Footnotes - Dept of English Newsletter for Students UWG Home Page


Spring 2004 Edition
Volume 5, Number 1


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Courses Offered, Spring 2004

Skip down the page to view the following courses offered during the Spring 2004 term:

ENGL 2050-01: Self-Staging, Prof. Tiffany Armand

XIDS 2100: Myth and Religion, Prof. Lori Lipoma

XIDS 2100-05: Modernism, Prof. Angela Insenga

XIDS 2100-08: Travel Writing, Prof. Uwe Zgratzki

ENGL 2110-01: World Literature, Prof. Chad Davidson

ENGL 2110-02: World Literature, Prof. Kevin Collins

ENGL 2110-25H: World Literature,Prof. Micheal Crafton

ENGL 2120-01: British Literature, Prof. Fran Chalfant

ENGL 2120-02: British Literature, Prof. Uwe Zagratzki

ENGL 2120-25H: British Literature, Prof. Lisa Crafton

ENGL 2120-26H: British Literature, Prof. Andrew Hartley

ENGL 2130-01: American Literature , Prof. David Morgen

ENGL 2130-25H: American Literature, Prof. Randy Hendricks

ENGL 2130-26H: American Literature, Prof. Debra MacComb

ENGL 2190-01: Studies in Women's Literature, Prof. Jessica Lyn Van Slooten

ENGL 2300-01: Practical Criticism, Prof. Maria Doyle

ENGL 2300-02: Practical Criticism, Prof. Robert Snyder

ENGL 2300-01: Practical Criticism, Prof. Gregory Fraser

ENGL 3200-01: Creative Writing, Prof. Tom Dvorske

ENGL 3200-02: Creative Writing, Prof. Gregory Fraser

ENGL 3300-01: Studies in American Culture, Prof. David Raney

ENGL 3405-01W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. Peter Morgan

ENGL 3400-01: Advanced Composition-Creative Nonfiction, Prof. Todd Rudy

ENGL 4106-01: Studies in Genre (Fiction), Prof. Peter Morgan

ENGL 4135-01W/5135: British Romanticism, Prof. Lisa Crafton

ENGL 4155-01W/5155: 20th-Century British Literature, Prof. Robert Snyder

ENGL 4/5160-01: 20th-Century American Literature, Prof. Khalil Elayan

ENGL 4/5170-01: African-American Literature, Prof. Teresa Jones

ENGL 4180-01: Studies in Regional Literature (Scottish Literature), Prof. Uwe Zagratzki

ENGL 4188-01W/5188: Individual Authors (James Joyce), Prof. Maria Doyle

ENGL 4/5188-02: Individual Authors (Edith Wharton), Prof. Debra MacComb

ENGL 4/5210-01: Advanced Creative Writing (Fiction), Prof. Randy Hendricks

ENGL 4300-01: English Grammar Prof. Sonja S. Bagby

ENGL 4384-01W: Senior Seminar (Ritual Realities: Patterns of Performed Living), Prof. Maria Doyle

ENGL 4384-02W: Senior Seminar (Extraordinary Bodies: Disability in Literature), Prof. Gregory Fraser

ENGL 4385-01W/5385: Special Topics (The Espionage Film), Prof. Robert Snyder

ENGL 6105-01: Seminar in British Literature I (Shakespearean Revenge Tragedy), Prof. Andrew Hartley

 

ENGL 2050-01: Self-Staging, Prof. Tiffany Armand
Oral Communication in Daily Life
TR 11:00-12:15, PAF 206
(Or , English 2050-02, TR 12:30-1:45, PAF 308; Or, English 2050-03, W 5:30-8:15, PAF 307)
May count for credit in Core Area B.

Description: Afraid of professional speaking and everything that goes with it? You're not alone! Oral communication in professional settings--such as University events, job interviews, and work-related meetings--can be very stressful. In this course, you will learn physical impression management strategies to help you control the crucial, first impression you make with your body--prior to saying a word! You will also gain speech-planning strategies to minimize those undesirable utterances that so many people make when in the spotlight. Spoken delivery takes practice, but once you have learned your best personal delivery style you will marvel at how much more confident and authoritative you sound.

Remember that embedded in the whole process of oral communication is the presumption that the message you are trying to convey is meaningful to the target audience. Because of this, we will also examine how to create messages that engage audiences without sacrificing meaning.

Get ready for a class that could possibly affect the rest of your life--just imagine! You might never have that dream again, you know the one...where you have to give a speech, and you look down at yourself....

Texts: Course pack of materials from a variety of sources, available on Library Reserve.

Requirements:
You will be required to complete the following: a number of brief oral presentations/exercises; several short papers and written scripts, totaling a minimum of ten typewritten pages; weekly homework assignments essential to your preparedness for the upcoming class meetings; and in-class exercises that, along with participation, count toward a daily grade. Attendance is essential, and there will be stiff penalties for excessive absenteeism.

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XIDS 2100: Myth and Religion, Prof. Lori Lipoma
MWF 10:00-10:50, Boyd-Crider
May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: Hercules, Zeus, Thor, Gilgamesh-these are the figures that leap to mind when we think of myth … yet myths are more than just stories of deities and fantastic beings from other people's religions. Myth is simultaneously the most particular and the most universal feature of civilization, and myths help each of us understand and face common concerns with which every society on Earth struggles in its own way.

In XIDS 2100 "Myth and Religion," we'll study common themes throughout world myths and religions-including creation, birth and death, great floods, initiation, hero, cosmology, deities, and transformation myths-as they appear in the rich traditions of Aztec, Greek, African, Chinese, Australian, Japanese, Norse, Muslim, Native American, Hittite, Celtic, Polynesian, and Persian cultures. We'll explore the fantastic, dreadful, bizarre, and sometimes hilarious themes which occupy the human imagination, and which comprise what Joseph Campbell called "the wonderful song of the soul's high adventure."

Text: Leeming, David Adams. The World of Myth. Oxford UP, 1992.

Requirements:
Reading quizzes and unit tests, 2 short response essays, and, of course, active, informed participation in each class session.

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XIDS 2100-05: Modernism, Prof. Angela Insenga
TR 12:15-1:45, TLC 1305
May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: In an era of artists who prided themselves on impersonality and wallowed in the failure to connect in a societal wasteland of hollow men, several Modernist artists relied paradoxically on a motif that drew people together: the party. This course will examine the social phenomenon of the party as it existed in the social circles of artists who traversed the Modernist terrain (The Bloomsbury Circle, The Algonquin Roundtable, Stein's Paris mecca for the "lost generation" of painters and writers, and the Post-Impressionist movement).

