in this issue

1-2-3-4-5-6-7

News & Events

Poetry Gala to Honor UWG's Centennial

Undergrad Conference

Film Studies Minor is Here!

Whittier Brings Fairchild to UWG

People News

Dr. Snyder Retiring

Davidson Pens Hockey Haiku

Beal Lands Internship

Job Spotlight on Susan McNeel

Anisa Lewis: Teaching and Learning in France

Course Descriptions

Summer 2007

Fall 2007

 

 

Fall 2007 Courses


NOTE: Courses are subject to change depending on enrollment and faculty teaching assignments. Please check BANWEB for more current information on the availability of all courses.

English 1101 and 1102 are prerequisites for all courses from ENGL 2110 through 4386.

A “W” designation after a section number of a 3000- or 4000-level course signifies that the course is a Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) course. WAC accepts as a guiding principle the idea that writing is a valuable tool for learning and communication. Therefore, the components of a course so designated are designed to help you learn the material and communicate what you have learned. Students are required to take two “W” courses for the undergraduate degree.


 

XIDS

4/5000-level

  XIDS 2100: Arts and Ideas ENGL 4/5106: Studies in Genre
 

 

ENGL 4/5108: Studies in the Novel
    ENGL 4/5109: Film as Literature
 

2000-level

ENGL 4/5120: Seventeenth-Century British Lit
  ENGL 2000: American Speech ENGL 4/5135: British Romanticism
 

ENGL 2050: Self Staging

ENGL 4/5165: Contemporary Brit and American Lit
 

ENGL 2080: Intro to the Art of Film

ENGL 4170: African-American Literature
 

ENGL 2110: World Literature

ENGL 4/5180: Studies in Regional Literature
 

ENGL 2120: British Literature

ENGL 4/5188: Individual Authors
 

ENGL 2130: American Literature

ENGL 4/5210: Advanced Creative Writing
 

ENGL 2180: Studies in African-American Literature

ENGL 4/5295: Reading/Lit in Secondary English Classrooms
 

ENGL 2190: Studies in Literature by Women

ENGL 4/5300: Studies in the English Language
 

ENGL 2300: Practical Criticism

ENGL 4/5310: Studies in Literary Theory
    ENGL 4384: Senior Seminar
    ENGL 4/5385: Special Topics
 

3000-level

 

ENGL 3200: Creative Writing

6000-level
 

ENGL 3300: Studies in American Culture

ENGL 6110: Seminar in American Literature I
 

ENGL 3400: Advanced Comp: Creative Nonfiction

ENGL 6115: Seminar in British Literature II
 

ENGL 3405: Professional and Technical Writing

ENGL 6385: Seminar in Special Topics

XIDS


XIDS 2100

 

XIDS 2100-01: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Patricia Reinhard
Photography and Short Stories
TR 12:30pm-1:45 pm, TLC 1116

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: Photography and Short Stories will study the dialogic relationship between photographic images and short stories. Fraternal twins separated at birth, the modern short story and the photographic image have flourished, one form shadowing the other, since their origins in the mid-nineteenth century. This course will analyze the synergistic effect created by photographic images and short fiction when they are scrutinized through the dual lenses of perspective and point of view. Both disciplines present sketches, slices of perspective that concentrate on a single or unique effect. In their uses and manipulations of point of view, both disciplines appear infinitely malleable and wildly flexible as artists continually craft and redefine the ways in which a story or an image can be “told.” Our study of the synergy between short fiction and image will begin with Eudora Welty, an artist who serves as the literal and physical embodiment of the interpenetration of these two disciplines. As a young woman, Welty worked for the Works Progress Administration in a job that allowed her access to places and people throughout her home state. Before she wrote, Welty photographed—recorded on film her sojourn through Mississippi’s eighty-two counties. Closely reading a Welty short story and several of her images will enable students to formulate a set of terms and concepts that are shared by both disciplines. Welty’s fiction and images, along with these specific terms and concepts descriptive of both disciplines, provide the springboard to all that follows—dozens of online photographic images, thirteen stories, and Susan Sontag’s On Photography, Roland Barthes’s Camera Lucida, and John Berger’s About Looking.

Texts: Susan Sontag’s On Photography, Roland Barthes’s Camera Lucida, and John Berger’s About Looking; a course packet of thirteen short stories, an online portfolio of photographic images, and additional selected essays on photography.

Requirements: Students will write three essays on topics derived from the themes and concepts in the texts. These essays will be approximately 1000 words and will require secondary sources. Weekly informal response writing intended to generate ideas and concepts explored in greater depth and detail in the essays will be assigned. This writing is designed as write to learn exercises and offers students a free space in which to begin exploring the texts. A group/collaborative oral assignment in which students will select a specific photograph or series of images and a short story and present a report on them to the class. A midterm and a final exam.

XIDS 2100-01D: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Stacey Carter Morin
The Monstrous and the Grotesque
This class will largely be conducted on WebCT Vista; however, we will meet on Thursday August 16 th from 2:00 PM to 3:15 PM in Bonner Lecture Hall B to discuss the class format and the use of WebCT Vista. We will also be meeting for the midterm and final exams (date, time, location of these exams—TBA)

May count for credit in Core Area C1.

Description: In this class, we will explore the role gothic fiction and its progeny, horror film, have played in establishing social, political and cultural beliefs and identities. Through “monsters” such as Dracula, Norman Bates, and Hannibal Lecter, the gothic/horror works to project what we fear most—pestilence and disease, invasion, sexual transgression, and the darkness that lurks beneath the thin veneer of normality. By presenting these monsters and the values they represent as the embodiment of evil, the gothic/horror becomes a mode for defining “good” as the value systems of dominant societies and religions it wants to support and promote. Our exploration will begin with classic gothic texts such as Frankenstein and Dracula and move to a survey of horror films of the 20 th century.

Texts: Darryl Jones, Horror: A Thematic History in Fiction and Film and Mary Shelley, Bram Stoker and Robert Louis Stevenson, Frankenstein, Dracula, and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (published as a single volume). You will also be expected to watch an array of films including Dracula (1931), Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992), Psycho (1960), Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974), Halloween (1978), Silence of the Lambs (1991), Scream (1996), The Sixth Sense (1999)

Requirements: periodic listserv postings, two short response papers, final exam

XIDS 2100-02: Arts and Ideas, STAFF
The Creative Process
MWF 10:00am-10:50am, Humanities 208

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

XIDS 2100-03: Arts and Ideas, Janet Donohoe
Postmodernism
MWF 11:00am-11:50am, Humanities 206

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

XIDS 2100-04: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Lori Lipoma
Myth and Religion: The Song of the Soul’s High Adventure
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Pafford 308

Satisfies Area C1 of the core.

Description:Hercules, Sundiata, Thor, Gilgamesh-- these heroes leap to mind when we think of mythology, yet myths are more than just stories of deities and fantastic beings from other people’s religions. They are simultaneously the most particular and the most universal feature of civilization, and they help each of us understand and face common concerns as well as aspire to new heights; indeed, Joseph Campbell calls mythology “the wonderful song of the soul’s high adventure.”

In XIDS 2100 “Myth and Religion,” we’ll study common themes throughout world myths and religions—including creation, birth and death, great floods, initiation, hero, cosmology, deities, and transformation myths—as they appear in the rich traditions of cultures worldwide. Moreover, we’ll hear from speakers who will tell us about the world religious traditions which they practice, including Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, Baha’i, African Traditional Religion, Wicca, Islam, and Zoroastrianism. (3 credits)

Texts: Leeming, David Adams. The World of Myth; Class coursepack

Requirements: Three Tests:  15% each = 45%; Two 2-1/2 to 3-page response papers:  30% cumulative (Paper #1 = 10%; Paper #2 = 20%.); Reading quizzes: 5%; Final Exam:  20%.

XIDS 2100-06: Arts and Ideas, Prof. Bonnie Adams
Marriage
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Pafford 307

May count for credit in Core Area C1.

Description: “As progressive as our society claims to be, there are certain life targets that we’re supposed to hit: marriage, babies, and a home to call your own [ . . . . ] Do we really want these things, or are we just programmed?” (Carrie Bradshaw, Sex and the City)

For most of the past century, Western society has viewed marriage as one of the hallmarks into adulthood, an expected chapter in life's journey. Even in these enlightened times, the general consensus continues to regard marriage as a foregone conclusion - a necessary part of a truly "fulfilled" life. Indeed, one could argue that the pressures for marriage are as existent in our contemporary culture as they were centuries ago; from fairy tales that end in "happily ever after" to presidential candidates who base their platforms on family values, marriage continues to be perceived as a necessary, stabilizing force in our culture - one that should be revered and "protected" (as evidenced by the heated debate regarding same sex marriage) - a perception that persists in spite of divorce rates that hover between 50 and 52%.

This course, then, will begin by examining the history of marriage, charting its inception and its various incarnations throughout the centuries leading up to our present conceptions of the institution itself. Central to our historical survey will be an examination of several key issues surrounding marriage, including the history of power relations surrounding marriage, gender roles in marriage and how they have changed over the centuries, and industry of marriage itself.

