Footnotes - Dept of English Newsletter for Students UWG Home Page




Visit the UWG English Department Website

Visit UWG BanWeb to Check Course Availability
Footnotes ArchivesCurrent Issue
b

Spring Courses, 2005

Skip down the page to view the following courses offered during the Spring 2005 term:

ENGL 2050: Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Everyday Life, Profs. Lori Lipoma and John Sturgis

ENGL 2110-01: World Literature, Prof. Tom Dvorske

ENGL 2110-02: World Literature, Prof. Joshua Masters

ENGL 2110-25H: World Literature, Prof. Robert Snyder

ENGL 2120-01: British Literature, Prof. Fran Chalfant

ENGL 2120-02: British Literature, Prof. Prasanta Chakravarty

ENGL 2120-25H: British Literature, Prof. Maria Doyle

ENGL 2120-26H: British Literature, Prof. Nina Leacock

ENGL 2130-01: American Literature, Prof. Debra MacComb

ENGL 2130-02: American Literature, Prof. Mitzi McFarland

ENGL 2130-25H: American Literature, Prof. Jane Hill

ENGL 2130-26H: American Literature, Prof. Alison Umminger

ENGL 2180-01: Studies in African-American Literature, Prof. Joshua Masters

ENGL 2190-01: Studies in Literature by Women, Prof. Bonnie Jett Adams

ENGL 2300-01: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Maria Doyle

ENGL 2300-02: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Lisa Crafton

ENGL 2300-03: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Andrew Hartley

ENGL 3200-01W: Creative Writing, Prof. Tom Dvorske

ENGL 3200-02: Creative Writing, Prof. Teresa Jones

ENGL 3200-03W: Creative Writing, Prof. Todd Rudy

ENGL 3400-01W: Advanced Composition: Creative Nonfiction, Prof. Todd Rudy

ENGL 3405-01W and 3405-02W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. Tiffany Armand

ENGL 4/5106-01W: Studies in Genre, Prof. Gregory Fraser

ENGL 4/5106-02: Studies in Genre, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell

ENGL 4/5109-01: Film as Literature, Prof. Andrew Hartley

ENGL 4/5115-01: Renaissance Literature, Prof. Andrew Hartley

ENGL 4/5145-01: Victorian Literature, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell

ENGL 4/5150-01W: American Realism and Naturalism, Prof. Debra MacComb

ENGL 4/5160-01W: Twentieth-Century American Literature, Prof. Randy Hendricks

ENGL 4/5170-01: African-American Literature, Prof. Stacy Boyd

ENGL 4/5180-01W: Studies in Regional Literature, Prof. Debra MacComb

ENGL 4/5188-01W: Individual Authors, Prof. Maria Doyle

ENGL 4/5188-02W: Individual Authors: Edgar Allan Poe, Prof. David Newton

ENGL 4/5210-01: Advanced Creative Writing
, Prof. Alison Umminger

ENGL 4/5210-02W: Advanced Creative Writing, Prof. Gregory Fraser

ENGL 4/5300-01: Studies in the English Language, Prof. David Newton

ENGL 4384-01W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Randy Hendricks

ENGL 4384-02W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Robert Snyder

ENGL 6115-01: Seminar in British Literature II, Prof. Lisa Crafton

ENGL 6120-01: Seminar in American Literature II, Dr. Randy Hendricks

ENGL 6385-01: Seminar in Special Topics, Prof. Nina Leacock

XIDS 2100 01: Arts and Ideas: Special Topics, Prof. Lori Lipoma

XIDS 2100-04: Arts and Ideas: Special Topics, Prof. Patricia Reinhard

XIDS 2100-09: Mapping Modernism(s), Prof. Angela Insenga

 

<< back to list

ENGL 2050: Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Everyday Life, Profs. Lori Lipoma and John Sturgis
Section 01 (Lipoma): MWF 11:00-11:50, PAF 308
Section 02 (Lipoma) MWF 12:00-12:50, PAF 308
Section 03 (Sturgis) TR 9:30-10:45, PAF 307
Section 04 (Sturgis) TR 12:30-1:45, PAF 307
May count for credit in Core Area B. Same as THEA 2050.

Description: Effective communicators are more productive, have enhanced career opportunities, enjoy more fulfilling relationships, earn more respect, and have more fun! The good news is that you already have the tools you need to become a great communicator; it’s just a matter of learning how to use them consciously and masterfully . . . in other words, learning how to “self-stage.”

In Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Everyday Life, we will study and practice practical communication skills—creativity, quick thinking, risk taking, lateral thinking, active listening, subtext mastery, self-awareness—and apply them to virtually every interaction you encounter outside the classroom: One-on-One Conversations, Public Presentation, Debate and Argumentation, Conflict Resolution and Confrontation Skills, Stress Management, Team Building, and Impression Management. By the end of the semester, students will have had first-hand experience in all of these areas, and, more importantly, will know exactly how to continue honing and perfecting those skills long after.

Requirements: Formal solo presentations, group projects and presentations, panel discussions/debates, vocabulary-building exercises, role-playing and improvisation exercises, journaling, and, of course, active, informed participation in each class session.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 2110-01: World Literature, Prof. Tom Dvorske
MWF 12:00–12:50, HUM 206
Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: Whether through a hero’s noble journey or the fantastical adventures of a disturbed mind, literature from around the world sings of our basic human needs and desires. This survey of world literature shows that each text attempts to tell the story of a people. We will explore how texts grow from previous texts and cultural interactions. In fact, one might say that the story of world literature is the story of intercultural exchange, where stories are built upon, revised, adapted, translated, interpreted from one culture to the next, each taking it and making it their own in unique ways. In this course we will survey some of the world’s best known literature, paying attention to its historical, cultural, and geographical framework as well as how cultural interaction makes for intertextuality and literary tradition.

Texts: Maynard Mack, ed., The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces (single volume edition). Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote. (trans Burton Raffel; Norton ed., 1995).

Requirements: Two papers, weekly reading responses, midterm and final exams.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 2110-02: World Literature, Prof. Joshua Masters
T 5:30-8:00, HUM 206
Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: This survey of World Literature will focus on the theme of travel in imaginative literature, from early epic to the post-colonial novel. We will explore the dominant myths and themes that attend narratives of travel, and we will examine how travel has shaped the literary imagination, political goals, and social values of a variety of cultures. What are the central motives that drive us to travel? Why do some people choose to wander the earth, while others need the imagined permanence of a stationary “home?” What is the relationship between home and away, here and there, self and other? Most importantly, why has much of the world’s imaginative literature developed within the context of travel, adventure, exploration, and conquest, from Odysseus’s trials on the road home, to Moses’s quest for a homeland, to Arthur’s search for the Grail, to Keruac’s desire simply to be “on the road”? These questions, and many more, will fuel our own literary explorations and wanderings this semester.

Texts: The Odyssey by Homer, selections from the Old and New Testament, The Aeneid by Virgil, Dante’s Inferno, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Flaubert in Egypt, Ngugi’s A Grain of Wheat, and Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony.