We'll study fictive representations of party creations in Modernist texts, examining the role of the host/hostess, various types of soirees, and the party's function in each text. We will initiate our discussion with an historical background on the party before we arrive at Modernism's grand affair. Through study of current social arbitration, we'll be able to measure cross-currents and reverberations between the Victorian, Modern and Postmodern eras. You're all invited!

Texts: Excerpts of etiquette handbooks from late 19th-century Britain (Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management); some theory about festive occasions, and selections from contemporary American hostesses such as the Barefoot Contessa and Martha Stewart; T. S. Eliot's poem "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," a visit to a hallucinogenic party in James Joyce's Ulysses, garden parties in Katherine Mansfield's short stories, a picnic party at the Marabar caves in E. M. Forester's A Passage to India, post-World War One celebrations in Dorothy Parker and F. Scott Fitzgerald, a short foray into the seemingly whimsical worlds of Winnie the Pooh and Alice in Wonderland, and even some "must-see TV"-an episode of Friends. A substantial portion of our reading will come from Virginia Woolf's canon, as we'll read all of Mrs. Dalloway and excerpts from To the Lighthouse, The Years, and The Voyage Out. We'll end with Michael Cunningham's The Hours and the Oscar-winning movie based on that text.

Requirements:
Daily quizzes, five one-page responses, two major tests, and one group presentation.

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XIDS 2100-08: Travel Writing, Prof. Uwe Zgratzki
M 5:30-8:15, TLC 1301
May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: Currently Unavailable.
Requirements: Currently Unavailable.

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ENGL 2110-01: World Literature, Prof. Chad Davidson
TR 2:00-3:15, PAF 308
Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: This course, built on the theme of the literary underworld, will focus on the ways texts and the cultures from which they spring have dealt with myths of the underworld and how those myths inform the way we think about life, death, and the all-important afterlife. Using Dante's Inferno as a pivotal text, we will look at classical and contemporary representations of the underworld as they appear in both European and non-European literature. Central to our exploration will be the concepts of the hero's journey, the quest for spiritual enlightenment, the fascination with sin, and the notion of justice (both the divine and the figuratively medieval). Ultimately we will come to texts such as Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground and Bohumil Hrabal's Too Loud a Solitude as figurative depictions of the underworld with weighty psychological and sociopolitical implications.

Texts: Dante Alighieri, The Inferno (Allen Mandelbaum, trans.); Hrabal, Too Loud a Solitude; Maynard Mack, ed., The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces (expanded edition in one volume).

Requirements:
Weekly readings, participation in discussion, daily journal entries, two analytical essays (4-6 pages each), midterm and final exams.

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ENGL 2110-02: World Literature, Prof. Kevin Collins
MWF 10:00-10:50, PAF 308
Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: This course examines samples of important literature from several cultures and time periods. Among our aims will be determining why they are considered important, what they say about the times/cultures/writers that produced them, and why in the world the university wants that its students to come to know them.

Texts: Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces, 7th edition, volume 1; Conrad, Heart of Darkness (Dover); Pirandello, Six Characters in Search of an Author (Dover); Achebe, Things Fall Apart (Anchor); additional texts to be provided by professor or students.

Requirements:
Daily reading quizzes, one group presentation, two exams, two research papers. (Students with particular talents and experiences-art, music, drama, etc.-may substitute a performance project for the second paper, but the project must demonstrate a level of engagement with the text(s) equal to or greater than that required for the paper.)

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ENGL 2110-25H: World Literature, Prof. Micheal Crafton
MW 3:30-4:45, Honors House
For Honors Students only.

Description: The purpose of this course is to survey literary and cultural documents from around the world, starting with the earliest extant materials and extending to the modern period. Although we shall try our best to view these documents in a historical or political context, we will be hard pressed to be very detailed due to the astonishing breadth of this survey. As we attempt a view of the influence of socio-political history on aesthetic patterns, we will also be concerned about the development of literary structures that have greatly influenced contemporary culture, structures such as the epic, tragedy, comedy, and lyric poetry.

Text: Maynard Mack, ed., The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces (single volume edition).

Requirements:
Normally, two short papers, a group oral presentation, a midterm, and a final.

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ENGL 2120-01: British Literature, Prof. Fran Chalfant
TR 11:00-12:15, TLC 1200
Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: This course, focusing on the uses of the past, is a survey of important works of British literature. Our study will slightly revise Winston Churchill's comment, "Those who do not know history will repeat its mistakes," as "Writers who can draw from past models with respect to genres, poetic form, and character types often strongly enrich their own work." This course will reveal how the classical heroic epic, pastoral elegy, and tragedy; the Anglo-Saxon heroic poem; the medieval romance and ballad; Shakespearean tragedy and metaphysical poem all were utilized by later poets and prose writers, a process in this course culminating with the late 20th-century poet Stevie Smith's utilization of Coleridge's "Kubla Khan."

Texts: Anderson, et. al., The Literature of England; Hardy, The Return of the Native.

Requirements:
Active participation in class; four tests, including a midterm and final (all writing-based); plus paper.

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ENGL 2120-02: British Literature, Prof. Uwe Zagratzki
MW 2:00-3:15, PAF 206
Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: Currently Unavailable.
Requirements: Currently Unavailable.

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ENGL 2120-25H: British Literature, Prof. Lisa Crafton
TR 11:00-12:15, Honors House
For Honors Students only.

Description: "I Must Create a System or be Enslav'd by Another Man's," warns Romantic poet/painter William Blake. In this study of British literature, we will read selected texts, medieval to contemporary, with an emphasis on the dynamic between individuals and communities (familial, social, cultural, political), how individuals are shaped by/resist these forces, and how literature and critical practices respond to these changing dynamics. We will analyze diverse texts of fiction, drama, poetry, film, and music which nevertheless offer recurrent themes; for example, conflicts between spiritual and material culture from medieval mystic Julian of Norwich to U2 and the compelling power of what Heaney will call "the tribe" in Irish literature.

Texts: The Tempest, Dr. Faustus, The Rover, English Romantic Verse, Frankenstein, Dubliners, Endgame and a course pack of excerpts from Julian of Norwich, Pearl Poet, Chaucer, Donne, Milton, Browning, Rosetti, Woolf, Heaney, Gordimer, et al.

Requirements:
Active discussion, group oral report, brief response essays, midterm and final.

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ENGL 2120-26H: British Literature, Prof. Andrew Hartley
TR 2:00-3:15, Honors House
For Honors Students only

Description: This course, which is more a heavily editorial highlights reel than a greatest hits album, will survey examples of British literature from Beowulf to the present day, searching fiction (Joyce and Hornby), drama (Shakespeare, Marlowe and Beckett), poetry (the Gawain poet, Wordsworth, Blake, Donne, Marvell and Larkin) for those elements of Britishness which go beyond mere geography and which continue to appear even in today's global culture.