We will then shift to an examination of the various means through which marriage continues to be perpetuated as the ultimate ideal, studying representations of marriage as such in literature, film, and television over the last forty years (since the feminist movement). We will also, however, discuss what Joseph Allen Boone calls the "countertraditional" voices -- those that work counter to the perpetuation of marriage as a foregone conclusion. In addition, we will examine the current relationship between politics and marriage, discussing such seminal historical milestones as the Defense of Marriage Act and considering contemporary debates regarding gay marriage.

Ultimately, the course will uncover the extent to which external, social forces continue to shape our (ostensibly) most personal perceptions regarding what, exactly, constitutes "happily ever after."

Texts: Course pack

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 2000-level

ENGL 2000
 

ENGL 2000-01: American Speech, Prof. David W. Newton
MWF 11:00am-11:50am, TLC 1116

May count for credit in Core Area B.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 2050
 

ENGL 2050: Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life, Profs. Lori Lipoma and Maren Henry
Section 01 (Henry): MWF 9:00am-9:50am, Pafford 307
Section 02 (Lipoma): MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, Pafford 302
Section 03 (Lipoma): TR 11:00am-12:15pm, Pafford 302

May count for credit in Core Area B. Same as THEA 2050.

Description: Effective communicators are more productive, have enhanced career opportunities, enjoy more fulfilling relationships, earn more respect, and have more fun! The good news is that you already have the tools you need to become a great communicator; it’s just a matter of learning how to use them consciously and masterfully…in other words, learning how to “self-stage.”

In Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Everyday Life, we will study and practice practical communication skills—creativity, quick thinking, risk taking, lateral thinking, active listening, subtext mastery, self-awareness—and apply them to virtually every interaction you encounter outside the classroom: One-on-One Conversations, Public Presentation, Debate and Argumentation, Conflict Resolution and Confrontation Skills, Stress Management, Team Building, and Impression Management. By the end of the semester, students will have had first-hand experience in all of these areas, and, more importantly, will know exactly how to continue honing and perfecting those skills long after.

Requirements: formal solo presentations, group projects and presentations, panel discussions/debates, vocabulary-building exercises, role-playing and improvisation exercises, journaling, and, of course, active, informed participation in each class session.

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ENGL 2080
 

ENGL 2080-01: Introduction to the Art of Film, Prof. Barbara Brickman
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, TLC 1200

Description: In this course students will consider the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. Students will watch a wide range of films from a variety of countries and historical moments in film history. Students will have the chance to explore issues such as framing, photographic space, film shot, editing, sound, genre, narrative form, acting style, and lighting in the context of wider discussions of the weekly films. This is an introductory course, and assumes no prior knoweldge of film. Students will be evaluated primarily on the basis of weekly postings, a shot-by-shot analysis, and exams. Weekly screenings will be offered.

Texts: Corrigan, Timothy and Patricia White. The Film Experience: An Introduction.

Requirements: Weekly postings, quizzes, a shot-by-shot analysis, and two exams.

ENGL 2080-02: Introduction to the Art of Film, Prof. Muriel Cormican
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, Pafford 204

Description: As Socrates might have said, the unexamined film is not worth watching! So this course is designed to enhance your experience and enjoyment of films by introducing you to the discipline of film studies and the tools, vocabulary and frameworks necessary for “reading” film from a variety of critical perspectives.

Texts: Timothy Corrigan and Patricia White The Film Experience: An Introduction and reading package prepared by instructor.

Requirements: journal; 3-4 position papers; quizzes; final paper.

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ENGL 2110
 

ENGL 2110-01: World Literature, Prof. Lori Lipoma
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Pafford 308

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: Why do bad things happen to good people? How do we account for—or even define—good and evil? Is ours, in fact, the best of all possible worlds…and what narratives do we create when we find that it isn’t? In World Literature: Reading the Dark Side, we’ll explore these unrelenting questions, and examine the many ways in which mankind has perceived, explained, and coped with adversity since we were first able to express our deepest hopes and fears in written form.

Texts: TheEpic of Gilgamesh; Goethe, Faust; Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound; Voltaire, Candide; Dante, The Inferno; Soyinko, Death and the King’s Horseman; Frankl, Man's Search For Meaning. Supplementary course pack will include excerpts from The Egyptian Book of the Dead, The Bhagavad Gita, the Tao Te Ching, Homer’s Odyssey, Virgil’s Aeneid, Plato’s Apology and Phaedo, The Koran, The Bible, John Milton’s Paradise Lost, Lu Xun, Oswalde de Andrade, and Mark Twain’s Letters from the Earth.

Requirements: Reading journal, two analytical essays, midterm and final exams, and informed, active participation in class discussions.

ENGL 2110-25H: World Literature-Honors, Prof. Chad Davidson

TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, TLC 2237

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F. Honors students only.

Description: While functioning as a survey of world masterpieces in literature, this course will also focus on the ways texts and the cultures from which they spring have dealt with myths of the underworld and how those myths inform the way we think about life, death, and beyond. Using Dante’s Inferno as a pivotal text, we will look at classical and contemporary representations of the underworld as they appear in literature. Central to our exploration will be the concept of the hero’s journey, the quest for spiritual enlightenment, the fascination with sin, and the notion of justice (both the divine and the figuratively medieval).

Texts: Achebe, Things Fall Apart ; Dante, Inferno; Goethe, Faust; Homer, The Odyssey; plus excerpts from the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures, the Apocrypha, Aeschylus, Baudelaire, Dostoevsky, Silko, Virgil, Voltaire, and others to be distributed in class.

Requirements: Daily participation, four critical papers with detailed assignments leading up to them, and a final portfolio of writing.

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ENGL 2120
 

ENGL 2120-01: British Literature, Prof. Angela Insenga
MWF 9:00am-9:50am, Humanities 208

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2120-02: British Literature, Prof. Bonnie Adams
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, Pafford 308

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F.

Description: Over the course of the semester, we will examine not only the significant works of British authors, but we will also discuss the corresponding literary periods as well, spanning from The Middle Ages to The Twentieth Century. Students will examine these works within the context of their cultural importance; we will discuss at length how these works both shaped and reflected their cultures. As we progress, we will also examine how cultural ideals (regarding such issues as politics, education, war, gender relations, religion, and the individual) have evolved over the course of British history.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Major Authors (Eighth Edition)

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2120-03: British Literature, Prof. John Sturgis
TR 7:00pm-8:15pm, Humanities 208

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F.

Description: What does love have to do with it? From Beowulf to Virginia Woolf, from its emergence as a scruffy amalgam of Germanic and Roman roots to the thriving global voice it has become, English literature imaginatively addresses the eternal human concept of Romantic Love. Our journey across the eras will be framed by a continuing effort to define love in a manifold selection of enduring literary representations. Sampling diverse literary genre and works from each period, we will essay the concept of romantic love in an assortment of ineffable manifestations. A brief introductory section outlining the history and development of English will open up to a chronological, critical close-reading of texts in each genre: music, poetry, fiction, drama, and film. Engaging the literature of the language in all of its forms educates the imagination, enriches experience and validates existence in completely unexpected ways. There is no substitute for a trip like this one.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Eighth Edition. Stephen Greenblatt, Editor. ISBN-13: 9780393928297; Frankenstein. Mary Shelly. Pocket Books. ISBN-13: 978-0743487580;Shakespeare in Love. A film on DVD. Directed by John Madden. Written by Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard. ASIN: B00001U0E1.

Requirements: Extensive and concentrated reading from the texts and films will be accompanied by an assortment of weekly reading quizzes, written and oral. Two formal out-of-class essays, 4 pages each in length and a final research paper will be symmetrically assigned, and in-class essay style midterm and final examinations will provide ample rhetorical opportunities for students to excel. Students will be required to provide detailed design specifications for each out-of-class essay, ensuring sufficient effort is placed in the primary act: reading the text.

ENGL 2120-25H: British Literature, Prof. Lisa Crafton
MW 12:30-1:45, TLC 2237

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F. Honors students only.

Description: "I Must Create a System or be Enslav'd by Another Man's," warns Romantic poet/painter William Blake. In this study of British literature, we will read selected texts, medieval to contemporary, with an emphasis on the dynamic between individuals and communities (familial, social, cultural, political), how individuals are shaped by/resist these forces, and how literature and critical practices respond to these changing dynamics. We will analyze diverse texts of fiction, drama, poetry, film, and music which nevertheless offer recurrent themes; for example, conflicts between spiritual and material culture from medieval mystic Julian of Norwich to U2 and the compelling power of what Heaney will call "the tribe" in Irish literature.

Texts: Longman Anthology of British Literature, Frankenstein, Endgame, and a course pack, including Julian of Norwich, Chaucer (interlinear translation), Heaney,Woolf, Gordimer, and introduction to postcolonial literature.

Requirements: Active discussion, group oral report, 2 response essays, midterm and final.

ENGL 2120-26H, British Literature-Honors, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell

MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 1204

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F. Honors students only.

