.in this issue

1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5

Awards Day Award Recipients

Undergrad Conference Participants

Alumni Update: Matt Sherling

Cheers

Course Descriptions

Spring 2011

Spring 2011 Courses


NOTE: Courses are subject to change depending on enrollment and faculty teaching assignments. Please check BANWEB for more current information on the availability of all courses.

English 1101 and 1102 are prerequisites for all courses from ENGL 2110 through 4386.

A “W” designation after a section number of a 3000- or 4000-level course signifies that the course is a Discipline Specific Writing (DSW) course. DSW accepts as a guiding principle the idea that writing is a valuable tool for learning and communication. Therefore, the components of a course so designated are designed to help you learn the material and communicate what you have learned. Students are required to take two “W” courses for the undergraduate degree.


ENGL 2000-level

ENGL 4/5140: American Romanticism

ENGL 2050: Self-Staging

 

ENGL 2060: Intro to Creative Writing

ENGL 4/5188: Individual Authors: Hardy

ENGL 2110: World Literature

ENGL 4/5210: Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

ENGL 2120: British Literature

ENGL 4286: Teaching Internship

ENGL 2130: American Literature

ENGL 4/5300: Studies in English Language

ENGL 2180: Studies in African-American Lit

ENGL 4384: Senior Seminar

ENGL 2190: Studies in Literature by Women

ENGL 4/5385: Special Topics: 18th-Century Novel

ENGL 3000-level

ENGL 6000-level

ENGL 3000: Research and Methodology

ENGL 6105: Seminar in British Literature I

ENGL 3200: Intermediate Creative Writing

ENGL 3300: Studies in American Literature

ENGL 6115: Seminar in British Literature II

ENGL 3400: Pedagogy and Writing

ENGL 6120: Seminar in American Literature II

ENGL 3405: Professional and Technical Writing

FILM

ENGL 4/5000-level

FILM 2080: Intro to the Art of Film

ENGL 4/5106: Studies in Genre

FILM 2100: History and Theory of Film

ENGL 4/5108: Studies in the Novel: American

 

ENGL 4/5109: Film as Literature

XIDS

 

ENGL 4/5135: British Romanticism

XIDS 2100: Arts and Ideas


XIDS

XIDS 2100-02: Arts and Ideas: Jewish American Literature and Culture, Dr. Lisa Propst
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm; Paf 302

Satisfies area C1 of the core.

Description: This course explores the interrelationships among Jewish American history, fiction, film, and visual arts. It considers how the experiences of Jewish artists and writers have shaped their works and how these art works, in turn, have contributed to diverse conceptions of Jewish American identity. The course moves from Eastern European legacies to experiences of immigration, acculturation, and self-definition. Within this context, our readings and discussions will focus on people’s efforts to define themselves through acts of imagination. Such acts of imagination can be destructive, enabling people to ignore the demands of the world around them or to manipulate others. They can also be survival strategies, both literal and psychological: means of escaping danger through trickery or of finding hope under bleak conditions.

Texts: Norton Anthology of Jewish American Literature; Electronic reserves, art and photography slides, and 2-3 films.

Requirements: One 4-5 page essay. Two exams (midterm and final). Group creative project with related individual reflection. Attendance at 5 cultural events and written reflections. In-class writing and short homework assignments. Class participation.

XIDS 2100-03: Arts and Ideas: Mythology and Religion, Prof. Lori Lipoma
Myth and Religion: The Song of the Soul’s High Adventure
TR 11:00am-12:15pm; Paf 305

Satisfies area C1 of the core.

Description: Hercules, Sundiata, Thor, Gilgamesh--these heroes leap to mind when we think of mythology, yet myths are more than just stories of deities and fantastic beings from other people’s religions. They are simultaneously the most particular and the most universal feature of civilization, and they help each of us understand and face common concerns as well as aspire to new heights; indeed, Joseph Campbell calls mythology “the wonderful song of the soul’s high adventure.”

In XIDS 2100 “Myth and Religion,” we’ll study common themes throughout world myths and religions—including creation, birth and death, great floods, initiation, hero, cosmology, deities, and transformation myths—as they appear in the rich traditions of cultures worldwide. Moreover, we’ll hear from speakers who will tell us about the world religious traditions which they practice, including Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, Baha’i, African Traditional Religion, Wicca, Islam, and Zoroastrianism. (3 credits)

Texts: Leeming, David Adams. The World of Myth; Class coursepack

Requirements: Three Tests: 15% each = 45%; Two 2-1/2 to 3-page response papers: 30% cumulative (Paper #1 = 10%; Paper #2 = 20%.); Reading quizzes: 5%; Final Exam: 20%.

XIDS 2100-04: Arts and Ideas: The Monstrous and the Grotesque, Prof. Stephanie Hollenbeck
MWF 11:00am-11:50am; Paf 109

Satisfies area C1 of the core.

Description: We will trace the evolution of the horror genre by examining both classic and contemporary short stories, poems, novels, and films. By considering how cultural, social, political and religious influences work to construct collective fears of society, we will understand that the “monsters” in these texts are personifications of common fears and that the stories themselves are hyperbolized versions of decidedly less grotesque, though debatably less frightening, realistic situations.

Texts: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (These are all published as a single volume by Signet Classics). You will be required to read several short stories and poems, including but not limited to Flannery O’Connor’s “A Good Man is Hard to Find,” Sylvia Plath’s “Daddy,” Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper,” Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Fall of the House of Usher,” Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown” and Genesis from the Holy Bible. You will also be required to view the following films: Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992); Halloween (1978); Seven; 1408; Spiderman 3; Legends of the Fall; Requiem for a Dream; Mystic River; The Departed.

Requirements: Active participation in class discussion and activities, attendance and essay response to five (5) cultural events, weekly writings/activities, periodic quizzes, in-class oral presentation, midterm and final exams.

Return to top


FILM

FILM 2080-01: Intro to the Art of Film, Prof. Patricia Burgey
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm; Hum 209

This is an introductory course, and assumes no prior knowledge of film. You must have passed English 1101 with the grade of C or higher.

Description: In this course students will consider the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. Students will watch a wide range of films from a variety of countries and historical moments in film history. Students will have the chance to explore issues such as framing, photographic space, film shot, editing, sound, genre, narrative form, acting style, and lighting in the context of wider discussions of the weekly films. This is an introductory course, and assumes no prior knowledge of film; however, it does require analytic and critical writing skills.

Texts : Richard Barsam and Dave Monahan. Looking At Movies: An Introduction to Film, Third Edition. Comes packaged with Writing About Movies and an accompanying DVD with short films.

Requirements : Weekly quizzes, analysis papers, and two exams. Creative projects are also part of the course.

FILM 2100-25H: History and Theory of Film, Dr. Barbara Brickman
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm; Paf 309

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 and 1102. Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register.

Description: This course will explore major developments in film history, theory, and criticism. Students will become familiar with several different film movements in the development of the art form and will be introduced to basic ideas in film theory. Through a variety of film movements and historical periods, students will develop an understanding of the cultural, industrial, and political contexts for some of most significant debates about film. Specific topics covered will include Russian formalism, the history of classical Hollywood cinema, the French New Wave, recent global cinemas, as well as alternatives to Hollywood in the United States.

Texts: Corrigan, Critical Visions in Film Theory

Requirements: discussion leading, three short essays, quizzes, and exams

Return to top

ENGL 2000-level

ENGL 2050-01: Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life, Prof. Jane McClain
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm; Hum 209

Description: Effective communicators are more productive, have enhanced career opportunities, enjoy more fulfilling relationships, earn more respect, and have more fun! The good news is that you already have the tools you need to become a great communicator; it’s just a matter of learning how to use them consciously and masterfully…in other words, learning how to “self-stage.”

In Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life, we will study and practice practical communication skills—creativity, quick thinking, risk taking, lateral thinking, active listening, subtext mastery, self-awareness—and apply them to virtually every interaction you encounter outside the classroom: One-on-One Conversations, Public Presentation, Debate and Argumentation, Conflict Resolution and Confrontation Skills, Stress Management, Team Building, and Impression Management. By the end of the semester, students will have had first-hand experience in all of these areas, and, more importantly, will know exactly how to continue honing and perfecting those skills long after.

Texts: Lipoma, Lori and Michael. Self-Staging from the Inside Out. Students will also need to purchase other materials during the semester such as notecards.

Requirements: formal solo presentations, group projects and presentations, panel discussions/debates, vocabulary-building exercises, role-playing and improvisation exercises, journaling, and, of course, active, informed participation in each class session.

ENGL 2050-02: Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life, Prof. Jade Kierbow
MW 5:30pm-6:45pm; Hum 206

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2050-03: Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life, Prof. Dorothy Byrom
TR 9:30am-10:45am; Hum 206

Description: Self Staging teaches students to use lateral thinking skills in order to better present their authentic selves in today’s world. Those skills enable them to think more objectively while involved in true-to-life experiences. Self Staging prepares students to deal with public presentation, internal and external stress, conflict resolution, building a functional team, and impression management. Through the text readings and in-class improvisational exercises, students engage mentally and physically in these vital aspects of successful living.

Texts: Lipoma, Lori and Michael, Self-Staging from the Inside Out. Students will also need to spend approximately $5 for materials during the semester.