Throughout this analysis we will be emphasizing magic and the supernatural, at least as far as the Renaissance, moving to a consideration of the harder "realism" and what it implies manifested by the later texts as they revisit the familiar themes of love and selfhood and mortality which we have seen play out in the earlier works. We will end with a consideration of some significant literary concerns (such as the differences between modernism and postmodernism, or the way politics and aesthetics intersect) in the popular "poetry" of important British music of the late twentieth century (Elvis Costello, The Clash and The Jam), always keeping uppermost the question of how an expressly non-American culture shapes and manifests itself through its literary art.

Texts: Beowulf (trans. Seamus Heaney); Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Doctor Faustus (Marlowe); The Tempest and Sonnets (Shakespeare); selected poems by Donne, Marvell, Blake, Wordsworth, and Larkin; Krapp's Last Tape (Beckett); Dubliners (Joyce); musical selections (from The Jam and The Clash); High Fidelity (Hornby).

Requirements:
Midterm (4 pages) and final (8 pages) papers. Midterm and final exams. Active and regular participation in classroom discussion.

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ENGL 2130-01: American Literature, Prof. David Morgen
MW 2:00-3:15, TLC 1200
Required for English majors. May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: Our goal in this class will be to sketch the broad outlines of American literary history: its major figures, periods, and movements. We'll be reading stories, novels, essays, letters, speeches, and poems ranging from very early to fairly recent, examining both their individual merits and their places in American cultural history. To give some order and focus to a sprawling subject, I have divided our readings under four main themes, each with a number of shorter readings and one longer, full-length "cornerstone" text: What is an American?; Wilderness and the American Mind; Contested Visions, "American" Voices; and Alienation and Literary Experimentation.

Texts: Norton Anthology of American Literature, shorter sixth edition; Scarlet Letter; and Frederick Douglass's Narrative.

Requirements: Midterm, final, 2 short response essays and one longer essay.

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ENGL 2130-25H: American Literature, Prof. Randy Hendricks
MW 2:00-3:15, Honors House
For Honors Students only.

Description: In this class we will devote much of our time to reading, discussing, and writing about such classic texts in American literature as Franklin's Autobiography, Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans (through Michael Mann's film adaptation and selected passages from the novel), Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Douglass's Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Thoreau's Walden, Whitman's and Dickinson's poems, Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Eliot's The Waste Land, and more.

Reading the texts in whole or in part, we will focus on the way in which they, through their forms, themes, and language, echo and even parody each other as they record a cultural/literary debate on the issue of American identity with its related questions of what constitutes an American self, society, and attitudes toward nature. We will use the examples to work toward a definition of the qualities beyond "written in America" that make a work of literature "American." Additional readings from the anthology will supplement the primary ones.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Sixth Edition, ed. Nina Baym, et. al. The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Requirements: Active participation in class meetings; several short writing assignments; midterm essay, research (term) paper; comprehensive final exam.

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ENGL 2130-26H: American Literature, Prof. Debra MacComb
TR 9:30-10:45, Honors House
For Honors Students only.

Description: This course will explore two of the most significant and closely related traditions in American literature: the ability of the individual to discover and deploy a satisfying selfhood and his ability to rise to success. Using Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography as the text which establishes the model for American identity and exploit, this course will: consider the way in which the American literary canon has been determined by this ideal; explore the differences that gender, class, and race make in representing the American experience; trace the transition from plots of agency and choice to those of coercion and chance; and explore the changing authorial strategies in genres such as the autobiography and tropes such as the quest.

Texts: Foster, The Coquette; Douglass, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Twain. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Chopin, The Awakening; Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Miller, Death of a Salesman; Smith, Fair and Tender Ladies; additional shorter works in a course reader.

Requirements: Weekly response papers, two oral reports, three short essays (3-4 pages), a comprehensive final exam, and active and informed participation in discussion.

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ENGL 2190-01: Studies in Women's Literature, Prof. Jessica Lyn Van Slooten
"Not Just 'Chick-Lit"--Love and Romance in Women's Literature
MWF 12:00-12:50, HUM 225
May count for credit in Core Area C.

Description: Women's literature has a troubled relationship with matters of the heart. Throughout much of history, women's experience has been circumscribed to the private world of relationships, home, and domestic concerns. However, as women's power has extended beyond the private realm, so too has their literature. Now romance is often dismissed as fantasy "fluff" that supports old gender stereotypes. Yet romance novels, movies, and television shows remain wildly popular with female readers and viewers-the recent birth of the "chick-lit" genre is a testament to romance's enduring power.

This course will cover a variety of prose and poetry by women that can be categorized as romance. We will trace significant features of the romance genre as well as explore the complex relationship between romance literature and "real life." I'm particularly interested in exploring the ways in which the romance genre is a valid, legitimate expression of women's imagination and desire.

Texts: Heywood's Fantomina, Austen's Pride and Prejudice, Wharton's The House of Mirth, Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, West's The Wedding, Barrett Browning's Aurora Leigh, and Fielding's Bridget Jones's Diary. We will also consider supplemental poetry and critical essays, as well as contemporary popular romances like Sex and the City (the short stories and TV series), When Harry Met Sally, and reality-romance shows like The Bachelor.

Requirements:
The class will be discussion based, and students will write short response journals, participate in group projects/presentations, and also write one critical essay.

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ENGL 2300-01: Practical Criticism, Prof. Maria Doyle
MWF 1:00-1:50, HUM 209
Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Requires permission of the department chair. Not offered during summer session.

Description: This course provides those preparing for upper-level work in English with an introduction to various methods of critical analysis and the opportunity to discover how the application of these theories can broaden the exploration of literature. Discussions will allow students to engage a variety of terms and ideas central to current critical debate and will use these investigations to define the distinctive characteristics of individual schools including psychoanalysis, feminism, reader-response, Marxism and deconstruction.

Our main focus, however, as the course title suggests, will be on the practical application of theory, and thus the first portion of the term will use these critical models to produce readings of selected shorter texts and of a single, more substantial text (Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man). Having built this analytical base, students will spend the last few weeks of the term developing their own theoretically informed, research-based reading of a contemporary text.

Texts: Culler, Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction; Lentricchia and McLaughlin, eds., Critical Terms for Literary Study; Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Bedford Critical Edition); Shepard, Seven Plays; Gibaldi, ed., MLA Handbook.

Requirements: 3 short papers, oral presentation, final exam, final research project (involving a proposal, draft, editing workshops and final documented paper).

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ENGL 2300-02: Practical Criticism, Prof. Robert Snyder
TR 12:30-1:45, HUM 209
Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Requires permission of the department chair. Not offered during summer session.