Description: This course will offer a sweeping survey of some of the highlights of British literature from the medieval period to the present. Along the way, we will seek to explore and understand the world that produced this literature, to acquire a sense of Britain through the ages—from feudal lords and vassals to the age of empire, from Victorian workhouses to London air raids. We will read literature in the context of the political, cultural, philosophical, and scientific developments that helped to shape it. We will supplement our extensive readings in poetry and fiction by examining other kinds of cultural texts—paintings, popular journalism, political tracts, diaries. Students will be actively engaged in the process of constructing this historical backdrop through research and visual presentations, and will incorporate this perspective into analytical essays on literary texts.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 8 th Edition. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt. Jane Eyre , Charlotte Brontë; Wide Sargasso Sea, Jeab Rhys.

Requirements: Active participation; weekly short writing assignments; group and individual presentations; 2 short(5 page) analytical essays, one involving some research; midterm; final exam.

ENGL 2120-27H, British Literature-Honors, Prof. Meg Pearson
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, TLC 2237

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F. Honors students only.

Description: Exploration drives the heroes and heroines of British Literature, from the medieval knights of King Arthur's Round Table to the Alpha-Plus intellectuals of the Brave New World. These journeys force explorers to face their greatest fears, ambitions and failures as they quest for utmost desires. This course will also be an exploration, one that travels to the wild and magical northern forests of England, to the storm-tossed Caribbean, to the craggy snow-topped Alps, to the wild west of America, and even to Hell itself. We, too, will experience the glory and exhilaration of creation as well as the often formidable consequences of discovery.

Texts: to include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, The Tempest, Paradise Lost, Olaudah Equiano's Interesting Narrative, Brave New World.

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 2130
 

ENGL 2130-01: American Literature, Prof. Gwen Davidson
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, Pafford 307

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F.

Description: In this course we will examine the movement of the American frontier and its effects on national identity. How do we define “frontier”? Can we define it? Or is the notion of a frontier in constant flux? How does east-west frontier define the American Dream? What does the idea of a Manifest Destiny tell us about our insatiable desire for westward expansion, for empty spaces? And were they actually empty? To answer these questions and others, we will consult a variety of American texts—from the cultured “European” Northeast to the often romanticized “wild” West—to view how different regions formed identity in relation to both national geography and mental borders. Furthermore we will pay specific attention to Western literature that depicts the challenge of building a new West in the shadow of its mythic past. Finally, our frontier exploration will address how barriers, both physical and psychological, shaped cultural and racial relations, and how the frontier became a dividing line between society and wilderness.

Texts: TBA

Requirements: One short essay (three pages), one long final essay project (eight to ten pages) with presentation, two take-home exams, class discussion, and readings.

ENGL 2130-02: American Literature, Prof. Brandy L. James
TR 9:30am-10:45am, TLC 1116

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F.

Description: On defining the creation of identity, American essayist, novelist, and playwright James Arthur Baldwin comments, “An identity would seem to be arrived at by the way in which the person faces and uses his experience.” Baldwin’s statement encompasses far-ranging ideas and introduces questions that have historically characterized American literature: How have Americans characterized their own identities at different points in time, and how have historical events, cultural phenomena, social environments, and personal experiences become meshed with and changed these identities? To what extent does the American landscape, either as a physical or symbolic space, attribute to this definition? Is the definition “American” even a valid identity? As we closely examine these questions by examining the various literary genres that span almost four centuries, we will focus on how language and writing has been used to construct and alter the meaning of “American identity.” In addition, we will also delve into the formation of identity from the perspectives of race, gender, and social class and examine how each has been used for this purpose.

Texts: Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby; Hawthorne, Nathaniel. The Scarlet Letter; Baym, Nina, Ed. The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter Sixth Edition.

Requirements: See Syllabus (http://www.westga.edu/~brobinso)

ENGL 2130-03D: American Literature, Prof. Stacey Carter Morin
This class will largely be conducted on WebCT Vista; however, we will meet on Thursday August 16 th from 12:30pm- 1:45pm in TLC 1303 to discuss the class format and the use of WebCT Vista. We will also be meeting for the midterm and final exams (date, time, location of these exams—TBA)

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F.

Description: As a survey of American Literature, we will be focusing on texts that explore the development of a uniquely American individual/national identity at different points in American history as well as how issues of race, gender, and class complicate these definitions of identity.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter 6 th edition; The Scarlet Letter; The Great Gatsby

Requirements: Periodic listserv postings, three short analytical responses, midterm and final exams.

ENGL 2130-25H: American Literature-Honors, Prof. Patrick M. Erben
MWF 10:00am-10:50am, Location TBA

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F. Honors students only.

Description: In spite of a stunning variety of aesthetic sensibilities and cultural voices, American literature seems to hold at its core three fundamental concerns: the relationship between human and non-human environments, the emergence and definition of the self as both part of and independent from community, and the encounter/confrontation with cultural, racial, or sexual difference. Throughout the semester, we will explore these themes within several “canonical” and “non-canonical” texts. This common distinction, in turn, reveals the high ideological and cultural stakes involved in literary production and interpretation. Why have we come to regard very specific responses to these issues or problems—as well as certain literary styles—as quintessentially “American,” while considering others as marginal? In surveying American literature from colonial times to the 20 th century, this course traces the ideas and styles that make works distinctively “American,” and it questions the principles under which such an ideal is constructed.

Texts: Cabeza de Vaca, Relación; Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography; Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Fanny Fern, Ruth Hall; Emily Dickinson, selected poems; Mark Twain, Huck Finn; F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; August Wilson, Fences; Gary Snyder, Turtle Island.

Requirements: Active participation, weekly reading quizzes, two short argumentative essays, brief oral presentation, midterm and final exams.

ENGL 2130-26H: American Literature-Honors, Prof. Debra MacComb
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, TLC 2237

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F. Honors students only.

Description: This course will develop a range of enduring themes that have characterized American literature: the encounter with and appropriation of nature; the crafting of an identity that attempts to reconcile the desires of the individual with the needs of society; the individual’s ability to chart his own path to success; the “problem” of the socio-cultural “other.” In exploring these themes, we will consider how American authors “speak” to each other, endorsing, correcting, and even rejecting previous ideas and ideals. Finally, we will also examine the authorial strategies that developed over time which make these works aesthetically as well as historically pertinent.

Texts: The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of A Slave Girl, Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God, Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter, Wharton, The House of Mirth, Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mason, In Country, Pyncheon, The Crying of Lot 49, Morrison, Jazz.

Requirements: Active and informed class participation, oral report(s), two 3-4 page papers, a cumulative final exam.

ENGL 2130-27H: American Literature-Honors, Prof. S. Boyd
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, Humanities 205

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F. Honors students only.

Description: Through the examination of a number of materials engaging issues of identity, this course will pay close attention to the ways in which authors have constructed and deconstructed American identities. Specifically, we will consider how selected works define America, how America defines itself, and how Americans have defined themselves. We will spend considerable time thinking about how race and its intersections with gender, sexuality and class complicate the formulation of a particularly American identity.

Texts: Benjamin Franklin , The Autobiography; Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass; Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Abraham Cahan, Yekl; F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye; Tim O'Brien, The Things They Carried

Requirements: short response papers, quizzes, oral presentation, a midterm exam or essay, and a final essay or exam.

ENGL 2130-28H: American Literature-Honors, Prof. Gregory Fraser
TR 2:00-3:15, TLC 2237

Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C2 or F. Honors students only.

Description: This Honors-level survey of American literature will focus on works that examine various ideals central to the shaping of American identity and consciousness. We will explore—and write in-depth about—the ways in which America writers reproduce the culture’s dominant philosophical and ideological positions, even while undercutting these shared tenets for political and aesthetic purposes.

Texts: Benjamin Franklin , The Autobiography; Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Spike Lee, The 25 th Hour (film); electronic handouts of poetry, short fiction, and drama primarily by women and writers of non-white cultural backgrounds.

Requirements: Four researched critical essays of at least five pages in length; oral and written contributions to workshops on Honors-level interpretative writing.

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ENGL 2180
 

ENGL 2180: Studies in African American Literature, Prof. Mandi Campbell
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 206

May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: This survey course will focus on narrative techniques employed in a variety of African-American writings. Beginning with a slave narrative and ending with a contemporary novel, we will trace a long tradition of storytelling and examine how African-American writers use the power of narrative voice to construct both individual and communal identities. In addition to understanding the impact that these writers have on the African-American community, we also will consider how the voices that have emerged from this literature contribute to America’s evolving sense of a national identity.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of African American Literature ; Gloria Naylor, Mama Day.

Requirements: Weekly reading quizzes and responses, three short analytical essays, midterm and final exams.

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ENGL 2190
 

ENGL 2190-01: Studies in Literature by Women, Prof. Alison Umminger
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm

May count for credit in Core Area C2.

Description: This course will begin with a look at Naomi Wolf’s book of cultural criticism, The Beauty Myth, as a springboard for a survey of literature by women. Wolf brings up the ongoing problem with expectations of femininity as they affect “modern” women, but one can see that struggling with and against such expectations is nothing new for women writers and their fictional characters. We will look at how different writers and critics have responded to the various pressures placed on women to be beautiful, to be good mothers (or mothers at all), or to inhabit a particular place in society, and to create a space for themselves as subjects in a culture that (still) places many women in an object role.

