
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 1109

Fulfills an English major requirement (Area C, Language and Writing). May be taken for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 4000-level


ENGL 4106

 

ENGL 4/5106-01W: Studies in Genre, Prof. Gregory Fraser
Poetry
MWF 11:15am-12:10pm, Humanities 209

Required for Certification in Secondary English Education. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This class will proceed under the assumption that the very notion of a literary “genre” is an unstable category whose definitions shift under historical, ideological, and aesthetic pressures. Consequently, we will begin not with the question, “What is poetry?” but instead try to articulate, “What is poetry at these specific periods of time; in these particular cultural circumstances; under these conflicting ideological conditions; in the light of these specific artistic practices?” In short, we will study the ways in which poets have produced texts that both reflect and refract the prevailing views of their literary and social contexts. To facilitate our study of this flexible, “blurry-bordered” genre, we will examine the historical conditions and power relations under which given texts were written; review the manifestos of several poets; and apply the contemporary reading practices of various textual theorists. Most significantly, however, we will focus on reliable, repeatable methods of writing confidently about poetry.

Text: Reading Poetry,Tom Furniss and Michael Bath, Prentice Hall/Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1996. (Note: This volume is out of print, so I will provide an on-line copy. Those students wishing to read the book in its originally printed form must try to locate it through an internet used-book supplier. There are copies to be found with a little initiative.)

Requirements: periodic homework assignments; two formal essays of at least five pages in length; one formal essay of at least eight pages in length; a final portfolio with critical introduction.

English 4/5106-02W: Studies in Genre, Prof. Maria Doyle
Drama
TR 11-12:15, Humanities 209

Required for Certification in Secondary English Education. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course will illuminate how theater texts function both as "drama"—as literary contributions to the evolution of ideas—and as "theater"—as living stage pieces that grow and transform through performance. Beginning with an exploration of the development of theatrical form—the historical evolution of the traditional "poles" of tragedy and comedy from classical Greece to the nineteenth century—the course will move on to examine a variety of modern and contemporary plays by writers like Tennessee Williams, Samuel Beckett, Wole Soyinka, Margaret Edson and Bertolt Brecht. Not only will these discussions introduce students to significant modern schools of drama (Theater of the Absurd, expressionism), but they will also highlight ways of thinking about how theater means by asking questions about performance spaces, audience expectations, and the value of gesture and staging in relation to language.

Texts: The Bedford Introduction to Drama (5th Edition)

Requirements: Undergrads: Normally, 2-3 short response essays, 8-10 page research paper, oral presentation, midterm and final exams. Grad students: Normally, short response essay, annotated research bibliography, 12-15 page research paper, oral presentation, midterm and final exams.

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ENGL 4108

 

ENGL 4/5108-01W: Studies in the Novel, Prof. Nina Leacock
The British Novel
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 208

May be taken to satisfy the British Literature II area of the major. Students may take both the British and the American versions for credit. May be counted for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: The novel is a modern, national-language genre, one which emerged without obvious classical predecessors. This genre thus offered the first British authors an unprecedented freedom, along with a special invitation to reflect on and contribute to the shaping of their own national language and culture. The efforts of British novelists over the past three hundred years have produced a tradition, not classical but modern and British, with which contemporary English-language novelists and novel-readers around the world have to reckon. After an introductory consideration of that contemporary world-wide readership, our study will proceed through five units: (1) The New World of the Novel, (2) The Novel and Romance, (3) Substantial Fictions and Victorian Ghosts, (4) For Experienced Readers Only: Modernist Experiment, and (5) The Empire Writes Back.

Texts: Likely texts include Home and Exile (Achebe); Robinson Crusoe (Defoe); Pride and Prejudice (Austen); Confessions of a Justified Sinner (Hogg); Jane Eyre (Bronte); Great Expectations (Dickens); To the Lighthouse (Woolf); and The Quiet American (Greene).

Requirements: Active participation, reading quizzes and exams, short analytical essays, class presentations, and final research project.

