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Summer/Fall 2005 Edition
Volume 6, Number 2


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Fall Courses, 2005

NOTE: Courses are subject to change depending on enrollment and faculty teaching assignments. Please check BANWEB for more current information on the availability of all courses.

English 1101 and 1102 are prerequisites for all courses from ENGL 2110 through 4386.

A “W” designation after a section number of a 3000- or 4000-level course signifies that the course is a Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) course. WAC accepts as a guiding principle the idea that writing is a valuable tool for learning a communication. Therefore, the components of a course so designated are designed to help you learn the material and communicate what you have learned. Students are required to take two “W” courses for the undergraduate degree.

Skip down the page to view the following courses offered during the Fall 2005 term:

ENGL 2050:  Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Everyday Life, Profs. Lori Lipoma, John Sturgis, and Tiffany Armand

ENGL 2110-01:  World Literature, Prof. Lori Lipoma

ENGL 2110-02:  World Literature, Prof. Joshua Masters

ENGL 2110-25H: World Literature-Honors, Prof. Micheal Crafton

ENGL 2120-01:  British Literature, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell

ENGL 2120-02: British Literature, Prof. Paula N. Patch

ENGL 2120-03:  British Literature, Prof. Teresa Jones

ENGL 2120-25H:  British Literature-Honors, Prof. Tom Dvorske

ENGL 2120-26H:  British Literature-Honors, Prof. Maria Doyle

ENGL 2120-27H:  British Literature-Honors, Prof. Gregory Fraser

ENGL 2120-28H:  British Literature-Honors, Prof. Lisa Crafton

ENGL 2130-01: American Literature, Prof. Gwen Davidson

ENGL 2130-03:  American Literature, Prof. Brandy James

ENGL 2130-25H:  American Literature-Honors, Prof. Randy Hendricks

ENGL 2130-26H:  American Literature-Honors, Prof. Debra MacComb

ENGL 2180-01: Studies in African American Literature, Prof. Stacy Boyd

ENGL 2190-01:  Studies in Literature by Women, Prof. Bonnie Adams

ENGL 2300-01: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Nina Leacock

ENGL 2300-02 & 03:  Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Barbara Brickman

ENGL 3200-01: Creative Writing, Prof. Kelly Whiddon

ENGL 3200-02W:  Creative Writing, Prof. Alison Umminger

ENGL 3200-03W: Creative Writing, Prof. Chad Davidson

ENGL 3400-01: Advanced Composition, Prof. Kelly Whiddon

ENGL 3405-01W & 02W:
Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. Tiffany Armand

ENGL 4/5106-01W:  Studies in Genre, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell

ENGL 4/5106-02W:  Studies in Genre, Prof. Chad Davidson

ENGL 4/5108-01W:  Studies in the Novel, Prof. Debra MacComb

ENGL 4/5109-01:  Film as Literature, Prof. Barbara Brickman

ENGL 4/5125-01W: Colonial and Early American Literature, Prof. David W. Newton

ENGL 4/5130-01W:  18th Century British Literature, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell

ENGL 4/5155-01W: 20th Century British Literature, Prof. Angela Insenga

ENGL 4/5160-01W:  20th Century American Literature, Prof. Joshua Masters

ENGL 4/5180-01W:  Studies in Regional Literature, Prof. Randy Hendricks

ENGL 4/5188-01W: Individual Authors, Dr. Nina Leacock

ENGL 4/5188-02W: Individual Authors, Prof. Gregory Fraser

ENGL 4/5210-01W: Advanced Creative Writing, Prof. Alison Umminger

ENGL 4295-01W:  Reading and Literature in Secondary English Classrooms, Prof. Tom Dvorske

ENGL 4/5300-01: Studies in the English Language, Prof. David W. Newton

ENGL 4/5310-01W: Studies in Literary Theory, Prof. Michael Crafton

ENGL 4384-01W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Nina Leacock

ENGL 4384-02W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Lisa Crafton

ENGL 6115-01: Seminar in British Literature II, Prof. Maria Doyle

ENGL 6385-01:  Seminar in Special Topics, Prof. Alison Umminger  

XIDS 2100-03: Arts and Ideas: The Creative Process, Prof. Chad Davidson

XIDS 2100-05: Arts and Ideas:  Photography and Short Stories, Prof. Patricia Reinhard

XIDS 2100-07:  Arts and Ideas: Representing American Women, Prof. Lucy Curzon

 

ENGL 2050:  Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Everyday Life, Profs. Lori Lipoma, John Sturgis and Tiffany Armand
Section 01 (Lipoma):  MWF 9:00AM-9:50AM,  Pafford 308
Section 02  (Lipoma):  MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM,  Pafford 308
Section 03 (Sturgis):  TR 11:00AM-12:15PM, Humanities 225
Section 04 (Sturgis):  TR 12:30PM-1:45PM, Humanities 225
Section 05 (Armand): TR 3:30PM-4:45PM, Humanties 225

May count for credit in Core Area B.  Same as THEA 2050.

Description:  Effective communicators are more productive, have enhanced career opportunities, enjoy more fulfilling relationships, earn more respect, and have more fun!   The good news is that you already have the tools you need to become a great communicator; it’s just a matter of learning how to use them consciously and masterfully…in other words, learning how to “self-stage.”  

In Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Everyday Life, we will study and practice practical communication skills—creativity, quick thinking, risk taking, lateral thinking, active listening, subtext mastery, self-awareness—and apply them to virtually every interaction you encounter outside the classroom:  One-on-One Conversations, Public Presentation, Debate and Argumentation, Conflict Resolution and Confrontation Skills, Stress Management, Team Building, and Impression Management.   By the end of the semester, students will have had first-hand experience in all of these areas, and, more importantly, will know exactly how to continue honing and perfecting those skills long after.

Requirements:  formal solo presentations, group projects and presentations, panel discussions/debates, vocabulary-building exercises, role-playing and improvisation exercises, journaling, and, of course, active, informed participation in each class session.

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ENGL 2110-01:  World Literature, Prof. Lori Lipoma
Reading the Dark Side
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM, Pafford 308

Prerequisites:  ENGL 1101 and 1102.  Required for English majors.  May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description:  Why do bad things happen to good people?  How do we account for—or even define—good and evil?  Is ours, in fact, the best of all possible worlds…and what narratives do we create when we find that it isn’t?   In World Literature:  Reading the Dark Side, we’ll explore these unrelenting questions, and examine the many ways in which mankind has perceived, explained, and coped with adversity since we were first able to express our deepest hopes and fears in written form.  

Texts:  The Epic of Gilgamesh;  Goethe, Faust; Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound; Voltaire, Candide; Dante, The Inferno; Soyinko, Death and the King’s Horseman; Frankl, Man's Search For Meaning.  Supplementary course pack will include excerpts from The Egyptian Book of the Dead, The Mahabarata and The Bhagavad Gita, the Tao Te Ching, Homer’s Odyssey, Virgil’s Aeneid,  Plato’s Apology and Phaedo, The Koran, The Bible, John Milton’s Paradise Lost, Lu Xun, Oswalde de Andrade, and Mark Twain’s Letters from the Earth.

Requirements:  Reading journal, two analytical essays, midterm and final exams, and informed, active participation in class discussions.

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ENGL 2110-02:  World Literature, Prof. Joshua Masters
TR 7:00PM-8:15PM, Humanities 227

Required for English majors.  May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description:  This course investigates the origins and development of the human capacity to create narratives epic in their scope: narratives that establish the myths, values, character, and history of a tribe, nation, or culture. Rather than assigning a host of excerpts from the diverse literatures of the entire world that were ever written or spoken, I have chosen six representative texts for us to analyze and explore in great detail. Each of these texts focuses on a traveler seeking heroic adventures in new worlds, cultural encounters with new beings, and ultimately someplace to settle down and call “home.” And, more importantly, each of our texts chart the imagined origins and history of a new culture, nation, or even empire, from Greek and Roman, to Italian and British, to African and Native American.

Texts:  The Odyssey (Homer), The Aeneid (Virgil), The Inferno (Dante), The Tempest (Shakespeare), A Grain of Wheat (Ngugi), Ceremony (Silko).

Requirements:  Students must write two 1500-word papers, maintain a passing quiz average, and take a final exam in order to pass the class.