Requirements: Sophomore level students with a desire to step outside their comfort zones and experience new levels of confidence.

Return to top


ENGL 2060-01: Intro to Creative Writing, Prof. Amy Ellison
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm; Hum 209

Required for the minor in Creative Writing.

Description: As an introductory creative writing course, English 2060 familiarizes students with tools for writing both poetry and fiction. We will study a wide variety of writers across genres, examining texts to understand how (and why) they work . Additionally, w e will constantly challenge overly romanticized notions of the lone artist, the prodigy, and the genius. Creative writing is not a “natural talent”—it can be learned, and this class begins that learning process.

Texts: Steering the Craft: Exercises and Discussions on Story Writing for the Lone Navigator or the Mutinous Crew by Ursula K. LeGuin; Writing Poetry: Creative and Critical Approaches by Davidson and Fraser; Word of Mouth: Poems Featured on NPR's All Things Considered, ed. Catherine Bowman; and American Short Story Masterpieces , ed. Raymond Carver

Requirements: Daily readings and writing exercises, journals, participation, weekly workshop contributions, midterm examination, and a final portfolio of polished writing which includes original poetry and fiction in addition to a critical preface.

ENGL 2060-02: Intro to Creative Writing, Prof. Brooke Parks
TR 9:30am-10:45am; Paf 109

Required for the minor in Creative Writing.

This class will provide an introduction to poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. As we study a range of authors, we’ll try our hands at a variety of exercises and discuss where our voices might fit in the literary world. In workshop, we’ll carefully review and discuss individual student work, which will (as we’ll discuss) benefit both the writer being workshopped and the classmates involved in the discussion. Revision will be an important aspect of this class, and by the end of the semester you will turn in a portfolio of your best (thoroughly revised) work.

Texts: Imaginative Writing: The Elements of Craft, 3 rd ed. (Janet Burroway); Grimm’s Fairy Tales (Grimm and Grimm); My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me (Kate Bernheimer and Gregory Maguire, eds.); additional texts made available electronically.

Requirements: Daily reading and writing assignments, journals, workshop contributions, participation, polished final portfolio.

ENGL 2060-03: Intro to Creative Writing, Prof. Katie Chaple
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm; Paf 307

Required for the minor in Creative Writing.

Description:

But all art is sensual . . . . It is directly, that is, of the senses, and since the senses do not exist without an object for their employment all art is necessarily objective. It doesn’t declaim or explain, it presents.

—William Carlos Williams

English 2060 is an introduction to fiction and poetry writing. The aim of this class is for the student to acquire a familiarity with the tools and forms of poetry and fiction and to apply those to both creative and academic work. In addition to a study the crafts of both fiction and poetry through reading and lecture, we will also be exploring and discussing where poems and stories come from—the inspirational element of writing. You will be expected to produce works in both genres, and we will workshop your creative efforts in class.

Texts: Janet Burroway & Elizabeth Stuckey-French Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft (7 th Edition); Chad Davidson & Gregory Fraser Writing Poetry: Creative and Critical Approaches (Approaches to Writing) ; additional online readings.

Requirements: Daily readings and exercises, participation, written contributions to the workshop, and a final portfolio of polished writing.

ENGL 2060-04: Intro to Creative Writing, Prof. Geveryl Robinson
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm; Paf 307

Required for the minor in Creative Writing.

Description: This section of English 2060 is centered around the quote by British essayist, novelist, and short story writer, E.M. Forester, “How do I know what I think, until I see what I say.” Although the focus of this class will be on the writing of short stories (including creative non-fiction), poems, and essays, students should have an understanding of how language works; hence, being proficient in the basic tenets of rhetoric is paramount. Through a workshop approach, students will write and share their original works that are not only thought provoking, but are also complex in nature and include characters, dialogue, and imagery that illustrate that students’ not only know what they think, but they are also able to express those thoughts in a clear creative fashion.

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2060-25H: Intro to Creative Writing-Honors, Dr. Emily Hipchen
TR 9:30am-10:45am; Paf 309

Required for the minor in Creative Writing. Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

Return to top


ENGL 2110-01: World Literature, Prof. Andy Brewer
MWF 10:00am-10:50am; Paf 308

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: As human beings, we display tremendous cultural, religious, social and personal differences that define us. We should celebrate these things. Sometimes, though, these differences separate us, leading to competition and conflict. We categorize one another as “alien,” “strange,” or even “inferior.” Even within national boundaries and neighborhoods, our localized cultures tend to make us suspicious of those outside our comfortable self-classifications. Hence, we restrict ourselves, never encountering the other, never really realizing that it is possible to be “other” and thereby human. Part of the reason for our tendency to associate solely only with those within our own comfortable environment lies in our lack of familiarity with anything else. Certainly, this isolation has been breaking down in the last few decades under the pressure of the internet and other forms of mass communication. Overall, these manifestations have sometimes had the unfortunate effect of reducing differences superficially, creating a culture determined by the leveling power of advertising in a consumerist society. As valuable and powerful as these technological mechanisms have been in fostering global identity, they have not typically enabled us to experience the profound level of recognition that literature, especially World Literature, provides. One of the benefits of studying literature, aside from its historical, psychological, and academic value, resides it the way it enables readers to see beyond the surface of the cultural to the individual. It accomplishes this miracle without disparaging cultural diversity. At the same time, it allows for a very rigorous analysis of culture through comparison and contrast. The reader may not embrace all aspects of other societies, past or present, but he or she will see that the ancient Egyptian poet who contemplates “feigning terminal illness” in order to get his sweetheart’s attention derives his emotion from the same source as the fourteenth century Italian Petrarch, who wishes that his departed lover might “deign to stand at [his] bedside” as he dies. And the irresistible Achilles, remembering his own father and homeland as he releases Hector’s body to the grieving father Priam, would have understood the French hero Roland who, centuries later, dying of his wounds, remembers “sweet France, the men of his line, remember[s] Charles, his lord, who fostered him… .” If you allow it to do so, your reading of world literature will confirm that yes, you are different because of where you were born, where you have lived, and whom you know. But it will also allow you to experience the intrinsically human qualities that exist beyond both geography and time.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of World Literature, 2 volumes, Shorter Second Edition, 2009. The Brothers Karamazov, Norton Critical Edition.

Requirements: 3 exams, 2 essays, regular attendance (limited absences), participation.

ENGL 2110-03: World Literature, Dr. Patrick Erben
The World Traveler’s Guide to World Literature
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm; Paf 308

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description : I have to be honest—travel is one of my greatest passions. Growing up in Germany, many foreign countries were only a few hours away. Nothing thrills me more than exploring another country with guidebook, dictionary, and—a great work of literature that opens a window into the culture, intellect, achievements, emotions, fears, prejudices, and beliefs of its people. In this class, I will take you on a trip to places I’ve visited or lived in by highlighting some of the greatest works of literature ever written around the world. We will visit the epic beginnings of Ancient Greece and Rome, the cultural crossroads of the Levant and Mesopotamia, the castles of medieval Germany, the churches and palaces of Renaissance Italy, the Spain of the Reconquista and early empire, Mexico during the Spanish conquest, the France of Louis XV and the Enlightenment philosophers, the Germany of neo-classicism and early Romanticism, Prague and the modern Czech Republic, Nazi Germany and its aftermath, and post-colonial Africa. We will supplement our literary explorations with the art, music, and maybe even the cuisine of some of those countries.

Texts : The Longman Anthology of World Literature, Compact Edition; Mark Mathabane, Kaffir Boy.

Requirements : Lively participation, regular quizzes, one oral presentation on historical/cultural/biographical context of a literary work, 2 short analytical papers, mid-term and final exams.

ENGL 2110-05: World Literature, Prof. Josh Grant
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm; Paf 308

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

Return to top


ENGL 2120-01: British Literature, Dr. Gregory Fraser
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm; Paf 308

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: This course introduces students to representative works of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon era to the twentieth century. In addition to exploring questions of genre, literary periodization, and socio-historical context, we will also discuss effective methods of producing written interpretations of literary texts.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Majors Authors, 8th edition, packaged with CD-ROM.

Requirements: Regular quizzes; midterm and final exam; final researched paper of at least seven pages in length; active participation in class discussions.

ENGL 2120-02: British Literature, Prof. Phil Purser
MW 5:30pm-6:45pm; Hum 209

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2120-03: British Literature, Prof. Bonnie Adams
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm; Paf 308

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2120-04: British Literature, Dr. Fran Chalfant
TR 11:00am-12:15pm; Paf 308

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2120-05: British Literature, Dr. Lisa Crafton
“Where You Are Is Who You Are.”
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm; Hum 229

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: In this course we will read selected British literature texts from medieval to contemporary times with an emphasis on the question of identity and place. More than just general issues of setting, we will interrogate place from many directions. While we move from the Chapel of the Green Knight to Blake’s “forests of the night” to Coleridge’s ‘water, water everywhere and not a drop to drink” to Heaney’s contemporary bog people, we will explore representations of self and culture through this lens.

Texts: Norton Anthology of British Literature , Shakeapeare’s THE TEMPEST,, and online readings on reserve, including Julian of Norwich, Chaucer (interlinear translation), Heaney, Woolf, Gordimer, and a theoretical introduction to postcolonial literature.

Requirements: Active discussion, 2 response essays, midterm and final.