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ENGL 4109

 

ENGL 4/5109-01W: Film as Literature, Prof. Barbara Brickman
Cinematic Representations of Youth
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 312

May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Since at least the early- to mid-1950s in the United States, there has been one audience that has spent the most money on films, attended films with the greatest frequency, and garnered the undivided attention and adoration of Hollywood producers and studio heads alike: teenagers. In this course, we will examine adolescents as filmgoers, deconstruct the filmic texts sold to them, and attempt to theorize their special position as cinematic consumers and, sometimes, producers.

Seeing as the “teen film,” in fact, dates back to the early sound era, we will begin the course with a brief history of Hollywood’s attention to teens as subject matter and cinemagoers, which will be followed by an overview of genre studies in film criticism, especially as it pertains to this popular post-war genre. Finally, these historical and generic contexts will provide the groundwork for theoretical analyses of several films, preparing students for the kind of analysis expected in their final research papers. Filmic texts might include many or all of the following: Boys Town, Blackboard Jungle, Rebel Without a Cause, Easy Rider, Harold and Maude, A Clockwork Orange, Cooley High, American Graffiti, Fast Times at Ridgemont High, The Breakfast Club, River’s Edge, Heathers, Boyz N the Hood, Heavenly Creatures, and Donnie Darko.

Texts: Timothy Shary, Teen Movies: American Youth on Screen; Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange (Norton Paper Fiction edition); Tim Corrigan, A Short Guide to Writing About Film (4 th Ed)

Requirements: weekly postings to the listserv, two short critical analysis papers, two exams, and a research paper (proposal, drafts, peer review, and annotated bibliography required)

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ENGL 4115

 

ENGL 4/5115-01: Renaissance Literature, Prof. Meg Pearson
To Strive, To Seek, To Find
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Humanities 208

Description: Poets, playwrights, and prose writers in early modern English literature are explorers. They and their characters seek fame, wealth, love, knowledge, and salvation even as they confront the often devastating repercussions of achieving these desires. This course undertakes its own epic voyage of discovery through English Renaissance literature alongside Knights of the Round Table, Canterbury pilgrims, sorcerers, queens, and fallen angels.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume 1. Specific texts will include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the Canterbury Tales, Doctor Faustus, and Paradise Lost.

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 4125

 

ENGL 4/5125-01: Colonial and Early American Literature, Prof. Patrick M. Erben
Subtitle: Beyond Babel: The Many Tongues of Early America
M 5:30pm-8:15pm, Humanities 206

Description: This course examines the multilingual and multiethnic development of early American literature and culture by reading Spanish, French, Dutch, and German immigrant writings (in translation!) alongside texts from the English-language tradition (itself a heterogeneous group including African American and Native American authors). We will try to understand how multiple traditions and forms in American literature emerged from the contest and confluence of different languages and genres. Readings reflect a wide spectrum of expression including Native American oral narratives, chronicles of the European conquest of America (viewed from both sides), captivity and slave narratives, poetry, letters, autobiographical writings, and fiction. Throughout the course, we analyze how these works engaged recurring themes and problems such as language difference, conquest, captivity, slavery, race, sexuality, gender, and nationhood.

Texts: Mulford, Carla, Early American Writings (anthology); Titu Cussi Yupangui, An Inca Account of the Conquest of Peru, Cabeza de Vaca, Relación; Olaudah Equiano, Interesting Narrative; Hannah Webster Foster, The Coquette, Baron Ludwig von Reizenstein, The Mysteries of New Orleans; William Wells Brown, Clotel, or, The President’s Daughter.

Requirements: Engaged contributions to the discussion of primary texts, secondary source analysis, oral presentation, and final project: students competent in a foreign language are encouraged to translate a section of a non-English text and research its historical/cultural context; others may edit and introduce an English text or document that is unpublished or unavailable in a modern edition.

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ENGL 4145

 

ENGL 4/5145-01W: Victorian Literature, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell
MWF 10:10am-11:05am, Humanities 209

May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course will consider Victorian literature as a response to the social, political, and cultural ideals and anxieties that marked nineteenth-century Britain. Surveying fiction and poetry as well as non-fiction, from the “social problem novel” of the “hungry forties” to fin de siècle Decadence, we will explore these texts as literary responses to Victorian concerns about class boundaries, definitions of gender, crime, science, and empire, just to name a few. We will examine not only the cultural wishes and fears reflected in Victorian literature, but the ways in which each work seeks to structure and resolve them.