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ENGL 2110-25H: World Literature-Honors, Prof. Micheal Crafton
TR 3:30PM-4:45PM, TLC 2237

For Honors students only.  Required for English majors.  May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description:  The purpose of this course is to consume the world.  Well, maybe that is a slight exaggeration.  Let’s say the purpose is to survey literary and cultural documents from around the world starting with the earliest extant materials, usually the Sumerian epic poem Gilgamesh, and working our way by leaps and bounds up to the modern period, usually a contemporary poet such as Seamus Heaney or perhaps a film.  Although we shall try our best to view this literature in a historical and political context, we will be hard pressed to be very detailed due to the astonishing breadth of this survey. Given the fact that we will be moving quickly through a lot of cultures, we shall hold to two constants: one, mythology as a grammar for comparative analysis; two, literacy as the fundamental skill of skills that we shall practice.  The myths that we shall survey are typically myths of various heroes (gods, goddesses, warriors, tricksters, and wisdom figures), employed in a variety of archetypal plots (creation, protection, deliverance, questing and testing).  The literacy tasks will be an assortment of the following: oral responses in class, oral presentation as a group, short answer writing on exams, and short essays written out of class.

Texts:  Maynard Mack, ed., The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces. Norton, 1997 (ISBN: 0393971430).  Robert Segal, A Very Short Introduction to Myth Oxford University Press, 2004 (ISBN: 0192803476).

Requirements:  Active engagement in class discussion, two short essays, oral presentation, midterm, and final exam.

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ENGL 2120-01:  British Literature, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell
MWF 9:00AM-9:50AM, Humanities 227

Required for English majors.  May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description:  Our sweeping survey of British literature will take us from the medieval poem Beowulf to Doris Lessing’s novel The Grass Is Singing. As we move swiftly through the centuries, touching on important works of literature from all the major periods, we will look for connections, patterns, and trends that enable us to begin to define a national literature, paying attention to the historical and political contexts out of which these texts arose. Throughout the history of British literature we will trace a preoccupation with the social order: how it is established and maintained, what threats it faces, and to what extent the existing order may be challenged. We will pay attention to how the social order is represented in these works, and consider its relationship to the literary works that not only reflect it but arguably both reinforce and undermine it.

Texts:   Beowulf, Trans. Seamus Heaney; Selected Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer; King Lear, Shakespeare; Moll Flanders, Daniel Defoe; English Romantic Poetry: An Anthology, Ed. Stanley Appelbaum; Wuthering Heights, Emily Brontë; Dubliners, James Joyce; The Grass Is Singing, Doris Lessing.

Requirements:  Active participation, quizzes, oral presentations, two essays, midterm and final.

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ENGL 2120-02: British Literature, Prof. Paula N. Patch
MW 2:00PM-3:15PM, Humanities 208

Required for English majors.  May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description:  You could call this course the British Buffet, in which  you’ll sample literary delicacies created by major British authors from the middle ages to the present. All literary genres will be presented for your tasting pleasure: poetry (Blake, Tennyson, Heaney), drama (Shakespeare, Beckett), essay (Swift, Wollstonecraft, Darwin) and short and long fiction (Chaucer, Dickens, Conrad, Woolf). To add spice to the literature, we’ll also consider the major cultural trends (political, religious, artistic) that inform and influence the texts.

Texts:  Damrosch, David, et al. The Longman Anthology of British Literature, 2nd compact edition (2004), volumes A and B

Requirements:  Active participation in class; weekly informal writing assignments; 2-3 formal essays; midterm and final exams.

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ENGL 2120-03:  British Literature, Prof. Teresa Jones
TR 12:30-1:45 PM, Humanities 227

Required for English majors.  May count for credit in Core Area C.


Description:  This course introduces students to representative works of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon age to the twentieth century. In addition to exploring questions of genre, literary periods, and historical context, we will explore  stories of adventure that grapple with the fluidity of individual and social identify as shaped by the transformative power of desire, the desire to own, to understand, to create, to imagine, to conquer, and to contain.  We will explore a national consciousness over time as it finds expression in individual moments of striving and being.

Texts:  The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Majors Authors, 7th edition, packaged with CD-ROM, Shakespeare’s Othello, Shelley’s Frankenstein, Wool’s Orlando.

Requirements:  Two short essays (at least five pages each), midterm exam, final essay (at least eight pages), final exam.

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ENGL 2120-25H:  British Literature-Honors, Prof. Tom Dvorske
MW 2:00PM-3:15PM, TLC 1204

For Honors students only.  Required for English majors.  May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description:  Beginning with Beowulf and ending in the latter twentieth-century, we will survey the major authors and periods of British literature, paying attention to how the ideas of each period inform the language, style, and leading genres of the times as well as how each period builds upon and revises important literary and cultural ideas of the previous generation in the course of developing a national literature.

Texts:  Graham Greene, The Quiet American;  J.M. Synge, Playboy of the Western World; Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities; William Shakespeare, The Tempest (Norton Critical Edition); M.H. Abrams, et.al. The Norton Anthology of English Literature: Major Authors, w/ media companion.

Requirements:  Reading responses and journal, two papers, short oral presentation, midterm and final exams.

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ENGL 2120-26H:  British Literature-Honors, Prof. Maria Doyle
TR 12:30PM-1:45PM, TLC 2237

For Honors students only.  Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description:  From the mead halls of Beowulf to the various wastelands of modernity, this course will explore the evolution of the British literary tradition, with particular attention to the prominence of specific literary forms and genres within particular historical periods. Drawing together the various threads of our conversation will be the question of “Britishness”

itself: how does a national literary tradition establish a sense of national character, and how do the various spaces of our textual exploration—from Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre to Brontë’s lonely manor houses to Joyce’s “dear, dirty Dublin”—raise questions about what it means to be included in that tradition?

Texts:  Norton Anthology of British Literature: The Major Authors; William Shakespeare, Othello; Tom Stoppard, Arcadia.

Requirements:  Reading journal, independent analytical essay (8 pages with proposal), midterm and final exams, group oral presentation.

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ENGL 2120-27H:  British Literature-Honors, Prof. Gregory Fraser
TR 2:00PM.-3:15PM, Humanities 212

For Honors students only.  Required for English majors.  May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description:  This course introduces students to representative works of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon age to the twentieth century. In addition to exploring questions of genre, literary periodization, and historical context, we will be concerned with the stories literature has told, over time, about the “self”—whether that involves the person writing the text, the people imagined in the text, or the larger culture surrounding the text. We will also examine ways in which texts mediate the relationship between “self” and “culture” in both reactionary and revolutionary ways.

Text:  The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Majors Authors, 7th edition, packaged with CD-ROM.

Requirements:  Two short essays (at least five pages each), midterm exam, final essay (at least eight pages), final exam.

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ENGL 2120-28H:  British Literature-Honors, Prof. Lisa Crafton
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM, TLC 2237

For Honors students only.  Required for English majors.  May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description:  "I Must Create a System or be Enslav'd by Another Man's," warns Romantic poet/painter William Blake. In this study of British literature, we will read selected texts, medieval to contemporary, with an emphasis on the dynamic between individuals and communities (familial, social, cultural, political), how individuals are shaped by/resist these forces, and how literature and critical practices respond to these changing dynamics. We will analyze diverse texts of fiction, drama, poetry, film, and music which nevertheless offer recurrent themes; for example, conflicts between spiritual and material culture from medieval mystic Julian of Norwich to U2 and the compelling power of what Heaney will call "the tribe" in Irish literature.

Texts:  Longman Anthology of British Literature, Mrs. Dalloway, Frankenstein, Endgame, and a course pack, including Julian of Norwich, Chaucer (interlinear translation), Heaney, Gordimer, and introduction to postcolonial literature.

Requirements:  Active discussion, group oral report, brief response essays, midterm and final.

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ENGL 2130-01: American Literature, Prof. Gwen Davidson
MW 5:30PM-6:45PM, Humanities 206

Required for English majors.  May count for credit in Core Area C.

 Description:  In this course we will examine the movement of the American frontier and its effects on national identity. How do we define “frontier”? Can we define it? Or is the notion of a frontier in constant flux? What does the idea of a Manifest Destiny tell us about our insatiable desire for westward expansion, for empty spaces? And were they actually empty? To answer these questions and others, we will consult a variety of American texts—from the cultured “European” Northeast to the often romanticized “wild” West—to view how different regions formed identity in relation to both national geography and mental borders. Furthermore we will pay specific attention to Western literature that depicts the challenge of building a new West in the shadow of its mythic past. Finally, our frontier exploration will address how barriers, both physical and psychological, shaped cultural and racial relations, and how the frontier became a dividing line between society and wilderness.