ENGL 2120-25H: British Literature-Honors, Dr. Angela Insenga
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm; TLC 1204

May count for credit in Core Area C. Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register.

Description: Philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche's warning that “Whoever battles with monsters had better see that it does not turn him into a monster [and that] if you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you" does not always apply to artists who bravely plumb the depths to create monsters of their own. Our class, a survey of British literature, will investigate such creatures born of authors' minds. Taking as our general premise that humanity "needs" its hobgoblins, we will focus on artistic creations that pit humans against demons, both real and metaphorical, and ask ourselves what purposes such grotesque figures serve in their various cultural incarnations.

Texts (in the order we’ll read them): M. Night Shyamalan, dir. The Village; Anonymous, ed. by Seamus Haney, Beowulf; Geoffrey Chaucer, Canterbury Tales (selections); William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus; Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Rime of the Ancient Mariner; Christina Rossetti, “Goblin Market”; Bram Stoker, Dracula; James Joyce, Dubliners (selection); Katherine Mansfield, The Garden Party and Other Stories (selection); Virginia Woolf, Flush: A Biography.

Requirements: Take-home Mid-term examination; In-class Final examination; Scholarly Abstract; 3 Roundtable Discussions with supporting preparation.

Return to top


ENGL 2130-01: American Literature, Prof. Rod McRae
MWF 9:00am-09:50am; Paf 308

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: On defining the creation of identity, American essayist, novelist, and playwright James Arthur Baldwin comments, “An identity would seem to be arrived at by the way in which the person faces and uses his experience.” Baldwin’s statement encompasses far-ranging ideas and introduces questions that have historically characterized American literature: How have Americans characterized their own identities at different points in time, and how have historical events, cultural phenomena, social environments, and personal experiences become meshed with and changed these identities? To what extent does the American landscape, either as a physical or symbolic space, attribute to this definition? Is the definition “American” even a valid identity? As we closely examine these questions by examining the various literary genres that span almost four centuries, we will focus on how language and writing has been used to construct and alter the meaning of “American identity.” In addition, we will also delve into the formation of identity from the perspectives of race, gender, and social class and examine how each has been used for this purpose.

Texts: Customized text available through bookstore (ISBN: TBA)

Requirements: several response essays, a mid-term (cumulative), and a final exam essay

ENGL 2130-03: American Literature, Prof. Brandy Robinson
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm; TLC 1116

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: On defining the creation of identity, American essayist, novelist, and playwright James Arthur Baldwin comments, “An identity would seem to be arrived at by the way in which the person faces and uses his experience.” Baldwin’s statement encompasses far-ranging ideas and introduces questions that have historically characterized American literature: How have Americans characterized their own identities at different points in time, and how have historical events, cultural phenomena, social environments, and personal experiences become meshed with and changed these identities? To what extent does the American landscape, either as a physical or symbolic space, attribute to this definition? Is the definition “American” even a valid identity? As we closely examine these questions by examining the various literary genres that span almost four centuries, we will focus on how language and writing has been used to construct and alter the meaning of “American identity.” In addition, we will also delve into the formation of identity from the perspectives of race, gender, and social class and examine how each has been used for this purpose.

Texts: The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin with Related Documents 0312404158; The Great Gatsby 0743273567; The Scarlet Letter and Other Writings 9780393979534.

Requirements: Daily Quizzes and Writing Responses: 10% (Quizzes, announced and unannounced, along with in-class and out-of-class writing responses will be given weekly; the assignments may take the form of short explications or brief analytical responses to questions on the text being discussed). Response Essays: 50% (Several 3-4 page essays dealing with analyses of chosen literary works and based on a range of topics from class discussion); grading rubric. Mid-Term: 20% (The mid-term exam, which is cumulative, includes identifications, explication, and concise analyses of passages from texts we have read and discussed in class). Final: 20% (The final exam will be administered in the form of a take-home essay) **Also Note: No extra credit will be assigned or accepted in this course. In addition, work completed for another course will not be accepted in this course

ENGL 2130-04: American Literature, Prof. Carrie McWhorter
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm; Hum 209

May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: In a world where our focus is constantly on the future and people often communicate in 140 characters or less, what can we learn from those who put pen to paper in the past, providing a record in both fiction and non-fiction of the history, culture, and essential human experiences that make up the tapestry of American life? We will seek the answer to this question through our readings and study this semester. Through the lens of literature, we will examine the threads of this American tapestry and consider how our country’s past, present and future are intricately and irreversibly connected.

Texts: Major works will include Ben Franklin’s Autobiography, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and The Awakening. Other representative works (poetry, essays, and short fiction) will feature such writers as Anne Bradstreet, early Native American leaders, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Emily Dickinson, Alice Walker, Natasha Trethewey, Sandra Cisneros, Julia Alvarez, and others, with a Coursepack of readings and brief audio/video clips linked within CourseDen.

Requirements: This section of American Lit will be technology-intensive, with several classes meeting online through CourseDen. Class participation will be evaluated based on class discussions in the face-to-face meeting, as well as through participation in online discussion assignments. Two exams and two analytical essays also are required.

ENGL 2130-25H: American Literature-Honors, Dr. Debra MacComb
Frontiers of Meaning
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm; Paf 309

May count for credit in Core Area C. Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register.

Description: Frederick Jackson Turner’s assessment that the frontier’s “significance” lay in its capacity to arouse utopian expectations, suggests, perhaps, that the literature associated with the frontier exists in a mental as much as a geographical territory. That is, while the values associated with western boundary of “civilization” on the North American continent—limitless possibility, natural justice, vast wealth, Adamic renewal—have remained constant, the physical space denoted has shifted—well, west—from the Atlantic settlements of the seventeenth century across the North American continent and beyond in the twentieth. This course will focus on works shaped by the idea of the frontier, from narratives of captivity, exploration, settlement and enterprise in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to those which, in the twentieth century, redefine, subvert or parody the dominant themes and conventions of the genre.

Texts: Turner, The Significance of the Frontier, as well as works by Rowlandson, Equiano, Cooper, Thoreau, London, Grey, Cather, Faulkner and McMurtry; film texts to include The Searchers and The Three Burials ofMelquiades Estrada.

Requirements: Active and informed class participation, reading questions, three brief (3-4 page) essays, a cumulative final exam. Optional participation in a field trip to the Booth Western Art Museum in Cartersville, GA.

ENGL 2130-26H: American Literature-Honors, Dr. Josh Masters
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm; Hum 209

May count for credit in Core Area C. Honors course. 3.2 GPA required. Call the Honors College at 678-839-6636 or email sholland@westga.edu for permission to register.

Description: This survey of American literature traces the development of such themes as nature, nationhood, law, gender, race, and identity in our national culture, from first contact to the present day. The writers and texts we will examine speak to shared concerns that reach across American history, and we will imagine the writers engaged in a dialogue and exchanging ideas through their literary works. We will begin by looking at the invention of “America,” examining the idea of American nationhood from its Puritanical origins to its postmodern reformulations in the poetry and prose of William Bradford, Benjamin Franklin, Walt Whitman, Langston Hughes, and John Berryman. We will then consider the legacy of slavery in the American imagination in our reading of an autobiography by Olaudah Equiano, a short story by Herman Melville, and the only novel written by Edgar Allan Poe. We will then leap forward into the twentieth century, with its emphasis on “identity”: as a racial category, as a thing we “quest” after, and as a territory or landscape we both explore and inhabit.

Texts: Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano; Herman Melville, Benito Cereno; Edgar Allan Poe, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket; Nella Larsen, Passing; Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony; Scott Bradfield, The History of Luminous Motion (not available through bookstore); Sean Penn, Into the Wild (film on reserve); (Shorter works will be available on electronic reserve as PDFs.)

Requirements: Students will write several short papers, a medium length essay, and a research paper. In addition, students must earn a passing reading-quiz average, attend class without fail, and participate in round-table discussions.

Return to top


ENGL 2180-01: Studies in African-American Lit, Prof. Kevin Murphy
MWF 11:00am-11:50am; Paf 308

May count for credit in Core Area C2 (Humanities), Core Area F (Major Related Courses), or toward a minor in Africana Studies.

Description: Using an historical lens, this survey course introduces students to the literature that writers of African American heritage created from the early Colonial period to the present. Beginning with the poetry of Phillis Wheatley, America’s first black author to publish a book, the course will address why African American writers put pen to paper and how these early literary expressions lay the groundwork for the artists who came after them. How, for example, does W.E.B. Du Bois’s idea of double consciousness help us to understand such diverse cultural productions as Wanda Sykes stand-up comedy routine I’ma Be Me and Spike Lee’s film Bamboozled? Examining a number of genres (such as poetry, essay, prose, film, and spoken word), this course will analyze the historic, socio--political and cultural forces which helped to shape the African American experience.

Texts: Norton Anthology of African American Literature 2ed., Their Eyes Were Watching God (Hurston)

Requirements: two short essays (3-4 pages each), a midterm, a final, and a mandatory, out-of-class viewing of Spike Lee’s film Bamboozled (film will be provided by professor)

ENGL 2180-02: Studies in African-American Lit, Prof. Aaron Bremyer
TR 9:30am-10:45am; Paf 308

May count for credit in Core Area C2 (Humanities), Core Area F (Major Related Courses), or toward a minor in Africana Studies.