Texts: The Beauty Myth, Jane Eyre, Wide Sargasso Sea, Waking Beauty, The Bluest Eye, Real Women Have Curves, Veronica, Geek Love,, Quicksand, and The House of Mirth.

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 2300
 

ENGL 2300-01: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Mitzi McFarland
‘The Art of Constru(ct)ing’: Practical Criticism and Research Methodology
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 209

Registration requires permission of Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu). Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Description: A prerequisite for upper-division English studies, this course introduces students to representative methods of critical analysis that inform contemporary literary and cultural studies . Whereas much of meaning depends on the sorts of questions we ask of a text, our readings – surveying a number of theoretical schools of thought – will immerse students in the sorts of questions that can be asked of a given work. Ultimately we will come to see the infinitely varied and complex ways that our questions are themselves shaped by culture, ideology, and normative discursive practices (what Professor Bruce Harvey calls “the scripts that script us”).  By this, students will become more deft readers of literary texts and their contexts (theoretical and historical) as well as develop greater facility in analytical skills. Hopefully, through the process of articulation, we will deepen our understanding of the aesthetic, literary, psychological, and socio-historical facets out of which texts are both generated and interpreted.

In all our discussions we will give attention to questions raised by contemporary literary theory (Why read? What should we read? How should we read?). However our central focus on “practical criticism” will involve the application of various approaches and methodologies to the explication – that is, to the interpretation and understanding of particular texts. This course, then, is essentially a process course, where students can gain ample practice – through written and oral reports – in research methods, critical frameworks, and the close examination and analysis of texts.

Texts: Bressler, Charles. Literary Criticism: An Introduction to Theory and Practice. 4 th ed. Prentice-Hall, 2006. ISBN: 0131534483; Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 6 th ed. MLA, 2003. ISBN: 0873529863; Malcolm X, directed by Spike Lee. (DVD) ISBN: 0-7907-3923-2; Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street. Vintage, 1984. ISBN: 0-679-73477-5; Supplemental online readings – poems, short stories, essays – provided online; Highly recommended: Baldick, Chris. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms. Oxford UP, 2004. ISBN: 0198608837.

Requirements: 3 shorter analytical essays, a research paper (including proposal, required drafts, peer reviews, and an annotated bibliography), one oral presentation (film and critical theory discussion), final exam.

ENGL 2300-02: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Meg Pearson
Sleuthing and Interpretation
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Humanities 206

Registration requires permission of Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu). Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Description: Literary criticism is a process of deduction. With that in mind, this course will take as its mascot the master sleuth Sherlock Holmes. Alongside our explorations of theory and critical methodology, we will read Holmes's adventures as imagined by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Once we have mastered several theoretical models, we will finish the course with Dracula, a detective story gone Gothic.

Texts: Bressler's Literary Criticism, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Dracula

Requirements: ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, Permission of Dept. Chair.

ENGL 2300-03: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Rebecca Harrison
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, TLC 1111

Registration requires permission of Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu). Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Description: An introduction to critical theory, Engl 2300 provides the English major with a solid foundation of theoretical approaches to reading literature, analyzing texts, and engaging in worthwhile research. As a collaborative liberal arts research community, this course will aid students in developing critical lenses and individual approaches to the advanced study of texts by focusing on female sexuality and captive bodies in literature, and how paradigms of confinement enforce or transgress national, cultural, and political agendas. We will begin with a representation of a past community through a critical case study of Kate Chopin’s The Awakening and culminate in Margaret Atwood’s dark vision of the future in The Handmaid’s Tale. Film clips and art will regularly supplement the assigned texts.

Texts: Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale; Kate Chopin, The Awakening ( Bedford/St. Martin's Case Studies, 2 nd Ed.); Jonathan Culler, Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction; Joseph Gibaldi, MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (6th Ed); film and art as assigned.

Requirements: Reading quizzes, 2 response essays, a multi-staged research project, and a final exam.

ENGL 2300-04: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Joshua Masters
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, Humanities 206

Registration requires permission of Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu). Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Not offered during summer session.

Description: Practical Criticism introduces students to the English major and the discipline of literary studies. In it you will develop the analytical, writing, and research skills necessary to succeed in the major. The course will also introduce you to three interrelated critical approaches to the study of literature and culture: new historicism, gender theory, and minority discourse. The primary focus, however, is refining your skills in writing thesis-driven critical essays, and thus the theory will always be employed in the service of your own original ideas and arguments. Three collections of short stories will provide the literary material that inspires our interpretation, analysis, and critical writing.

Texts: James Baldwin, Going to Meet the Man; Raymond Carver, Where I’m Calling From; Flannery O’Connor, The Complete Stories; (All theoretical and critical material will be on electronic reserve in the library.)

Requirements: Active participation; frequent writing exercises; two short papers and one longer research paper; and weekly reading quizzes.

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ENGL 3000-level

ENGL 3200
 

ENGL 3200-01W: Creative Writing, Prof. Randy Hendricks
MWF 9:00am-9:50am, TLC 1204

No more than two [2] 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: An introduction to creative writing, this course offers students practice in writing poetry, fiction, drama, and creative nonfiction, as well as critical and theoretical study of the aesthetics in all four genres. Rigorous preparation for class meetings and commitment to daily writing are a must. For more information e-mail rhendric@westga.edu or call 678-849-4876.

Texts: David Madden, ed. A Pocketful of Poems: Vintage Verse. Volume II; A Pocketful of Prose: Vintage Short Fiction, Volume II, Revised Edition; A Pocketful of Plays: Vintage Drama, Volume II

Requirements: Submission of work for critique by the class, critiques of the writing of others, short written work as assigned, a portfolio of creative work in multiple genres, a ten-page profile of a literary journal based on a full year’s issues.

ENGL 3200-02W: Creative Writing, Prof. Gregory Fraser
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, TLC 1204

No more than two [2] 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: In this introductory course, students will be encouraged to experiment in poetry, short fiction, play- and screen-writing, and creative non-fiction. We will make use of several practical writing strategies such as “riffing” or “improv-ing” on the work of published authors; putting characters on the witness stand; climbing the slanted ladder of specificity; and many more. In addition to reading and commenting on each other’s texts-in-progress, we will study the creative writings of established writers, thinking about how these authors respond to literary traditions while seeking to break new creative ground. Our primary goal will be to produce creative writing that tests the limits of language and stretches the imagination in unexpected ways.

Texts: Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, Martone and Williford, eds.; The Vintage Book of Contemporary World Poetry, J. D. McClatchy, ed.; The Best American Short Plays 2000-2001, Mark Glubke, ed; plus various handouts to be distributed in class.

Requirements: Regular readings; written contributions to the workshop; five in-depth journal exercises; midterm and final exam; written commentaries of peer creative submissions; author video and interview write-ups; the compilation of a writing “junkyard” or “warehouse.” Each member of the class will also produce a final portfolio of his or her strongest work and compose a critical introduction situating that work in the larger contexts of contemporary creative writing.

ENGL 3200-03W: Creative Writing, Prof. Alison Umminger
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, TLC 1204

No more than two [2] 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course provides an introduction to poetry and fiction writing, with attention to craft and revision. Using contemporary fiction and poetry anthologies, students will gain some basic familiarity with poets and short-story writers currently practicing their art. This should serve as an inspiration and springboard for their own writing, as good writers must also be good readers. The course will cover the building blocks of fiction and poetry: concrete language, dramatic situation, voice, meter, imagery, characterization, conflict, showing vs. telling, etc. Students will be writing and revising their own work weekly and should expect to produce a portfolio of work for review at the end of the semester.

Texts: Bowman, Catherine, ed., Word of Mouth; Charters, Ann, The Story and its Writer; Addonizio, Laux, The Poet's Companion; Leguin, Ursula, Steering theCraft.

Requirements: Each student will write 5-6 poems and revise them for the poetry section. For the fiction section, students will do a number of short exercises and write and revise one longer story (10-12 pages). There will also be a short paper and presentation on one of the poets in the Word ofMouth anthology. All students are required to be active participants in workshops.

ENGL 3200-04W: Creative Writing, Prof. Tom Dvorske
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm, TLC 1204

No more than two [2] 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course explores the foundations of the creative process as it pertains to the writing of fiction and poetry. We will read widely in contemporary letters from well-established writers to younger ones, all of whom have been quite successful. Through in-depth reading in each genre, we will come to develop a sense of what “works” in contemporary creative writing and strategies for channeling our own creative impulses.

Texts: Walking to Martha's Vineyard by Franz Wright; Black Zodiac by Charles Wright; Refusing Heaven by Jack Gilbert; Blessing the Boats: New and Selected Poems, 1988-2000 by Lucille Clifton; The School Among the Ruins by Adrienne Rich; The Orchard by Brigit Pegeen Kelly; My Brother Is Getting Arrested Again by Daisy Fried; A Kind of Flying: Selected Stories by Ron Carlson; The Best American Short Stories 2006 by Ann Patchet (Editor), Katrina Kenison (Series Editor)

Requirements: daily discussion, presentations, original poems and stories, portfolio, critical reviews and essays.