 Texts:  The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter Version; Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

 Requirements:  TBA

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ENGL 2130-03:  American Literature, Prof. Brandy James
TR 2:00PM-3:15PM, Humanities 208

Required for English majors.  May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description:  On defining the creation of identity, American essayist, novelist, and playwright James Arthur Baldwin comments, “An identity would seem to be arrived at by the way in which the person faces and uses his experience.”  Baldwin’s statement encompasses far-ranging ideas and introduces questions that have historically characterized American literature: How have Americans characterized their own identities at different points in time, and how have historical events, cultural phenomena, social environments, and personal experiences become meshed with and changed these identities?  To what extent does the American landscape, either as a physical or symbolic space, attribute to this definition?  Is the definition “American” even a valid identity?    As we closely examine these questions by examining the various literary genres that span almost four centuries, we will focus on how language and writing has been used to construct and alter the meaning of “American identity.”  In addition, we will also delve into the formation of identity from the perspectives of race, gender, and social class and examine how each has been used for this purpose.

Texts:  TBA

Requirements:  TBA

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ENGL 2130-25H:  American Literature-Honors, Prof. Randy Hendricks
MWF 1:00PM-1:50PM, TLC 2237

For Honors students only.  Required for English majors.  May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description:  In this class we will devote much of our time to reading, discussing, and writing about such classic texts in American literature as Franklin’s Autobiography,  Cooper’s The Last of the Mohicans, Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Douglass’s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Thoreau’s Walden, Whitman’s and Dickinson’s poems, Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Eliot's The Waste Land, and more. Reading the texts, in whole or in part, we will focus on the way in which they, through their forms, themes, and language, echo and even parody each other as they record a cultural/literary debate on the issue of American identity with its related questions of what constitutes an American self, society, and attitudes toward nature. We will use the examples to work toward a definition of the qualities beyond “written in America” that make a work of literature “American.” Additional readings from the anthology will supplement the primary ones.

Texts:  The Norton Anthology of American Literature,  Sixth Edition,  ed. Nina Baym, et. al.  The Last of the Mohicans, The Great Gatsby, The Scarlet Letter.

Requirements:  Rigorous preparation for and active participation in class meetings; several short writing assignments; midterm essay, research paper (for class presentation); and a comprehensive final exam.

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ENGL 2130-26H:  American Literature-Honors, Prof. Debra MacComb
TR 2:00PM-3:15PM, TLC 2237

For Honors students only.  Required for English majors.  May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description:  This course will develop a range of enduring themes that have characterized American literature: the encounter with and appropriation of nature; the crafting of an identity that attempts to reconcile the desires of the individual with the needs of society; the individual’s ability to chart his own path to success; the “problem” of the socio-cultural “other”; and the tension between the public and private spheres. In exploring these themes, we will read a variety of canonical and non-canonical texts to examine the authorial strategies that developed over time which make these works aesthetically as well as historically pertinent.

Texts:  Franklin, The Autobiography; Foster, The Coquette; Douglass, Narrative of the Life; Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Chopin, The Awakening; Jewett, The Country of the Pointed Firs; Johnson, Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man;  Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49; Smith, Fair and Tender Ladies; Morrison, Jazz.

Requirements:  Informed and regular class participation, one short oral report, two short response papers (3 pages each), one longer paper (5-6 pages), a “conference” presentation of that longer paper to the seminar; a cumulative final exam.

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ENGL 2180-01: Studies in African American Literature, Prof. Stacy Boyd
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM, Pafford 208

May count for credit in Core Area C. 

Description:  This survey course introduces the student to the literature that writers of African American heritage created from its beginning in Colonial America to 1960. The course will examine a number of writers, issues, genres, styles, and themes; furthermore, it will analyze the historic, socio--political and cultural forces which helped to shape the African American experience. The course will also emphasize interlocking race, gender, and class perspectives, whenever applicable, for analyzing literary works.

Text:  Norton Anthology of African American Literature

Requirements:  Normally, daily reading quizzes, presentation, two critical essays, a midterm, and a final.

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ENGL 2190-01:  Studies in Literature by Women, Prof. Bonnie Adams
Resistance and Revision
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM, Humanities 208

May count for credit in Core Area C.     

Description:  Why study literature by women?  Although the literary canon has evolved significantly over the past thirty years, there remains much yet to be uncovered in the female voice.  How, then, do we set about exploring this terrain?  As Ellen Moers notes, “By some accidental or willed critical narrowness, we have routinely denied ourselves additional critical access to [major female writers] through the fact of their sex – a fact surely as important as their social class or era or nationality, a fact of which women writers have been and still are conscious.  How, as human beings, could they not be?” 

We will, then, approach the literature in this course through the lens of the female experience itself.  Beginning with Virginia Woolf, we will first examine those writers whose work centers upon not only finding their distinctly female voices, but expressing them as well.  We will move then to an examination of the treatment of the female body and female sexuality: How do women writers represent their own bodies and sexuality?  How does the biological fact of their female bodies influence their writing? 

Finally, we will examine what Joseph Boone refers to as the “countertraditional voices” in literature by women – those texts whose premise runs decidedly counter to the traditional structure of narrative, which deems marriage the ultimate (and often, the only) end for the female protagonist.  Through a discussion of works spanning from the seventeenth century (Atell’s A Serious Proposal to the Ladies) to contemporary culture (Bushnell’s Sex and the City), we will consider how these women writers raise their voices against marriage, whether through uncovering the misogynist principles inherent in the traditional structure of marriage, or through simply advocating alternative choices which prove ultimately more satisfying. 

Our class will culminate in an examination of two seminal works: Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre and Kate Chopin’s The Awakening.   We will discuss each text in light of the writer’s revolutionary/revisionist treatment of the issues we’ve deconstructed this semester: the female voice, sexuality, and marriage.   

Texts:  The Longman Anthology of Women’s Literature.  Ed. Mary K. DeShazer; Jane Eyre. Charlotte Bronte; Their Eyes Were Watching God.  Zora Neale Hurston.

Requirements:  TBA

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ENGL 2300-01: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Nina Leacock
MWF 12:00-12:50, HUM 205
Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study.  Requires permission of the department chair.  Not offered during summer session.

Description:  This challenging course will investigate critical approaches to literature associated with various contemporary or recent "schools of thought" (Marxism, New Historicism, psychoanalysis, feminism, queer theory, post-colonial studies, New Criticism, deconstruction, etc.).  While we will read some short excerpts from seminal texts associated with these schools (Marx, de Beauvoir, Derrida, etc.), more time will be devoted to studying approaches as they are practiced in recent criticism.  Our work in the first part of the semester will aim at helping each student assemble an individual "toolbox" of approaches he or she finds sympathetic and illuminating. In the second part of the semester, students will try out their "tools" in individual research projects. Our shared texts will include E.T.A. Hoffmann's short story "The Sandman," Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818 version), and a film (probably Ridley Scott's Blade Runner). 

Texts:  Culler, Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction; Shelley, Frankenstein (1818), stories and critical essays on electronic reserve; MLA Handbook.

Requirements:  Class participation, reading quizzes and exams, three short papers, oral presentation, a research project (including proposal, required drafts, editing workshops, a formal annotated bibliography, and a final documented research paper).

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ENGL 2300-02 & 03:  Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Barbara Brickman
Section 02:  TR 9:30AM-10:45AM, Humanities 225
Section 03: TR 5:30PM-6:45PM, Humanities 205

Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study.  Requires permission of the department chair.  Not offered during summer session.

Description:  As a prerequisite for upper-division English studies, this course provides an introduction to various methods of critical analysis. Students will be encouraged to develop and articulate interpretations from a variety of theoretical approaches and, hopefully, in the process of articulation, come to recognize how these perspectives broaden our understanding of diverse texts. While theoretical approaches such as reader-response or psychoanalytic criticism will provide the underlying methods of analysis, the central task of the course is the act of applying them to literary (and a few filmic) texts. Beginning with an introduction to the different approaches to critical analysis as applied to one literary text (Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw), we will transfer the skills learned in that introduction to a series of other texts (short stories, poems, and films) before concluding with the final research project.

