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Summer/Fall 2005 Edition
Volume 6, Number 2

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Summer Courses, 2005

NOTE: Courses are subject to change depending on enrollment and faculty teaching assignments. Please check BANWEB for more current information on the availability of all courses.

English 1101 and 1102 are prerequisites for all courses from ENGL 2110 through 4386.

A “W” designation after a section number of a 3000- or 4000-level course signifies that the course is a Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) course. WAC accepts as a guiding principle the idea that writing is a valuable tool for learning and communication. Therefore, the components of a course so designated are designed to help you learn the material and communicate what you have learned. Students are required to take two “W” courses for the undergraduate degree.

Skip down the page to view the following courses offered during the Summer 2005 term:

ENGL 2110-01: World Literature, Prof. Michael Crafton

ENGL 2120-01: British Literature, Prof. Robert Snyder
ENGL 2130-01: American Literature, Prof. Joshua Masters

ENGL 3200-01:  Creative Writing, Prof. Alison Umminger
ENGL 3405-01W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. Tiffany Armand
ENGL 4106-01W: Studies in Genre: Poetry, Prof. Angela Insenga
ENGL 4109-01: Film as Literature, Prof. Margaret Mitchell
ENGL 4120-01: 17th Century British Literature, Prof. Prasanta Chakravarty
ENGL 4165-01W: Contemporary British and American Literature, Prof. Tom Dvorske
ENGL 4188-01W:  Individual Authors, Prof. Stacy Boyd
ENGL 6120-01: Seminar in American Lit II, Prof. Debra MacComb
ENGL 6385-01: Seminar in Special Topics, Prof. Jane Hill

 

 

ENGL 2110-01: World Literature, Prof. Michael Crafton
Session III
MTWRF 3:00PM-5:15PM, Humanities 227
Required for English Majors.  May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description:  The purpose of this course is to consume the world.  Well, maybe that is a slight exaggeration.  Let’s say the purpose is to survey literary and cultural documents from around the world starting with the earliest extant materials, usually the Sumerian epic poem Gilgamesh, and working our way by leaps and bounds up to the modern period, usually a contemporary poet such as Seamus Heaney or perhaps a film.  Although we shall try our best to view this literature in a historical and political context, we will be hard pressed to be very detailed due to the astonishing breadth of this survey. Given the fact that we will be moving quickly through a lot of cultures, we shall hold to two constants: one, mythology as a grammar for comparative analysis; two, literacy as the fundamental skill of skills that we shall practice.  The myths that we shall survey are typically myths of various heroes (gods, goddesses, warriors, tricksters, and wisdom figures), employed in a variety of archetypal plots (creation, protection, deliverance, questing and testing).  The literacy tasks will be an assortment of the following: oral responses in class, oral presentation as a group, short answer writing on exams, and short essays written out of class.

Texts:  Maynard Mack, ed., The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces (expanded single-volume edition), and a few supplementary paperbacks.

Requirements:  Active engagement in class discussion, three short essays, oral presentation, midterm, and final exam.

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ENGL 2120-01: British Literature, Prof. Robert Snyder
Session II
TR 11:00AM-1:30PM, Humanities 227

Required for English majors.
  May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description of Class:  This course surveys major texts of British literature while addressing the question of why certain forms or genres predominate during specific historical periods.  In addition to becoming familiar with seminal authors and their work, we will try to understand both the defining characteristics of the modes in which they wrote as well as the cultural factors that contributed to their emergence.  In particular, we will be concentrating on the dream-vision, pilgrimage narrative, sonnet, dramatic tragedy, epic, satire, lyric, ode, dramatic monologue, novel, and absurdist play, not including some texts such as T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land that cannot be easily categorized.       

Texts:  The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Major Authors, 7th ed.

Requirements:  Informed participation in class discussion, reading quizzes, two short papers, midterm and final examinations.

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ENGL 2130-01: American Literature, Prof. Joshua Masters
Session IV

MTWR 6:00PM-8:55PM, Humanities 206
Required for English majors.  May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description:  This survey of American literature, from first contact to the present day, explores the themes of nature, nationhood, law, language, and race in American culture.  As we examine the controversies, concerns, and conflicts surrounding these themes, we will confront a recurring pair of questions:  What is “America,” and what does it mean to be an “American?”  In their manifold efforts to answer these questions, American writers occasionally affirm the idea of America and occasionally critique it (and often do both), but always in their own peculiar ways.  The course therefore focuses on the prevailing ideas of the period and the development of important literary trends, but it also emphasizes the unique nature of individual writers and texts.