Requirements: Students are expected to complete the day’s reading assignment in advance and come to class prepared to participate in discussion. In addition to your attendance, preparation, and intellectual curiosity, you are also encouraged to discuss your writing and thinking with me in my office. Your final grade will be based on short response papers, reading quizzes, participation in class discussion, a final examination, a four-page paper, and a six-page paper.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 2110-25H: World Literature, Prof. Robert Snyder
Myth and Metaphysics
MW 3:30-4:45, TLC 2237
For Honors students only. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: What exactly is myth, and how does literature participate in its construction? How also does myth disclose a culture-specific metaphysics or Weltanschauung? Beginning with Gilgamesh (Babylonian), Old Testament stories (Judaic), Homer’s The Odyssey (Greek), and The Bhagavad-Gita (Indian), this course explores this twofold issue in terms of selected classics of world literature. Considerable attention will also be given to Dante’s Inferno and several modern texts, including Franz Kafka’s In the Penal Colony (selections), Jorge Luis Borges’ Labyrinths (selections), and Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude. In terms of the latter, we finally will be asking how myth survives post-Enlightenment impulses toward demythologization.

Texts: Maynard Mack, ed., The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces (expanded single-volume edition), and a few supplementary paperbacks.

Requirements: Active engagement in class discussion, three short essays, oral presentation, midterm, and final exam.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 2120-01: British Literature, Prof. Fran Chalfant
The Uses of the Past
MWF 1:00-1:50, Hum 208
Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: A survey of important works of British literature. This course will slightly revise Winston Churchill’s comment, “Those who do not know history will repeat its mistakes,” as “Writers who can draw from past models with respect to genres, poetic form, and character types often strongly enrich their own work.” This course will reveal how the classical heroic epic, pastoral elegy, and tragedy; the Angelo-Saxon heroic poem; the medieval romance and ballad; Shakespearean tragedy and metaphysical poem all were utilized by later poets and prose writers, a process in this course culminating with the late 20th century poet Stevie Smith’s utilization of Coleridge’s “Kubla Khan.”

Texts: Anderson, et. al., The Literature of England; Hardy, The Return of the Native.

Requirements: Active participation in class; four tests, including a mid-term and final (all writing-based); plus paper.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 2120-02: British Literature, Prof. Prasanta Chakravarty
MW 5:30-6:45, HUM 206
Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: In this study of British literature, we will read selected texts, medieval to contemporary, with an emphasis on the dynamic between individuals and communities (familial, social, cultural, political), how individuals are shaped by/resist these forces, and how literature and critical practices respond to these changing dynamics. We will analyze diverse texts of fiction, drama, poetry, film, which often offer recurrent themes. On one hand, we will be reading such canonical authors like Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Pope, Blake, Browning, Dickens, Shaw and T.S. Eliot. On the other hand, we will concentrate on works with more direct political and social implications like Hooker’s Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity, Milton’s Areopagitica, Hobbes’ Leviathan and Marx and Engels’ The Communist Manifesto.

Text: The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Volume I and II. Abrams, M. H. (General Ed.); Stephen Greenblatt (Associate General Ed.); et al.

Requirements: Active discussion, group oral report, brief response essays, final research essay, final exam.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 2120-25H: British Literature, Prof. Maria Doyle
MWF 11:00-11:50, TLC 1204
For Honors students only. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: From the mead halls of Beowulf to the various wastelands of modernity, this course will explore the evolution of the British literary tradition, with particular attention to the prominence of specific literary forms and genres within particular historical periods. Drawing together the various threads of our conversation will be the question of “Britishness” itself: how does a national literary tradition establish a sense of national character, and how do the various spaces of our textual exploration—from Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre to Brontë’s lonely manor houses to Joyce’s “dear, dirty Dublin”—raise questions about what it means to be included in that tradition?

Texts: Norton Anthology of British Literature: The Major Authors; William Shakespeare, Othello; Tom Stoppard, Arcadia.

Requirements: Reading journal, independent analytical essay (8 pages with proposal), midterm and final exams, group oral presentation.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 2120-26H: British Literature, Prof. Nina Leacock
TR 2:00-3:15, TLC 2237
For Honors students only. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: This course will survey the major periods of British Literature from its Anglo-Saxon beginnings to the present. We will have to read the earliest texts on our syllabus in translation, and in our subsequent reading we will be paying close attention to the development of our language in its literature, becoming familiar with the Oxford English Dictionary in the process. In addition to considering the relation of our present language and literature to the past, we will also be exploring critical debates about problems of genre and literary periodization.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of Poetry (5th Edition, Shorter Version), Beowulf, King Lear, Pride and Prejudice, The Importance of Being Earnest, To the Lighthouse, and a packet of texts available on electronic reserve at the library. We will be working with the online Oxford English Dictionary.

Requirements: Active participation, weekly informal written homework, three formal essays, reading quizzes, midterm, and final exam.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 2130-01: American Literature, Prof. Debra MacComb
MWF 9:00-9:50, Hum 206
Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C

Description: This course will develop a range of enduring themes that have characterized American literature: the encounter with and appropriation of nature; the crafting of an identity that attempts to reconcile the desires of the individual with the needs of society; the individual’s ability to chart his own path to success; the “problem” of the socio-cultural “other”; and the tension between the public and private spheres. In exploring these themes, we will read a variety of canonical and non-canonical texts to examine the authorial strategies that developed over time which make these works aesthetically as well as historically pertinent.

Texts: Nina Baym, ed., The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter Edition; Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter.

Requirements: Three short papers, midterm and final examinations, informed participation in class discussion.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 2130-02: American Literature, Prof. Mitzi McFarland
TR 3:30-4:45, Hum 206
Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C

Throwing the gauntlet at society’s rigid expectations for black women, Toni Morrison’s ambitious heroine Sula enumerates a quintessential aspect of the American dream: “I don’t want to make somebody else. I want to make myself.” The notion of the self-made individual will be our focal point for exploring a range of enduring questions that have characterized American literature: How have Americans defined individual, cultural or national identity at different moments in our history as a nation? Does a national and/or individual identity that is uniquely “American” exist? What qualities or characteristics constitute individual and/or national identity? What roles do the historical past, personal experiences, and social environments or conditions play in defining who we are? And to what extent has the American landscape as a geographic or symbolic space contributed to the formation of American identity? As we examine these questions, we will assess the importance of language—especially writing—in rhetorically shaping, mediating and constructing individual, national, and literary “American-ness.” We will also explore the role of race, gender, and social class in forming American identities as well as the criterion texts enact for the inclusion or exclusion of these categories. Through careful study and close reading of the texts, we want to probe the notion of literary value (“What makes a text American?” and “What is an American masterpiece?”) as we foray multiple genres (essay, film, non-fiction, fiction, and poetry) and look at some of the aesthetic, literary, psychological, and socio-historical facets out of which texts are both generated and interpreted.

Texts: Benjamin Franklin’s The Autobiography, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Toni Morrison’s Sula, Sandra Cisnero’s The House on Mango Street, Sherman Alexie’s First Indian on the Moon.

Requirements: Active and informed class participation, reading quizzes, one oral presentation, three papers, a midterm, and a final.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 2130-25H: American Literature, Prof. Jane Hill
MW 2:00-3:15, TLC 2237
For Honors students only. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: Through examining texts representative of American literature, we will explore how our nation's story of itself, as recorded in its literature, has both reflected and shaped us as a people. We will consider issues of genre and of history as they influence that story during specific eras in our literary development, and we will seek to understand how race, class, and gender affect representations of American lives.