Description: Charles Johnson declares that the “black American writer begins his or her career with—and continues to exhibit—a crisis of identity. If anything, black fiction is about the troubled quest for identity and liberty, the agony of social alienation, the longing for a real and at times a mythical home” (Being and Race 9). In light of Johnson’s statement, we will investigate the “crisis of identity” and the resulting “troubled quest” as it is represented in the slave narrative and subsequent neo-slave narratives of these authors.

In our broad survey of African American literature, the writers we will study contemplate both the construction of race and the experience of a racialized identity. For these artists, race and identity become plastic categories to be mauled and manipulated in an effort to demonstrate their inherently constructed nature, and, perhaps most importantly, the repercussions of these constructions. The meaning of “race” in the work of these African American writers has become experiential; freedom is both a dreadful and liberating responsibility; identity, a conscious choice. Perhaps ultimately, the work of these African American writers suggests that the most authentic identity is one that is constantly in flux, that can not be pinned to the wall and dissected, that transcends the traditional discourse of identity categories altogether, that is constantly forming and re-forming itself as individual consciousness experiences the contingencies of the world. We will consistently test the validity of claims such as these as we encounter the work of the authors on our list.

Texts: In order of appearance: Frederick Douglass’s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, James Weldon Johnson’s The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, Charles Johnson’s Oxherding Tale, Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, and Toni Morrison’s Beloved.

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 2180-03: Studies in African-American Lit, Prof. Donnie McMahand
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm; Hum 228

May count for credit in Core Area C2 (Humanities), Core Area F (Major Related Courses), or toward a minor in Africana Studies.

Description: This survey course in African American literature examines crucial writings produced during various periods of American history, from the colonial era to the present. Assigned texts include, in chronological order, Phillis Wheatley’s poetry, slave narratives, essays by du Bois and Richard Wright as well as fiction, poetry, and drama by leading figures in the black literary canon. Integral to the discussion of these texts is a keen understanding of key concepts, such as masking, double consciousness, and Afrocentricism, which critically inform the historical framework of our readings.

Texts: Norton Anthology of African American Literature

Requirements: Two essays, two exams (midterm and final), group presentations, rigorous class participation and discussion.

Return to top


ENGL 2190-03: Studies in Lit by Women, Prof. Lee Moon
TR 9:30am-10:45am; Paf 306

May count for credit in Core Area C2 (Humanities), Core Area F (Major Related Courses), or toward a minor in Women’s Studies.

Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to significant works of literature by women writers and to consider the history and atmosphere in which they wrote. How were their works received? In what ways were the authors limited because of their gender? Did they grapple with social issues and cultural trends in their texts or maintain conspicuous silences? Students will work with the instructor to answer these and other questions while seeking a more intimate understanding of both texts and writers.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women, Volume One , The Norton Critical Edition of Persuasion, by Jane Austen and other literary and critical texts to be provided on Course Den and Docutek.

Requirements: Active participation in class, reading quizzes and responses, two short essays (3-4 pages), a midterm and a final exam.

Return to top


ENGL 3000-level

ENGL 3000-01: Research and Method, Prof. Mitzi McFarland
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm; TLC 1204

Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Requires permission to register. Email sholland@westga.edu for permission. Not offered during summer session.

Description: “Deconstruction” is a word that gets used in Newsweek. Scritti Pollitti, a pop group, publishes its lyrics under the copyright of “Jouissance Music,” borrowing a term that French critic Roland Barthes used to describe the pleasure of reading. Critic Thomas McLaughlin even recalls a time when he overheard a basketball coach say that his team had learned to “deconstruct a zone defense.”

Just what is all this theory talk? And why should we study it in a literature course?

Whether we are aware of it or not, resist it or welcome it, theory is absorbed into the fabric of our cultural and literary discourse. It is inherent in human perception, in our presuppositions and attitudes toward life. Even the most resistant reader makes theoretical decisions – conscious or not – about what kinds of texts to value most, how to read and study literature, what elements of plot, character, and language to focus on (or to overlook). We make theoretical decisions all the time that seem so “obvious,” so self-evident, that they’re not always recognized as theoretical or as decisions.

This course takes as its basic premise the idea that theory is inextricable from practice. Like it or not, we are always already “in theory.” In all our discussions, then, we will give attention to questions raised by contemporary literary theory: Why read? What should we read? How should we read? However, our central focus on “practical criticism” will involve the application of various approaches and methodologies to the explication – that is, to the interpretation and understanding of particular texts. This course is essentially a process course, where students can gain ample practice – through written and oral reports – in research methods, critical frameworks, and the close examination and analysis of texts. Hopefully, through the process of articulation, we will deepen our understanding of the aesthetic, literary, psychological, and socio-historical facets out of which texts are both generated and interpreted.

Texts: Parker, Robert Dale. How to Interpret Literature: Critical Theory for Literary and Cultural Studies . Oxford UP, 2008. ISBN: 978-0-19-533470-8; Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers . 6 th ed. MLA, 2003. ISBN: 0873529863; Cisneros, Sandra. The House on Mango Street . Vintage, 1984. ISBN: 0-679-73477-5; Yang, Gene Luen. American Born Chinese . First Second; Revised edition, 2006. ISBN: 978-1-59643-152-2; Highly recommended: Baldick, Chris. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms . Oxford UP, 2004. ISBN: 0198608837.

Requirements : 3 shorter analytical essays, a research paper (including proposal, required drafts, peer reviews, and an annotated bibliography), one oral presentation (film and critical theory discussion), final exam.

ENGL 3000-02: Research and Method, Dr. Maria Doyle
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm; TLC 1204

Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Requires permission to register. Email sholland@westga.edu for permission. Not offered during summer session.

Description: English 3000 serves as an introduction to literary research and critical theory with an eye to preparing students for the theoretical questions and research writing they will encounter in upper level courses. This class will offer students a focused examination of three distinct kinds of theoretical inquiry (genre studies, poststructuralism and postcolonialism) and will use these varied lenses to examine two major literary texts (Michael Ondaatje’s novel The English Patient and Neill Blomkamp’s film District 9). The course will also enable students to hone the writing skills essential for success in the major through the development of a series of analytical and research essays.

Texts: Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient; Neill Blomkamp, District 9; Catherine Belsey, A Very Short Introduction to Poststructuralism; Ania Loomba, Colonialism/Postcolonialism (New Critical Idioms Series); John Frow, Genre (New Critical Idiom)

Requirements: 2-3 short essays, research project, class and workshop participation, final exam

ENGL 3000-03: Research and Method, Dr. Maria Doyle
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm; Hum 206

Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Requires permission to register. Email sholland@westga.edu for permission. Not offered during summer session.

Description: English 3000 serves as an introduction to literary research and critical theory with an eye to preparing students for the theoretical questions and research writing they will encounter in upper level courses. This class will offer students a focused examination of three distinct kinds of theoretical inquiry (genre studies, poststructuralism and postcolonialism) and will use these varied lenses to examine two major literary texts (Michael Ondaatje’s novel The English Patient and Neill Blomkamp’s film District 9). The course will also enable students to hone the writing skills essential for success in the major through the development of a series of analytical and research essays.

Texts: Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient; Neill Blomkamp, District 9; Catherine Belsey, A Very Short Introduction to Poststructuralism; Ania Loomba, Colonialism/Postcolonialism (New Critical Idioms Series); John Frow, Genre (New Critical Idiom)

Requirements: 2-3 short essays, research project, class and workshop participation, final exam

Return to top


ENGL 3200-01W: Intermediate Creative Writing: Poetry, Dr. Chad Davidson
MW 2:00pm-3:15pm; Paf 309

DSW course. Prerequisite: ENGL 2060. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.

Description: This class will focus on the generation of poetic material through intensive, process-oriented strategies. More than merely create works of art, we will be interested in designing and implementing a sustainable writing practice. Additionally we will study intimately a host of contemporary poets, a few of whom will visit our campus during the semester. Chief among the various student projects in the course will be daily workshop critiques and memorizations of poems, extensive journal entries, and a finished portfolio of poetry (including a critical preface and statement of aesthetics).

Texts: Albergotti, Dan. The Boatloads; Fraser, Gregory, and Chad Davidson. Writing Poetry: Creative and Critical Approaches; Northrop, Kate. Things Are Disappearing Here; Pence, Amy. The Decadent Lovely; plus other materials distributed in class.

Requirements: Daily workshop responses and participation; memorization of at least one hundred lines of poetry over the course of the semester; electronic journal; and final portfolio with critical preface.

ENGL 3200-02W: Intermediate Creative Writing: Nonfiction, Dr. Emily Hipchen
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm; Paf 309

DSW course. Prerequisite: ENGL 2060. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.

Description: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 3200-03W: Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction, Dr. Margaret Mitchell
TR 5:30pm-6:45pm; Paf 309

DSW course. Prerequisite: ENGL 2060. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.

Description: This class will provide an intermediate level immersion in the writing of fiction, cultivating the imagination, the observant eye and the discipline that are essential to crafting good stories. Readings in short fiction will plunge us into the contemporary literary landscape and introduce you to some classics of the genre; not only will this acquaint you with various elements of the craft, but encourage you to situate your own emerging voice among those of other writers. Your journal will encourage you to think of yourself as a writer, to watch and to listen, to find stories at odd moments and in unlikely places, to practice playfulness as well as rigor. In workshops, you will benefit from intense discussions of your own work and that of other students. We will emphasize revision; by the end of the semester you will have produced a polished portfolio of short fiction.