Texts: Mary Barton, Elizabeth Gaskell (Oxford World Classics); Oliver Twist, Charles Dickens (Penguin); Adam Bede, George Eliot (Penguin); The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde (Broadview); Lady Audley’s Secret, Mary Elizabeth Braddon (Penguin); English Victorian Poetry: An Anthology (Dover); Victorian Prose, Ed. Mudhenk and Fletcher (Columbia).

Requirements: Active participation, quizzes, oral presentations, two essays (one a longer research-based paper), responses, final exam. Graduate students will be expected to do additional critical readings, write a longer research paper, and take a leading role in class discussions.

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ENGL 4160

 

ENGL 4/5160-01W: Twentieth-Century American Literature, Prof. Joshua Masters
Modern American Fiction in Black and White
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 208

May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course, subtitled “Modern American Fiction in Black and White,” will explore the myths, themes, and political controversies that have shaped the development of modern American fiction, with a particular eye towards the troubled status of racial identity in the American imagination. As we survey such literary movements as Realism, Modernism, and Post-modernism, we will pay attention to the way that new literary forms and movements responded to dramatic social and historical events and shifting cultural attitudes about race, particularly our attitudes towards the categories of “whiteness” and “blackness.” We will also consider the role of American fiction in shaping those attitudes. The works we will read demonstrate a wide a range of perspectives and narrative techniques, and each suggests new ways to imagine the status of the individual, the boundaries of nationhood, and the meaning of such categories as race, ethnicity, class, and gender in America. While examining the works’ shared interests in history, identity, and human agency, we will also bear in mind the unique nature of the individual writers and their texts.

Texts:(in order of appearance)Toni Morrison’s Playing in the Dark, Herman Melville’s Benito Cereno, Charles Johnson’s Middle Passage, Mark Twain’s Pudd’nhead Wilson, Nella Larsen’s Passing, James Weldon Johnson’s Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, Russell Banks’s Rule of the Bone, Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon, Colson Whitehead’s The Intuitionist.

Requirements: Students are expected to complete the day’s reading assignment in advance and come to class prepared to participate in discussion. Students must maintain a reading-quiz average of 65% in order to qualify for a passing grade in the class, as well as turn in several short writing assignments, three short essays, and a ten-page research paper.

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ENGL 4170

 

ENGL 4/5170-01: African-American Literature, Staff
MW 3:20pm-4:40pm, Humanities 208

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 4180

 

ENGL 4/5180-01W: Studies in Regional Literature, Prof. Michael Crafton
The Bayeux Tapestry: the Making of the Anglo-Norman World and the Emergence of King Arthur
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, Humanities 207

May be taken to satisfy the British Literature I area of the major. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May count for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: What is that thing hanging in the third floor of the Humanities Building? After taking this course, you will be an expert on that question. The “thing” is West Georgia’s reproduction of The Bayeux Tapestry, one of the single most important art objects from the Middle Ages and one of the very few surviving pieces of textile. The Tapestry was created not long after the Norman Invasion of 1066 and tells a version of that history, a version that seems to be propaganda for William the Conqueror’s cause. It is also, in my view, a virtual anthology of artistic and literary styles of the Middle Ages. In particular, we can find in the Tapestry elements of history, epic, and the beginnings of romance. This text also weaves connections between Normandy and England, in effect, creating the Anglo-Norman world, a world that would transform the literary world of epic into that of medieval romance. In that class, we will study the Tapestry as text, as history, propaganda, and epic and we will read the epics of Beowulf and Roland to find parallels in the Tapestry. (It is claimed in the chronicles of the Conquest that the Song of Roland was sung to inspire the French troops in their battle with the English.) We will then read the history of Geoffrey of Monmouth in which he, out of praise for the memory of William, creates the Arthur myth. We will finish up with the more developed literature of the mythology of Camelot, texts by Marie de France, Chretien de Troyes, Quest of the Holy Grail, and Malory.