ENGL 3200-05HW: Creative Writing-Honors, Prof. Emily Hipchen
TR 9:30am-10:45am, TLC 1204

No more than two [2] 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:This course is designed to introduce students to basic skills for writing creatively in at least three genres: in this course, fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. We’ll be analyzing published texts in each genre, using them to spur writing and to learn craft, and producing pieces weekly during the last half of the semester for workshops based on student writing.

Texts: Include short stories by Angela Carter, William Faulkner, and Alice Walker, among others; poetry by Wislawa Szymborska and Dale Ritterbusch, among others; and creative nonfiction by Alex Haley, Jon Krakauer, Ann Fessler, and Augusten Burroughs, among others.

Requirements: Required daily attendance and participation; willingness to participate in workshops and produce at least eighteen pages of typed responses to other students’ work in addition to one’s own creative texts; two reading tests; a writing/response journal; and a final portfolio with several original pieces and a meta-text.

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ENGL 3300
 

ENGL 3300-01W: Studies in American Culture, Prof. Randy Hendricks
MWF 11:00am-11:50am, Humanities 209

Prerequisite: ENGL 2130, HIST 2111 or 2112. Required for the minor in American Studies. Same as HIST 3300. No more than two [2] 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: A required course for the American Studies minor, an elective for both the English and history majors, and an attractive upper-division elective for all other majors, this course introduces students to the theory and discipline of American Studies and provides ample opportunities to practice research in subjects related to American history and culture using various media and combining perspectives from multiple disciplines. As a class we will use archives (both electronic and print), film, literature, and other sources to study two major subjects: the Battle of Gettysburg (1863) and the murder of Emmet Till (1955). In consultation with the instructor, students will complete an individual term project.

Texts: Michael Shaara, The Killer Angels. Course packet.

Requirements: Rigorous preparation for class, 2 short papers, 2 presentations, 1 research paper (12-15 pages).

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ENGL 3400
 

ENGL 3400-01W: Advanced Composition: Creative Non-Fiction, Prof. Tom Dvorske
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 1204

Prerequisite: ENGL 2130, HIST 2111 or 2112. Required for the minor in American Studies. Same as HIST 3300. No more than two [2] 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: In this course, we will study narrative writing in the nonfiction mode, explore the tension between the concepts of “creative” and “nonfiction,” “fact” and “truth.”

Texts: The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion; Best American Essays, 2006 by Lauren Slater (Ed.); Writing the Memoir: From Truth to Art (2 nd Ed) by Judith Barrington

Requirements: creative essays and critical response papers.

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ENGL 3405
 

ENGL 3405-01W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. Crystal Shelnutt
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 1109

May be taken for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: English 3405-01w will introduce basic rhetorical concepts that students need for myriad professional situations. Such principles, and an analysis of the professional and technical climates under which many of our documents will be produced, will provide assistance in responding to a variety of workplace needs. This class will provide students opportunity for intensive practice in composing powerful audience-driven documents in a variety of real-world business, professional, and technical contexts. Students will also learn how to make effective business-related presentations supported with appropriate documentary and visual aids, as well as collaborate on technical research and reporting.

Texts: Alred, Gerald J. Charles T. Brusaw, and Walter E. Oliu. The Business Writer’s Handbook, Eighth Edition. Bedford/St. Martin’s. ISBN: 9780312436124; Graves, Heather and Roger Graves. A Strategic Guide to Technical Communication. Broadview Press. ISBN: 9781551118149; Course Packet.

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 3405-02W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. John Sturgis
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, TLC 1109

May be taken for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 4/5000-level

ENGL 4/5106
 

ENGL 4/5106-01W: Studies in Genre, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell
Fiction: The Novel: Form and Feeling
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 209

Required for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken to satisfy the Genre and Theory 1 or 2 (Major Area B1 or B2) requirement. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: As a genre, fiction presents pretense as reality, forges feeling into form. This course will consider the aesthetic and ideological effects of these transformations. We will raise questions about what kinds of fictions arise from particular historical and cultural circumstances and consider the relationship between text and context. Some writers strive to close the gap between real and fictional worlds, producing fictions that mirror reality as closely as possible; others emphasize the constructed, textual nature of the worlds they have invented; we will trace these conflicting impulses of the genre from the early 19 th century to the present. We will read an eclectic assortment of novels that define and contest the boundaries of fiction, inviting us to consider the relationship between form and content, representation and reality.

Texts: Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; Wilkie Collins, The Woman in White; Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse; Zadie Smith, White Teeth; Colson Whitehead, The Intuitionist; Mary Gaitskill, Veronica. Supplemental critical readings on fiction and form available electronically.

Requirements: Active participation, quizzes and short writing assignments, oral presentation, 5-page analytical essay, research paper.

ENGL 4/5106-02W: Studies in Genre, Prof. Rebecca Harrison
Nonfiction- The American Indian Captivity Narrative: Victims, Victors, & Vanquishers
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Pafford 302

Required for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken to satisfy the Genre and Theory 1 or 2 (Major Area B1 or B2) requirement. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: A highly politicized genre produced most often with propagandistic, theological, and racist agendas, the American captivity narrative has been an immensely popular tradition permeating the American cultural imaginary from the colonial era to the present day. These foundational texts of early American contact with the cultural Other are dominated by the experiences of women as captives, writers, and readers. This course will closely examine the characteristics, historical roots, and nationalist impulses of this distinct genre and its employment of the female body, along with its evolution in the American literary and cultural landscape.

Developing alongside the sentimental and historical novel, narratives of captive women gained the status of national myths. They became a “usable” past for authors seeking to cement or undo different cultural agendas. Beginning with the early factual accounts, we will follow the genre’s reinvention to both uphold and subvert communal, regional, and national borders. Focusing on the modern South, a portion of the semester will be spent interrogating the uses and transformations of this genre at the hand of female modernists such as Beatrice Witte Ravenel, Caroline Gordon, and Evelyn Scott. The latter part of the term will push us forward to contemporary captives, such as Jessica Lynch, and fictional characters that draw from early tropes of the vanquisher, such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Film clips and art will regularly supplement the assigned texts.

Texts: Course materials will include works such as Kathryn Z. Derounian-Stodola, ed., Women’s Indian Captivity Narratives; Evelyn Scott, Escapade ; Caroline Gordon, “The Captive”; poetry (published and unpublished) by Beatrice Ravenel; Film clips, art, and supplemental critical readings on the captivity genre.

Requirements: Active participation, quizzes, two response essays, a multi-staged research project, and a final exam.

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ENGL 4/5108
 

ENGL 4/5108-01W: Studies in the Novel, Prof. Jane Hill
American
TR 9:30am-10:45am, Humanities 208

May be taken to satisfy the American Literature I or II (Major Area A3 or A4) requirement. Students may take both the British and the American versions for credit. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement. Three of the nine novels are on the MA reading list.

Description: In Lawrence Kasdan’s film Grand Canyon, Steve Martin plays a producer of action films that are highly successful at the box office. When he and his best friend, played by Kevin Kline, discuss a meaning-filled-purpose-of-our-lives kind of question, Martin concludes the discussion by saying, “The answers to all of life’s questions are in the movies.” Part of the premise for this course is that most of the questions about America and its literature (and hence about life’s questions, for Americans, at least) are answered in the novels that our culture has produced. So, whether you come at the project of close analysis of American novels spanning the period from the late eighteenth century to the early twenty-first century from the perhaps old-fashioned (and largely erroneous) perspective that novels are really just television before there was television, or from the much hipper present reality of a culture in which print is dead, in this course you will find answers to questions about American life and about the literary form that has most lovingly detailed that life, almost from the moment Europeans claimed the continent as their own.

We will use Michael McKeon’s Theory of the Novel: An Historical Approach and Nina Baym’s “Elements of the Novel” as our primary theoretical lenses. Within those frameworks, we will read about the men and women whose stories reflect America’s and about the aesthetic and cultural influences that have shaped those stories and their readers. Our authors will include Native Americans, African Americans, southerners, New Yorkers, expatriates, and home bodies.

To borrow from Jonathan Franzen, whose comments on the novel and its relation to commerce got him kicked off Oprah’s show, “I intend this [course], in part, as a record of a movement away from an angry and frightened isolation toward an acceptance—even a celebration—of being a reader and a writer.”

Texts: [Note: The course will assume knowledge of The Scarlet Letter, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and The Great Gatsby, all required reading in ENGL 2130. Students who haven’t read these texts should expect to familiarize themselves with them prior to the beginning of the term.] McKeon, Michael, ed. Theory of the Novel: A Historical Approach; Rowson, Susanna. Charlotte Temple; Cooper, James Fenimore. The Pioneers; Stowe, Harriet Beecher. Uncle Tom’s Cabin; James, Henry. Washington Square; Chesnutt, Charles. The Marrow of Tradition; Faulkner, William. As I Lay Dying; O’Connor, Flannery. Wise Blood; Erdrich, Louise. The Beet Queen; Shields, Carol. Unless.