Texts : Best American Stories 2010, Ed. Richard Russo; Making Shapely Fiction , Jerome Stern; The Vintage Book of Contemporary Americna Short Stories , ed. Tobias Wolff.

Requirements: Writing journal, formal and informal writing assignments, short analytical essay, 20 page portfolio, written responses to other students’ work, active participation in class.

Return to top


ENGL/HIST 3300-01W: Studies in American Culture, Prof. Lori Lipoma
Comedic Representations of Satan in American Culture
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm; Paf 204

DSW course. Prerequisite: ENGL 2130, HIST 2110 or 2112. Same as HIST 3300. No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.

Description: In this course, we will consider a problem that Andrew Delbanco identifies in The Death of Satan: How Americans have Lost the Sense of Evil , in which he argues that “a gulf has opened up in our culture between the visibility of evil and the intellectual resources available for coping with it”; has our postmodern culture, he asks, “emptied” the concept of evil of all meaning? Humor theorists John Morreall and V.I. Zilvys, on the other hand, argue that contemporary humor—even when it’s transgressive—is one of the most effective strategies for coping with evil, conflict, or adversity, especially in the endless complexities of our pluralistic national and global culture.

As an introduction to American studies, therefore, we will examine Satan-comedy as a symptom of culture: its roots in our history and evolution in our literature and art. In so doing, we will attempt to answer three overriding questions for the course: What does “Satan-comedy” reveal about our religious and cultural fears, and the ways in which we confront them? What deeper meanings about our ongoing struggle with the problem of evil might we derive from such a paradoxical approach? Does such humor trivialize our experience, or might it be a means by which we can reorder our own perceptions of evil, morality, and value systems in collision?

Texts: Coursepack of Supplementary Readings (available at Book Store) includes selections by Cotton Mather, Elizabeth Reis, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Stephen Vincent Benet, Mark Twain, V. I. Zilvys, John Morreall, Andrew Delbanco. Batchelor, Stephen. Living With the Devil: A Meditation on Good and Evil.

ISBN: 1594480877. Publisher: Riverhead Trade

Requirements: Five response papers 1-1/2 to 2 pages (10% ea—50% total); leading class discussion (5%); research presentation (15%); research project 8-10 pages (30%).

Return to top


ENGL 3400-01: Pedagogy and Writing, Dr. Rebecca Harrison
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm; TLC 1112

No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. DSW course. Required for certification in Secondary English Education for those who entered the program in fall 2008 or later. Those who entered before fall 2008 may choose to take ENGL 3405.

Description: Establishing sound and purposeful writing environments and assessment practices that motivate students are a challenging task for the burgeoning teacher at any level. We all inherit a host of obstacles concerning student writing when we enter a classroom, but, as as Kelly Gallagher points out, “well-trained teachers of writing produce students who write better” regardless of the hurdles they face. But, how can theoretical lenses be used meaningfully in different learning environments? How do you teach writing in context with authentic purpose? And, perhaps the more pressing question, how can you get student commitment to the task of becoming a discerning reader and writer of texts and the world around them? In response to these (and many other) concerns with the teaching of writing, this course will integrate the theoretical and the pragmatic as we strategize—first with our own critical reading and writing skills and then with those of the students we will face—instructional methods and pedagogical practices that lead to informed and intrinsically motivated communities of learners. As teaching is a multifaceted and unique art, students will observe faculty teaching writing in context in both classroom and tutorial environments.

Texts: Works will include poetry, fiction, and polemical tracks by authors such as Judith Sargent Murray, Kate Chopin, Margaret Atwood, and Langston Hughes. Critical material, available via course reserve, will encompass educational theory by authors such as John Bushman, Jim Blasingame, Deborah Appleman, and Kelly Gallagher (among others).

Requirements: Active participation, reading journal, two analytical essays, observation/response project, and a term paper.

Return to top


ENGL 3405-01W: Professional & Technical Wrtng, Dr. Melanie Jordan
MW 5:30pm-6:45pm; TLC 1109

DSW course. No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.

Description: This course provides intensive practice in composing audience-driven documents in a variety of real-world business, professional and technical contexts.  Students will create effective business-related presentations and their requisite appropriate documentary and visual aids. The course, while focused on the growth of the individual writer, will provide opportunities for collaborative learning. The course emphasizes the necessity of close examination of and response to various real-world rhetorical situations; these situations will require serious attention to detail and to correct and effective writing. This course will require the creation of documents such as memos, PowerPoints, letters, resumes, manuals, etc. Attention to correctness as well as larger issues of audience are crucial.

Texts: Lannon, John. Technical Communication, 11 th Ed. New York: Pearson, 2008.

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 3405-02W: Professional & Technical Wrtng, Prof. John Sturgis
TR 11:00am-12:15pm; TLC 1109

DSW course. No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.

Description: The concept of the profession of Technical Writing has evolved from an auxiliary function practiced by necessity into a full blown primary profession that includes virtually every imaginable industry and service oriented business on the planet. Successfully marketed products and services cannot exist without complete written descriptions, specifications, functional instructions, promotional materials, and other supporting documentation. The ever-changing rhetorical situations that surround the creation of these documentary instruments provide the exploratory field for this course. Participants will discover absolutely new ways to employ their writing abilities and to stretch their understanding of their own writing processes by generating an entirely original set of documents based on real-time requirements and standards of practice.

Text : Alred, Gerald J., Charles T. Brusaw, and Walter E. Oliu. The Technical Writer’s Companion. Third Edition. Boston: Bedford / St. Martin’s. 2002. ISBN 0-312-25978-6. (Subject to change).

Requirements : Students will execute a variety of different writing tasks under a variety of rhetorical situations established by the assignments package: Resumes, cover letters, business letters, and writing samples will be combined into a job search Presentation Package delivered at the midterm. A completed Research Project covering a subject of the student’s own choice will result in a Formal Report and Presentation delivered at the end of the semester.

ENGL 3405-03W: Professional & Technical Wrtng, Prof. Crystal Shelnutt
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm; TLC 1109

DSW course. No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.

Description: English 3405-03W will introduce students to basic rhetorical concepts that govern a multitude of professional and technical situations.

Highlighting the importance of the writing process, this course will concentrate on the fundamental topics and principles within professional writing communities in order to train students in effective and persuasive communication.

Students will gain intensive practice in composing powerful audience-driven documents—from gathering information through primary and secondary research to the planning and organizing of these workplace communiqués. Covering a wide range of technical communication—from letters, memos, and job application materials to definitions, descriptions, and instructions—this course provides practical and pertinent instruction in t he professional standards which students will encounter in their future careers.

Moreover, students will learn how to craft effective presentations supported with appropriate documentary and visual aids, as well as collaborate on research and reporting projects.

Texts: Heather Graves & Roger Graves, A Strategic Guide to Technical Communication, 978-1-55111-814- 7, Broadview Press; Gerald J. Alred, Charles T. Brusaw, & Walter E. Oliu, The Business Writer’s Handbook 9 th ed., 978-0-312-47709-0, Bedford St. Martin’s Press.

Return to top


ENGL 4/5000-level

ENGL 4/5106-01W: Studies in Genre: Poetry, Dr. Gregory Fraser
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm; Paf 109

DSW course. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters. Satisfies the following Major requirement: Genre and Theory.

Description: This class will study the ways in which poets have produced texts that both reflect and refract the prevailing views of their literary and social contexts. We will examine the historical conditions and power relations under which given poems were written, review the manifestos of several poets, and apply the contemporary reading practices of various textual theorists.

Texts: Reading Poetry,2nd ed.,Tom Furniss and Michael Bath; How to Read a Poem, Edward Hirsch

Requirements: Regular quizzes, midterm and final exam; final researched paper of at least seven pages in length; active participation in class discussions.

ENGL 4/5106-02W: Studies in Genre: Drama, Dr. Maria Doyle
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm; Paf 109

DSW course. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters. Satisfies the following Major requirement: Genre and Theory.

Description: Literally, a play is a piece of literature written in dialogue and meant for performance, but the larger question that this course will explore is the more important issue of why a writer might choose this particular form of expression: what’s the value of putting real actors in a room with a real audience, and how does this shape the way a writer presents his or her ideas? Rather than attempting a complete survey of a genre that has been around for well over two millennia, this course will organize its exploration around a set of archetypal Greek models -- the human fall of Oedipus, the rebellion of Antigone and the frenzied destruction of Euripides’s Bacchae -- using analysis of these plays to inform a reading of major developments in modern theater, from Tennessee Williams’s modern gothic to Tom Stoppard's parodic absurdism and August Wilson’s stage chronicle of African-American experience. Discussions will provide students with a vocabulary for reading British, American and world drama as literature –its connection to larger literary, political and social movements – and as theater – its relation to performance conventions and stage spaces. Students will attend a production in Atlanta as part of their course material.