Texts: Russell Banks, Continental Drift; Ann Beattie, The Burning House; David Bottoms, Armored Hearts: Selected and New Poems; F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Benjamin Franklin, The Autobiography; Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; and Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass. In addition to these written texts, we will also study four films: The Last of the Mohicans, The Scarlet Letter, Avalon, and Forrest Gump.

Requirements: In addition to regular attendance, active class participation, and regular reading quizzes, students will do several short response papers as well as midterm and final essays, all written out of class, and at least two presentations to the class.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 2130-26H: American Literature, Prof. Alison Umminger
TR 9:30-10:45, TLC 2237
For Honors students only. Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

This survey class on American literature centers upon the theme: “The Search for Identity: The American Experience in Black and White.” The first week will read Toni Morrison’s short story “Recitatif,” and discuss cultural assumptions about race, gender, and identity. We will then move back in time and work our way forward, starting our reading of longer texts with Ben Franklin and Frederick Douglass’s autobiographies, examining the tension between how an individual shapes his own identity, and how the larger culture determines how an individual’s identity will be shaped. We will then move to look at The Scarlet Letter and Harriet Jacobs’ autobiography, complicating questions of race with the intersecting rubric of gender norms and their hold on women. Rounding out our discussion of the nineteenth century will be a number of short readings, including sections of Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass,” Emerson’s “Self-Reliance,” Melville’s “Benito Cereno,” and the longer text of Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn. Our discussion of twentieth century literature will begin with Jean Toomer’s Cane and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, and will include a discussion of the two major literary movements of this time: Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance. We will also read poetry by Langston Hughes and T.S. Eliot, and the novella Passing by Nella Larsen. Moving into mid-century, we will read Faulkner’s Light in August and Carson McCullers’s Member of the Wedding. The course will conclude with the neo-slave narrative, Ishamel Reed’s Flight to Canada, as part of a larger discussion of postmodernism. While race figures prominently in many of these readings, we will also be attentive to gender and sexuality, community and tradition as important factors in creating American identity and American literature.

Requirements: You will be expected to write two longer essays, one at mid-term and one at semester’s end, complete a number of short responses, and give at least one presentation on the material covered. Active reading and participation is expected.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 2180-01: Studies in African-American Literature, Prof. Joshua Masters
MW 3:30-4:45, PAF 307
May count for credit in Core area C.

Description: This survey of African American literature focuses on the formation and development of the novelistic tradition in African American letters. The course is divided into two sections, “From Slavery to Freedom” and “America Re-Imagined.” In Part I of the course we will focus on slave narratives, both actual and fictional, and their pivotal role in establishing an African American literary tradition. As we examine issues of voice, memory, and education, we will confront the two central aims of the slave narrative: to present objective, authentic records of America’s “peculiar institution” of chattel slavery; and to present that system in such a way as to render it ethically, politically, and economically intolerable. In Part II we will examine the novel as a vehicle through which to explore, and ultimately destabilize, the very notion of “race,” a category that consistently undermines the human potential to achieve freedom. If the twentieth century was the era of the color line, according to W.E.B. Du Bois, then what will be the persistent moral theme of the twenty-first? Our readings, and our discussions, will give us insight into this most urgent of questions.

Texts: The Classic Slave Narratives, Frances Harper’s Iola Leroy, James Weldon Johnson’s The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, Ellison’s Invisible Man, Morrison’s Song of Solomon, Charles Johnson’s Middle Passage, and Coulson Whitehead’s The Intuitionist.

Requirements: Students are expected to complete the day’s reading assignment in advance and come to class prepared to participate in discussion. In addition to your attendance, preparation, and intellectual curiosity, you are also encouraged to discuss your writing and thinking with me in my office. Your final grade will be based on short response papers, reading quizzes, participation in class discussion, a final examination, a four-page paper, and a six-page paper.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 2190-01: Studies in Literature by Women, Prof. Bonnie Jett Adams
Resistance and Revision
MWF 10:00-10:50, HUM 206
May count for credit in Core area C.

Description: We will approach the literature in this course through the lens of the female experience itself. Beginning with Virginia Woolf, we will first examine those writers whose work centers upon not only finding their distinctly female voices, but expressing them as well. We will move then to an examination of the treatment of the female body and female sexuality: How do women writers represent their own bodies and sexuality? How does the biological fact of their female bodies influence their writing?

Finally, we will examine what Joseph Boone refers to as the “countertraditional voices” in literature by women—those texts whose premise runs decidedly counter to the traditional structure of narrative, which deems marriage the ultimate (and often, the only) end for the female protagonist. Through a discussion of works spanning from the seventeenth century (Atell’s A Serious Proposal to the Ladies) to contemporary culture (Bushnell’s Sex and the City), we will consider how these women writers raise their voices against marriage, whether through uncovering the misogynist principles inherent in the traditional structure of marriage, or through simply advocating alternative choices which prove ultimately more satisfying.

Our class will culminate in an examination of two seminal works: Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre and Kate Chopin’s The Awakening. We will discuss each text in light of the writer’s revolutionary/revisionist treatment of the issues we’ve deconstructed this semester: the female voice, sexuality, and marriage.

Texts: The Longman Anthology of Women’s Literature. Ed. Mary K. DeShazer. ISBSN 0-321-01006-X. Jane Eyre. Charlotte Bronte. Ed. Beth Newman. ISBSN 0-312-09545-7.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 2300-01: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Maria Doyle
MWF 10:00-10:50, HUM 225
Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Requires permission of the department chair. Not offered during summer session.

Description: This course provides those preparing for upper-level work in English with an introduction to various methods of critical analysis and the opportunity to discover how the application of these theories can broaden the exploration of literature. Discussions will allow students to engage a variety of terms and ideas central to current critical debate and will use these investigations to define the distinctive characteristics of individual schools including psychoanalysis, feminism, reader-response, Marxism and deconstruction.

Our main focus, however, as the course title suggests, will be on the practical application of theory, and thus the first portion of the term will use these critical models to produce readings of selected shorter texts and of a single, more substantial text (Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man). Having built this analytical base, students will spend the last few weeks of the term developing their own theoretically informed, research-based reading of a contemporary text.

Texts: Jonathan Culler, Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction; James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Bedford Critical Edition); Margaret Edson, Wit; Joseph Gibaldi, ed., MLA Handbook.

Requirements: 3 short papers, oral presentation, final exam, final research project (involving a proposal, draft, editing workshops and final documented paper).

.

<< back to list

ENGL 2300-02: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Lisa Crafton
TR 2:00-3:15, HUM 225
Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Requires permission of the department chair. Not offered during summer session.

Description: As a prerequisite for upper-division English studies, this course provides an introduction to representative critical approaches to literature. Enabling students to develop and articulate interpretations from a variety of theoretical approaches, the course investigates the historical development and the key assumptions and methodologies of significant schools of literary criticism. As the aim of the course is not literary theory, per se, we will examine each critical theory in context of application to literary texts in a variety of genres. In order to prepare students for critical writing on both poetry and the novel, the course will include intensive study of representative critical essays on Coleridge’s poem Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Toni Morrison’s novel Sula. As Toni Morrison has said of her heroine Sula, the novel itself is “uncontained and uncontainable,” and provides a particularly rich field for critical study and critically-informed writing.

Texts: Toni Morrison, Sula and online casebook of critical essays; Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism ed.); Critical Terms for Literary Study, eds. Lentricchia and McLaughlin; Culler, Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction.