The subtitle of the course is American Literature, Backwards and Forwards, and each week we will read two texts from different centuries that speak to each other, both historically and thematically.  Week 1, “Puritanism and Its Other(s),” will pair the writings of William Bradford and Anne Bradstreet with Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter.  Week 2, “The Making of the American Self,” pairs Ben Franklin’s Autobiography with Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby.  Week 3, “Radical Empathy,” pairs Twain’s Huck Finn with Russell Banks’s recent novel Rule of the Bone, and Week 4, “Race and Coming of Age in America,” pairs Harriet Jacobs’s slave narrative with Toni Morrison’s novel The Bluest Eye.

Texts:  The Scarlet Letter, The Autobiography of Ben Franklin, The Great Gatsby, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Rule of the Bone, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, The Bluest Eye.

Requirements:  Students must attend every three-hour class, achieve a passing reading quiz average, write two 1500 word essays, and take midterm and final exams.

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ENGL 3200-01:  Creative Writing, Prof. Alison Umminger
Session III

MTWR  5:00PM
-7:45PM, Humanities 225
No more than two (2) 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.

Description:  This course provides an introduction to poetry and fiction writing, with attention to craft and revision. Using contemporary fiction and poetry anthologies, students will gain some basic familiarity with poets and short-story writers currently practicing their art. This should serve as an inspiration and springboard for their own writing, as good writers must also be good readers. The course will cover the building blocks of fiction and poetry: concrete language, dramatic situation, voice, meter, imagery, characterization, conflict, showing vs. telling, etc. Students will be writing and revising their own work weekly and should expect to produce a portfolio of work for review at the end of the semester.

Texts:  Bowman, Catherine, ed., Word of Mouth; Cassill, Oates, eds., The Norton Anthology of Contemporary Fiction; Addonizio, Laux, The Poet's Companion; Leguin, Ursula, Steering the Craft.

Requirements:  Each student will write 5-6 poems and revise them for the poetry section. For the fiction section, students will do a number of short exercises and write and revise one longer story (10-12 pages). There will also be a short paper and presentation on one of the poets in the Word of Mouth anthology. All students are required to be active participants in workshops.

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ENGL 3405-01W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. Tiffany Armand
Session III
MTWRF 3:00PM-5:15PM, TLC 1109

May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.
  May be taken for certification in Secondary English Education.

Description:  Professional careers require you to present and prove your skills before you can make significant advancements, and this is usually accomplished through written documentation.  Therefore, even if you are not a professional writer, you will be a professional who writes.  And professionals who can write well are usually more impressive than those who cannot.

This course will teach you how to write proper business letters, memos, email, and resumes.  Then we will advance into proper summarization, document design, and instructional writing.  Your final assignment will be a research project requiring you to write a proposal, a short report, and a long assessment/recommendation report.

This class requires you to be an already competent writer.

Text:  Handbook of Technical Writing (Alred, Brusaw, and Oliu), occasional library reserve materials.

Requirements:  The documents described above, several tests, and some small daily assignments. Punctual submission of assignments is crucial; if you have trouble meeting deadlines, this is not the course for you.

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ENGL 4106-01W: Studies in Genre: Poetry, Prof. Angela Insenga
Session II
TR 8:00AM-10:30AM, Humanities 208
May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.  May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters.

Description of Class:  At the beginning of American Beauty (1999), Carolyn Burnham laments that she wishes the now-absent “Lomans” had hired her as their real-estate agent before they vacated the neighborhood.  With one striking allusion, screenwriter Alan Ball suffuses the film with the themes, characters, and even a structure akin to Arthur Miller’s classic drama Death of a Salesman (1949).  Studying such overt connections between the genres of drama and film helps to frame questions about how each—the dramatic and cinematic—informs, presupposes, or even reconceives the other.  Our course will focus primarily on reading play texts from antiquity to the present, though we will also view a film re-presentation that recycles or re-visions each play.  Such examination will create a sustained dialogue between the genres that will help us theorize links and divergences as we explore the page, the stage, and beyond.