Texts: Sophocles, Oedipus Rex and Antigone, Euripides, The Bacchae, William Shakespeare, King Lear, J.M. Synge, The Playboy of the Western World, Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire, Vaclav Havel, Largo Desolato, August Wilson, The Piano Lesson, Margaret Edson, Wit, Wole Soyinka, Death and the King's Horseman, Tom Stoppard, The Real Inspector Hound

Requirements: For undergraduates, two short papers, final research project, midterm and final exams, active discussion participation. Graduate students will complete additional secondary reading and a longer research project including a substantial annotated bibliography.

Return to top


ENGL 4/5108-01W: Studies in the Novel: American, Dr. Debra MacComb
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm; Hum 231

DSW course. Satisfies the following Major requirement: American Literature I or II.

Description: This course will focus on representative novels from the 18 th through 20 th centuries that reflect and that have significantly influenced the development of the American novel .

Texts: Rowson, Charlotte Temple, Sedgwick, Hope Leslie, Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, James, The Portrait of a Lady, Johnson, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, Faulkner, As I Lay Dying, Pycheon, The Crying of Lot 49. Critical readings will supplement primary texts.

Requirements: Active and informed participation in class discussions, weekly reading questions, three short (3 pages) essays, documented research project, final exam.

Return to top


ENGL 4/5109-01W: Film as Literature, Dr. Margaret Mitchell
Adapting the Victorians
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm; Paf 308

DSW course. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Satisfies the following Major requirement: Genre and Theory.

Description: The nineteenth-century novel has provided rich and complex material for twentieth-century filmmakers. This course will consider how the Victorians have been appropriated and revised through the medium of film. We will focus on several major British novels and multiple incarnations of those novels in both classic and contemporary films. We will examine the strategies and politics of adaptation, exploring what happens when 19th-century representations of gender, class, and social conflict are filtered through a twentieth- or twenty-first-century lens.

Texts: Oliver Twist, Charles Dickens; Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë; Dracula, Bram Stoker; Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad. Multiple film adaptations of these works, to be specified later. Selected readings in adaptation theory.

Requirements: Film journal, response papers, midterm and final, analytical essay, research paper.

Return to top


ENGL 4/5135-01W: British Romanticism, Dr. Lisa Crafton
TR 9:30am-10:45am; Hum 209

DSW course. Satisfies the following Major requirement: British Literature II.

Description: Romanticism/Revolution—the s pirit of Romanticism is defined by the political/cultural revolutions of the time and the self-conscious break with inherited literary tradition. As Blake says, “I must Create a System or be Enslav’d by another Man’s.” Yet this revolutionary activism is accompanied by an equally strong passion for imaginative power: Shelley’s desire to escape into the "still cave of the witch Poesy," Coleridge’s hallucinogenic Kubla Khan, Keats’ magical poet/snake Lamia. We will explore a diverse selection of Romantic texts—from imaginative visions to graphic renditions of history—with special attention to the genre of gothic, from Coleridge’s skeleton ship to Shelley’s monstrous bodies to Austen’s manipulation of gothic to suit her gender satire. In all, we will explore Romantic contexts with regard to political, cultural, sexual, and spiritual liberation and the equally subversive Romantic imagination.

Texts: British Literature of the Romantic Age, Frankenstein, Northanger Abbey, and readings on electronic reserve.

Requirements: Class discussion, 2 response essays, research paper, midterm, take-home final.

Return to top


ENGL 4/5140-01W: American Romanticism, Dr. Patrick Erben
Radical Romanticisms
TR 9:30am-10:45am; TLC 1116

DSW course. Satisfies the following Major requirement: American Literature I.

Description: Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Dickinson—if a list of these 19 th-century American authors makes you yawn, this course will help you wake up to the fresh and radical ideas of a generation of writers who tried to rouse their contemporaries from the dusty remains of Puritanism, the complacent acceptance of slavery, the mindless imitation of European literature and culture, the smug belief in the exceptionalism of American liberty, the debasing of human sexuality as filth, and—above all—the inability to think independently. Women writers such as Margaret Fuller and Fanny Fern as well as escaped slaves such as Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, moreover, fueled the spirit of discontent and radical change from the “margins.” In this course, we will study how the new art forms, philosophies, and social movements emerging from this period affected 19 th century America, but we will also explore how they have influenced writers and activists across the ages. When Thoreau famously postulated “Let your life be a counter-friction to stop the machine,” he also inspired activists from Mahatma Gandhi to Martin Luther King. So, this spring, come along and take a dip in the cool waters of “Walden Pond.”

Texts : Norton Anthology of American Literature, 7 th ed., vol. B (1820-1865).

Requirements : Lively participation, regular quizzes, one oral presentation, one short paper, one research paper (exploring how American Romanticism reverberates in 20 th-century and present-day culture).

Return to top


ENGL 4/5180-01W: Studies in Regional Literature: Native American Literature, Dr. David Newton
MW 3:30pm-4:45pm; Paf 308

DSW course. Satisfies the following Major requirement: American Literature II.

Description: In this course, we will study Native American literature as an authentic literary tradition with its own unique literary forms, modes of cultural practice, theoretical perspectives, and canon of writers. We will read Native American writers (such as N. Scott Momaday and Leslie Marmon Silko) who helped to inaugurate the Native American literary renaissance during the 1960s as well as contemporary Native American writers (such as Sherman Alexie and Joy Harjo) who engage questions of Native American identity in significantly new ways. We will also consider the relationship between Native American literature and the larger historical and literary currents within American culture. For example, we will look back to earlier historical eras when questions about racial otherness and political anxieties about American national identity often were often organized around problematic representations of Native Americans. One only need look at our nation’s most popular political monuments, cultural mythologies, and literary works to see their historical significance. We will read these non-Native representations along with—and often against—representations of this history by contemporary Native American writers who offer us an important counter narrative to this authorized literary and national history.

Texts: N. Scott Momaday. House Made of Dawn; Louise Erdrich, Love Medicine; Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony; Sherman Alexie, Reservation Blues, Lydia Maria Child, Hobomok and Other Writings on Indians; John L. Purdy and James Ruppert, eds., Nothing but the Truth: An Anthology of Native American Literature.

Requirements: Regular attendance and active participation in class discussions; periodic reading quizzes; a mid-term and a final examination; an analytical essay (4-5 pages); and a major research essay minimum 8 pages). In addition to these requirements, graduate students will complete an annotated bibliography of secondary sources and a final 12 page research paper (in lieu of the undergraduate research paper).

Return to top


ENGL 4/5185-01W: Studies in Literature by Women-British, Dr. Lisa Crafton
TR 11:00am-12:15pm; Hum 229

DSW course. Satisfies the following Major requirement: British Literature II.

Description: The contemporary novel and film The Hours reclaims and renews Virginia Woolf ’s Mrs. Dalloway (originally titled The Hours). The novel about three women searching for meaning and connection at three different places and times blurs the lines between life and literature; if we are all really as interconnected as he (and Woolf ) would have us believe, are we really so neatly separated from the fictional characters we resemble or create? These questions will help shape our study of British women writers in context. This course explores a diversity of literature by British women writers, from medieval mystic Julian of Norwich (who offers the maternal female body as analogy to God) to Mary Shelley (whose characters grapple with “body” of any material sort) to Nadine Gordimer (who represents the female body as a site of conflict including race, class, and gender in relations in South Africa). Course readings will require us to consider allegorical, spiritual renderings of the body as in Julian or the conflict between spiritual and sexual in the poetry of Rosetti; we will explore the intersection of the female body with social/political/cultural norms in Behn, Wollstonecraft, Shelley, Austen, and Gordimer. Finally, we will read Woolf ’s A Room of One’s Own and Mrs. Dalloway in the context of the contemporary text The Hours and the question of a “tradition” of women writers.

Texts: Behn, The Rover; Wollstonecraft, Maria, or the Wrongs of Woman; Shelley, Frankenstein; Austen, Mansfield Park; Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Cunningham, The Hours; Texts on electronic reserve: Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe, Amelia Lanier, Christina Rosetti, and Nadine Gordimer.

Requirements: Active participation in class; brief response essays; midterm and final exams; 10 page documented paper.

Return to top


ENGL 4/5188-01W: Individual Authors: Hardy, Dr. Fran Chalfant
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm; Hum 209

DSW course. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to fulfill the major's Individual Author's requirement. Satisfies the following Major requirement: British Literature II.

Description: Thomas Hardy was born in 1840, twenty-one years before the start of the American Civil War. By the time he died in 1928, he regularly listened to the radio. World War II started eleven years later.

That it is no surprise that Hardy’s literary output reflects the many changes confronting English society in the years depicted by his novels (1805-95) and poems (time immemorial to 1924). Today Hardy is still one of the leading subjects for scholarly publication, paralleling recent interest in feminism, gender studies and lesser-known works.

This course will primarily focus on five major Hardy novels, plus several short stories and a number of poems. As early as 1912, Hardy’s work enjoyed the attention of filmmakers, and a significant portion of the time allotted to each novel will be devoted to parallel cinematic or televised adaptation, including one of Catherine Zeta-Jones’ first film roles. Where appropriate, audio-visual information on Hardy’s life and milieu will be included, and it is hoped that students will enhance their study of Hardy’s poetry by volunteering to read aloud when appropriate.

Texts: Far From the Madding Crowd, The Return of the Native, The Mayor of Casterbridge, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, and Jude the Obscure, plus several short stories and Chosen Poems by Thomas Hardy.