Description: This course provides an introduction to criticism and its applications. The main emphasis will not be theory itself but rather the practice(s) of literary criticism, including its uses and abuses. Along the way we will be taking up such interrelated issues as the ethics of reading, the functions of criticism, and the nature of interpretation. The primary text on which we will be focusing throughout the semester is Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre: An Autobiography, a novel first published in 1847 that has become one of the canonical works in British literature and that lends itself well to various methodologies including formalist, psychoanalytic, archetypal, deconstructionist, feminist, Marxist, and cultural-studies approaches. By the course's end students will have significantly strengthened their skills in the discourse of literary criticism as it has evolved over the past sixty years.

Texts: Chris Baldick, Concise Dictionary of Literary Terms, 2nd ed. (Oxford University Press, 2001); Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, ed. Beth Newman, Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism (Bedford/St. Martin's, 1996); Ann B. Dobie, Theory into Practice: An Introduction to Literary Criticism (Heinle & Heinle/Thomson Learning, 2002); Joseph Gibaldi, MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 6th ed. (Modern Language Association, 2003).

Requirements: Active participation in discussions, four critical essays (3-4 pages), oral presentation, research prospectus, annotated bibliography, research-based paper (10-12 pages), midterm and final exams (literary terms).

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ENGL 2300-01: Practical Criticism, Prof. Gregory Fraser
TR 5:30-6:45, HUM 206
Required for the major in English as a prerequisite to upper-division study. Requires permission of the department chair. Not offered during summer session.

Description: This course is designed to introduce students to various schools of modern literary theory. In addition, students will learn how to apply different theories to individual literary texts. The course is both reading and writing intensive, as students learn to absorb, interpret, and respond to intellectually stimulating material that challenges, decentralizes, or purposefully subverts privileged or dominant ideologies.

In the first half of the term, we will test our growing awareness of the current critical landscape by closely studying Elizabeth Bishop's "In the Waiting Room" and Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, both of which lend themselves to a range of analytical perspectives (postcolonial, deconstructive, feminist, Marxist, among others). We will then turn our attentions to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, which will help us respond in greater depth to many of the questions intrinsic to contemporary reading practices, including "How does language construct rather than merely describe reality?" What roles does literary discourse play in the maintenance of established power structures?" and "What does it mean to talk about the radical instability of the self?"

Texts: Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction, Jonathan Culler; Critical Terms for Literary Study, ed. Frank Lentricchia and Thomas McLaughlin; Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad; Frankenstein, Mary Shelley.

Requirements: Two analytical essays of at least five pages in length; periodic "quests" (a quest is a cross between a quiz and a test); final research paper of at least ten pages in length; final portfolio of revised essays accompanied by a substantive critical introduction; active participation in class discussions.

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ENGL 3200-01: Creative Writing, Prof. Tom Dvorske
MW 2:00-3:15, HUM 209

Description: Calling all cars, all unemployed and nervous workers, the pluck of dreams, minor league umpires, lasting impressions of first experiences, first impressions of last experiences, we're in to something big here, I can feel it. In 3200-01 you will engage in critical writing of creative texts, creative writing of poems, plays, and short fiction, thoughtful and insightful reading and discussion of various and disparate ideas in aesthetics and theory, and above all an enormous amount of reading.

Texts: Madison Smartt Bell, Narrative Design; Wallace & Boisseau, Writing Poems; McClatchy, ed., Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry (2nd ed.); Daniel Halpern, Plays In (One Act); Hatcher, The Art & Craft of Playwriting; and a course-packet of materials on reserve at the library.

Requirements: In addition to in-class exercises, workshop participation and class discussion, you will write short critical responses, write and revise creative material, and construct a portfolio of polished pieces with an introduction discussing your work with relation to texts and ideas we've bandied about in this course.

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ENGL 3200-02: Creative Writing, Prof. Gregory Fraser
W 5:30-8:15, HUM 208

Description: In this introductory course, you will be encouraged to experiment in a variety of writing genres, including poetry, short fiction, play- and screen-writing, and creative nonfiction. We will make use of several practical strategies for strengthening our writing such as "improve"-ing on the work of published authors, putting characters on the witness stand, climbing the slanted ladder of specificity, and many more. Every student's work will be taken seriously; we will foster a sense of community and mutual support. In addition to reading and commenting on each other's texts-in-progress, we will also study the work of establish writers from the United States, the Caribbean, England, and elsewhere, thinking about how these authors respond to literary traditions while also seeking to break new creative ground. Our primary goal will be to produce creative writing that tests the limits of language and stretches the imagination in unexpected ways.

Texts: Best American Short Stories 2002; Best American Poetry 2003; Best American Short Plays 2000-2001.

Requirements: Each member of the class will produce a final portfolio of his or her strongest work, and also compose a critical introduction situating that work in the larger contexts of contemporary creative writing.

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ENGL 3300-01: Studies in American Culture, Prof. David Raney
MW 2:00-3:15, HUM 225
Cross-listed as History 3300. Required for the minor in American Studies.

Description:
Peter Conrad's book Imagining America begins with the sentence: "Before America could be discovered, it had to be imagined." In this course, we will investigate some of the many ways that America has been-and is being-imagined and invented: as destination and destiny, as (is)land, cult(ure), h(e)aven, idea(l). We'll seek for answers in written texts and in film, photographs, architecture, music, and artifacts. The aim will be to come to an understanding of American Studies as a field (one which began early in what has come to be called the "American century") and of the methods, both conscious and unconscious, by which cultural meaning is created, constituted, transmitted, subverted, and revised.

Texts: Horwitz, ed. The American Studies Anthology; Wilkinson, The Pursuit of American Character; Kouwenhoven, The Beer Can By the Highway: Essays On What's American About America; Bellamy, Looking Backward; readings as provided in class or on reserve.

Requirements: Occasional quizzes and in-class writing; a class presentation; several short response papers; a midterm; and an 8-10-page documented essay.

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ENGL 3405-01W: Professional and Technical Writing, Prof. Peter Morgan
W, 5:30-8:15, TLC 1116
(Or English 3405-02W: Professional and Technical Writing, TR 12:30-1:45, TLC 1110)
This class is an upper-level English elective, a requirement for the BS in Computer Science, and an elective for the minor in Business Information Systems. It also satisfies a requirement for Secondary Certification in English.

Description: This course is a practically oriented instructional workshop aimed at giving the already competent writer the skills to succeed in real-world professional and technical writing situations. You will write individually, but frequently collaboratively. You will deal with professional letters and memos, resumes and letters of application, families of documents, proposal writing and oral presentation, boilerplate text, peer and supervisor review processes, instruction manuals, integrated oral/written reporting strategies, writing for the web, ethics in writing, and a variety of other vital areas of professional communication.