Texts: The Romance of Arthur : An Anthology of Medieval Texts in Translation (New, Expanded Edition) (Paperback). James J. Wilhelm, ed. Garland Publishing, 1994. (ISBN: 0815315112); Beowulf: A Verse Translation (Norton Critical Editions) (Paperback) by Daniel Donoghue (Editor), Seamus Heaney (Translator) New York: Norton, 2001 (ISBN: 0393975800). The Song of Roland (Penguin Classics) (Paperback) by Anonymous, Glyn S. Burgess (Translator) Penguin, 1990. (ISBN: 0140445323); King Harald's Saga : Harald Hardradi of Norway: From Snorri Sturluson's Heimskringla (Classics S.) (Paperback) Penguin Classics; Reprint edition (October 28, 1976) Language: English (ISBN: 0140441832)

Requirements: Active engagement in class discussion, one short essay, oral presentations, research paper, take-home exams.

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ENGL 4185

 

ENGL 4/5185-01W: Studies in Literature by Women, Prof. Debra MacComb
American; “A Woman’s Place . . .”
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Humanities 209

May be taken to satisfy the American Literature I or the American Literature II area of the major. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May count for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course is both a historical (although not chronological) survey of American women’s prose and prose-fiction writing from the early Republic to the present and a critical consideration of these texts in the American literary tradition. The overarching theme of the class will focus on a woman’s “place” – in the domestic and/or the public sphere; in the family; in the literary marketplace; in the national “plot”—as well as the strategies women authors have employed to create an aesthetic space to interrogate such categories. Texts from different periods will be grouped under the (tentative) headings Gender and Genius, (de) Facing the Feminine Ideal, and Familiar Strangers in order to consider the transhistorical nature of women’s concerns.

Texts: Fern, Ruth Hall: A Domestic Tale of the Present Time; Freidman, Waking Beauty; Foster, The Coquette Harper, (available via digital library link); Iola LeRoy (available via digital library link); Hipchen, Coming Apart Together; Jewett, The Country of the Pointed Firs; James, The Diary of Alice James (on reserve); Mason, In Country; Rowlandson, The Account of Mary Rowlandson; Shields, Swann; Wharton, The House of Mirth.

Requirements: Active and informed participation in class discussions, brief weekly writing assignments; two short essays (3 pages each); final exam; research prospectus and documented essay (8-10 pages).

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ENGL 4188

 

ENGL 4/5188-01W: Individual Authors, Prof. Jane Hill
Ann Beattie
MW 12:20pm-1:40pm, Humanities 209

May be taken to satisfy the American Literature II requirement or individual author requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Shakespeare may be taken for up to six (6) hours, if topic varies, with the department chair’s permission. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

The youngest author ever selected at the time of her induction into the American Academy of Arts and Letters, Ann Beattie has nonetheless published influential fiction and nonfiction for three decades. She has been called the most imitated story writer of her generation, but her work also reveals much about contemporary fiction’s relationship to the traditions of realism, modernism, the novel of manners, and other significant aesthetic movements of earlier eras. Thus, to study Ann Beattie is, in many ways, to study the development of fiction in English through the lens of someone who has the knowledge of Susan Sontag, the irony of Jon Stewart, and the hipness of someone too cool for a middle-aged college professor to name. The first words of her first published book, Distortions (1976), are “Are you happy? . . . Because if you’re happy I’ll leave you alone.” If you are interested in learning how fiction has evolved to be one of our most accurate mirrors on reality and are not afraid to admit that you are not entirely and perfectly happy with reality as it has evolved, a semester’s immersion in the world of Ann Beattie is the perfect world for you. Beattie will visit our class, giving you a rare chance to meet the author that you are studying.

Texts: By Ann Beattie--Park City: New and Selected Stories; Follies; Chilly Scenes of Winter; Falling in Place; Picturing Will; Love Always; Another You; The Doctor’s House. Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby. Austen, Emma. Howells, The Rise of Silas Lapham. Course pack of stories by contemporary writers influenced by Beattie.

Requirements: In addition to informed and active participation, several short response papers, a final essay (take-home), a documented essay, and an online presentation. There will also be ongoing reading quizzes and writing-to-learn activities. Graduate students will be expected to do an annotated bibliography and a longer, more extensive documented essay in addition to the above.