Texts:  Play texts (in reading order):  Herbert Wernicke. Orpheus in the Underworld (a filmed musical version of the out-of-print play that we will watch in class); Christopher Marlowe, Dr. Faustus; William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus; Moises Kaufman, Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde; George Bernard Shaw, Pygmalion; Jean Genet, The Maids; Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman; Tony Kushner, Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes-- Part One:  Millennium Approaches; Part Two: Perestroika; Margaret Edson, Wit.  Film texts* (in reading order):  Marcel Camus, director. Black Orpheus; Ernst Gossner, Jan Svankmajer, dirs. Faust; Julie Taymor, dir. Titus; Brian Gilbert, dir. Wilde; George Cukor, dir. My Fair Lady; Nancy Meckler, dir. Sister, My Sister; Sam Mendes, dir. American Beauty; Moises Kaufman, dir. The Laramie Project; Mike Nichols, dir. Angels in America; Mike Nichols, dir. Wit.

*Students carry the responsibility for viewing films by specific class dates set down in the daily syllabus.  The department owns two copies of each film, available for student check-out.  All films can also be acquired through an online movie service like Netflix, and some are available from local rental establishments.   

Requirements:  2-3 page weekly reading/viewing responses (seven in all), one 20-minute class presentation, 12-15 page critical essay, annotated bibliography.

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ENGL 4109-01: Film as Literature, Prof. Margaret Mitchell
Images of Women in 19th—Century British Texts
Session IV

MTWR 6:00PM-8:55PM, Humanities 209

May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Note: This course may be substituted to satisfy the British literature II requirement on the program sheet for majors.

Description:  The nineteenth-century novel has provided rich and complex material for twentieth-century filmmakers.  This course will consider how representations of women in 19th-century British fiction have been appropriated and revised through the medium of film.  Taking as our central texts three important British novels and a number of film adaptations of those and other texts, we will examine the strategies and politics of adaptation, exploring what happens when 19th-century representations of gender are filtered through a twentieth-century lens.

Texts:  Novels: Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre; Thomas Hardy, Tess of the D’Urbervilles. Films: Adaptations of these and other novels, to be made available for viewing outside of class.

Requirements:  Participation, quizzes, film journal, research paper, final exam.

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ENGL 4120-01: 17th Century British Literature, Prof. Prasanta Chakravarty
Session II
TR 11:00AM-1:30PM, Humanities 208

Description:  We will divide the course into 5 different headings and try to cover the vast literary output of 17th- century Britain.  We will begin with Love and contrast the reigning Petrarchan model with other modes of early modern theories of love in the poetry of Sidney, Shakespeare, Donne and Marvell.  We will follow this up with the divergent approaches to Religion (Meditative / Reformed / Antinomian / Pantheistic) in the writings of Herbert, Donne, Vaughan, Lanyer, Winstanley and Milton.  Ideas of Science and Politics will then follow as we look into the works of Francis Bacon, Hobbes and Locke.  The English Revolution will be our next station and Milton, Lucy Hutchinson, Lilburne and Coppe will feature prominently in this section.  We will conclude the course with a critical study of arguably the greatest of English Tragedies:  William Shakespeare’s King Lear.

Texts:  The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 7th Edition. Eds. M. H. Abrams and Stephen Greenblatt. Norton, 2000

Requirements:  Weekly Response Papers and a final 6-8 page Term Paper.

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ENGL 4165-01W: Contemporary British and American Literature, Prof. Tom Dvorske
Session II

TR 2:00PM-4:30PM, Humanities 208
May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:  The realist umpire calls the pitches what they are.  The modernist umpire calls ‘em like he sees ‘em.  The postmodernist umpire says, “They ain’t nothintil I call ‘em.”  This course is an examination of selected texts produced in the last thirty years in the British Isles and the United States.  Specifically, we will examine how writers and theorists contend with the conditions of indeterminacy and immanence that Hans Bertens, Ihab Hassan, and others argue comprise the milieu of postmodern and contemporary culture: What to call what’s already been called something by someone at some possible point for some ostensible purpose that tells us more about the umpire making the call than the event we characterize, however, provisionally, as “pitched” and which nonetheless seems as ever-present and un-catchable as the air “we” breathe.  Toward the center of our study lie the concepts of power and authority: how individuals and institutions construct reality, history, gender, race, knowledge, nationality, social and “individual” identity.  Batter up!

Texts: Derek Walcott, Omeros; Graham Swift, Waterland; Don Delillo, White Noise; Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale; Paula Geyh, et.al., Postmodern American Fiction: A Norton Anthology; Course packet of Essays and Poetry.

Requirements: Reading responses; short presentations on scholarship; term paper; final exam.