Requirements: In addition to active and informed participation, an average of 65 or higher on all quizzes (open note) in order to pass the class; four short response papers; a documented essay incorporating secondary sources; and a take-home final essay. Other short writing-to-learn activities will also be a regular part of the class, as will short, informal presentations on assigned reading in McKeon’s book. Graduate students will do formal presentations rather than quizzes and will be expected to do a more sophisticated documented essay.

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ENGL 4/5109
 

ENGL 4109-01W: Film as Literature, Prof. Barbara Brickman
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, TLC 1301

May be taken to satisfy the Genre and Theory 1 or 2 (Major Area B1 or B2) requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: In this course students will examine the horror film genre and the way it affects popular culture, other film genres, and even the human mind. Horror films have transformed themselves from monster dramas drawn from nineteenth-century literature to psychological scare fests, which led to a great proliferation of slasher films and the inevitable postmodern horror film. In fact, horror has a global place in cinema now, with the dominance of Japanese horror. This class will offer a brief historical overview of the horror genre and then students will begin to consider the larger historical, cultural, and theoretical debates around horror films and their audiences. At the end of the semester, students will be asked to offer their own argument about the phenomenon that is the horror film.

Texts: Wells, Paul. The Horror Genre. Wallflower. 2000; Jancovich, Mark. Horror: The Film Reader. Rutledge, 2002; Possible Film Texts: Bride of Frankenstein, Nosferatu, Psycho, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Night of the Living Dead, Halloween, Nightmare on Elm Street, Scream, Henry, Portrait of a Serial Killer; Blair Witch Project, Pulse (Kirosawa, 2001), The Ring (Verbinski, 2002)

Requirements: Two short essays, presentations, two exams, and one research paper

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ENGL 4/5120
 

ENGL 4/5120-01W: Seventeenth-Century British Literature, Prof. Meg Pearson
Revenge, Revolution(s), and Restoration
TR 2:00pm-3:15 pm, Humanities 208

May be taken to satisfy the British Lit I (Major Area A1) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: The seventeenth century in Britain featured the Gunpowder Plot, Irish and Scottish rebellion, witch trials, civil war, foreign conspiracies, regicide, and unceasing religious dissent. From this roiling stew of upheaval emerges some of the darkest but also the most stirring poetry and prose in the English language. We will follow the massive shifts in English history and literature over the course of one hundred years: from bloody revenge tragedy to fevered political philosophy, through epic works seeking to justify the ways of God to man to cavalier poetry in search of illicit rendezvous. There is no single seventeenth century; this class explores instead the multitude of experiences and transformations that pushed Britain from the Renaissance into the Enlightenment and Empire.

Texts: Works will include poetry by John Donne, Webster's The Changeling and Milton's Paradise Lost.

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 4/5135
 

ENGL 4/5135-01W: British Romanticism, Prof. Lisa Crafton
MWF 10:00am-10:50am, Humanities 206

May be taken to satisfy the British Lit II (Major Area A2) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Romanticism/Revolution—the s pirit of Romanticism is defined by the political/cultural revolutions of the time and the self-conscious break with inherited literary tradition. As Blake says, “I must Create a System or be Enslav’d by another Man’s.” Yet this revolutionary activism is accompanied by an equally strong passion for imaginative power: Shelley’s desire to escape into the "still cave of the witch Poesy," Coleridge’s hallucinogenic Kubla Khan, Keats’ magical poet/snake Lamia. We will explore a diverse selection of Romantic texts—from imaginative visions to graphic renditions of history—with special attention to the genre of gothic, from Coleridge’s skeleton ship to Shelley’s monstrous bodies to Austen’s manipulation of gothic to suit her gender satire. In all, we will explore Romantic contexts with regard to political, cultural, sexual, and spiritual liberation and the equally subversive Romantic imagination.

Texts: British Literature 1780-1830, Frankenstein, Northanger Abbey, and a short coursepack.

Requirements: Class discussion, 2 response essays, research paper, midterm, take-home final.

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ENGL 4/5165
 

ENGL 4/5165-01W: Contemporary British and American Literature, Prof. Tom Dvorske
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 209

May be taken to satisfy the British Lit II (Major Area A2) or the American Lit II (Major Area A4) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This glance into award-winning contemporary British and American literature discerns two prevailing trends: the historical/fantastical and the middle-class quotidian. Certainly there are other trends, but this appears to cover a continuum of sorts through which we may reflect on this dual tendency in contemporary letters to ask, as Archie Bunker might, “What’s the difference?”

Texts: What Work Is by Philip Levine; Selected Poems by Tony Harrison; The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion; Last Orders by Graham Swift; Disgrace by J.M. Coetzee; American Pastoral by Philip Roth; The Night Inspector by Frederick Busch; The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood; Old School by Tobias Wolff.

Requirements: Lead discussions, two papers, daily write-ups.

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ENGL 4170
 

ENGL 4170-01: African-American Literature, Prof. S. Boyd
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 207

May be taken to satisfy the American Lit II (Major Area A4) requirement. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course will examine major trends, authors, and texts central to the development of African-American literature.  Beginning with the New Negro Movement and moving chronologically to contemporary literature and culture, we will examine African American novels, serial poetry, short stories, and drama.  The politics of race, gender, sexuality, class, and region will play major roles in our analysis.  Indeed, the dynamics of inter-textual exchange—the ways in which texts invoke and revise previous works (the ways in which they “riff” on one another)—will also inform our exploration.  And, of course, the ways in which texts derive meaning through extra-textual references and associations (African American music or folk culture for example) will also shape our reading of African American literature and its place/role in literary studies.

Texts:  Passing, Nella Larsen; short stories by Zora Neale Hurston; short stories by Richard Wright; Invisible Man, Ralph Ellison; In My Father’s House, Ernest Gaines; Maude Martha, Gwendolyn Brooks; Thomas and Beulah, Rita Dove; The Oxherding Tale, Charles Johnson; The Color Purple, Alice Walker; The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison; and The Dutchman, Leroi Jones (Amiri Baraka)

Requirements: Response papers, presentations, a longer literature project, daily quizzes.

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ENGL 4/5180
 

ENGL 4/5180-01W: Studies in Regional Literature, Prof. Debra MacComb
The West
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm, Humanities 208

May be taken to satisfy the American Lit II (Major Area A4) requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Perhaps more than any other regional literature, that of the American West exists as a mental rather than geographical territory. That is, while the values associated with “the” West—limitless possibility, natural justice, vast wealth, Adamic renewal—have remained constant, the physical space denoted has shifted—well, west—from the Atlantic settlements of the seventeenth century across the North American continent and beyond in the twentieth. In addition to reading various works that might constitute a literature of “the” west, we will also entertain broader questions about the nature of regional literature and its relation to the dominant canon.

Texts: Rowlandson, The Account of Mary Rowlandson . . ., Cooper, The Pioneers, Sedgewick, Hope Leslie, Grey, Riders of the Purple Sage, Cather, O! Pioneers, Jackson, Romona, Didion, Play it as it Lays, Silko, Ceremony, and shorter works posted on the Library Electronic Reserve.

Requirements: Active and informed participation, weekly reading questions, three short (2-3 pages) response essays, research prospectus and documented essay, cumulative final exam.

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ENGL 4/5188
 

ENGL 4/5188-01W Individual Authors, Prof. David Newton
Walt Whitman
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm; TLC 1116

May be taken to satisfy the American Lit 1 (Major Area A3) requirement. Fulfills the Individual Authors requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: In this course we will explore the life and literary career of Walt Whitman, one of most significant poets of the nineteenth century. We will begin by considering how Whitman’s literary career—and his decision to become a poet—is situated within the diverse cultural and political realities of nineteenth-century America. We will also explore how his understanding of poetry is shaped by literary and philosophical traditions such as Romanticism, by his early professional work for magazines and newspapers, and by his interest in language and popular modes of communication such as sermons and orations. Reading Whitman’s poetry and prose also will allow us to consider how he responds to and frequently attempts to transform moments of cultural crisis and anxiety associated with the ruptures of the Civil War, innovations in technology, representations of race and ethnicity, debates over gender and sexuality, the relationship between science and religion, and the possibilities of constructing a truly democratic culture. Along the way we will examine as well Whitman’s revolutionary contributions to poetic form and technique and his influence on successive generations of American poets like William Carlos Williams, Allan Ginsberg, Adrienne Rich, and Jorie Graham.

Texts: Kaplan, Justin, ed. Walt Whitman: Poetry and Prose. Library of America College Editions, 1996. Paperback. ISBN-13: 978-1883011352; Reynolds, David. Walt Whitman’s America: A Cultural Biography. Knopf, 1995. Paperback. ISBN: 0-394-58023-0.

Requirements: For undergraduates, active participation in class discussions, reading quizzes, 2 short response papers, midterm and final exams, in-class presentations; and 8-10 page research paper (with proposal). For graduate students, all of the requirements listed above as well as an annotated bibliography (min. 10 sources), and a more extensive 12-15 page research paper.