ENGL 4/5188-02: Individual Authors, Prof. Meg Pearson
Shakespeare; Be Not Afraid of Greatness!
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 208

May be taken to satisfy the British Literature I or individual author area of the major. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Shakespeare may be taken for up to six (6) hours, if topic varies, with department chair’s permission.

Description: This class explores seven major Shakespeare plays in terms of their genre, plot, language, and performance history. In addition to placing these "greatest hits" in their historical context, the class will pay close attention to the relationship between language and staging.

Texts: The Necessary Shakespeare, including Much Ado About Nothing, Macbeth, and 1 Henry IV.

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 4210

 

ENGL 4/5210-01W: Advanced Creative Writing, Prof. Randy Hendricks
Fiction
MW 1:50pm-3:10pm, Humanities 208

Prerequisite: ENGL 3200. Fulfills an English major requirement (Area C, Language and Writing). May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Students in this course will improve their knowledge of and skill in the art of fiction by writing original works, presenting oral and written critiques of the work of other writers in the class, and learning to read as writers read--with an eye for the techniques and effects artists bring to their works.  Texts will include student writing and professional writing from the Norton Anthology of Short Fiction (Shorter Sixth Edition).

Texts: Norton Anthology of Short Fiction

Requirements: 2 original stories (40% of final grade), 6 formal critiques of stories by other students in the class (40% of final grade), total participation (20% of final grade).

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ENGL 4295

 

ENGL 4/5295-01W: Reading and Literature in Secondary English Classrooms, Prof. Tom Dvorske
Young Adult Literature
MW 3:20pm-4:40pm, Pafford 105

Requires permission of the department’s academic coordinator. Required for certification in Secondary English Education. Cross-listed with SEED 4295. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: In this course, we will survey representative works of young adult literature from the 19 th and 20 th-centuries. Drawing heavily on reader-response theory and other critical theories, we will examine how these seemingly simple texts written for middle and high-school age students register literary and social complexities. In context of this cultural and theoretical framework, we will also bear in mind the practical element of this course, designed to assist in the preparation of prospective teachers of English at the high school level by exploring literacy instruction using young adult literature in its own right and as a bridge to classic literature. (Cross-listed with SEED 4295.)

Texts: Charles Frey and Lucy Rollin, Classics of Young Adult Literature; Richard Beach, A Teacher’s Introduction to Reader-Response Theories; John Bushman & Kay Parks Haas, Using Young Adult Literature in the English Classroom; James Greenlaw and Jazlin Ebenezer, English Language Arts and Reading on the Internet; Deborah Appleman, Critical Encounters in High School English.

Requirements: Critical Paper over a Classic YA text; Reading responses; Unit Plans; Presentations; Annotated Bibliography; Website.

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ENGL 4300

 

ENGL 4/5300-01: Studies in the English Language, Prof. David W. Newton
History of the English Language
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, TLC 1116

Required for Certification in Secondary English Education. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Fulfills an English major requirement (Area C, Language and Writing)

Description: This course will explore the historical development of the English language from its origins as a member of the Indo-European family of languages through its emergence as one of the most influential languages in the modern era. Along the way, we will examine the English language at different stages of development, including Old English, Middle English, Early Modern English, and contemporary varieties of American English. We will learn about some of the major structural changes that have contributed to the development of English and investigate how the grammar of the English language and the pronunciation and meaning of English words have changed over time. We will also consider some of the major social, cultural, and intellectual influences that have contributed to the development of the English language at different historical moments.

Texts: Baugh and Cable. A History of the English Language. 5 th Revised Edition. Routledge, 2002. Paperback edition (ISBN: 0415280990).

Requirements: For undergraduates, active participation in class discussions and activities, four examinations (a midterm and final included in this number), and a research project. For graduate students, all of the items above, as well as an annotated bibliography and a more extensive research project.