Texts:  Henry James, The Turn of the Screw (Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism Edition); The Selected Writings of Edgar Allen Poe (Norton Critical Edition, Ed. G.R. Thompson); Jonathan Culler, Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction; and the MLA Handbook

Requirements:  3 shorter analytical essays, a research paper (including proposal, required drafts, peer reviews, and an annotated bibliography), one oral presentation/leading of class discussion, final exam.

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ENGL 3200-01: Creative Writing, Prof. Kelly Whiddon
MWF 12:00PM-12:50PM, TLC 1204
No more than two (2) 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.                 

Description:  Introduction to Writing Fiction and Poetry.  In this course, students will gain writing instruction from class sessions and from instructional texts and handouts, will critique contemporary fiction and poetry by acclaimed writers, and will use what they have learned in class and what they have learned from their readings to create their own poems and short stories.                                                         

On a day to day level, students’ tasks will consist of reading, writing, and workshopping (discussing each others’ work in the classroom for the purpose of improvement).  Students will learn to identify literary elements in the work of established writers and the work of their classmates.  Though tastes in fiction and poetry are arbitrary, in this class, there will be a certain standard for students to follow.  The goal will be to create fiction and poetry with the same qualities and strengths as the assigned readings—the type of writing appropriate for mainstream literary magazines or for well-respected commercial magazines such as The New Yorker or The Atlantic Monthly.  To be clear, students will not be expected to write as well as authors who regularly appear in these magazines, but they will be expected to use these as examples of “good” writing—as goals to work toward, and so, genre fiction (mystery, romance, thriller, childrens’, young adult, science fiction, etc.) or greeting card verse will not be represented or permitted.                                                                                                                                  

Texts:   Imaginative Writing: The Elements of Craft by Janet Burroway; Like Life by Lorrie Moore; The Best American Short Stories 2004, Editor: Lorrie Moore, Series Editor: Katrina Kenison; Delights and Shadows by Ted Kooser; Jack and Other Poems by Maxine Kumin.          

Requirements:  Creative work in poetry and fiction, journal entries, reading responses, critiques, formal reviews, at least one magazine submission, and a portfolio.    

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ENGL 3200-02W:  Creative Writing, Prof. Alison Umminger
MW 2:00PM-3:15PM, TLC 2237

No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.  May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:  This course provides an introduction to poetry and fiction writing, with attention to craft and revision. Using contemporary fiction and poetry anthologies, students will gain some basic familiarity with poets and short-story writers currently practicing their art. This should serve as an inspiration and springboard for their own writing, as good writers must also be good readers. The course will cover the building blocks of fiction and poetry: concrete language, dramatic situation, voice, meter, imagery, characterization, conflict, showing vs. telling, etc. Students will be writing and revising their own work weekly and should expect to produce a portfolio of work for review at the end of the semester.

Texts:  Bowman, Catherine, ed., Word of Mouth; Cassill, Oates, eds., The Norton Anthology of Contemporary Fiction; Addonizio, Laux, The Poet's Companion; Leguin, Ursula, Steering the Craft.

Requirements:  Each student will write 5-6 poems and revise them for the poetry section. For the fiction section, students will do a number of short exercises and write and revise one longer story (10-12 pages). There will also be a short paper and presentation on one of the poets in the Word of Mouth anthology. All students are required to be active participants in workshops.

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ENGL 3200-03W: Creative Writing, Prof. Chad Davidson
TR 12:30PM-1:45PM, TLC 1204

No more than two 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.  May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.Description:  This creative writing course will focus on the explorative act of writing to find a subject to write about. Along the way, we will learn how to make language and, by extension, the world strange again. In Craig Raine’s famous coinage, we will “defamiliarize” things. Though this is an introductory level course, expect to read an astonishing amount of poetry, fiction, essays, and criticism. Count on engaging in critical discussions regarding aesthetic principles and offering up your own writing for the betterment of the class. Ultimately the aim of the course is to enable you to access your imagination through writing, to judge critically works of literature from the vantage point of the artist, and to come to terms with both the beautiful and the sublime.

Texts:  Davis, Break It Down; Hummell, Poppy; McClatchy, ed, Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry; Shapard, ed., Sudden Fiction

Requirements:  daily readings and exercises, memorization of twenty lines of poetry, participation, written contributions to the workshop, a final portfolio of polished writing including a critical preface.

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ENGL 3400-01: Advanced Composition, Prof. Kelly Whiddon
 
Creative Nonfiction
MW 5:30-6:45, Pafford 307
No more than two (2) 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken for certification in Secondary English Education.                                                                                           

Description:  “Creative nonfiction is no oxymoron. Shorthand for an exciting genre that encompasses the hard-hitting honesty of journalism and the dramatic techniques that make fiction so compelling, creative nonfiction is just that: gripping stories that just happen to be true.” –These are lines from a literary magazine aptly title Creative Nonfiction.  This description accurately conveys what creative nonfiction is because it goes beyond the accustomed idea of simply “essay writing.”  It uses the words “hard-hitting,” “dramatic,” “compelling,” and “gripping.”  The writing you will read and do in this class will not be of the elementary and stale “What I did on my summer vacation” variety.  It will be you taking those moments from your life when you have said, “It was like something out of a book or a television show,” and actually turning those moments into written stories or taking those moments that may have seemed at the time to have little import and writing them so that you reveal the beauty or gravity or eccentricity in small things.  You will be telling nothing but the truth, but learning to tell that truth in a way that makes your experiences particularly intriguing.                                                                                                                        

In this course, students will gain instruction in writing from class sessions and from instructional texts and handouts, will critique contemporary creative nonfiction by acclaimed writers, and will use what they have learned in class and what they have learned from their readings to create their own creative nonfiction.                                                            

Texts:  Writing Creative Nonfiction: Instruction and Insights from Teachers of the Associated Writing Programs, Editors: Philip Gerard and Carolyn Forche; In Fact: The Best of Creative Nonfiction, Editors: Lee Gutkind and Annie Dillard; The Best American Essays 2004, Editors: Louis Menand and Robert Atwan. 

Requirements:  Creative nonfiction, journal entries, reading responses, critiques, at least one submission to a magazine, and a portfolio.

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ENGL 3405-01W & 02W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. Tiffany Armand
Section 1: TR 2:00PM-3:15PM, TLC 1109
Section 2: W 5:30PM-8:00PM, TLC1109

May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.
May be taken for certification in Secondary English Education.

Description: Professional careers require you to present and prove your skills before you can make significant advancements, and this is usually accomplished through written documentation. Therefore, even if you are not a professional writer, you will be a professional who writes. AProfessionals who can write well are usually more impressive than those who cannot.

This course will teach you how to write proper business letters, memos, email, and resumes. Then we will advance into proper summarization, document design, and instructional writing. Your final assignment will be a research project requiring you to write a proposal, a short report, and a long assessment/recommendation report.

This class requires you to be an already competent writer.

Text: Handbook of Technical Writing (Alred, Brusaw, and Oliu), occasional library reserve materials.

Requirements: The documents described above, several tests, and some small daily assignments. Punctual submission of assignments is crucial; if you have trouble meeting deadlines, this is not the course for you.

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ENGL 4/5106-01W:  Studies in Genre, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell
Fiction
MWF 11:00AM-11:50AM, Humanities 205

Required for Certification in Secondary English Education.  May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies.  Students may enroll up to three semesters.  May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:  As a genre, fiction may be said to present pretense as reality, thereby involving the reader in a temporary illusion. This course will consider the cultural and ideological function of this process. We will raise questions about what kinds of fictions arise from particular historical and cultural circumstances and consider the relationship between text and context. Some writers strive to close the gap between real and fictional worlds, producing fictions that mirror reality as closely as possible; others emphasize the constructed, textual nature of the worlds they have invented. We will read an eclectic assortment of novels that define and contest the boundaries of fiction, considering the relationship between form and content, representation and reality.

Texts:  Virginia Woolf, The Waves; Angela Carter, Nights at the Circus; Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient; Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist, Toni Morrison, Sula, Colson Whitehead, The Intuitionist; Marilynne Robinson, Housekeeping; some critical readings.

Requirements:  Short paper, longer research-based paper, response papers, final exam. Graduate students will be expected to do additional critical readings, write a longer research paper, and take a leading role in class discussions.