You will be required to come to grips with some of the more advanced features of Microsoft Word and basic features of Acrobat Writer; you will use PowerPoint to create persuasive presentations; you will use Excel to generate budget scenarios to help you make a convincing case for project funding; and you will use FrontPage and WSFTP to create and publish effective web pages that establish your web presence and showcase your work. You should note, however, that this is fundamentally a writing class, not a class to teach you specific computer applications: technical instruction will of course be given, and technical support will be continually available, but you will be responsible for practicing on your own any computer skills that you need to perfect in order to complete the assignments.

Two thousand business executives from all levels of management were recently asked what in their companies were the most important factors leading to promotion. Above such qualities as ambition, drive, education, experience, self-confidence, and good appearance, the group listed the ability to communicate as the single most important factor.
This course is designed to prepare you to work in such companies.

Text: Porter, Sullivan, and Johnson-Eilola, Professional Writing Online Version 2.0 (Allyn and Bacon).

Requirements: Full course description and requirements at http://www.westga.edu/~pmorgan/proftech/splash.html.

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ENGL 3400-01: Advanced Composition-Creative Nonfiction, Prof. Todd Rudy
TR 3:30-4:45, TLC 1109
Satisfies a requirement for certification in Secondary Education in English.

Description: "You mean I can take a composition class where I get to talk about myself and things I like?"

"Of course you can; what we're personally interested in is the best subject for creative nonfiction."

"But in Advanced Composition, I'd probably have to spend a lot of time with commas and semicolons and stuff, right?"

"Not necessarily: of course, knowing grammar and mechanics is an important part of any writing, but this class will also cover ideas such as bending the rules of 'proper' grammar and mechanics for rhetorical effect. Your voice is valued".

"But I'm afraid my life is too boring to write about-I mean, who wants to hear about me?"

"Well, the same people who like to hear stories you tell everyday-your friends, family, colleagues at the water cooler, your dentist-all sorts of people! What you'll be writing is true stories that somehow link both you and the reader, in fact the world at large, so that we'll all understand each other just a little bit better."

This is the type of conversation I often have with students considering a class that combines both the pedagogical ideas of rhetoric and composition with the existential ideas of what it means to be human-why some people would rather eat snails than cheese sandwiches, the reason so many people choose blue as their favorite color, what goes through the mind of an accident victim seconds after the crash, your christening dress that rests in a sealed garbage bag in the attic-the things that make us both individual and part of a larger human family. While students will write and workshop and share of themselves to a great extent, read accomplished essays by writers such as Thoreau, E. B. White, Annie Dillard, and Alice Walker, and do some outside research into their chosen topics of exploration, the essays produced will be peculiarly their own and exist not just as assignments completed, but documents of culture.

Text: Tell It Slant, edited by Brenda Miller and Suzanne Paola.

Requirements: Regular reading and discussion of published nonfiction, bi-weekly half-page responses, participation in bi-weekly revision workshops, two 5-page essays, one 10-page researched essay, final exam.

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ENGL 4106-01: Studies in Genre, Prof. Peter Morgan
Fiction
TR 11:00-12:15, HUM 208

Description: What does it mean to separate texts according to genre? What does it mean to label something as "fiction" (or, even worse, "genre fiction")? Clearly we will want to become conversant with a conventional analysis of "fiction," examining how an aesthetic approach parses a story into plot, setting, character, point of view, and so on. But as we explore both the genre and genre theory, we will find that these questions become quicksilver and lead us down other paths: how has fiction as a genre become established, how does it work to construct meaning in its situation of the reader? How may it be said to control reader response and naturalize the ideologies embedded in the text? Moreover, how can we read against the grain to discover the cultural and ideological position of a text?

In our study, we will read texts that represent or explore historical moments in the formation of the genre. We will examine works that represent or challenge different worldviews and different ways to represent reality. We will explore the issue of different fictional genres and sub-genres. And we will sample fictions that attempt to write back against the colonization of the genre and imagine the "elsewhere" that may have been accidentally or deliberately displaced by the slavish adherence to orthodoxy.

Texts: Aphra Behn, Oroonoko; Sutton Griggs, Imperium in Imperio; Tony Grooms, Bombingham; Julia Alvarez, In the Time of the Butterflies; Milton Murayama, All I Asking for Is My Body; Jessica Hagedorn, Dogeaters; Lois-Ann Yamanaka, Blu's Hanging; John Barth, Lost in the Funhouse; Angela Carter, The Bloody Chamber; Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire; Philip K. Dick, Blade Runner: (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep); Don Delillo, White Noise; a selection of short stories to be announced.

Requirements: Active and informed participation in class discussion; brief reading questions; oral report; research prospectus and paper (10-12 pages); midterm and final exams.

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ENGL 4135-01W/5135: British Romanticism, Prof. Lisa Crafton
TR 2:00-3:15, HUM 225
May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description: "The word 'romantic' has come to mean so many things that, by itself, it means nothing...there is, in fact, a plurality of romanticisms." --A. O. Lovejoy.

"'In the future we can no longer speak monolithically of 'British Romanticism,' of a 'Romantic spirit of the age,' of 'the Romantic ideology.'" -- Anne Mellor.

The "revolutionary" spirit of Romanticism is defined by the political/cultural revolutions of the time and the self-conscious break with inherited literary tradition. Yet these assumptions are countered by notions of what has been called the "autonomous imagination" celebrated by Romantics, a desire to escape into what Shelley called the "still cave of the witch Poesy." The definition of Romanticism, as the quotations above imply, is a question that we will explore by reading a diverse selection of Romantic texts. We will explore the movement of Romantic vision from flights of imaginative reverie to graphic renditions/distortions of history, including Wollstonecraft's cultural "vision," Blake's mythical, abiding critiques of sexual, political, and aesthetic oppression, Wordsworth's revolutionary Lyrical Ballads and Revolutionary breakdown in The Prelude, Keats' sites of imaginative retreats (the urn, the nightingale, a magical snake, the myth of Endymion), as well as Byron, the Shelleys, and less well-known writers like Hemans, Landon, More, and Price. In all, we will explore Romantic contexts with regard to political, cultural, sexual, and spiritual liberation and the equally subversive Romantic imagination.

Texts: Wollstonecraft, Maria, or the Wrongs of Woman; Blake's Poetry and Designs; Wordsworth, Selected Poetry; Coleridge, Selected Poetry; Keats, Selected Poems; Shelley, Frankenstein; Austen, Persuasion and a course pack of Byron, P. Shelley, Burke, Price, Paine, More, and selected critics.

Requirements: For undergraduates, active discussion, response essays, midterm, final, and documented paper. Graduate students will write a 12-15-page research paper as well as do an oral report and additional critical and theoretical readings.

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ENGL 4155-01W/5155: 20th-Century British Literature, Prof. Robert Snyder
TR 9:30-10:45, HUM 225
May be taken for 3 hours of WAC requirement.