NOTE: This is writing intensive course. By successfully completing this course, you can receive WAC (Writing Across the Curriculum) credit toward graduation. The goals of WAC are to encourage students to use writing as a way to learn, to show students how to write effectively in their disciplines and to improve students' writing skills. All students majoring in disciplines in the School of Arts and Sciences are required to satisfy the WAC requirements for WAC to graduate: These requirements include at least two 3000/4000 level W courses for a total of 6 hours with at least 3 of these hours in the major. Additional WAC certification is also available. See the current undergraduate catalog for details.

NOTE: Your response papers and presentation assignments will involve writing-to-learn activities in which you will be using the writing exercise itself to come to terms with the material we have read. Your responses will be used to generate class discussion as well as to help you gain confidence in your abilities to read and write about what you have learned. They will be evaluated in terms of these expectations. The final research project may grow out of the initial work you've done on the response papers. ALL of these written assignments should conform to the standards of college-level, academic writing.

ENGL 4/5188-02W: Individual Authors, Prof. Maria Doyle
James Joyce
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm, Humanities 209

May be taken to satisfy the British Lit II (Major Area A2) requirement. Fulfills the Individual Authors requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Every summer in Dublin, fans of Joyce's Ulysses descend on the city to retrace the steps of Leopold Bloom and Stephen Dedalus, the novel’s central characters, whose modernist odyssey from seaside to hearth (with some pub stops in between) was banned on its initial publication. These contemporary “odysseys,” however, attest to the human expansiveness, technical virtuosity and comic inventiveness of Joyce’s masterpiece. This course will allow students to explore Joyce's major writings, beginning with Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and continuing on with an extended, thoughtful plunge into Ulysses itself. We will also dabble in other Joyceana, seeking all the while to contextualize the author as a pillar of the British literary tradition, as a particularly Irish writer and as an experimental modernist intent on circulating with and speaking to a world audience. At the end of the course, students will also examine Joyce’s continuing influence as it shapes the work of more recent writers. Ultimately the goal of this course will be to provide students with an appreciation for Joyce's mature style and a clear understanding of the historical and cultural context in which--and frequently against which--he moved.

Texts: The Portable James Joyce (including Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man); Ulysses; Don Gifford's Ulysses Annotated; selected commentaries on Joyce; additional short texts by Beckett, Rushdie, Heaney

Requirements: For undergraduates, two short response papers, oral presentation, midterm and final exams, final research project. Graduate students will complete additional secondary reading and a longer research project including a substantial annotated bibliography.

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ENGL 4/5210
 

ENGL 4/5210-01W: Advanced Creative Writing, Prof. Alison Umminger
Fiction
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, TLC 1204

Prerequisite: ENGL 3200. May be taken to satisfy the Writing and Language (Major Area C) requirement. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This class will look at the short story from a writerly perspective, and require students to complete and workshop at least two longer stories (10-20 pages) along with a number of weekly responses. As a craft text, we will be using Madison Smartt Bell’s Narrative Design. We will begin the class by reading such masters of the genre as Updike and O’Connor, then turn our attention to more recent collections, such as Denis Johnson’s Jesus’ Son and Dana Johnson’s Break Any Woman Down. We will be reading a number of the excellent stories from the recent anthology The Story and its Writer. You will develop your skills as active readers and writers, with attention not only to craft and form, but to thematic content and relevance. I expect active engagement with and respect for the work of fellow students, and some familiarity with fiction writing. This is primarily a workshop class, but active reading produces good writing, thus the longer reading list.

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ENGL 4/5295
 

ENGL 4295-01: Reading and Literature in Secondary English Classrooms, Prof. Angela Insenga
Coming of Age in this Day and Age: Young Adult Literatures
MWF 11:00am-11:50am, Humanities 208

Required for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken to satisfy the Genre and Theory 1 or 2 (Major Area B1 or B2) requirement. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: A popular adolescent book club cheerfully incites pre-teen and teen readers to "get lost in a book and find [themselves]!" But how exactly do we lure students into texts and toward a greater understanding of their various selves and the selves of others? To answer such a question and, in turn, nurture adolescent reading practice, we will examine both primary and secondary material, both conventional narratives and film texts. Chief goals of the class include preparing future teachers of English through examination of an array of literacy modes and the methods that best help students achieve and bridging the distance between adolescent literature and "classic" texts.

Texts: Elliot Berlin, dir. Paperclips (documentary); Martha Brooks. True Confessions of a Heartless Girl; John H. Bushman, et. al. Using Young Adult Literature in the English Classroom (4th Edition); Walter Dean Myers. Scorpions; Laurie Halse-Anderson. Speak;John McNally, ed. When I Was a Loser: True Stories of (Barely) Surviving High School; J.D. Salinger. Catcher in the Rye.

Requirements: One in-class presentation (fifteen minutes); Mid-term take home exam; Final major project (8-10 pages); Annotated bibliography (five sources); Reading Journal.

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ENGL 4/5300
 

ENGL 4/5300-01: Studies in the English Language, Prof. David Newton
History
MWF 9:00am-9:50am, TLC 1116

May be taken to satisfy the Writing and Language (Major Area C) requirement. Required for certification in Secondary English Education. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

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ENGL 4/5310
 

ENGL 4/5310-01W: Studies in Literary Theory, Prof. Chad Davidson
Postmodern Poetics
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm, Pafford 307

Prerequisite: ENGL 2300. May be taken to satisfy the Genre and Theory 1 or 2 (Major Area B1 or B2) requirement. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: “I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked […]”; “My mind’s not right”; “I burn the way money burns”; “You do not do, you do not do / Any more black shoe / In which I have lived like a foot / For thirty years […]”; “They fuck you up, your mum and dad”: Want to find out more about where these lines come from? Want to dismantle Modernism piece by piece? Want to “burn for the ancient heavenly connection to the starry dynamo in the machinery of night”? Come take this class.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry; James Longenbach’s Modern Poetry After Modernism; Marjorie Perloff’s The Poetics of Indeterminacy; plus various handouts and documents made available through Docutek.

Requirements: Daily participation and three critical papers, including a final term paper with documented research.

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ENGL 4384
 

ENGL 4384-01W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Randy Hendricks
Regional Perspectives in Literature
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm, TLC 2237

Registration requires permission of Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu). Required for all English majors. Cannot be taken until ENGL 1101, 1102, and core area F have been completed with a minimum passing grade of C. A minimum of 18 hours of upper-level English courses must also have been completed with no grade lower than C. Not offered during summer session. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: The senior seminar usually focuses on a professional issue that involves debate and conflict. Regionalism and regionalist theory, once a vibrant issue for debate in American literature before falling out of favor, has recently reemerged as a significant movement in critical theory. There are important similarities and key differences between this new theorizing of regional writing and the traditional views which afford us an opportunity for a rich experience in reading and adding our thoughts to the debate.

The course is divided into three main parts. First we will read and discuss some of the significant works of regionalist criticism and theory, old and new. Once we have identified and discussed some of the key issues of the debate, we will turn to three primary texts: Sarah Orne Jewett’s The Country of the Pointed Firs, Robert Drake’s For the Record (stories and essays), and Woody Allen’s film Annie Hal, to see how the issues apply to and are reshaped by actual literary works. Finally, we will turn to the production of the individual and class projects.

Texts: Jewett, The Country of the Pointed Firs; Hendricks and Perkins, eds. For the Record: A Robert Drake Reader; Course packet.

Requirements: Seminar paper (including drafts) 50%; group presentation 10%; short Essays 30%; editing exercises and participation 10%; required exit interview 0%

ENGL 4384-02W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Joshua Masters
This Is the Way the World Ends: The Apocalypse in Literature and Film
TR 11:00am-12:15pm, TLC 2237

Registration requires permission of Susan Holland (sholland@westga.edu). Required for all English majors. Cannot be taken until ENGL 1101, 1102, and core area F have been completed with a minimum passing grade of C. A minimum of 18 hours of upper-level English courses must also have been completed with no grade lower than C. Not offered during summer session. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Alien invasions, viral outbreaks, the flood, the rapture, the second coming, the second ice age, the rise of the machines—these are just a few of the ways human beings have imagined their “end of days.” This class will pose the theoretically imposing question, “So, like, what’s up with that?” What do we tell ourselves about ourselves when we dream of the apocalypse? What are the social and political functions of these narratives in any given historical period? How do different cultures imagine the apocalypse, and what do these differences reveal? I am anxious to discover some answers to these questions, and not just because the end could indeed be upon us. If these questions interest you—as you reach the end of your undergraduate lives—then I hope you will join me in this tour of our darkest imaginings. We will read three contemporary novels, sample from the vast array of apocalyptic films—from Invasion of the Body Snatchers to The Planet of the Apes (Charleton Heston’s rather than Marky Mark’s) to The Matrix—and immerse ourselves in the critical and cultural theories that surround apocalyptic narratives.

Texts: Cormac McCarthy, The Road; Toni Morrison, Sula;Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony; (All theoretical and critical material will be on electronic reserve in the library.)

Requirements: Active participation in class, an oral report, two response essays, a substantive research project (including prospectus, abstract, and annotated bibliography), and a final presentation.