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ENGL 4/5106-02W:  Studies in Genre, Prof. Chad Davidson
Poetry
TR 3:30PM-4:45PM, Humanities 209

Required for Certification in Secondary English Education.  May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies.  Students may enroll up to three semesters.  May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:  This course will attempt to show how poetry means by looking at the ways poets use language in “defamiliarized” ways. We will look at poems from various historical and political contexts and try to examine how what we think of as “poetry” is in continual flux. Rather than create a taxonomy for poetry, then, we will instead be engaged in a more “evolutionary” or “evolving” process of viewing the poetic act. What does, say, the Anglo-Saxon poem “The Wanderer” have to do with a 20th-century poem such as Lowell’s “For the Union Dead”? More importantly, how do they influence and affect one another? Is it possible that the influence works in both directions, that Lowell’s poem influences a poem from the first millennium? And how finally do they affect us as readers? In addition to this trans-historical training, students will also look closely at a single contemporary collection of poems and situate that work within the framework constructed throughout the semester constructing.

Texts:  Pinsky, The Sounds of Poetry; Mason and Nims, eds., Western Wind; plus a course packet of poems, and the purchase of a single volume of poetry during the course.

Requirements:  participation, quizzes, mid-term and final exam, memorization of twenty-five lines of poetry, six critical responses (2 pages each), and a final research-based paper (8-10 pages). 

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ENGL 4/5108-01W:  Studies in the Novel, Prof. Debra MacComb
American
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM, Humanities 227

May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:  This course will focus on representative novels that have significantly influenced the development of the American novel with some discussion of precursor genres (spiritual and criminal biographies and autobiographies, travel writing, captivity narratives, romances, etc.).  This course will also examine different theoretical positions accounting for the nature and evolution of the genre and the changing relationship between the novel and the reading public.

Texts:  Rowson, Charlotte Temple; Cooper, The Pioneers; Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; James, The Portrait of a Lady; Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises; Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom!; Ellison, The Invisible Man; Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49; Morrison, Jazz; handouts on critical/theoretical/historical context.

Requirements:  Informed and regular class participation, short weekly reading questi0ns, three short (750 words) response papers, a research prospectus and documented essay (2500 words); cumulative final exam.

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ENGL 4/5109-01:  Film as Literature, Prof. Barbara Brickman
Cinematic Representations of Youth
TR 2:00PM-3:15PM, Humanities 203

May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Description:  Since at least the early- to mid-1950s in the United States, there has been one audience that has spent the most money on films, attended films with the greatest frequency, and garnered the undivided attention and adoration of Hollywood producers and studio heads alike: teenagers. In this course, we will examine adolescents as filmgoers, deconstruct the filmic texts sold to them, and attempt to theorize their special position as cinematic consumers and, sometimes, producers.

Seeing as the “teen film,” in fact, dates back to the early sound era, we will begin the course with a brief history of Hollywood’s attention to teens as subject matter and cinemagoers, which will be followed by an overview of genre studies in film criticism, especially as it pertains to this popular post-war genre. Finally, these historical and generic contexts will provide the groundwork for theoretical analyses of several films, preparing students for the kind of analysis expected in their final research papers. Filmic texts might include many or all of the following: Angels With Dirty Faces, Blackboard Jungle, Rebel Without a Cause, Girls Town, Splendor in the Grass, Easy Rider, Harold and Maude, A Clockwork Orange, Cooley High, American Graffiti, Halloween, Fast Times at Ridgemont High, The Breakfast Club, River’s Edge, Heathers, Boyz N the Hood, Heavenly Creatures, and Donnie Darko.

Texts:  Dick Hebdige, Subculture: The Meaning of Style; Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange (Norton Paper Fiction edition); Tim Corrigan, A Short Guide to Writing About Film (4th Ed).

Requirements:  weekly postings to the listserv, two short critical analysis papers, one exam, and a final research paper (proposal, drafts, peer review, and annotated bibliography required).

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ENGL 4/5125-01W: Colonial and Early American Literature, Prof. David W. Newton
MW 2:00PM-3:15PM, HUM 209

Fulfills the Literary History Requirement in American Literature I.  May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:   While it is often characterized as an era populated by dour-faced Puritans and sermonic texts, Colonial and Early American literature was instead an era of dynamic cultural encounters and transitions, which radically altered Europe and the New World.  Our reading will reflect the diversity of literary works and cultural perspectives from this 300-year period and will include exploration narratives by women and men, Native American literature, and women novelists from the early republic. Among the topics we will consider: 1) how early exploration narratives shaped the European vision of the Americas and were used to translate the New World to European audiences; 2) the transforming experience of first encounters with the geographical landscape of the Americas and with people from other cultures; 3) the construction of the New World as a constantly evolving fictional text out of which early explorers and colonists struggled to fashion new personal and social identities; 4) the textual and interpretive challenge of reconstructing early Native American oral narratives; 5) the evolution of gender roles during the Colonial and New Republic eras; and 6) the role of language and writing in the era of exploration and in the formation of the new nation.

Texts:  Mary Rowlandson, A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration; Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano; Susanna Rowson, Charlotte Temple; Ben Franklin, The Autobiography; Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar Huntley; Lydia Maria Child, Hobomok and Other Writings on Indians; Tabitha Tenny, Female Quixotism. Other shorter works (exploration narratives, poems, and short stories) will be assigned from a course reading packet, electronic (online) editions, or placed on reserve.

Requirements:  For undergraduates, active participation in class discussions, reading quizzes, 2 short response papers, midterm and final essay exams, and a 8-10 page research paper (with proposal). For graduate students, all of the requirements listed above as well as an annotated bibliography (min. 10 sources), and a more extensive 12-15 page research paper.  WAC Requirement:  This is a writing intensive course. Your response papers and other assignments involve writing-to-learn activities in which you will be using the writing exercise itself to come to terms with the material we have read. ALL of these written assignments should conform to the standards of college-level, academic writing. By successfully completing this course, you can receive WAC (Writing Across the Curriculum) credit toward graduation. The goals of WAC are to encourage students to use writing as a way to learn, to show students how to write effectively in their disciplines and to improve students' writing skills. All students majoring in disciplines in the School of Arts and Sciences are required to satisfy the WAC requirements for WAC to graduate: These requirements include at least two 3000/4000 level W courses for a total of 6 hours with at least 3 of these hours in the major. Additional WAC certification is also available. See the current undergraduate catalog for details.

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ENGL 4/5130-01W:  18th Century British Literature, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell
MWF 1:00PM-1:50PM, Humanities 227

May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:  The eighteenth century was a period of flux in Britain; the rise of the middle class threatened to reshape established notions of social identity, while definitions of gender and sexuality were arguably both fluid and contested. The same diversity is reflected in literary trends of the period, which ranged from formal poetic wit to the frank bawdiness of restoration and eighteenth-century drama to the emergence of a new, unwieldy, still-developing form, the early novel. This course will trace the shifting ideologies of the eighteenth century through representations of class, gender, and society in a variety of representative texts, paying particular attention to the concept of “virtue,” which is alternately rewarded, abandoned, celebrated, derided, questioned and ultimately defined in these works.

Texts:  Moll Flanders, Daniel Defoe; Pamela, Samuel Richardson; Evelina, Fanny Burney; Gulliver’s Travels, Jonathan Swift; Essay on Man and Other Poems, Alexander Pope; She Stoops to Conquer, Oliver Goldsmith, The Rover, Aphra Behn; selected poetry (handouts or reserve).

Requirements:  Active participation, quizzes, oral presentations, two essays (one a longer research-based paper), responses, final exam. Graduate students will be expected to do additional critical readings, write a longer research paper, and take a leading role in class discussions.

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ENGL 4/5155-01W: 20th Century British Literature, Prof. Angela Insenga
MWF 2:00PM-2:50PM, Humanities 225

May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:  “The House that Modernism Built” After "eminent Victorian" Sir Leslie Stephen's death in 1904, Virginia, Vanessa, and Thoby Stephen repaired to 46 Gordon square in Bloomsbury. In a 1921 address, Virginia Woolf remembered this exodus from her childhood home at Hyde Park Gate saying, "We were full of experiments and reforms. We were going to do without table napkins, we were to have large supplies of Bromo instead; we were going to paint; to write; to have coffee after dinner instead of at nine o' clock. Everything was going to be new; everything was going to be different; everything was on trial." In their quest to "make it new," the Bloomsberries and other artists of the early to mid-twentieth century put into play revolutionary artistic principles and created art objects reflective of their own historicity. Our course will focus on the artist-architects who built the Modernist era. Up for discussion will be both "major" and "minor" texts in multiple genres and the socio-economic and political positioning found in them.  We will also investigate the effects of World War One on artists’ work, the creation and application of key aesthetic principles across genre boundary lines, the advent of modern psychoanalytical theory, and artistic renderings that focus on Britain’s practice of imperialism.