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ENGL 4310

 

ENGL 4/5310-01W: Studies in Literary Theory, Prof. Joshua Masters
The New Historicism and Race Theory
MW 1:50-3:10, Humanities 206

Prerequisite: ENGL 2300. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: The aim of this course is to introduce upper-level English majors and graduate students to two interrelated modes of critical inquiry that employ a flexible, interdisciplinary, and, above all, utilitarian theoretical approach to cultural texts. We will begin by looking at what is called “the new historicism”—a critical method that aims, in the words of Louis Montrose, to analyze and understand “the historicity of texts and the textuality of history.” New historicism’s emphasis on the material, historical, and political contexts framing our cultural productions has proven particularly useful to literary critics interested in unpacking and revealing the ideology of race in American cultural life; thus, in the second half of the semester, we will focus our attention on what is loosely called “race theory.” Our theoretical readings will be complemented by literary readings throughout the semester, with our goal always being the studied and meaningful application of theoretical methods to literary inquiry.

Texts: Terry Eagleton’s Literary Theory: An Introduction, Toni Morrison’s Playing in the Dark, Michel Foucault’s Discipline and Punish, Herman Melville’s Benito Cereno, Raymond Carver’s What We Talk About When We Talk About Love, Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man, and an extensive packet of critical essays and book chapters on reserve.

Requirements: Students are expected to complete the day’s reading assignment in advance and come to class prepared to participate in discussion. Students must maintain a reading-quiz average of 65% in order to qualify for a passing grade in the class, as well as turn in several short essays and a ten-page research paper.

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ENGL 4384

 

ENGL 4384-01W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Lisa Crafton
Madwomen in the Attic: Trickster Figures in Literature and Film
MW 3:20pm-4:40pm, TLC 2237

Required for all English majors. Cannot be taken until ENGL 1101, 1102, and core area F have been completed with a minimum passing grade of C. A minimum of 18 hours of upper-level English courses must also have been completed. Requires permission of the department’s academic coordinator. Not offered during the summer session. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Thi s capstone course, a culmination of study in the English major, allows students to examine theoretical/practical debates within the discipline, analyze implications of their coursework, and choose a substantive research project which will become part of a published anthology of essays from the class. This semester, we will explore the ways in which trickster figures (often manifested as madmen, ghosts, witches, and other marginal characters) function in literary texts. Using two critical books on tricksters, we will explore 1) how witchhunts, or scapegoating, take place in culture, especially with regard to class and gender as in Morrison’s Sula and Caryl Churchill’s play Vinegar Tom, 2) how the marginalized Other (in terms of beliefs, culture, discourse) is cast in terms of madness or the supernatural, as in Kingston’s The Woman Warrior; and how artistic and social rebellion lead to a construction of madness/trickster identities in the films Girl Interrupted and Fight Club. In all these inquiries, we will consider how the “trickster” figure functions in either the subversion or preservation of communities. Student projects may be on any literary/filmic text in which trickster characters, thematic elements, or trickster aesthetics are at play.

Texts: Doty/Hynes, Mythical Trickster Figures: Contours, Contexts, and Criticisms; online text Smith, Writing Tricksters: Mythic Gambols in Ethnic American Literature;Maxine Hong Kingston, Woman Warrior; Morrison, Sula;; films Fight Club, Girl Interrupted

Requirements: Class discussion, individual and group oral reports, two response essays, substantive research project, including prospectus, abstract, and annotated bibliography, andcolloquia presentation.

ENGL 4384-02W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Chad Davidson
The Invention of Nature: Environment and Literature
TR 5:30-6:45pm, TLC 2237

Required for all English majors. Cannot be taken until ENGL 1101, 1102, and core area F have been completed with a minimum passing grade of C. A minimum of 18 hours of upper-level English courses must also have been completed. Requires permission of the department’s academic coordinator. Not offered during the summer session. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This senior seminar will focus on representations of nature in both British and American literature, and what those representations tell us about the cultural ideologies that shape them. As part of our exploration, we will ask questions such as “When is nature the untainted paradise of Hebrew Scripture and pastoral poems?” “When is nature the evil seat of Puritan fears and passions to be subdued and “civilized? “To what extent does the way we think, and talk, about nature inform our own sense of cultural, national, and individual identity?” “What do myths of the landscape as “other” (“the savage,” “the untamed,” even “the female”) tell us about imperialism, colonialism, and gender politics?” We will even look at pop and consumer culture, film and television, for contemporary representations of the environment and what significance they hold in a world of ever diminishing “wild.”

