University of West Georgia -- Department of English and Philosophy
1601 Maple Street, Carrollton, Georgia 30118 -- Phone: (678) 839-6512 - Fax: (678) 839-4849

Course Template
The following information should be available to students as a part of all syllabi for this course.


Course Information
Number: ENGL 4160
Section:
Catalog Name: Twentieth-Century American Literature
Instructor Information
Instructor's name:

Office Location:
Office hours:
Phone/email:

Required texts and other readings/materials
  • Individual instructors may assemble a group of texts that will allow students to meet the objectives and specifications of the course. No specific texts are required.
Course description
  • An in-depth examination of ideas and issues prevalent in twentieth-century American literature in its historical, political, cultural, and aesthetic contexts.
  • Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 and 1102.
  • A further specific description pertaining to this section of the course may be added.

Course Goals

  • Students will demonstrate their ability to understand, analyze, and critique selections of twentieth-century American literature.
  • Students will recognize distinct aesthetic movements in the twentieth century in order to gain familiarity with the content and defining qualities of the literary period.
  • Students will develop an understanding of different critical approaches to the interpretation of works of twentieth-century American literature.
  • Students will demonstrate in both oral and written work a discipline-specific critical facility through convincing and well-supported analysis of related material.
  • Students will demonstrate their command of academic English and the tenets of sound composition by means of thesis-driven analytical prose.
  • Students will learn to use discipline-specific computer technologies related to the study of language such as listservs, word processing, and internet research.

Program Goals

  • This course fulfills one of the departmental requirements for the completion of the English major.
  • Students will develop the analytical, oral and written skills to pursue graduate study or careers in teaching, writing, business and a variety of other fields.
  • Students will be able to define and pursue independent research agendas.
  • This course contributes to the program goal of equipping students with a foundation in literary history and the issues surrounding literary study in contemporary culture.
  • This course broadens students' desire and ability to take pleasure in their encounter with literature.

General topics and assignments appropriate to those topics

  • To be determined by instructor.
Assessment activities
  • To be determined by instructor.
  • Students will display their command of academic English and of the tenets of  sound composition by means of thesis-driven analytical prose, including at least ten pages of research-based writing.
Other policies
  • Departmental plagiarism policies
  • Other policy statements specific to this class should be included on the syllabus.
  • A detailed calendar of readings and assignments should be made available to the class at the first class meeting. A copy should be posted electronically and kept on file in the English department office.
  • Students should be expected to come to class, prepared and able to participate.
  • MLA style should be emphasized and required on out-of-class essays.
Last updated 8-9-04 --Email Susan Holland with problems or questions about the site.