Texts:  Appignasesi, Richard; Garratt, Chris; and Rodrigues, Chris. Eds. Introducing Modernism. Conrad, Joseph. Heart of Darkness. Forster, E.M. Howard's End. Joyce, James. Dubliners. Lawrence, D.H. Sons and Lovers. Mansfield, Katherine. The Garden Party and Other Stories. Synge, J.M. Riders to the Sea. Ward, Candace. Ed. World War One British Poets: Brooke, Owen, Sassoon, Rosenberg and              Others. Woolf, Virginia. Between the Acts. Yeats, W.B. Easter, 1916, and Other Poems.

Requirements: 10-15 minute presentation, Eight two-page reading responses,  Annotated bibliography, Critical analysis essay (10-12 pages). Graduate students will write a longer essay (12-15 pages), give a longer presentation (15-25 minutes), and create a longer annotated bibliography.

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ENGL 4/5160-01W:  20th Century American Literature, Prof. Joshua Masters
TR 12:30PM-1:45PM, Humanities 206

May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:  This course, subtitled “Modern American Fiction in Black and White,” will explore the myths, themes, and political controversies that have shaped the development of modern American fiction, with a particular eye towards the troubled status of racial identity in the American imagination. As we survey such literary movements as Realism, Modernism, and Post-modernism, we will pay attention to the way that new literary forms and movements responded to dramatic social and historical events and shifting cultural attitudes about race, particularly our attitudes towards the categories of “whiteness” and “blackness.” We will also consider the role of American fiction in shaping those attitudes. The works we will read demonstrate a wide a range of perspectives and narrative techniques, and each suggests new ways to imagine the status of the individual, the boundaries of nationhood, and the meaning of such categories as race, ethnicity, class, and gender in America. While examining the works’ shared interests in history, identity, and human agency, we will also bear in mind the unique nature of the individual writers and their texts.

Requirements:  Students are expected to complete the day’s reading assignment in advance and come to class prepared to participate in discussion. Students must maintain a passing quiz average, write several short papers, a 1500-word essay, a 2500-word essay, and a final exam.

Texts (In order of appearance):  Twain’s Pudd’nhead Wilson, Nella Larsen’s Passing, Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man, Flannery O’Connor’s The Complete Stories, James Baldwin’s Going to Meet the Man, Toni Morrison’s Paradise, and Russell Banks’s Rule of the Bone.

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ENGL 4/5180-01W:  Studies in Regional Literature, Prof. Randy Hendricks
Southern Literature:  The Heroic Past in Southern Fiction
MW 3:30PM-4:45PM, Humanities 209

May be repeated for credit as topic varies.  May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:  We will begin with fiction written soon after the Civil War that contributed to the creation of a mythic interpretation of the antebellum South and helped establish a Southern heroic narrative pattern that took many forms.  Whether they followed the career of the plantation beau or belle or traced the adventures of the frontier or tall-tale hero, these narratives left a standard and a legend that later Southern writers would respond to in a variety of ways.   Most of our effort will then be concentrated on fiction of a later era when the need to “claw out” of desperate economic and cultural circumstances and a response to modernist aesthetics sparked conflict with the Southern heroic order reflected through both tragic and comic modes.  Though several other themes and aesthetic issues will be explored, this response to the past will anchor our discussions.

Texts:  William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom!; Katherine Anne Porter, The Collected Stories; Robert Penn Warren, All the King’s Men; Walker Percy, The Moviegoer; Eudora Welty, The Ponder Heart; Flannery O’Connor, The Complete Stories; Lee Smith, Oral History;  Alice Walker, Everyday Use (includes critical materials); and a course packet of shorter readings.

Requirements:  Rigorous preparation for class and participation in discussions, two short papers (4-5 pages), a midterm and a comprehensive final, one longer research paper (10-12 pages).  Graduate students will, in lieu of the final exam, write a more substantial research paper grounded in an appropriate critical context.  They will also critique a draft of another graduate student’s paper.

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ENGL 4/5188-01W: Individual Authors, Dr. Nina Leacock
Jane Austen
MW 2:00PM-3:15PM, Humanities 205

May be repeated for credit as topic varies.  Shakespeare may be taken for up to six (6) hours, if topic varies, with department chair’s permission.  May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:  Who is your Jane Austen?  A subversive writer whose biting satires exposed the harsh social inequalities of her time?  Or a conservative whose celebration of England and especially its gentry worked to suppress questioning of a society based on imperialism abroad and hierarchies of class and gender at home?  A spinster lady, referred to condescendingly but also lovingly as "Aunt Jane" by critics well into the twentieth century?  Or a novelist whose unparalleled technical mastery made her one of the first women to force entry into the British literary canon?  A deeply philosophical thinker whose work offers a sustained meditation on the nature of modern love?  Or an entertainer who brought to perfection the art of dazzling her readers with pretty surfaces?

This course will offer an opportunity to compare and explore our reading experiences of a set of texts that have inspired widely varied reactions in the nearly two centuries since Austen began publishing.  We will supplement our exploration with critical readings including Sir Walter Scott's early acknowledgements, David Simpson's mid-nineteenth-century depiction of Austen as an undercover Platonist, and the essay from Edward Said's Culture and Imperialism that started a revolution in Austen criticism.  We will also take time for a lighter consideration of Austen's recent popularity, especially among filmmakers.

Texts:  Northanger Abbey, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, Lady Susan, all in Oxford World Classics paperback editions, and selections from Austen's juvenilia on electronic reserve.  We will also view the controversial 1999 film version of Mansfield Park.  Secondary material will be made available on electronic reserve.

Requirements:  Active class participation, three essays (including required drafting and workshops) midterm and final.

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ENGL 4/5188-02W: Individual Authors, Prof. Gregory Fraser
Elizabeth Bishop
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM, Humanities 212

May be repeated for credit as topic varies.  Shakespeare may be taken for up to six hours, if topic varies, with department chair’s permission.  May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement. 

Description: Contemporary approaches to Elizabeth Bishop often view her poetry on a threshold between modernist and postmodernist aesthetics. This course will begin with a study of the dominant philosophical and artistic assumptions of “the modern” and “the postmodern,” and attempt to situate Bishop’s work on the shifting borders of two traditions and historical contexts. In a primarily discussion-based format, the class will inspect Bishop’s subtle critiques of patriarchal violence and the oppression of women, her interest in the semiotics of the body as a map of ideological inscriptions, and her explorations of the intersections between race and gender. We will also explore various intertextual aspects of her work—her revisions, for example, of Marianne Moore and Emily Dickinson, and her work’s ambivalent relationship to the confessional movement and the poetry of figures such as Robert Lowell and Sylvia Plath. The course will survey Bishop’s collected poems through the lenses of present-day literary theories (including deconstruction, new historicism, race theory, post-feminism, gender studies, and queer theory), and will also delve into Bishop’s prose and letters.

Texts: The Complete Poems, 1927-1979, by Elizabeth Bishop; The Collected Prose, by Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Giroux (Editor).

Requirements: Students will read and summarize at least five scholarly essays on Bishop’s writing, compose two short analyses of at least five pages in length, and write a final researched study of at least ten pages. (The requirements for graduate-level credit will reflect an appropriate degree of additional rigor.)

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ENGL 4/5210-01W: Advanced Creative Writing, Prof. Alison Umminger
Fiction
MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM, TLC 2237

Prerequisite: ENGL 3200.  May be repeated for credit as topic varies.  May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:  This class will look at the short story from a writerly perspective, and require students to complete and workshop at least two longer stories (10-20 pages) along with a number of weekly responses. As a craft text, we will be using John Gardener’s The Art of Fiction. We will begin the class by reading such masters of the genre as Updike and O’Connor, then turn our attention to more recent collections, such as Denis Johnson’s Jesus’ Son and Dana Johnson’s Break Any Woman Down. We will be reading a number of the excellent stories from the recent anthology The Contemporary American Short Story. You will develop your skills as active readers and writers, with attention not only to craft and form, but to thematic content and relevance. I expect active engagement with and respect for the work of fellow students, and some familiarity with fiction writing. This is primarily a workshop class, but active reading produces good writing, thus the longer reading list.