Requirements: For undergraduates, two shorter exams, plus mid-term and final, all requiring coherent written responses. The mid-term and final exams will include significant essay questions. Also required are a brief response paper and a well-developed research/critical paper. Graduates will be responsible for all the above; in addition, they will write two response papers, with the research paper also including an ambitious bibliography relating to the topic explored.

ENGL 4/5188-02W: Individual Authors: Sylvia Plath, Dr. Chad Davidson
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm; Paf 109

DSW course. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to fulfill the major's Individual Author's requirement. Satisfies the following Major requirement: American Literature II.

Descritption: TBA

Texts: TBA

Requirements: TBA

ENGL 4/5188-03W: Individual Authors: Benjamin Franklin, Dr. Patrick Erben
“The Many Faces of Benjamin Franklin”
TR 12:30pm-1:45pm; Paf 110

DSW course. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. May be taken to fulfill the major's Individual Author's requirement. Satisfies the following Major requirement: American Literature I.

Descritption: During the recent tercentenary of his birth, celebrations of the life and accomplishments of Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) reached new heights. How did Franklin become an icon of 21 st-century American culture, equally at home in elementary school science classes and university courses? Intriguingly, Franklin’s fame is not merely a product of our modern media machinery. Besides his many occupations as printer, politician, scientist, and philanthropist, Franklin was and is above all the product of his own literary self-fashioning. Perhaps, Franklin is such an inexhaustible topic of present-day imagination, because we never seem to capture the true nature of his public and private personae. Like no other subject of early American literature and culture, the study of Benjamin Franklin links processes of cultural myth-making and literary construction in the 18 th century and today.

Texts: Walter Isaacson, ed., A Benjamin Franklin Reader. Additional readings (primary and secondary) on reserves and e-reserves.

Requirements: Engaged reading and active participation; oral presentation; several short papers; research project connecting Franklin’s life and work with his representation and significance today.

Return to top


ENGL 4/5210-01W: Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry, Dr. Gregory Fraser
W 5:30pm-8:00pm; Hum 231

DSW course. Prerequisite: ENGL 3200 (same genre). DSW course. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Satisfies the following Major requirement: Writing and Language.

Description: Designed to help advanced students refine their talents as makers of poetry, this course offers a sustained look at five major living poets from diverse backgrounds and experiences. We will work on experimental methods of generating verse and build upon the critical reading and commenting skills that students have developed in previous creative-writing classes. Students will learn to situate their work in the contemporary poetic moment and engage with the larger poetry cultures in the Atlanta metro area.

Texts: Writing Poetry, Davidson and Fraser; The Boatlands, Dan Albergotti; Dolls, John Poch; Houses Fly Away, Leigh Anne Couch, Renunciation, Corey Marks, Things Are Disappearing Here, Kate Northrop

Requirements: Regular readings and exercises, memorizations of poetry, oral and written contributions to workshop, and a final portfolio of polished writing, including a critical preface.

Return to top


ENGL 4286-01: Teaching Internship, Dr. Rebecca Harrison
M 5:30pm-7:00pm; TLC 2234

Contact ainsenga@westga.edu for permission to register. Admission to TEP and application for internship required.

Description: The internship for secondary education certification involves teaching English for one semester in a public school under the supervision of an experienced, qualified English teacher. Weekly seminars are an integral part of the student teaching experience and will model and provide interns with numerous and varied opportunities to plan, deliver, evaluate, and revise educational strategies. Such a learning environment, based on developing best practices through sound pedagogical modeling, will serve as part of an ongoing and comprehensive portfolio assessment process.

Texts: All readings will be provided via course reserve.

Requirements: An active Foliotek account. Six mandatory field observations, including lesson plans with standards, and a teaching journal. A polished, final portfolio containing necessary professional artifacts such as a resume, cover letter, teaching philosophy, effect on instruction, portfolio introduction, and case study responses. Active seminar participation is a must.

Return to top


ENGL 4/5300-01: Studies in the English Language: Grammar, Dr. David Newton
MW 12:30pm-1:45pm; Paf 307

Required for certification in Secondary English Education. Required for students completing the Middle Grades Language Arts curriculum. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Satisfies the following Major requirement: Writing and Language.

Description: In this course we will explore the structure or grammar of the English language and work toward understanding the principles or rules that make it work. This course is primarily designed for English majors who seek to improve the grammatical proficiency of their writing and for future teachers at the secondary and college level. However, this course also has applications for students entering business and industry, science and medical fields, law and politics, media and public relations, or anyone who recognizes the essential human value of language and who understands how the ability to use language contributes to professional success in life. After all, when you are talking to friends, asking someone out on a date, debating sports or politics, buying clothes at the mall, or writing a paper, you are using the structures and principles of English grammar, even when your sentences are not grammatical! However, knowing a language and knowing about the language are different kinds of knowledge. Even the ability to speak grammatically correct sentences in no way guarantees that a speaker knows enough about English to explain what makes those sentences grammatical. This course is designed to help you achieve that knowledge. We will refer frequently to Standard English, and, certainly, one of the benefits of this course is that it will help you refine your written and verbal language skills. However, this is not simply a course about grammatical correctness; instead, this course is designed to help you understand how the English language functions, what structures and rules are behind the sentence constructions that you and others create every day. To accomplish this task, we will learn some basic linguistic and grammatical concepts, and we will learn how to analyze (and diagram) different sentence constructions. We will also learn how elements of the language (verbs, nouns, sentence structures, pronouns, etc.) emerged and changed over time to create the language we use today.

Texts: Vitto, Cindy. Grammar by Diagram. Second Edition. Broadview Press, 2006. Vitto, Cindy. Grammar by Diagram Workbook. Broadview Press, 2008. NOTE: These textbooks can be purchased as a set at a reduced price from the bookstore. The ISBN for the bundled set is either 978-1-55402-925-9 or 1-55402-925-2.

Requirements: Daily reading and homework assignments from the textbook and workbook, periodic quizzes, and 4 major examinations. In addition to these requirements, graduate students will produce an annotated bibliography and a research paper that relates the study of grammar to their career or professional goals (education, law, literary studies, editing, writing, etc.).

Return to top


ENGL 4384-01W: Senior Seminar, Dr. Chad Davidson
Hazardous Materials: Toxicity, Pollution, Contamination, and Waste
MW 5:30pm-6:45pm; Paf 309

DSW course. Registration requires permission of Susan Holland ( sholland@westga.edu). Required for all English majors. Cannot be taken until ENGL 1101, 1102, and core area F have been completed with a minimum passing grade of C. A minimum of 18 hours of upper-level English courses must also have been completed with no grade lower than C. Not offered during summer session.

Description: As if we needed one more horrifying example of widespread pollution and ecological ruin, the Deep Horizon oil spill comes along. Through the constant surveillance of cameras at the ocean floor, we watched millions of gallons of crude gush into the Gulf. But how does the media choose to present that information to us? What are the particular ideologies underlying the representations—and not the realities—of an oil spill or a leak in a nuclear station? What does this coverage say about our notions of the environment and our place in it? What might it imply about our responsibilities as consumers of the very substances that we later deem “pollutants”? In this course, we will examine representations of toxicity and pollution as they occur in literature, film, and popular culture. Central to our exploration will be a deep understanding of the tropes of pastoral and apocalypse, since they constitute the literary machinery most often applied to large-scale ecological catastrophe. Also, we will interrogate the very definitions of “pollutants” and “contaminants,” “toxic substances” and “waste materials,” since these concepts shift and slide over time, reflecting political as well as natural environments.

Texts: Carson, Rachel. Silent Spring; DeLillo, Don. White Noise; Dunlap, Thomas. DDT, Silent Spring, and the Rise of Environmentalism; Garrard, Greg. Ecocriticism; plus supplementary readings handed out in class.

Requirements: participation, workshop critiques, weekly discussion posts, two critical-writing assignments, and a final seminar paper on a text of your choosing.

ENGL 4384-02W: Senior Seminar, Dr. Josh Masters
Madness and the Asylum in Literature and Film
TR 3:30pm-4:45pm; TLC 1204

DSW course. Registration requires permission of Susan Holland ( sholland@westga.edu). Required for all English majors. Cannot be taken until ENGL 1101, 1102, and core area F have been completed with a minimum passing grade of C. A minimum of 18 hours of upper-level English courses must also have been completed with no grade lower than C. Not offered during summer session.

Description: I must begin with a confession: I have no formal training in madness or its various step-children (lunacy, insanity, mental illness, psychosis, nuttiness, etc.), and it has played very little role in my own literary and cultural research. That said, I have always been fascinated by the sight of gothic insane asylums (with marvelous names like “The Worcester State Lunatic Asylum”), and I have even gone so far as to learn a little about their history and seek them out—in such places as Staunton, VA; Ogdensburg, NY; and Danville, MA. I am similarly drawn to narratives—fictional, poetic, autobiographical, and cinematic—that feature madmen, madwomen (even madchildren), and the various institutions that house them. Therefore, this senior seminar, which will explore the representation of madness and the asylum in literature and film, is not being taught by an expert in the field, but by a curious, inquisitive co-learner and co-investigator. An important feature of the class will thus be to examine the methods of critical inquiry we mobilize in our pursuit of literary and cultural knowledge, since we’ll all be in the dark concerning our topic, at least initially. We will begin the course by reading two major works together—Ken Kesey’s novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Michel Foucault’s study Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason—as well as several shorter and excerpted texts. You will then design a final project—based on a text or texts of your choosing—that will culminate in a fifteen to twenty page research paper.