Requirements: 3 critical essays, research paper (including proposal, required drafts, editing workshops, a formal annotated bibliography, and final documented research paper), oral report on critical approach to contemporary film/music, final exam.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 2300-03: Practical Criticism: Research and Methodology, Prof. Andrew Hartley
TR 5:30-6:45, HUM 225
Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Requires permission of the department chair. Not offered during summer session.

Description: This course is an introduction to representative critical approaches in literary studies which is required for English majors and is a prerequisite for upper-division classes. Through close analysis of selected literary texts and reading of appropriate critical materials we will learn the basics of literary analysis and deepen our understanding of current critical theory.

Texts: The Dead (James Joyce: Bedford Case Studies Edition), Hamlet (Shakespeare: Bedford Case Studies edition), Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead (Stoppard), Literary Criticism (Bressler), A Handbook to Literature (Harmon/Holman).

Requirements: 3 short papers, one longer research paper, one exam, one oral presentation and class participation.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 3200-01W: Creative Writing, Prof. Tom Dvorske
MWF 10:00-10:50, HUM 209
No more than two (2) 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: In this course, students will read a great deal of fiction and poetry, write about much of it, and learn to identify elements of craft and how they function in a literary text. On the flipside, students will generate their own creative texts—from directed prompts and from their own imagination—employing many of the techniques we’ve explored. In a broader sense, students will also set forth and revise throughout the term their notions of creativity, aesthetics, and judgment through critiques of their own and each other’s work in an open, workshop forum.

Texts: Shapard & Thomas, eds., Sudden Fiction; Hemingway, In Our Time; John Drury, Creating Poetry; Kim Addonizio, Tell Me; Bob Hicok, Animal Soul; Toi Derricote, Tender; Jerry Williams, Casino of the Sun; handouts and miscellany.

Requirements: Creative work in poetry and fiction, reading responses and critiques, two to three analysis papers.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 3200-02: Creative Writing, Prof. Teresa Jones
T 5:30-8:00, TLC 1204
No more than two (2) 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.

Description: Introduction to Writing Fiction and Poetry. Writing is always an act of communication, an effort to reveal through words a truth of the physical world as apprehended through the senses, an effort to reveal through words a truth of physical, psychological, emotional human experience. Joseph Conrad says, “My task which I am trying to achieve is, by the power of the written word, to make you hear, to make you feel—it is before all, to make you see!” Rainer Maria Rilke says, “This above all—ask yourself in the stillest hour of your night: must I write? . . . then build your life according to this necessity.” If you worry that you have nothing to say, look to Flannery O’Connor: “Anyone who has survived childhood has enough material for a lifetime.” In this course, we will read and study short fiction and poetry from a writerly perspective. Then you will mine and shape your own material into poetry that works, fiction that works, literature that honors language and communicates something of what it means to be human. This class will not accommodate children’s literature, science fiction, romance, mysteries, memoirs, personal essays, or the like.

Texts: Imaginative Writing: The Elements of Craft, Janet Burroway. Student-generated stories and poems copied and distributed to the class by the authors.

Requirements: Attendance is mandatory. In addition: reading assignments, active and informed participation in class discussions, writing exercises, five poems (revised), a fully developed short story (revised), written responses to workshop submissions, and a comprehensive final exam.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 3200-03W: Creative Writing, Prof. Todd Rudy
TR 2:00-3:15, TLC 1112
No more than two (2) 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course is an introduction to the craft of creative writing that focuses on the genres of fiction and poetry. Since revision is the key to all good writing, we’ll workshop our own from inception through drafts to a polished piece. Considering the elements of these two genres, we’ll also examine published works by accomplished writers for both their strengths and weaknesses, and we’ll learn about the stark similarities between these purportedly separate genres, issues of artistic creation and influence, and manners of accessing the minds of our readers. Additionally, we will strive for imagination-driven rather than memory-driven works to make the most of the qualifier “creative.”

Texts: Knorr, Jeff & Tim Schell, A Writer’s Country: A Collection of Fiction and Poetry; assorted in-class handouts of poems and stories.

Requirements: Students will compose both poetry and fiction (about 6 poems & 2 stories), compose apologia reflecting upon that work, regularly submit online exercises, maintain reflective journals, compose short analyses of published works, engage in hearty workshops of their own work, and participate in a final reading of their favorite creations.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 3400-01W: Advanced Composition: Creative Nonfiction, Prof. Todd Rudy
TR 11:00-12:15, TLC 1110
No more than two (2) 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English. May be taken for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course will explore the writing of what is commonly referred to as “the 4th genre”—creative nonfiction. We’ll analyze published essays from accomplished writers to discover the forms and methods used, and students will compose personal essays about matters of importance in their own lives, experiences from their pasts, and thoughts about their existence in the present. Since revision is the key to all good writing, we’ll workshop our own essays from inception through draft to polished piece. This course requires a great deal of personal exploration and even—gracious—sharing of ourselves with others. A final work of yours will be published online; previous examples may be read here: http://www.westga.edu/~trudy/3400paper/paper1/paper1.htm.

Texts: Miller, Brenda & Suzanne Paola, Tell It Slant: Writing and Shaping Creative Nonfiction; assorted in-class selections from current magazines.

Requirements: Students will compose 3 major essays reflecting upon their own lives, one of which will require research into some topic close to the author, and we will engage in hearty workshops of these essays through several stages of revision. Students will also maintain reflective journals, submit regular online writing we call “soul-mining” exercises, compose brief analyses of accomplished and published essays, and submit one personal essay for online publication.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 3405-01W and 3405-02W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. Tiffany Armand
Section 01W: MW 2:00-3:15, TLC 1111
Section 02W: T 5:30-8:00, TLC 1111
May be taken for certification in Secondary English Education.
Required for the BS in Computer Science. May be used to satisfy the WAC requirement.

Description: Professional careers require you to present and prove your skills before you can make significant advancements, and this is usually accomplished through written documentation. Therefore, even if you are not a professional writer, you will be a “professional who writes”. And professionals who can write well are usually more impressive than those who cannot.

This course will teach you how to write proper business letters, memos, email, and resumes. Then we will advance into proper summarization, document design, and instructional writing. Your final assignment will be a research project requiring you to write a proposal, a short report, and a long assessment/recommendation report.

This class requires you to be an already competent writer.

Text: Successful Writing at Work, Philip C. Kolin, occasional library reserve materials.

Requirements: The documents described above, three tests, and some small daily assignments. Punctual submission of assignments is crucial; if you have trouble meeting deadlines, this is not the course for you.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 4/5106-01W: Studies in Genre, Prof. Gregory Fraser
Poetry
MW 2:00-3:15, HUM 225
Required for Certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

This class will proceed under the assumption that the very notion of a literary “genre” is an unstable category whose definitions shift under historical, ideological, and aesthetic pressures. Consequently, we will begin not with the question, “What is poetry?” but instead try to articulate, “What is poetry at these specific periods of time; in these particular cultural circumstances; under these conflicting ideological pressures; in the light of these specific artistic practices?” In short, we will study the ways in which poets have produced texts that both reflect and refract the dominant assumptions of their literary and social contexts. To facilitate our study of this flexible genre, we will closely examine the historical conditions and power relations under which given texts were written; review the manifestos of several poets; and apply the contemporary reading practices of various textual theorists—including but not be limited to Stephen Greenblatt, bell hooks, Roland Barthes, and Elizabeth Grosz.