Description:
In or about the year 1910, novelist Virginia Woolf famously quipped, human nature changed in some fundamental way. What she may have meant by that observation will be the question addressed by this course. Emphasizing the High Modernist phase of twentieth-century British literature, our study during the first ten weeks will revolve around the following authors/texts: David Bradshaw (ed.), A Concise Companion to Modernism (2003); Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness (1902); T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land and Other Poems (1934) and Four Quartets (1943); Thomas Hardy, selected poems; James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916); Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse (1927); and William Butler Yeats, selected poems. Over the last five weeks we then will be considering how High Modernism begins to transmogrify into postmodernism via Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot (1954), Philip Larkin's Collected Poems (1988), and Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (1967). Independent research projects will complement this coverage by focusing on other contemporaneous literature.

Texts: Paperback editions of all texts indicated above, plus handouts of selected poems by Hardy and Yeats.

Requirements: Several writing-to-learn responses (ungraded), oral synopsis of a chapter from the Bradshaw anthology, three analytical essays (3-4 pages), research-based paper (10-12 pages), active participation in discussions, midterm and final exam. Requirements for graduate credit will involve a longer research-based paper (15-18 pages) and leadership of a class session.

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ENGL 4/5160-01: 20th-Century American Literature, Prof. Khalil Elayan
MWF 1:00-1:50, HUM 206

Description: The emphasis of this course will be on the twentieth-century American novel as this genre develops through both Modernism and Post-Modernism. We will come to know the differences between Modern and Post-Modern, as well as looking at such factors as the Beat Generation, New Journalism, with special interest devoted to the notion of the American Dream.

Students should be expected to interpret how a particular author defines the American Dream through the author's particular work. The authors of the longer works we will discuss will not be so typical, nor are they necessarily forgotten writers; these writers, in fact, do much to shape Modern American literature and leave an indelible mark on America's future. Two works of nonfiction will also be discussed, one (Hell's Angels) a journalistic piece, and the other (Slouching Towards Bethlehem) a book of essays examining the effect of the '60s in America. These two works will help us gain a perspective on America's reality as the foundation for its Modern literature. We will also read and examine the Modern American short story and poetry as well, studying the effects of both the African/American and Southern women writers' influence.

Texts: Henry Miller, Tropic of Cancer; John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath; Jack Kerouac, Big Sur; Tim O'Brien, Going after Cacciato; Hunter S. Thompson, Hell's Angels; Joan Didion, Slouching Towards Bethlehem.

Requirements: Midterm, final, critical and interpretative journal, 10-page essay.

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ENGL 4/5170-01: African-American Literature, Prof. Teresa Jones
MW 3:30-4:45, HUM 209

Description: In keeping with Toni Morrison's observation that any study of American literature, music, or life that fails to take into account African-American literature, music, and life is "incoherent," we will study representative texts that span the African-American literary tradition and that can be, by periods, characterized by themes of protest, celebration, assimilation, and recovery: Literature of Slavery and Freedom (1746-1865); Literature of Post-Civil War, Emancipation (1865-1920); Harlem Renaissance (1920-1940); World War II and After (1940-1960); Literature of the Black Arts Movement (1960-1970); Post-Integration Period (1970-present). We will explore the relevant social, historical, and aesthetic contexts of these literary works as well as the implications of theoretical and critical approaches to such literature.

Texts: William Wells Brown, Clotel; or The President's Daughter; Randall, The Black Poets; Larson, The Complete Fiction of Nella Larson: Passing, Quicksand, and the Stories; Lewis, Portable Harlem Renaissance Reader; Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Wright, Native Son; Ellison, Invisible Man; Morrison, Jazz.

Requirements: Attendance, preparation, and participation; reading assignments; reading questions; response papers; a midterm and a final exam; a research project (10-12 pages) that seeks to identify an African-American aesthetic that characterizes a period of African-American literature and locates it within both an ongoing African-American social experience and an ongoing literary tradition. The graduate students' research project (12-15 pages) will incorporate ten theoretical/critical sources and an annotated bibliography.

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ENGL 4180-01: Studies in Regional Literature, Prof. Uwe Zagratzki
Scottish Literature
MW 3:30-4:45, PAF 206

Description: Currently Unavailable.
Requirements: Currently Unavailable.

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ENGL 4188-01W/5188: Individual Authors, Prof. Maria Doyle
James Joyce
MW 2:00-3:15, HUM 206
May be taken for 3 hours of WAC Requirement.

Description: Every summer in Dublin, fans of Joyce's Ulysses descend on the city to retrace the steps of Leopold Bloom and Stephen Dedalus, the novel's central characters. Such a literary pilgrimage suggests that Joyce's modernist version of The Odyssey is remarkable not only for its technical complexity-its wide variety of voices and styles-but also for the vitality of its characters and the often comic inventiveness of its perspective.

This course will allow students to explore Joyce's major writings, beginning with Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and continuing on with an extended, thoughtful plunge into Ulysses, which many critics consider to be the most important novel of the 20th century. We will also dabble in other Joyceana, seeking all the while to contextualize the author both as a particularly Irish writer and as an experimental modernist intent on circulating with and speaking to a world audience. Ultimately the goal of this course will be to provide students with an appreciation for Joyce's mature style and a clear understanding of the historical and cultural context in which-and frequently against which-he moved.

Texts: The Portable James Joyce (including Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and selections from Finnegan's Wake), Ulysses, selections from Stephen Hero, Gifford's Ulysses Annotated, Homer's Odyssey with selected critical background readings placed on reserve.

Requirements: For undergraduates, 2-3 short response papers, oral presentation, midterm and final exams, final research project. For graduate students, an annotated bibliography, two oral presentations, a 12-15-page research paper, a midterm, and a final.

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ENGL 4/5188-02: Individual Authors, Prof. Debra MacComb
Edith Wharton
TR 12:30-1:45, HUM 225

Description: Edith Wharton's birth, in 1862, into an elite New York family and her position among "the 400" provided her with a wealth of material as a novelist, but it did little to foster her development as an artist. Instead, she was educated for a single career: marriage. Her marriage in 1885 to Edward Wharton proved a stunning disappointment and despite the strain of this relationship-or perhaps as a result of it-Edith Wharton began to write, publishing her first story in 1889. This course will examine Wharton's extraordinary artistic career through her most famous novels and short fiction as well as her lesser known writings: her guide to interior decorating, her travel books and her literary criticism. We will also consider how Wharton's fascination with her society's manners and material culture-particularly as they concern literal and figurative "structures"-informs all of our readings and links them to the period's developing interest in anthropology and ethnography.