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ENGL 4295-01W:  Reading and Literature in Secondary English Classrooms, Prof. Tom Dvorske
Young Adult Literature
TR 5:30PM-6:45PM, Pafford 208

Required for certification in Secondary English Education.  Cross-listed with SEED 4295.  May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:  In this course, we will explore the contemporary experience of young-adults as expressed through fiction and graphic novels.  Drawing on reader-response theory and social-constructivist issues in childhood studies, we will examine how these seemingly simple texts written for middle and high-school age students register literary, dialogic, visual, and social complexities.  In context of this cultural and theoretical framework, we will also bear in mind the practical element of this course, designed to assist in the preparation of prospective teachers of English at the high-school level by exploring literacy instruction using young adult literature in its own right and as a bridge to classic literature. (Cross-listed with SEED 4295.)

Texts:  Katherine Arnoldi, The Amazing True Story of a Teenage Single Mom; Daniel Clowes, Ghost World; Will Eisner, A Contract with God; Scott McCloud, Understanding Comics; Terry Moore, Strangers in Paradise: High School; Francesca Lia Block, Weetzie Bat; Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower; Brock Cole, The Facts Speak for Themselves; Robert Cormier, We All Fall Down; Chris Crutcher, Chinese Handcuffs; S.E. Hinton, The Outsiders; Robert Lipsyte, The Contender; Jess Mowry, Way Past Cool; Han Nolan, Dancing on the Edge; Rob Thomas, Rats Saw God; Virginia Euwer Wolff, Make Lemonade; Paul Zindel, The Pigman; Course-packet and reserve materials.

Requirements:  reading journal, reading responses, book reviews, tests, research paper, presentations.

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ENGL 4/5300-01: Studies in the English Language, Prof. David W. Newton
English Grammar
MW 3:30PM-4:45PM, TLC 1116

Required for certification in Secondary English Education.

Description:  In this course, we will explore the structure or grammar of the English language and work toward understanding the principles or rules that make it work.  This course is primarily designed for English majors who seek to improve the grammatical proficiency of their writing and for future teachers at the secondary and college level. However, this course also has applications for students entering business and industry, science and medical fields, law and politics, media and public relations, or anyone who recognizes the essential human value of language and who understands how the ability to use language contributes to personal and professional success in life.  After all, when you are talking to friends, asking someone out on a date, debating sports or politics, buying clothes at the mall, or writing a paper, you are using the structures and principles of English grammar, even when your sentences are not grammatical! However, knowing a language and knowing about the language are different kinds of knowledge. Even the ability to speak grammatically correct sentences in no way guarantees that a speaker knows enough about English to explain what makes those sentences grammatical. This course is designed to help you achieve that knowledge. We will refer frequently to Standard English, and, certainly, one of the benefits of this course is that it will help you refine your written and verbal language skills. However, this is not simply a course about grammatical correctness; instead, this course is designed to help you understand how the English language functions, what structures and rules are behind the sentence constructions that you and others create every day.  To accomplish this task, we will learn some basic linguistic and grammatical concepts, and we will learn how to analyze (and diagram) different sentence constructions.  We will also learn how elements of the language (verbs, nouns, sentence structure, pronouns, etc.) emerged and changed over time to create the language we use today. 

Texts:  Calderonello, Martin, and Blair. Grammar for Language Arts Teachers. Longman, 2003; Maimon and Peritz, A Writer’s Resource: A Handbook for Writing and Research. McGraw-Hill, 2003. 

Requirements:  For undergraduates, active participation, four exams (a midterm and final included in this number), and in-class and homework assignments. For graduate students, all of the items above, as well as an annotated bibliography and a research essay on grammar and pedagogy.

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ENGL 4/5310-01W: Studies in Literary Theory, Prof. Michael Crafton
History of Criticism and Critical Theory
T 5:30PM-8:00PM, Humanities 209

Prerequisite: ENGL 2300.  May be repeated for credit as topic varies.  May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:  Arguably one of the most influential critics of the second half of the twentieth century, Northrop Frye, asserted in one of his most accessible books, The Educated Imagination, that one does not have a choice in having an imagination.  You have one whether you like it or not; your consciousness, your politics, your love-life is affected by that imagination.  You do however have a choice to educate your imagination by studying literature and the arts.  I would make a claim about critical theory.  You don’t have a choice about employing and being employed by your critical faculties, but you can understanding something of how it works, how it has worked in the past, how it can be tricked, and what it can deliver and a little of what it cannot.  In this course, we will spend for the first several weeks reading and attempting to understand some of the standard texts of critical theory or aesthetics, theorists such as Plato, Aristotle, Longinus, Horace, Cicero, Augustine, Aquinas, Dante, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche.  Later we will look at modern criticism through the lens of a particular problem or question: the subject, the author, the text, the referent, the body, the subaltern, or the differend.

Texts:  Vincent B. Leitch, ed., The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. Norton, 2001 (ISBN: 0393974294).  Jonathan Culler,  Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction.  Oxford University Press, 2000 (ISBN: 019285383X).

Requirements:  Active engagement in class discussion, two short essays, a longer, research-based essay, oral presentation, final exam.

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ENGL 4384-01W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Nina Leacock
Cultural Contact in English Literature
MW 5:30PM-6:45PM, TLC 2237

Required for all English majors.  Cannot be taken until ENGL 1101, 1102 and core area F have been completed with a minimum passing grade of C.  A minimum of 18 hours of upper-level English courses must also have been completed.  Requires permission of the department chair.  Not offered during the summer session.  May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:  Reading is a cultural practice.  As critic Gabrielle Schwab has argued, one function of this practice is to provide readers with "an experience of otherness."  On one level, literature helps readers accept and engage cultural differences that otherwise might seem too strange to be meaningful to them.  On another level, literary language "defamiliarizes" their own culture, and helps them notice internal differences they might otherwise gloss over.  All literature can thus be understood as a kind of fictional or imaginary ethnography, and reading as a place of cultural contact.

Senior seminars offer students an opportunity to reflect on and express their experiences as English majors as they develop individual projects and work collaboratively on an anthology. This seminar will invite students to discuss their projects in the framework of a theory of cultural contact, which Gregory Bateson defined as including not only (1) contacts between different national or ethnic cultures, but also (2) contact between significant groups within a culture, and (3) the process by which young people are initiated into their own culture.  This framework is deliberately broad, so that students will have the widest possible choice of topics for their projects.

Texts:  Shakespeare, The Tempest; Ngugi, A Grain of Wheat; as well as a set of critical texts on electronic reserve at the library.

Requirements:  Active class participation, two short papers, oral presentation, and research project (including proposal, required drafts, editing workshops and formal peer editing responses, a formal annotated bibliography, and a final documented research paper of 15-16 pages).

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ENGL 4384-02W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Lisa Crafton
Madwoman in the Attic:  Ghosts, Witches, and Tricksters in Literature and Film
TR 9:30AM-10:45 AM, TLC 2237

Required for all English majors.  Cannot be taken until ENGL 1101, 1102 and core area F have been completed with a minimum passing grade of C.  A minimum of 18 hours of upper-level English courses must also have been completed.  Requires permission of the department chair.  Not offered during the summer session.  May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:  This capstone course, a culmination of study in the English major, allows students to examine a critical/theoretical issue within the discipline and use their coursework and literary interests to choose a research project which will become part of a published anthology of essays from the class. This semester, we will explore the ways in which trickster figures (representing madness, witchcraft, or the supernatural) function in literary texts.  In virtually all cultures, tricksters (ubiquitous shape-shifters who dwell on borders, at crossroads, and between worlds) are both folk heroes and wanderers on the edges of the community, at once marginal and central to the culture. Tricksters challenge the status quo and disrupt perceived boundaries, which is why Smith argues for their particular functions in contemporary ethnic American writers. Using Smith’s Writing Tricksters:  Mythic Gambols in Ethnic American Literature, we will focus on the central functions of these characters in the construction of identity and culture. We will apply these arguments to race and gender in Morrison’s Sula and Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior and extend the argument in terms of how imagination and social rebellion lead to madness (or the construction of madness) in Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper and the film Girl Interrupted.  Finally, we may ponder how the narrative forms themselves act as trickster narratives for readers. Student projects may be on any literary/filmic text (British or American) in which ghosts, witches, or madwomen/madmen figure in the construction of identity within a given culture.