Text: Reading Poetry, Tom Furniss and Michael Bath, Prentice Hall/Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1996. (Note: This volume is currently out of print, but the campus book store has been notified to acquire used copies. Students may want to take a proactive approach and try to locate the text through an internet used-book supplier.)

Requirements: periodic quests (a quest is a cross between a quiz and a test); two formal essays of at least five pages in length; one formal essay of at least ten pages in length; a mid-term and a final exam.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 4/5106-02: Studies in Genre, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell
Fiction
TR 9:30-10:45, HUM 225
Required for Certification in Secondary English Education.

Description: As a genre, fiction may be said to present pretense as reality, thereby involving the reader in a temporary illusion. This course will consider the cultural and ideological function of this process. We will raise questions about what kinds of fictions arise from particular historical and cultural circumstances and consider the relationship between text and context. Some writers strive to close the gap between real and fictional worlds, producing fictions that mirror reality as closely as possible; others emphasize the constructed, textual nature of the worlds they have invented. We will read an eclectic assortment of short stories and novels that define and contest the boundaries of fiction, considering the relationship between form and content, representation and reality.

Texts: Virginia Woolf, The Waves; Angela Carter, Nights at the Circus; Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient; Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist, Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye, Colson Whitehead, The Intuitionist; Margaret Atwood, Wilderness Tips; Raymond Carver, collected stories; critical readings on electronic reserve.

Requirements: Short paper, longer research-based paper, response papers, oral presentation, final exam. Graduate students will be expected to do additional critical readings, write a longer research paper, and take a leading role in class discussions.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 4/5109-01: Film as Literature, Prof. Andrew Hartley
Shakespeare on Film
TR 2:00-3:15, HUM 206

Description: An examination of the way Shakespeare’s plays have been made/remade as movies, exploring the adaptive strategies employed in making the shift in genre from stage to screen . Among the films under consideration will be versions of Richard III, Henry V, King Lear, Macbeth, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Romeo and Juliet.

Texts: Signet Classic editions of the above mentioned plays and The Screen Writer’s Bible (Trottier).

Requirements: Two exams and two papers, the latter and longer of which is a full research paper, and class participation.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 4/5115-01: Renaissance Literature, Prof. Andrew Hartley
TR 11:00-12:15, HUM 206

Description: A study of the poetry, prose and drama of one of British literature’s richest periods, one whose writing manifests the massive cultural, religious and economic changes taking place at the time. We will move from the end of the medieval world to the tail end of the seventeenth century, examining works by some of the greatest literary artists of all time, among them Spenser, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson, Donne, Marvell and Milton.

Text: TBA.

Requirements: Two exams and two papers, the latter and longer of which is a full research paper, and class participation.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 4/5145-01: Victorian Literature, Prof. Margaret E. Mitchell
TR 12:30-1:45, HUM 225

Description: This course will consider Victorian literature as a response to the social, political, and cultural ideals and anxieties that marked nineteenth-century Britain. Surveying fiction and poetry as well as non-fiction, from the “social problem novel” of the “hungry forties” to fin de siècle Decadence, we will explore these texts as literary responses to Victorian concerns about class boundaries, definitions of gender, crime, science, and empire, just to name a few. We will examine not only the cultural wishes and fears reflected in Victorian literature, but the ways in which each work seeks to structure and resolve them.

Texts: Elizabeth Gaskell, Mary Barton; Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Charles Dickens, Dombey and Son; Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure; Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray. Selections from the poetry of Robert Browning, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Christina Rosetti, and Alfred, Lord Tennyson. Non-fiction selections from such writers as Matthew Arnold, Thomas Carlyle, and John Ruskin. Critical readings on reserve.

Requirements: Short paper, research paper, response papers, oral presentation, final exam. Graduate students will be expected to do additional critical readings, write a longer research paper, and take a leading role in class discussions.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 4/5150-01W: American Realism and Naturalism, Prof. Debra MacComb
MWF 11:00-11:50, HUM 225
May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: This course examines the American literary arts based in an aesthetic of accurate, unromanticized observation/representation of life and nature that flourished in the post-Civil War era. Students are expected to develop a vocabulary of realist/naturalism theory and technique and an understanding of the ideologies underlying their practice. Integral to the study of the period and its dominant aesthetic will be an introduction to a number of social, political and philosophical developments such as the American Civil War, the rise of the middle class, the unrest of the working class, the increasing segregation of the races, the rise of regional identities, the burgeoning consumer culture, the influence of Darwinian theories of survival and determinism, reform movements in education, business and the workplace, and the emergence of the “New Woman.”

Texts by Whitman, Twain, James, Howells, Chesnutt, Jewett, Wharton, Crane, and London are probable choices.

Requirements: Three short response papers, a research prospectus and 8-10 page documented essay, a final exam, and informed participation in class discussion.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 4/5160-01W: Twentieth-Century American Literature, Prof. Randy Hendricks
MWF 12:00-12:50, Hum 208
May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Concentrating on the first half of the century and using major texts supplemented by shorter readings, our study will consider the relations between historical and cultural developments and the literature of America from the rise of Modernism to the emergence of the Beat Generation. We will also become familiar with the major movements, literary works, and critical developments of the period; and we will consider ways in which the works we read reflect what is sometimes referred to as a cultural crisis that dominated the thinking of much of the last century as well as some of the century’s major socio/political debates.

Texts: Gertrude Stein, Three Lives; Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises; T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land and Other Poems; William Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury; Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God. We will also read or view (on video) plays by Eugene O’Neill, Tennessee Williams, and Arthur Miller and read selections of poems by a number of other poets, including Robert Frost, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Langston Hughes, Wallace Stevens, William Carlos Williams, Carl Sandburg, Marianne Moore, Robert Penn Warren, e.e. cummings, Allen Ginsburg, and others.

Requirements: rigorous daily preparation for class, a number of short writing assignments, 2 short papers, midterm and final exams, 1 longer research paper (10-12 pages). In lieu of the final exam, graduate students will write a more extensive research paper and prepare an annotated bibliography of secondary sources relevant to their research.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 4/5170-01: African-American Literature, Prof. Stacy Boyd
20th Century African-American Novel and Literary Criticism
TR 11:00-12:15, PAF 307

Description: This course will examine major trends, authors, and texts central to the development of the twentieth-century African-American novel. Beginning with the New Negro Movement and moving chronologically to contemporary literature and culture, we will examine African American fiction (and its attending criticism) as we develop definitions for the field. The politics of race, gender, sexuality, class, and region will play major roles as both primary and secondary texts address their present moment, cull from the past, and begin to envision the future. Indeed, the dynamics of inter-textual exchange—the ways in which texts invoke and revise previous works (the ways in which they “riff” on one another)—will also inform our analysis. And, of course, the ways in which texts derive meaning through extra-textual references and associations (African American music or folk culture for example) will also shape our reading of African American literature and its place/role in literary studies.

Texts: Possible novels include The Souls of Black Folk, W.E.B. Du Bois; Passing, Nella Larsen; Their Eyes Were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston; Native Son, Richard Wright; Invisible Man, Ralph Ellison; Go Tell It on the Mountain, James Baldwin; Maude Martha, Gwendolyn Brooks; The Oxherding Tale, Charles Johnson; The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison; The Color Purple, Alice Walker; Company Man, Brent Wade; The Man in My Basement, Walter Mosley.