Texts: Carson, Rachel. Silent Spring. New York: Mariner, 1962; The Ecocriticism Reader: Landmarks in Literary Ecology. Eds. Cheryl Glotfelty and Harold Fromm. Athens: U of Georgia P, 1996; Robinson, Marilynne. Housekeeping. New York: Picador, 1980; plus various handouts to be distributed in class.

Requirements: A range of informal and formal writing assignments and exercises—including two four-page papers—the ultimate goal of which is the completion of a seminar paper for the course anthology.

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ENGL 4385

 

ENGL 4/5385-01W: Special Topics, Prof. Robert Snyder
Twentieth-Century British Espionage Fiction
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Humanities 209

May be taken to satisfy one area of the Genre and Theory requirement. Requires permission of the department chair to repeat. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Ever since Rudyard Kipling referred to espionage in defense of the British Empire as the “Great Game” in Kim (1900), a new genre emerged from the nineteenth-century adventure tale and detective story that soon challenged its precursors in terms of commercial popularity. Although sometimes dismissed by literary purists on the grounds of being “formulaic,” à la Ian Fleming’s overexposed potboilers about James Bond, spy novels are often more complex than they appear, not least because they engage the reader in a diegetic or “behind-the-scenes” dimension of narrative. In this course we will be reading twelve such texts, spanning the years from 1907 (Joseph Conrad’s The Secret Agent) to 1978 (Graham Greene’s The Human Factor). After considering eight “conventions” that allegedly govern this manifestation of what John G. Cawelti and Bruce A. Rosenberg call the “Age of Clandestinity,” we will examine these novels from the critical perspectives of structuralism, Marxism, and gender studies. Whether these cultural productions constitute a “Great Game” will an ongoing focus of the course.

Texts: Eric Ambler, Epitaph for a Spy (Vintage) and The Intercom Conspiracy (Farrar); John Buchan, The Thirty-Nine Steps (Oxford UP); Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent (Oxford UP) and Under Western Eyes (Penguin); Len Deighton, Funeral in Berlin (HarperCollins); Graham Greene, The Human Factor (Knopf) and Our Man in Havana (Penguin); Adam Hall, The Quiller Memorandum (Forge); Geoffrey Household, Rogue Male (Orion); John le Carré, The Spy Who Came In from the Cold (Simon & Schuster) and Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (Scribner).

Requirements: Because this is a WAC-designated course, undergraduate students will be expected to complete six response essays (each three pages in length) and engage in listserv critiques. A twelve-page research paper is also required. In addition to completing the response essays, graduate students will be expected to submit an eighteen-page research paper and to lead discussion of an assigned primary text.

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ENGL 6000-level

ENGL 6115

 

ENGL 6115-01:Seminar in British Literature II, Prof. Lisa Crafton
British Romanticism: Staging Revolution
T 5:30pm-8:00pm, TLC 1204
Requires permission of the department’s Director of Graduate Studies, Dr. Maria Doyle. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Description: The Romantic era in England is bounded by revolutions—American, French, and Industrial—and has a critical legacy of revolutionary subversion of political, cultural, aesthetic, and sexual tyranny. From Blake’s “I must Create a System or be Enslav’d by another Man’s” to Wollstonecraft’s “Marriage had Bastilled me for life,” Romantic writers stage their positions in theatrical poses, all the while claiming a kind of authenticity of emotion (Wordsworth’s ‘spontaneous overflow of powerful feeling”). Recent Romantic theory on Romantic theatricality/spectacle will frame our discussions of the ways in which these writers 1) critique external forces of cultural oppression—how do radical writers respond to conservative theatrics regretting the fall of monarchy and use theatrical metaphors to expose the immorality of much “moral” discourse; and 2) reinvent a notion of an “authentic self” out of these metaphors of the theater. Austen will provide us a test case of these notions—is her parody of gothic as “revolutionary” act of subversion or a reactionary pose? We will use poetry, nonfiction, novels and film excerpts from contemporary adaptations in our explorations of these topics.