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ENGL 4188-01W:  Individual Authors, Prof. Stacy Boyd
Langston Hughes

Session IV

MTWR 5:00PM-7:55PM, Humanities 208

May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.
  May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Description:  Described as the “Poet Laureate of the Negro Race” and “Harlem’s Shakespeare,” Langston Hughes is one of the most important African-American writers in the twentieth century.  Although he is perhaps best known for his use of black vernacular traditions in his blues-inspired poetry, Hughes also produced notable works of fiction and drama.  In this seminar, we will have a close look at his major poems, short stories, and essays, paying particular attention to the  context of the various phases in Hughes' artistic career.  A prime focus will be on the period of the Harlem Renaissance in which Hughes emerged as an influential innovator of significant trends in twentieth-century African-American literature and culture.  We will pay particular attention to the idea of black pride as it relates to personal and political liberty, equality, and art.                      

Texts:  The Ways of White Folks, Short Stories; The Best of Simple; and Not Without Laughter all by Langston Hughes.  Also Langston Hughes and the Chicago Defender: Essays on Race, Politics, and Culture, 1942-62, with Christopher C. DeSantis, and The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes, edited by Arnold Rampersad.

Requirements:  usually short response papers, reading quizzes, oral presentation, 8-10 page research paper (with proposal), active participation in discussions

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ENGL 6120-01: Seminar in American Lit II, Prof. Debra MacComb
The Violence of Manners
Session II
MW 2:00PM-4:45PM, TLC 2237

“The manners, the manners: where and what are they, and what have they to tell?”
--Henry James, The American Scene

”Nothing seems at first sight less important that the outward form of human actions, yet there is nothing upon which men set more store; they grow used to everything except living in a society which has not their own manners.”
--Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America

Description:  A turn-of-the-century debate over the social, political and economic enfranchisement of women, African Americans and immigrants coincided with the emergence of the sciences of ethnography, anthropology and sociology and a burgeoning industry in etiquette books.  This course proposes to read the American novel of manners against this context in order to examine representations of the coercive force exerted by mystified—but apparently “natural”—social practices/rituals.  A number of period authors adopt the stance of the objective social scientist to reveal that manners cloak unspoken and unsuspected cultural interests inimical to the individual and, as such, operate as the “gentle, hidden form which violence takes when overt violence is impossible” in order to maintain those interests.  The novels covered will consider the plight of the social “other” whose desire both “to be” and “to belong” is hopelessly confounded by the hieroglyphic world of manners.

Texts:  James, The American; Wharton, The House of Mirth and The Age of Innocence; Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition; Cahan, Yekl; Crane, The Red Badge of Courage; London, The Call of the Wild; Veblen, The Theory of the Leisure Class; course reader.

Requirements:  Informed participation in seminar discussions, weekly response papers, an oral report, a research prospectus and essay.

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ENGL 6385-01: Seminar in Special Topics, Prof. Jane Hill
Ethical Criticism and Reading Film
Session II
MW 11:00AM-1:45PM, TLC 2237

Description:  Our project will be to examine how a basic film genre—the romance—morphs into increasingly complicated multi-generic narratives and how those transformations complicate the ethical offerings that these texts make to their audiences.  Using Booth’s seminal work on ethical criticism as well as various other theorists of genre and ethical criticism to ground our discussions, we will explore how the scaffolding of the romance plot and the rhetoric of storytelling intersect in contemporary cinema to create a complicated dynamic between text and audience.  While our subject matter and focus will be a particular type of film, our larger project will be the refining of our abilities to view, discuss, think, and write about visual texts with authority and sophistication.  My hope is that students will leave this class with a growing confidence in various techniques for using film in their own scholarship and their own classrooms.

Texts:  Wayne C. Booth, The Company We Keep: An Ethics of Fiction; in addition to this print text, we will study the following films, which you will be expected to view outside of class: Big Fish, Pretty Woman, Annie Hall, Kissing Jessica Stein, Chasing Amy, Lost in Translation, Love Actually, Ordinary People, You Can Count on Me, Crooklyn, Pieces of April, Requiem for a Dream, Laurel Canyon, Reds, Crimes and Misdemeanors, Do the Right Thing, Friday Night Lights, and The Sea Inside.

Requirements:  In addition to thoughtful and active participation, several short response papers and presentations and a fifteen-page critical paper supported by scholarly secondary sources of an appropriate nature.

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