Requirements: Normally, weekly response papers, presentation, a research prospectus for a longer literature project.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 4/5180-01W: Studies in Regional Literature, Prof. Debra MacComb
The West
MWF 1:00-1:50, HUM 225
May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

“I see now that this has been a story of the West, after all—Tom and Gatsby, Daisy and Jordan and I, were all Westerners . . .”

—F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

Description: Taken in light of Frederick Jackson Turner’s assessment that the West’s “significance” lay in its capacity to arouse utopian expectations, Nick Caraway’s rather opaque conclusion about his Long Island summer makes more sense: indeed, perhaps more than any other regional literature, that of the American West exists as a mental rather than geographical territory. That is, while the values associated with “the” West—limitless possibility, natural justice, vast wealth, Adamic renewal—have remained constant, the physical space denoted has shifted—well, west—from the Atlantic settlements of the seventeenth century across the North American continent and beyond in the twentieth. This course will focus on works shaped by the idea of the West, from narratives of captivity, exploration, settlement and enterprise in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to those which, in the twentieth century, redefine, subvert or parody the dominant themes and conventions of the genre.

Texts: Lewis and Clark, Cooper, Sedgwick, Twain, Harte, Wister, Grey, Cather, L’Amour and Didion seem likely choices.

Requirements: Three short response papers, a research prospectus and 8-10 page documented essay, a final exam, and informed participation in class discussion.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 4/5188-01W: Individual Authors, Prof. Maria Doyle
Seamus Heaney
MW 3:30-4:45, HUM 206
Required for English Majors. May be taken for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Seamus Heaney is a writer invested in the project of digging for origins, a concern introduced in the first poem of his first collection (aptly entitled, “Digging”) and pursued in various forms into his most recent work. This course will explore the evolution of that quest, examining Heaney’s concern for the physical and intellectual penetration of landscape and his wide-ranging interest in myth—from Danish sacrificial rites to the legends of ancient Greece to figures from pre-Christian Ireland. Discussions will also explore his sense of his own position within a literary heritage (both Irish and international) and his sense of his personal and writerly place within the political/historical world.

Texts: Heaney, Opened Ground: Selected Poems 1966-1996, Sweeney Astray, The Cure at Troy, Finders Keepers: Selected Prose 1971-2001 .

Requirements: 2 short response papers, oral presentation, 8-10 page research paper (with proposal), midterm and final exams, active participation in discussions. Requirements for graduate students: Short response paper, annotated bibliography, oral presentation, 12-15 page research paper (with proposal), midterm and final exams, active participation in discussions

.

<< back to list

ENGL 4/5188-02W: Individual Authors: Edgar Allan Poe, Prof. David Newton
TR 12:30-1:45, HUM 208
Required for English Majors. May be taken for certification in Secondary English Education. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: Much like the haunted landscapes and figures found in his poems and tales, Edgar Allan Poe lurks at the margins of the American—as well as the European—literary imagination. While debates about his status as a canonical writer persist, a wealth of writers have publicly acknowledged Poe as a seminal literary and theoretical influence, including Baudelaire, Doyle, Dostoevski, Nabokov, Barth, and Borges. Beyond his innovative contributions to the theory of poetic composition, to the development of the short story, and to the gothic tradition, Poe contributes to (if not outright invents) a number of important contemporary fields of writing, such as detective/mystery fiction and horror/fantasy. Poe’s influence also extends to the psychology of literature and psychoanalytic theory. In particular, “The Purloined Letter” has served as a basis for a series of studies beginning with Freud and continuing with Lacan and Derrida.

Beyond the scope of his influence on other writers and literary genre, an individual author course on Poe seems especially apt, since so many of Poe’s literary works have been read—usually incorrectly—through biographical and psychological misinterpretations of his life. The course will allow us to chart a more accurate appraisal of the relationship between his life and works, emphasizing his contributions as a literary theorist and as an editor of several significant nineteenth-century literary magazines, including the Southern Literary Messenger.

Texts: Poe, Poetry and Tales. Eds., Quinn and Thompson. Library of America Edition, 1984; Arthur Quinn, Edgar Allan Poe: A Critical Biography. New York, 1941. Ppbk rpt., John Hopkins UP, 1998; Other works by Poe (Letters, Critical Essays, Reviews in the Southern Literary Messenger, etc.) will be available online as electronic texts. We will also read one contemporary detective novel and view several science fiction and horror films to analyze Poe’s continuing influence on American culture.

Requirements: For undergraduates, active participation in class discussions, reading quizzes, 2 short response papers, midterm and final exams, in-class presentations; and 8-10 page research paper (with proposal). For graduate students, all of the requirements listed above as well as an annotated bibliography (min. 10 sources), and a more extensive 12-15 page research paper.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 4/5210-01: Advanced Creative Writing, Prof. Alison Umminger
Fiction
TR 3:30-4:45, HUM 225
Prequisite: ENGL 3200.

This class will look at the short story from a writerly perspective, and require students to complete and workshop at least two longer stories (10-20 pages) along with a number of weekly responses. As a craft text, we will be using John Gardener’s The Art of Fiction. We will begin the class by reading such masters of the genre as Chekov and O’Connor, then turn our attention to more recent collections, such as Adam Haslett’s You are Not a Stranger Here and Dana Johnson’s Break Any Woman Down. We will also be reading from Ben Marcus’s recent anthology The Anchor Book of New American Short Fiction. You will develop your skills as active readers and writers, with attention not only to craft and form, but to thematic content and relevance. I expect active engagement with and respect for the work of fellow students, and some familiarity with fiction writing. This is primarily a workshop class, but active reading produces good writing, thus the longer reading list.

.

ENGL 4/5210-02W: Advanced Creative Writing, Prof. Gregory Fraser
Poetry
W 5:30-8:00, HUM 225
Prerequisite: ENGL 3200. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Strong poetry grows from, converses with, and revises other strong poetry. With that in mind, we will read and discuss the work of established poets who write in a variety of styles, from a range of cultural and aesthetic backgrounds. These writers will include Elizabeth Bishop and Derek Walcott, Lorna Dee Cervantes and Fernando Pessoa, Gwendolyn Brooks and Wislawa Szymborska, Frank O’Hara and Ai, among many others. Poets such as these can teach us a great deal about craft; about the intellectually rigorous ways in which the poetic imagination can engage with and transform the world; and about the restless, revisionary process of discovering an authentic poetic voice (or voices). In group workshop sessions, students will give constructive comments to, and receive them from, their peers. There will be a strong audio-visual component to this course, as well. Students will study videos about major poets, listen to a great deal of recited poetry, and create audio-video projects that promote the study and composition of poetry. Ultimately, each member of the class will produce a portfolio of at least a dozen poems that have undergone substantive revisions; write a critical introduction situating his or her work in the larger context of contemporary verse; and construct an anthology of influential poems.

Texts: By the end of the term, each student will purchase at least five poetry books of his or her choosing and offer an in-class oral rationale for these selections.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 4/5300-01: Studies in the English Language, Prof. David Newton
History and Development of the English Language
TR 9:30-10:45, TLC 1116
Required for Certification in Secondary English Education.