Texts: Blake, Selected Poems; Wordsworth, Lyrical Ballads, Wollstonecraft Maria, or the Wrongs of Woman; A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (excerpts); Mary Shelley Frankenstein; Austen, Northanger Abbey, Mansfield Park; online selections from Coleridge, Hannah More, et al; excerpts from scholarship, e.g. Romantic Theatricality, Spectacular Politics, Masquerade and Gender.

Requirements: 2 analytical response essays, 15 page seminar research paper, oral report, and class colloquia presentation

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ENGL 6120

 

ENGL 6120-01: Seminar in American Literature II, Prof. Joshua Masters
After the Civil War: American Fiction in Black and White
W 5:30pm-8:00pm, TLC 2237

Requires permission of the department’s Director of Graduate Studies, Dr. Maria Doyle. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Description: After the Civil War ended, the battle to define, represent, and deconstruct the idea of “race” in the American imagination had only just begun. This course will work with pairings of texts by Anglo and African American writers that explore the myths, themes, and political controversies shaping the development of racial identity in the United States. As we survey such literary movements as Realism, Modernism, and Post-modernism, we will pay attention to the way that new literary forms and movements responded to dramatic social and historical events and shifting cultural attitudes about race, particularly our attitudes towards the categories of “whiteness” and “blackness.” We will also consider the role of American fiction in shaping those attitudes. The works we will read demonstrate a wide a range of perspectives and narrative techniques, and each suggests new ways to imagine the status of the individual, the boundaries of nationhood, and the meaning of such categories as race, ethnicity, class, and gender in America. While examining the works’ shared interests in history, identity, and human agency, we will also bear in mind the unique nature of the individual writers and their texts.

Texts: (in order of appearance) Toni Morrison’s Playing in the Dark (1993), Herman Melville’s Benito Cereno(1855), Charles Johnson’s Middle Passage(1990), Mark Twain’s Pudd’nhead Wilson (1893), Frances Harper’s Iola Leroy (1893), James Weldon Johnson’s Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (1912), Nella Larsen’s Passing (1929), William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! (1936), Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man (1950), Percival Everett’s Erasure (2002), Flannery O’Connor’s The Complete Stories (1960), Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon (1977), Russell Banks’s Rule of the Bone (1993), Toni Morrison’s Paradise (1999), Russell Banks’s Continental Drift (1986).

Requirements: Preparation for, and active participation in, weekly discussions; twenty minute oral presentation; four short essays; a fifteen to twenty page research paper.

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ENGL 6385

 

ENGL 6385-01: Seminar in Special Topics, Prof. Tom Dvorske
Introduction to the Profession; Teaching Theory and Practice
Th 5:30pm-8:00pm, TLC 1204

Requires permission of the department’s Director of Graduate Studies, Dr. Maria Doyle. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Description: This course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice of teaching English—composition and literature—at the college or university level. We will address topics such as institutional & departmental context; curriculum and course design and planning; assessment and evaluation; theories of teaching and learning, as well as ethical and practical issues related to teaching English and Composition. Students will be required to produce ample scholarly and pedagogical work, participate actively in class discussion, and develop a professional teaching portfolio. Additionally, students will be required to spend 20 hours in ENGL 1101/1102 observation (10 hours each), and ten additional hours in the University Writing Center in a tutorial or observational capacity.

Texts: Graff, Gerald. Professing Literature: An Institutional History. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1987. Faigley, Lester. Fragments of Rationality: Postmodernity and the Subject of Composition. Pittsburgh: U of Pittsburgh P, 1992. Tate, Gary, Amy Rupiper and Kurt Schick. Eds. A Guide to Composition Pedagogies. Oxford UP, 2001. Corbett, Edward P.J., Nancy Myers and Gary Tate. The Writing Teacher’s Sourcebook. 4 th ed. New York: Oxford UP, 1999. Yancey, Kathleen Blake. Teaching Literature as Reflective Practice. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 2004. Krueger, Ellen and Mary T. Christel. Seeing and Believing: How to Teach Media Literacy in the English Classroom. Frank, Carolyn. Ethnographic Eyes: A Teacher’s Guide to Classroom Observation. Heinemann, 1999. Shared Texts for UWG’s English 1101 and 1102.

Requirements: Field observation and journal; reading responses; annotated bibliography; critical analysis paper; teaching demonstration; professional portfolio and philosophy statement.

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