Requirements: Active participation in class, one short essay, an oral report, a substantive research project (including prospectus, abstract, and annotated bibliography), and a final presentation.

Return to top


ENGL 4/5385-01W: Special Topics, Dr. Margaret Mitchell
‘Frightful Indecencies’: Love and Danger in the Eighteenth-Century Novel
TR 2:00pm-3:15pm; Hum 208

DSW course. Satisfies the following Major requirement: British Literature I.

Description: Why are narratives of love, courtship, and marriage in the eighteenth century so fraught with menace and danger? The novels we will read in this class chart the early decades of the novel as a genre, and in their own very different ways they abound with violence, abduction, deception, and madness. We will explore the significance of this curious intersection.

Texts: Moll Flanders, Daniel Defoe; The Monk, Matthew Lewis; Love in Excess, Eliza Haywood; Evelina, Frances Burney; The Castle of Otranto, Horace Walpole; Pamela, Samuel Richardson; Northanger Abbey, Jane Austen.

Requirements: Response papers, midterm and final, analytical essay, research paper.

Return to top


ENGL 6000-level

ENGL 6105-01: Seminar in British Lit I, Dr. Micheal Crafton
Chaucer and the Critics
Thursday 5:30pm-8:00pm; TLC 1204

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description: One of the most traditional of courses in an English literature curriculum, undergraduate or graduate, is a course in Chaucer. For many years at many schools, no degree was complete without a course in C.S.M (Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton), a course I heard referred to by an irritated undergraduate at Fordham University as the Three Blind Whites. Well, only Milton was actually blind, but you can get the point. This is a shame in some ways because much of what Chaucer accomplishes, and the same could be said for Shakespeare, is not the conventional, the avant garde , in fact. Chaucer’s sly politics, radical experiments in narrative and language and thought are the very attributes that readers have responded variously to over the years. In this course, I want us to look at how a different version Chaucer emerges in the hands of different critics wielding different critical instruments and at different moments in history.

Texts: We will have only two texts that will provide us a selection of The Canterbury Tales and a selection of criticism.

Requirements: The bulk of the work will be reading, short oral reports, a short paper, and a longer one for the final exam at the end of the term.

Return to top


ENGL 6115-01: Seminar in British Lit II, Dr. Angela Insenga
Bloomsburied?: The Making of British Modernism
Monday 5:30pm-8:00pm; TLC 1204

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description: In her essay “Old Bloomsbury,” Virginia Woolf recalls the Thursday night parties that spawned one of the most prominent and influential groups in all of English literature: “We were full of experiments and reforms. [. . .] We were going to paint; to write; to have coffee after dinner instead of tea at nine o’ clock. Everything was going to be new; everything was going to be different. Everything was on trial.” Full of bravado and the intellect to back it up, the so-called “uppity women [and] emasculated men” (Marler) who began meeting regularly at 46 Gordon Square in 1906 sought, just as their American Modernist counterpart Ezra Pound did, to “make it new.” But how to put the world on trial? And, as they all stood poised on a promontory between the beauties and structure of the Victorian era and the approaching technological, political, and social progress of the twentieth century, of what crime did the world stand accused?

In seminar, we will examine the ideological foundations and historical development of the Bloomsbury Group through an investigation of primary and secondary materials from the various disciplines that worked to shape our perceptions of it. Among other topics for discussion, we will consider Modernist innovation in aesthetic practice, literary criticism, and major movements in painting, philosophy, economics, and politics. Of utmost importance will be the group’s major players: E.M. Forster, Lytton Strachey, Roger Fry, Clive Bell, Vanessa Bell, Leonard Woolf, and the “high priestess of Bloomsbury [and] godmother of the modern novel” (Drukman) herself, Virginia Woolf. Students will also study ancillary authors, some of whom cited Bloomsbury’s undeniable sway or affected the Modernist milieu themselves. Towards the end of our semester, we will consider the cultural “Bloomsbury Boom,” which perhaps began in the sixties with the publication of Leonard Woolf’s five-volume autobiography and crested in the early years of the twenty-first century with the publication of Michael Cunningham’s novel The Hours and the academy-award winning film adaptation that introduced Nicole Kidman’s gawky, prosthetic-nosed Woolf to audiences at large.

Texts: Conrad, Joseph. Heart of Darkness; E.M. Forster. A Passage to India; D.H. Lawrence. Sons and Lovers; S. P. Rosenbaum. The Bloomsbury Group: A Collection of Memoirs and Commentary (selections); Richard Shone. The Art of Bloomsbury: Roger Fry, Vanessa Bell, and Duncan Grant (selections); Lytton Strachey. Eminent Victorians (selections); Virginia Woolf. The Voyage Out; Virginia Woolf. Mrs. Dalloway. Other required shorter essays available on electronic reserve: “The Function of Criticism at the Present Time,” by Matthew Arnold; “Roger Fry,” by Clive Bell; “The Garden Party,” by Katherine Mansfield; selections from Regina Marler’s Bloomsbury Pie: The Making of the Bloomsbury Boom; selections from Principia Ethica, by G. E. Moore; “Sketch of the Past,” by Virginia Woolf; “Professions for Women,” by Virginia Woolf; “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown,” by Virginia Woolf; “How Does One Read a Book?,“ by Virginia Woolf; “Modern Fiction” by Virginia Woolf, and Mr. “Conrad: A Conversation,” by Virginia Woolf, and “Joseph Conrad,” by Virginia Woolf

Requirements: Seminar Paper (proposal, take-home peer review, final paper) (40%) In-Class Presentation on Primary Reading, corresponding analytical essay, and handout (3-4 pages) (25%) Scholarly abstract (20%) Active Seminar Participation (15%)

Return to top


ENGL 6120-01: Seminar in American Lit II, Dr. Barbara Brickman
Theories of Popular Culture
Wednesday 5:30pm-8:00pm; TLC 1204

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description: In this course, we will examine the central theoretical frameworks for studying popular culture—from debates about who defines “culture” and what counts as “culture” to questions of audience, authorship, and everyday life. We will begin with key theoretical readings to help us define “culture” and question how ideology and audience become central concerns for those who study popular culture. Each week’s assignment then will include an exemplary text to elucidate the week’s critical readings and these texts will range from novels and film to television, music, and digital media.

Texts: Guins, Raiford and Omayra Cruz, eds. Popular Culture: A Reader

Requirements: one formal presentation, weekly responses, one research paper

ENGL 6120-02: Seminar in American Lit II, Dr. Rebecca Harrison
The Female Aesthetic in the Modern South: “A Confederacy of Water Moccasins.”
Tuesday 5:30pm-8:00pm; TLC 1204

Registration requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description: The literature of the American South has been an established, growing, and prolific area of study since the 1950s. Yet, shaped by the Agrarian movement and New Criticism, this trajectory of canonization and criticism marginalized women and minority writers. Indeed, Southern women writers occupied an ambiguous position where their “feminine” style was historically dismissed as frivolous, domestic, local color, and outside the mainstream of historical concerns and significance allegedly identifiable in the works of white Southern men. In his 1980 collection A Southern Renaissance, Richard King goes as far as justifying the exclusion of women from his volume because they were not “concerned primarily with the larger cultural, racial, and political themes” of the South. This critical paradigm politely moves the women writers of the Southern Renaissance to the sidelines as King argues they neglect to place the “true” concerns of the region “at the center of their imaginative visions” (8-9). Such exclusions, as Susan Donaldson notes, are misguided, political, and depend on the ways in which history, culture, legitimacy, and the centrality of region are defined and controlled. It is only in the last three decades that revisionist scholars, historians and literary critics alike, have begun the work of redefining the literature of the South and excavating Southern women’s histories and writings with innovative lenses of inquiry.

This class examines the growing field of the female tradition in Southern literature based around a representative grouping of white Southern women writing in and around the modernist period. As a class, we will investigate their complex, diverse, and, at times, problematic conceptions of self, community, race, history, aesthetic sensibilities, and, of course, their plight as Southern women writers. In addition to the primary texts, students will engage in critical dialogue with the revisionist scholars—Carol Manning, Anne Goodwyn Jones, Louise Westling, Anne Firor Scott, and the likes—responsible for the increased visibility of and redefinition of critical paradigms applied to Southern women’s writing. As an outgrowth of this work, students will be required to submit an original conference proposal to the Southern Women’s Writers Conference to be held at Berry College in Rome, GA, in 2011.

Texts: Works will include the poetry and short fiction of Beatrice Ravenel; Ellen Glasgow, Barren Ground; Evelyn Scott, Escapade; Elizabeth Madox Roberts, The Time of Man; Julia Peterkin, Scarlet Sister Mary; Lillian Smith, Strange Fruit; Katharine Dupre Lumpkin, The Making of a Southerner; Eudora Welty, The Golden Apples; and Carson McCullers, Ballad of the Sad Café. Relevant criticism and additional materials, available via library reserve, will complement class discussion regularly.

Requirements: Active seminar participation, two brief response essays, a conference abstract, one presentation of a critical article, and a fifteen page term paper.

Return to top