Description: This course will explore the historical development of the English language from its origins as a member of the Indo-European family of languages through its emergence as one of the most influential languages in the modern era. Along the way, we will examine the English language at different stages of development, including Old English, Middle English, Early Modern English, and contemporary varieties of modern English. We will learn about some of the major structural changes that have contributed to the development of English and investigate how the grammar of the English language and the pronunciation and meaning of English words have changed over time. We will also consider some of the major social, cultural, and intellectual influences that have contributed to the development of the English language at different historical moments.

Text: Graddol, Leith, and Swann. English: History, Diversity and Change. New York: Routledge, 1996. Paperback (ISBN: 0415131189).

Requirements: For undergraduates, active participation, four exams (a midterm and final included in this number), in-class and homework assignments, and a final research project. For graduate students, all of the items above, as well as a formal class presentation and an annotated bibliography that corresponds to the final research project.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 4384-01W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Randy Hendricks
Regionalist Perspectives in Literature
MW 2:00-3:15, TLC 1204
Required for the major in English. Enrollment requires permission of department chair. Not offered during summer session. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: As the capstone course for the English major, the senior seminar provides individual students an opportunity to draw upon their course of study and apply it to a new topic in the collaborative production of a class anthology. In this course, our topic will be regionalist perspectives in literature. We’ll first ground ourselves by reading together some traditional and contemporary essays on regionalist theory and by identifying an extensive bibliography. Then, through lecture, discussion, and group presentations, we will study two works that clearly meet some of the criteria, both conventional and radical, of regionalist literature: Sarah Orne Jewett’s The Country of the Pointed Firs and Robert Drake’s Survivors, and Others. After that, we’ll break apart the notion that regionalist literature concerns itself only with life in the hinterland and the small town by considering Woody Allen's film Annie Hall as a regionalist work of art.

Having firmly established that much of what students have read during their course of study is open to regionalist interpretations, we’ll begin the second half of the class by identifying topics for and producing individual seminar papers that will be collected in a class anthology. (Note: While the texts we’ll study together are all written by American authors, students are free, and are in fact encouraged, to choose subjects in British or other national literatures for their projects.) Students should expect to be deeply engaged not only in writing their own papers, but in editing the work of others throughout this process.

Texts: Jewett’s The Country of the Pointed Firs, Drake’s Survivors, and Others, and a course packet.

Requirements: thorough preparation for each class, a number of short writing assignments (formal response papers, abstracts, etc.), presentations, editing, and a seminar paper.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 4384-02W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Robert Snyder
Sacrifice, Scapegoating and Sacrality
R 5:30-8:00, TLC 2237
Required for the major in English. Enrollment requires permission of department chair. Not offered during summer session. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: How are the concept of sacrifice, especially as involves the shedding of blood, and the practice of scapegoating related to ideas of sacrality in literature? What differentiates, in this regard, the “holy” from the “demonic”? Drawing on some theoretical frameworks by Søren Kierkegaard, Mircea Eliade, E. M. Cioran, and René Girard, we will begin by examining the story of Abraham and Isaac in the Hebrew Scripture. The course will then branch out to consider, in addition to one or two films, some of the following texts: Sophocles Oedipus Rex, Fyodor Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov (“Grand Inquisitor”), Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Joseph Conrad’s Under Western Eyes, William Faulkner’s Light in August, Franz Kafka’s In the Penal Colony, Cormac McCarthy’s Suttree, and Mary Lee Settle’s The Scapegoat. Concomitantly, students will develop independent research projects linked with the seminar topic and collaborate in the editing of an anthology featuring their work.

Texts: Several of the titles noted above, including Girard’s Violence and the Sacred. Photocopies of short stories and brief theoretical readings will be provided.

Requirements: Reading responses, active engagement in class discussion, two short essays, oral presentation, prospectus, and research-based seminar paper (15-16 pages).

.

<< back to list

ENGL 6115-01: Seminar in British Literature II, Prof. Lisa Crafton
Romantic Women Writers: The Gothic and Literary History
T 5:30-8:00, TLC 2237

Description: Romanticism has been defined as a “spirit of the age” characterized by political/cultural revolutions, a self-conscious break with inherited literary tradition, and a subversion of political, cultural, and sexual, and oppression. Yet these inherited notions of Romanticism, like any movement, depend upon selection of texts. This course investigates the relationship of gender and literary history by reading a variety of Romantic women writers and considering how texts by women writers subvert or complement traditional seminal texts of Romanticism. We will focus particularly on the appropriations of the period’s most notorious popular genre—the gothic (Radcliffe’s classic, Austen’s parody Northanger Abbey, and manipulations by Wollstonecraft, Mary Shelley, and Emily Bronte). We will question how cultural struggles were encoded in the images of aristocratic villains, haunted castles, and beleaguered heroines. Using Mellor’s Romanticism and Gender as a critical guide, our study will emphasize how theoretical orientations (feminist, psychoanalytical, new historicist) have shaped contemporary readings of Romantic women writers (for example, Said’s postcolonial reading of Austen’s Mansfield Park) and we’ll test the dominance of radical discourse by reading conservative responses (Hannah More’s counter-revolutionary texts and the cults of beauty and domesticity in poetry of Hemans and Landon).

Texts: Wollstonecraft Maria, or the Wrongs of Woman; A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (excerpts); Mary Shelley Frankenstein; Austen, Northanger Abbey, Mansfield Park; Bronte, Wuthering Heights; Anne Mellor, Romanticism and Gender; online selections from More, Hemans, Landon, Dorothy Wordsworth; critical readings on reserve.

Requirements: 2 analytical response essays, 15 page seminar research paper, oral report, and class colloquia presentation.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 6120-01: Seminar in American Literature II, Dr. Randy Hendricks
Robert Penn Warren and the Changing South
M 5:30-8:00, TLC 2237

Robert Penn Warren was the only writer ever to win a Pulitzer Prize in both fiction and poetry, the first to hold the title of America's Poet Laureate, a teacher and critic who influenced the teaching of literature for several decades during the twentieth century, and, to some minds, “America’s most distinguished man of letters.” But beneath this somewhat puffy, if true, book-jacket summary lay the career of an artist who struggled during his long life to find adequate forms and voices to explore the tensions between idealism and materialism, democratic zeal and bloodletting, cultural order and racism as they were played out on individual, regional, and national levels. The result was an examination and reexamination of a core of central themes—the meaning of America in world history, the concept of freedom in an “osmosis of being,” the legacy of the Civil War, the terms on which literature may be valued in a technological society. Another result was a powerful body of literature interesting from the vantage point of any number of scholarly disciplines and rewarding to a variety of critical approaches.

We’ll examine Warren’s development in multiple genres as he moves from his early entrenchment in High Modern themes, naturalistic techniques, and “Southern Defensiveness” through a growing dissatisfaction with his early “stand” that required a radical absorption of these techniques in more idiosyncratic, personal, or hybrid forms, forms that blurred the lines of art and commentary and figured a Wanderer struggling with the term “South.” The course will concentrate, in part at least, on the relation between Warren’s developing aesthetic theories and practices and the process of interpreting Southern and American history. As suggested above, however, students will be free to define, in consultation with the instructor, their own areas of interest in Warren or in relation to his work for individual research projects. Students who are interested may have an opportunity to work with Warren’s letters, which are currently being edited for publication.