Texts: The House of Mirth, The Custom of the Country, The Age of Innocence, Ethan Frome, Summer, Glimpses of the Moon, The Fruit of the Tree, Roman Fever and Other Stories, The Writing of Fiction, and a course reader. Also required is Eleanor Dwight's Edith Wharton: An Extraordinary Life.

Requirements: Undergraduate students: Weekly response papers, three short essays (2-3 pages), a research prospectus, an 8-10 page documented research essay, a comprehensive final exam, and active and informed participation in class discussion. Graduate students: Weekly response papers, three short essays (2-3 pages), a research prospectus including an annotated bibliography, a 12-15 page documented research essay, a comprehensive final exam, and leadership in class discussion.

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ENGL 4/5210-01: Advanced Creative Writing, Prof. Randy Hendricks

Fiction
M 5:30-8:15, HUM 225

Description: Combining formal analysis of techniques employed by published fiction writers, writing exercises, and workshops, this class provides students with an intense experience in the study and writing of fiction. You'll receive evaluation of your writing from other students as well as the instructor, with particular attention to subject, style, and structure. You will also come to see yourself as a writer related to other writers and have an opportunity to learn revision strategies you can adapt to your own needs and practices.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction, Shorter Sixth Edition.

Requirements: Oral and written presentations of your work to the class, oral and written critiques of other students' work, short analytical papers on published fiction, and 15-20 pages of original finished fiction. In addition, graduate students will write a critical preface placing their own creative work in an appropriate context of contemporary fiction.

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ENGL 4300-01: English Grammar, Prof. Sonja S. Bagby
W 5:30-8:15, TLC 1114
Satisfies a requirement for certification in Secondary Education in English

Description: Grammar: Does any school subject inspire such dread? We speak English; we write English. Must we study how or why?

Grammar is a word that might hold negative-or visceral at best-meanings and associations for students. However, remember that we will be studying a subject we already know (even if on an unconscious or subconscious level), so allow that knowledge to help you as we learn grammar and learn about grammar. Because these two activities involve the grammatical choices we make in everyday communication, we will relate the study of grammar and punctuation to our own speaking and writing. As a result, you will become more conscious, knowledgeable, and skilled in the ways that grammar operates to produce meaning. We will study, as Richard Weaver noted, what language "can and will do."

Texts: Writing Good Sentences, Claude Faulkner, and other articles/websites as assigned.

Requirements: Active and informed participation in class discussions, weekly readings and exercises, editing project, writing project, research project/presentation, midterm and final exam.

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ENGL 4384-01W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Maria Doyle
Ritual Realities: Patterns of Performed Living
MW 5:30-6:45, TLC 2-237
Requires permission of department chair. Not offered during summer session. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC Requirement.

Description: Simply defined, ritual is a patterned action endowed with meaning, yet from what source does that meaning derive? This course will explore how literary texts have conceptualized the relationship between the pattern and its interpretation in various ritual contexts, both formal events (a wedding) and informal processes (a party or a compulsive need to check one's pocket watch). Students will explore ritual "stagecraft"-the differing roles of participant and spectator, how objects and spaces generate ritual meaning-as well as the link between ritual action and personal/cultural memory and the ability of the ritual process to insulate from, and provide access to, various levels of "real" experience.

The first half of the course will introduce students to select theories of ritual-including Turner's examination of the links between social rituals and theater, Girard's discussion of violent ritual and social cohesion, Eliade's sense of ritual as a means of enacting myth-and will allow students to test these theories against four very different primary texts. These broad discussions will give students an ample base to draw upon as they work in the second half of the term to define their own responses to the course topic through individual seminar projects.

Texts: Seamus Heaney, Station Island, Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland, Marina Carr, By the Bog of Cats…, Edward Albee, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, and a course packet of critical readings

Requirements:
Series of brief reading responses, 2 short papers, oral presentation, 12-15- page seminar paper (preceded by a proposal, multiple drafts and editing workshops).

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ENGL 4384-02W: Senior Seminar, Prof. Gregory Fraser
Extraordinary Bodies: Disability in Literature
TR 2:00-3:15, TLC 2237
Requires permission of the department chair. Not offered during the summer session. May be taken for 3 hours of WAC Requirement.

Description: This senior seminar will explore representations of disabled bodies--bodies that don't fit established social categories--in British and American texts from the early modern to postmodern periods. Our goal will be to investigate what the status of the so-called "freak" or "crip" tells us about prevalent cultural anxieties and attitudes about subjectivity and the body. We will read poetry, fiction, and autobiography, asking why anomalous bodies are considered to be so disruptive of the social order, and how they have helped to establish the parameters of the "normal." To frame our discussions, we will make use of the field of contemporary disability theory.

The goal of the seminar will not only be to deepen our understanding of the literary texts under analysis, but also to become more subtle readers of what critic Leslie Fiedler calls "the tyranny of the normal." Thus, we will actively engage with the ideological world in which bodies become meaningful, exploring why certain forms are defined as beautiful, ideal, or simply ordinary, others as incapable, ugly, deviant, and subhuman. A "Writing Across the Curriculum" course, this class it will engage you in a range of both formal and informal writing projects. As a capstone project, we will publish an anthology of our critical work.

Texts: Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Nancy Mairs, Waist-High in the World; Disability Studies: Enabling the Humanities, edited by Sharon L. Snyder, et al.; The Critical Limits of Embodiment: Reflections on Disability Criticism, edited by Carol Breckenridge; Bending over Backwards, edited by Lennard Davis; distributed packet of poems from early modernity to postmodernity (including but not limited to John Milton, "On His Blindness," "When I Consider How My Light is Spent"; William Wordsworth, "The Idiot Boy," "Blind Shepherd Boy," and the "Parliament of Monsters" (Book VII of The Prelude, 1805); Elizabeth Bishop, "In the Waiting Room"; Karl Shapiro, "Mongolian Idiot," Richard Hugo, "The Freaks at Spurgin Road Field").

Requirements: Two analytical essays of at least five pages in length; periodic "quests" (a quest is a cross between a quiz and a test); final research project of at least fifteen pages in length; oral group presentation and peer reviews of final projects; active participation in class discussions.

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ENGL 4385-01W/5385: Special Topics, Prof. Robert Snyder
The Espionage Film
T 5:30-8:15, HUM 209
May be taken for 3 hours of WAC Requirement.