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ENGL 4/5385
 

ENGL 4/5385: Special Topics, Prof. Katie Chaple-Borton
Editing & Publishing
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm, Pafford 308

May be taken to satisfy the Writing and Language (Major Area C) requirement. Requires permission of the department chair to repeat. May be taken to satisfy 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: What, precisely, does being an “editor” entail? The responsibilities range from making decisions regarding acceptance and rejection of work, to revising and correcting manuscripts, to establishing the aesthetic, the principles, and procedures of a publication, to overseeing the production of that publication. And that’s just the beginning. In viewing an editor as a kind of bridge between writer and reader, the editor has to know and anticipate both the audience and the artist’s expectations. This class is an introduction to the theories and practices of literary editing and publishing. We will examine and discuss both the aesthetics, as well as the practicalities of editing and publishing. Students will explore their own theories regarding contemporary literature while studying, analyzing and evaluating current literary publications. Through readings, assignments and discussions, we will consider content, design, and mode of presentation (online, print, oral, multi-media) but will also get into the nitty-gritty of the everyday tasks involved (line-editing, copy editing, budgeting, marketing, just to name a few). The class will consist of workshops, a variety of written assignments and lectures both from the professor, as well as a variety of guests, all designed to increase the students’ knowledge and skills in the business of literary publishing.

Texts: Amy Einsohn’s The Copyeditor’s Handbook: A Guide for Book Publishing and Corporate Communications ( University of California Press, 2 nd Edition); Betsy Lerner’s The Forest for the Trees: An Editor’s Advice to Writers (Riverhead Trade); Gerald Gross’s Editors on Editing: What Writers Need to Know about What Editors Do (Grove Press); a variety of literary magazines.

Requirements: Active participation in class discussion, oral presentation, short papers (including reviews/analyses of literary magazines and manuscripts, critique of aesthetic), a research paper, including annotated bibliography, final group project.

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ENGL 6000-level

ENGL 6110
 

ENGL 6110-01: Seminar in American Literature I, Prof. Patrick M. Erben
Pilgrims, Prophets, and Reformers: The Utopian Impulse in Early American Literature and Culture
Monday 5:30pm-8:00pm, TLC 2237

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description: Ever since the discovery of the New World had inspired Thomas More’s Utopia, early American literature (as well as literature about the Americas) fashioned alternatives to orthodox religion, economic materialism, conventional sexuality, patriarchal and hierarchical concepts of social organization, and many other mainstream cultural and literary formations. The writings exploring such radical departures range from the esoteric, mystical, and spiritual, to the practical, political, and polemical, but they usually attempt to harness the promise and potential of the New World. This course surveys utopian, esoteric, and communitarian traditions and impulses in American literature and culture from a transatlantic perspective, tracing their backgrounds in 16th and 17th-century Europe to the American colonies and up to the Civil War.

The course examines a spectrum of literary modes and cultural sites: radical religious and political visions of colonial settlement; communal societies and their writings; secret societies; communal forms of organizing social, economic, and sexual interaction; visions of the end of the world; reform movements and societies. Approaching the idea of “literature” broadly, we will study a range of texts, including non-fiction prose, fiction, and poetry, as well as canonical and non-canonical works. Even more, we will examine how communal experiments generated cultures rich in semiotic systems, including architectural and natural spaces, religious and sexual rituals, food practices, social interactions, music, and material object worlds—all of which will serve as the course “texts,” interacting with literary works in the conventional sense. For example, we will study how the utopian culture and literature of the Moravian community in Bethlehem, PA, emerged from a variety of practices: Moravians wrote and sung hymns imagining an eroticized, mystical union with Christ; they built communal structures that housed separate living quarters for women, men, and children (the so-called “choir system”); they ritualized sexual intercourse during specific periods of religious worship, placed in designated chambers (the “Blue Room”) adjacent to other sacral spaces; and they embedded food consumption in a communal experience of the numinous during the famous “love feasts.”

Texts: Primary (excerpts and complete texts): Thomas More, Utopia; Anonymous, The Rosicrucian Manifestoes; John Winthrop, “A Model of Christian Charity;” General Court of Massachusetts, “The Trials of Anne Hutchinson;” Nicolas Ludwig, Count Zinzendorf (founder of the Moravian Church), selected poetry and prose; Brother Lamech and Brother Agrippa, Chronicon Ephratense (history of the Ephrata Cloister); Radical Pietist and Shaker hymnody and religious poetry; Mary Wollstonecraft, Vindication of the Rights of Woman; Gilbert Imlay, The Emigrants; Robert Owen, A New View of Society; Joseph Smith, The Pearl of Great Price ; Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Blythedale Romance; Henry David Thoreau, Walden; Emily Dickinson, selected poems and letters. Secondary Texts (excerpts from books and articles): Aaron Fogleman, “Jesus Is Female: The Moravian Challenge in the German Communities of British North America;” Michel de Certeau, The Mystic Fable; Philip Gura, A Glimpse of Sion’s Glory: Puritan Radicalism in Seventeenth-Century New England; David S. Lovejoy Religious Enthusiasm in the New World: Heresy to Revolution; Anna Lisa Peterson, Seeds of the Kingdom: Utopian Communities in the Americas; Stephen J. Stein, Communities of Dissent: A History of Alternative Religions in America; David W. Stowe, How Sweet the Sound: Music in the Spiritual Lives of Americans; Ronald Walters's American Reformers, 1815-1860 ; journal: Utopian Studies.

Requirements: Engaged class participation; regular short response papers; regular student contributions to a website collecting artifacts, texts, and images relating to utopianism in America and its communal manifestations; in-class presentation on a utopian vision or community and its writings in America before 1865; a 15-20 page research paper (including staggered assignments over the course of the semester: research proposal, bibliographic essay including primary and secondary sources, final paper).

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ENGL 6115
 

ENGL 6115-01: Seminar in British Literature II, Prof. Maria Doyle
Dis-United Kingdom: Violence in/to Form in British Literature since WWII
Tuesday 5:30pm-8:00pm, TLC 2237

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description: Orwellian Newspeak posits that language controls thought: only what one has a word for can one feel. Excising words from the lexicon thus constrains consciousness, violating it and subjecting it to force just as bodies in Orwell’s text are contained, controlled and tortured into a vision of self-hood concurrent with the values of the state. This course will explore the conjunctions of these “violent” impulses – the bodily and the linguistic – in British literature since WWII. Central to this investigation will be the idea of how violence in the text serves as both a thematic and an aesthetic phenomenon: how is disruptive content related to and intensified by disruptive form? To pursue this question, the class will explore how writers have deployed postmodern experiments with narrative structure, silences and linguistic absences, and English hybridized by class-based dialect and the influence of colonized languages. Such textual disruptions will be used to explore tensions and dislocations within the concept of Britishness itself: how is the stability of this identity troubled by political conflict, class- and gender-based discourses and by the changing position of the United Kingdom in the global arena? How does the disruptive text seek to assert control over its audience’s perception? Does the text employ its dual acts of violence as forms of destruction or as vehicles of liberation, a boundary breaking that creates as it demolishes? Course texts will include fiction, poetry and drama so as to allow for a broad-based discussion of these practices.

Texts: George Orwell, 1984, Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot and a selection of shorter plays, Doris Lessing, Briefing for a Descent into Hell, Harold Pinter, The Homecoming and Ashes to Ashes, Ted Hughes, Crow, Seamus Heaney, North, Salman Rushdie, Midnight’s Children, Angela Carter, The Bloody Chamber, Athol Fugard, Boesman and Lena, Martin McDonagh, The Lieutenant of Inishmore; selection of critical readings

Requirements: Two short response papers, one fifteen minute researched oral report, 15-20 page researched seminar paper.

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ENGL 6385
 

ENGL 6385-01: Seminar in British Literature II, Prof. Emily Hipchen
Reading Identity in the Literature of Adoption
Wednesday 5:30pm-8:00pm, TLC 2237

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description: According to Adrienne Rich, “Until we can understand the assumptions in which we are drenched we cannot know ourselves”; this is particularly true of the ways in which we make family. In this course, we’ll take texts that represent adoption and read them as discussions about the origin of personality. We’ll be thinking analytically and critically about texts that represent families constructed through adoption, how these enhance our understanding of race and ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation as they intersect with cultural expectations of procreation and family. We’ll address such complex concepts as “kinship,” “identity,” and “family,” through reading, analyzing, and discussing literature that troubles such concepts.

Texts: The course is multidisciplinary and includes primary works by Edward Albee, Sophocles, Barbara Kingsolver, Charles Dickens, Dan Savage, William Shakespeare, Ned Balbo, and Jackie Kay. Since this is the year for the biennial Adoption and Culture conference, the course includes the opportunity for an en masse field trip—to exciting Pittsburgh—to meet and hear many of the scholars who will comprise the secondary reading for the course talk about their work in the field of adoption and childhood studies.

Requirements: Daily attendance, discussion, and preparation; a final critical portfolio consisting of a one-page abstract suitable for submission to a conference, an eight-page paper with significant secondary sources suitable for reading at a conference, a draft of a twenty page paper that develops the eight page assignment towards publication and includes a significant number of secondary sources, and a twenty-entry annotated bibliography of student research on the portfolio subject; and a final oral presentation of the eight-page project to class and guests.


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