A unique opportunity for spring 2005. April 24, 2005, marks the centennial of Warren’s birth. Seminar members will be encouraged (but not required, of course) to attend the joint meeting of the Robert Penn Warren Circle and the Center for Warren Studies at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, April 22-25, 2005. Financial assistance will be available to offset the costs of attending the conference, which represents a rare opportunity to meet and discuss common interests with established scholars and graduate students from across the country. For more details e-mail rhendric@westga.edu.

Texts: Novels: Night Rider, All the King’s Men, Flood: A Romance of Our Time. Poetry: Selected Poems of Robert Penn Warren, Brother To Dragons (1979 version). Nonfiction: Segregation: The Inner Conflict in the South, The Legacy of The Civil War, selections from other works.

Requirements: Consistent participation, a number of short writing assignments, an oral report (20 minutes), a seminar paper of 12-15 pages.

.

<< back to list

ENGL 6385-01: Seminar in Special Topics, Prof. Nina Leacock
Theory and History of the Novel
R 5:30-8:00 TLC 1204

Description: The novel is a self-theorizing genre. That is to say, since its emergence or invention sometime in or around the eighteenth century, this genre has been concerned with questions of its own definition. As the earliest novelists were already arguing, the novel differs from other literary genres because its medium, prose rather than verse, is the same as the medium of theoretical and critical writing. This shared medium makes for easy crossing over what is, in the case of this genre, a relatively fluid boundary between critical and literary language. Reading novels and reading theories of the novel turn out to be intimately related practices, and in this seminar we will aim both to bring greater theoretical reflectivity into our literary reading, and to read theory with greater enjoyment and comfort.

This seminar will attempt to provide an overview of a broad field by investigating two competing theories or hypotheses. The first proposes that the novel was invented as a self-conscious rejection of the older narrative form of romance, while the second instead suggests that the novel emerges as an open continuation of romance narrative. “Old romance” had provided foundational stories for European nations, so these hypotheses in effect offer competing versions of national history and identity. Furthermore, modern nations develop and confirm their identities in part through their systems of public education, so this seminar will also raise questions about the role of novels in our own educational institutions.

Texts: Cervantes, Don Quixote (Ecco / translated by Grossman); Defoe, Robinson Crusoe (Oxford), Goethe, Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship (Princeton / translated by Blackall); Waverley (Oxford); Pride and Prejudice (Oxford); The Charterhouse of Parma (Modern Library / translated by Howard); Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time (Penguin / translated by Foote); Eliot, Middlemarch (Penguin). Most of our shared theoretical readings will be from Michael McKeon's anthology Theory of the Novel: A Historical Approach, which is worth owning, though there will also be a copy on reserve in the library for xeroxing.

Requirements: Weekly short response papers; oral report on a theoretical or critical text; individual research project including prospectus, annotated bibliography, final research paper, and oral presentation.

.

<< back to list

XIDS 2100 01: Arts and Ideas: Special Topics, Prof. Lori Lipoma
Myth and Religion
MW 2:00-3:15, Pafford 308
May count for credit in Core area C.

Description: Hercules, Sundiata, Thor, Gilgamesh—these exciting heroes leap to mind when we think of mythology, yet myths are more than just stories of deities and fantastic beings from other people’s religions. They are simultaneously the most particular and the most universal feature of civilization, and they help each of us understand and face common concerns with which every society on Earth struggles; indeed, Joseph Campbell calls mythology “the wonderful song of the soul’s high adventure.”

In XIDS 2100 “Myth and Religion,” we’ll study common themes throughout world myths and religions—including creation, birth and death, great floods, initiation, hero, cosmology, deities, and transformation myths—as they appear in the rich traditions of cultures worldwide. Moreover, we’ll hear from speakers who will tell us about the world religious traditions which they practice, including Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, Baha’i, Cherokee Shamanism, Paganism, Islam, and Zoroastrianism.

Text: Leeming, David Adams. The World of Myth. Oxford UP, 1992.

Requirements: Reading quizzes and unit tests, 2 brief response essays, and active, informed participation in each class session.

.

<< back to list

XIDS 2100-04: Arts and Ideas: Special Topics, Prof. Patricia Reinhard
Photography and Short Stories
TR 11:00-12:15, TLC 1116
May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: Photography and Short Stories will study the dialogic relationship between photographic images and short stories. Fraternal twins separated at birth, the modern short story and the photographic image have flourished, one form shadowing the other, since their origins in the mid-nineteenth century. This course will analyze the synergistic effect created by photographic images and short fiction when they are scrutinized through the dual lenses of perspective and point of view. Both disciplines present sketches, slices of perspective that concentrate on a single or unique effect. In their uses and manipulations of point of view, both disciplines appear infinitely malleable and wildly flexible as artists continually craft and redefine the ways in which a story or an image can be “told.” Our study of the synergy between short fiction and image will begin with Eudora Welty, an artist who serves as the literal and physical embodiment of the interpenetration of these two disciplines. As a young woman, Welty worked for the Works Progress Administration in a job that allowed her access to places and people throughout her home state. Before she wrote, Welty photographed—recorded on film her sojourn through Mississippi’s eighty-two counties. Closely reading a Welty short story and several of her images will enable students to formulate a set of terms and concepts that are shared by both disciplines. Welty’s fiction and images, along with these specific terms and concepts descriptive of both disciplines, provide the springboard to all that follows—dozens of photographic images, thirteen stories, and Susan Sontag’s On Photography and Regarding the Pain of Others.

Texts: Susan Sontag’s On Photography and Regarding the Pain of Others; course packet of short stories, an online portfolio of photographic images, and selected essays on photography.

Requirements: Students will write three essays on topics derived from the themes and concepts in the texts. These essays will be approximately 1000 words and will require secondary sources. Weekly informal response writing intended to generate ideas and concepts explored in greater depth and detail in the essays will be assigned. This writing is designed as write to learn exercises and offers students a free space in which to begin exploring the texts. Students will select an essay, article, photographer, or series of images and present a report on it to the class. A midterm and a final exam.

.

<< back to list

XIDS 2100-09: Mapping Modernism(s), Prof. Angela Insenga
TR 3:30-4:45, Humanities 227

In his 1922 poem "The Waste Land," T.S. Eliot asks of the desolate landscape, "What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow out of this stony rubbish?" His question matched many of his contemporaries', artists who also sought to chart the changing world through aesthetic practice. Still other artists of the time would alter the creative "lay of the land" forever with their work.

This class will position students as metaphorical "cartographers" who will also "map" the social, economic, artistic, and psychological "terrain" of the Modernist era. We will study four of the influential British and American groups from the period: the Bloomsbury Group, the "Lost Generation," the Algonquin Roundtable, and the Beat Poets.

Texts: Major novels (Woolf, Forster, Hemingway, and Fitzgerald), poetry (Eliot, Yeats, Hughes, Williams, Parker, Burroughs, and Ginsberg), short stories (Lawrence, Joyce, Mansfield, and Parker), and supporting criticism.

Requirements: Reading Journal (three written pages per week), two major tests (mid-term and final examination), daily quizzes (five, plot-based questions), five cultural events.

Contact the Webmaster at tarmand@westga.edu with questions/comments about this site.
Last updated April 9, 2005