Texts:  Smith, Writing Tricksters:  Mythic Gambols in Ethnic American Literature, Kingston, The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood among Ghosts, Morrison, Sula, Gilman, The Yellow Wallpaper, and film Girl Interrupted

Requirements:  Class discussion, individual and group oral reports, two response essays, substantive research project, including prospectus, abstract, and annotated bibliography.

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ENGL 6115-01: Seminar in British Literature II, Prof. Maria Doyle
Staging the Nation: Theater and Modern Irish Identity
W 5:30PM-8:00PM, TLC 1204

Requires permission of Director of Graduate Studies.

Description:  When Ireland’s drive for political independence from Britain stalled at the end of the 19th century, the arts, particularly the theater, became a potent space for the exploration of an autonomous cultural identity. Irish audiences, tired of the melodramatic vision of themselves popularized on Victorian London’s stages, became hungry for positive self-images and came to see the Abbey Theater in Dublin as an important space in which to define themselves anew. At times, Ireland’s newly formed national theater offered up exactly that, but on more than one occasion, the artistic goals of the Abbey’s directors, who wished to create a theatrical movement that would be valued as an aesthetic and intellectual enterprise rather than as a propagandistic tool, brought the theater into conflict--sometimes violent, chair-throwing conflict--with its audience. The public nature of the stage, the close proximity between the recipients of the artistic image and those involved in its creation, made it a powerful, but also a potentially volatile, means of constructing a national self.

Benedict Anderson defines nationalism as the drive to create an “imagined community,” and this course will examine the role of performance in this process in 20th-century Ireland. Exploring theatrical uses of myth, local dialect and historical events, the course will address how these ideas have evolved in response to audiences’ expectations of dramatic genre and performance style and to the various pressures exerted by the changing currents of modern Irish history – from the struggle for independence to the outbreak of the Troubles in Northern Ireland and the more recent Europe-centered focus of the Irish Republic.

Texts:  Modern Irish Drama (including plays by W.B. Yeats, George Bernard Shaw, John Millington Synge, Brendan Behan and Brian Friel) and individual plays by Marina Carr (Portia Coughlan), Seamus Heaney (The Cure at Troy), Sebastian Barry (Prayers of Sherkin), Frank McGuinness (Observe the Sons of Ulster) and John B. Keane (The Field); critical essays will provide background on Irish theater history as well as theoretical approaches to the construction of nationalism, postcolonial identity and performativity.

Requirements:  Two short response essays, one 15-minute oral presentation, 15-20 page research paper preceded by a proposal, active participation in discussion.

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ENGL 6385-01:  Seminar in Special Topics, Prof. Alison Umminger  
American Literature at Mid-Century:  Race and Sexuality at a Crossroads
M 5:30PM-8:00PM, TLC 1204

Requires permission of the director of graduate studies.

Description:  This seminar will look at one of the more nebulous times in American literary history, the 1940s and 1950s, a time when race and gender roles underwent revolutionary transformations in America and in American literature.  These texts point to rapidly changing ideas about race, gender, and sexuality.  While we will also look at the movement from modern to postmodern in the literary (and cultural) landscape, and be attentive to the “beats,” we will search for other ways to define this transitional moment in American literary history.

Texts:  Lilian Smith:  Killers of the Dream.  Frantz Fanon:  Black Skin, White Masks.  Carson McCullers:  A Clock Without Hands.  Jack Kerouac:  On the Road.  James Baldwin:  Giovanni’s Room.  Anne Petry:  The Street.  Gwendolyn Brooks:  Annie Allen.  Ralph Ellison:  Invisible Man.  Jane Bowles:  Two Serious Ladies.  Chester Himes:  If He Hollers, Let Him Go.  William Faulkner:  A Light in August. Zora Neale Hurston: Seraph on the Suwanne.  Flannery O’Connor:  A Good Man is Hard to Find.  Norman Mailer:  “The White Negro.”  Tennessee Williams:  A Streetcar Named Desire.  Selected critical readings.

Requirements:  Weekly short response papers; oral report on a theoretical or critical text; individual research project including prospectus, annotated bibliography, final research paper, and oral presentation.

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XIDS 2100-03: Arts and Ideas: The Creative Process, Prof. Chad Davidson
TR 9:30AM-10:45AM, Humanities 227

Required for Creative Writing Minor.  Prerequisites:  ENGL 1101 and 1102.  May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description:  The object of this course is to familiarize you with three distinctive ways in which artists from a range of cultural and historical backgrounds make sense (and art) of the world. Beginning with a trans-media study of the contrary artistic concepts of “order” and “chaos,” the class will then look at three methods by which artists marry or synthesize those contraries. Methods include “the aesthetic” (privileging the artistic medium itself), “the pragmatic” (privileging the purpose behind the artistic expression), and “the expressive” (privileging the artist in the act of creating). Using Csikszentmihalyi’s critical study of the creative mind and processes in tandem with two first-person accounts by Hugo and Shahn, students will work towards constructing a critical discourse regarding the nature of the creative process and test course theories on their own artistic creations.

Texts:  Csikszentmihalyi, Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention; Hugo, The Triggering Town; Shahn, The Shape of Content; plus an artist’s biography of your choosing.

Requirements:  Quizzes, daily readings and exercises, attendance at five cultural events, final creative project with critical preface, midterm, and final.

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XIDS 2100-05: Arts and Ideas:  Photography and Short Stories, Prof. Patricia Reinhard
TR 2:00PM-3:15PM, TLC 1116

Prerequisites:  ENGL 1101 and 1102.  May count for credit in Core Area C

Description:  Photography and Short Stories will study the dialogic relationship between photographic images and short stories. Fraternal twins separated at birth, the modern short story and the photographic image have flourished, one form shadowing the other, since their origins in the mid-nineteenth century. This course will analyze the synergistic effect created by photographic images and short fiction when they are scrutinized through the dual lenses of perspective and point of view. Both disciplines present sketches, slices of perspective that concentrate on a single or unique effect. In their uses and manipulations of point of view, both disciplines appear infinitely malleable and wildly flexible as artists continually craft and redefine the ways in which a story or an image can be “told.” Our study of the synergy between short fiction and image will begin with Eudora Welty, an artist who serves as the literal and physical embodiment of the interpenetration of these two disciplines. As a young woman, Welty worked for the Works Progress Administration in a job that allowed her access to places and people throughout her home state. Before she wrote, Welty photographed—recorded on film her sojourn through Mississippi’s eighty-two counties. Closely reading a Welty short story and several of her images will enable students to formulate a set of terms and concepts that are shared by both disciplines. Welty’s fiction and images, along with these specific terms and concepts descriptive of both disciplines, provide the springboard  to all that follows—dozens of photographic images, thirteen stories, and Susan Sontag’s On Photography and Regarding the Pain of Others.. 

Texts:  Susan Sontag’s On Photography and Regarding the Pain of Others; course packet of short stories, an online portfolio of photographic images, and selected essays on photography.

Requirements:  Students will write three essays on topics derived from the themes and concepts in the texts. These essays will be approximately 1000 words and will require secondary sources. Weekly informal response writing intended to generate ideas and concepts explored in greater depth and detail in the essays will be assigned. This writing is designed as write to learn exercises and offers students a free space in which to begin exploring the texts. Students will select an essay, article, photographer, or series of images and present a report on it to the class. A midterm and a final exam.

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XIDS 2100-07:  Arts and Ideas: Representing American Women, Prof. Lucy Curzon
Suffragettes to Slayers: Representing American Women in the Twentieth Century
TR 12:30PM-1:45PM, Humanities 134

 Prerequisites:  ENGL 1101 and 1102.  May count for credit in Core Area C

Description:  Through the analysis of representations in literature, music, film and television, and the visual arts, this course examines the range of identities (and associated gender ideologies) connected with American women from the early twentieth century to present day.  Our studies will investigate historical figures such as “the New Woman,”  “the suffragette,” and “the flapper,” as well as more contemporary ones, including Xena Warrior Princess and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

Texts:  Modern American Women: A Documentary History, 2nd Edition by Susan Ware (McGraw-Hill, 2002; ISBN 0072418206). Bitches, Bimbos, and Ballbreakers: The Guerrilla Girls' Illustrated Guide to Female Stereotypes (Penguin Books 2003) ISBN: 0142001015. Articles and/or excerpts from other works as handouts/PDFs

Requirements:  Mid-term and final exam, one analytical paper and presentation, listserv responses, consistent participation in class, and attendance at five cultural events.

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Last updated April 17, 2004