Description: Although susceptible to such parodies as Dr. Goldfoot and the Girl Bombs (1966), featuring robotic agents with thermonuclear navels, or the recent Austin Powers tripe, the spy film has enjoyed an enduring appeal throughout the last century, which John G. Cawelti and Bruce A. Rosenberg have dubbed the "Age of Clandestinity." Of the 1,760 examples of this genre profiled in Paul Mavis's The Espionage Filmography: United States Releases, 1898 through 1999 (2001), we will be screening and discussing 10-12 of the best: Spies (1929), The 39 Steps (1935), The Secret Agent (1936), Ministry of Fear (1944), Cloak and Dagger (1946), The Man Who Never Was (1956), North by Northwest (1959), The Manchurian Candidate (1962), The Ipcress File (1965), The Spy Who Came In from the Cold (1965), The Quiller Memorandum (1966), Colossus: The Forbin Project (1970), The Parallax View (1974), The Killer Elite (1975), and Blow Out (1981). By way of updating our coverage, while deliberately avoiding the James Bond pap, we also will be viewing The Art of War (2000), Spy Game (2001), and/or The Sum of All Fears (2002). Our focus throughout the course will be twofold: first, to understand the various ways in which "espionage" functions as a metaphor in these films (e.g., dissembled identity, "reality" as simulacrum, the act of viewing itself); and, second, to construct a critical lexicon for this understudied variant of the "thriller."

Texts: John G. Cawelti and Bruce A. Rosenberg, The Spy Story (University of Chicago Press, 1987); Martin Rubin, Thrillers (Cambridge University Press, 1999).

Requirements: Two-page response essays for eight films, collaborative entries in an electronic class handbook, research-based paper (10-12 pages), active participation in discussions, take-home final exam. Requirements for graduate credit will involve a longer research-based paper (15-18 pages) and an oral presentation.

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ENGL 6105-01: Seminar in British Literature I, Prof. Andrew Hartley
Shakespearean Revenge Tragedy
R 5:30-8:15, TLC 2237

Description: This course will examine major Shakespearean works (Titus Andronicus, Hamlet and Othello) in the specific context of Renaissance Revenge Tragedy rooted in Seneca (Thyestes) and adapted for the English stage in the 1580s in plays such as Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy. The genre, which has its own distinct features and concerns from other forms of tragedy, became especially popular in the first decade of the seventeenth century with plays such as Tourneur's The Atheist's Tragedy, Middleton's The Revenger's Tragedy and others in which the parameters of the genre were now well established enough to facilitate an unusually metadramatic focus on the nature of the theatre itself. Because of this self-consciously performative dimension, the plays provide unusual insight into the formation of selfhood in early modern culture which was itself highly performative, while providing a medium for social and political critique, and raises significant questions about the construction of personal ethical systems, their central premise-the importance of vengeance-running contrary to the religious and moral guidelines of the day. We will thus be able to read Shakespeare in the rare context of other works of his period which intersect aesthetically, culturally and politically.

Texts: Thyestes, Hamlet, Othello, Titus Andronicus, Four Revenge Tragedies.

Requirements: Students will read eight plays, will make individual presentations, will participate in informed discussion each class, and will write an extended research paper which actively engages with the relevant scholarship.

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ENGL 6120-01: Seminar in American Literature II, Prof. Jane Hill
Metafiction and the Domestic Novel: American Women Novelists since 1970
M 5:30-8:15, TLC 2237

Description: In the hundred years between Hawthorne's mid-19th-century outcry against the "damned mob of scribbling women" who were succeeding as domestic novelists while he struggled with his profession and John Barth's mid-20th-century declaration that the novel as a form had been exhausted, male novelists conducted a largely successful campaign to commandeer the form, partly through the technique of metafiction-fictions about fiction. Yet, as male novelists found themselves exhausted by their aesthetic direction in the 1960s, American women novelists demonstrated in their work a vibrant capacity to merge the conventions of the traditional domestic novel and the playful experiments of metafictions, thereby infusing the genre with new energies and redirecting its history as a form.

In this seminar we will examine the history of the novel in America through the lens of specific women novelists who have participated in this blending of the domestic novel and metafiction. While the focus will be on contemporary women writers, we will also place them in historical context, looking at Hawthorne's frustrations and his responses to them, as well as considering how the approach of blending the domestic and the metafictional finds its way into the novels of these women's male peers, suggesting that questions regarding the form's evolving identity are no longer to be answered differently depending on the author's gender.

Texts: Beattie, Another You and Picturing Will; Erdrich, The Beet Queen; Godwin, The Good Husband and A Southern Family; Morrison, Jazz; Otto, How to Make an American Quilt; Settle, The Killing Ground; Shields, Swann and Unless; Smith, Fair and Tender Ladies; Tyler, Celestial Navigation; and a course reader of assorted critical articles.

Requirements: Active and informed class participation; four short analysis papers; two presentations on critical reading; and a formal documented essay.

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ENGL 6385-01: Seminar in Special Topics, Prof. Chad Davidson
The Anxiety of Poetic Modernism
T 5:30-8:15, TLC 2237

Description: For the generation of poets born in the early twentieth century, the monuments of high modernist achievement loomed large on the poetic landscape. And as modernist agendas such as impersonality, artifice, self-conscious difficulty, allusiveness, and fragmentation solidified themselves through the writings of Eliot and the new critics, those monuments began to appear more as insurmountable obstacles. In likening Pound's Cantos to the Alps, Basil Bunting appears to have spoken for a good many poets living in the shadow of the modernists when he declared, "There they are, you will have to go a long way round / if you want to avoid them."

This course deals with the "anxiety"--in Harold Bloom's definition--caused by modernism's legacy. How do poets follow or rebel against such a seemingly all-inclusive movement devoted to reinventing and renaming itself continually? If not modern, then what? What might postmodern poetry be? What is left to discover beyond the Alps? Or, to borrow from Frost, is poetry after modernism "a diminished thing"? To answer these and other questions dealing with poetry up to the mid-twentieth century, we will look at both modern and early postmodern poets in an attempt to locate influences and investigate how poets after modernism dealt with such a colossal artistic inheritance. Because we will be focusing on the gradual shift away from modernism, we will cover a wide range of authors both British (Hardy, Yeats, Auden, and Larkin) and American (Stein, Frost, Stevens, Williams, Pound, H. D., Moore, Eliot, Hughes and other members of the Harlem Renaissance, Bishop, Berryman, Lowell, Brooks, and Plath).

Texts: Bloom, The Anxiety of Influence; Ellmann, O'Clair, et al, eds. The Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, 2nd ed. Perkins, A History of Modern Poetry: Modernism and After. Vol. 2; Pinsky, The Sounds of Poetry; and supplemental materials distributed in class.

Requirements: Recitation by rote of 20 lines of poetry; active participation in class discussions; daily journal entries responding to readings; two presentations over supplementary critical works; and one final project, which may be either scholarly or creative. The scholarly project consists of a researched-based essay (15-18 pages) preceded by a proposal, bibliography, and short presentation. The creative project consists of a group of original poems (6-8 pages) written in dialogue with some of the course poets and theories, along with a critical introduction (10-12 pages) that situates your work within the theoretical framework of the course.

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Last updated April 17, 2004