University of West Georgia -- Department of English and Philosophy
1601 Maple Street, Carrollton, Georgia 30118 -- Phone: (678) 839-6512 - Fax: (678) 839-4849

Course Template
The following information should be available to students as a part of all syllabi for this course.

Course Information
Number: ENGL 4188

Section:

Catalog Name: Individual Authors
Instructor Information
Instructor's name:

Office Location:
Office hours:
Phone/email:

Required texts and other readings/materials
  • Individual instructors may assemble a group of texts that will allow students to meet the objectives and specifications of the course. No specific texts are required.
Course description
  • An examination of the career of a single literary figure in the context of literary history.  Frequent offerings in Shakespeare and Chaucer will rotate with courses in a variety of other figures from several literary traditions.  May be repeated for credit as topic varies.  Shakespeare may be taken for up to six (6) hours, if topic varies, with department chair's permission.
  • Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 and 1102.
  • A further specific description pertaining to this section of the course may be added.

Course Goals

  • Students will become familiar with the career of a major figure in literature.
  • Students will understand how that writer's work both embodies the literary tradition that precedes it and influences the literature that follows it.
  • Students will appreciate the ways in which a writer's career and reputation are influenced by social, political, historical, and cultural forces.
  •  Students will gain an enhanced knowledge of how criticism shapes literary history.
  • Students will demonstrate in both oral and written work a discipline-specific critical facility through convincing and well-supported analysis of related material.
  • Students will demonstrate their command of academic English and the tenets of sound composition by means of thesis-driven analytical prose.
  • Students will learn to use discipline-specific computer technologies related to the study of language such as listservs, word processing, and internet research.

Program Goals

  • This course fulfills one of the departmental requirements for the completion of the English major.
  • Students will develop the analytical, oral and written skills to pursue graduate study or careers in teaching, writing, business and a variety of other fields.
  • Students will be able to define and pursue independent research agendas.
  • This course contributes to the program goal of equipping students with a foundation in literary history and the issues surrounding literary study in contemporary culture.
  • This course broadens students' desire and ability to take pleasure in their encounter with literature.
General topics and assignments appropriate to those topics
  • To be determined by instructor.
Assessment activities
  • To be determined by instructor.
  • Students will display their command of academic English and of the tenets of  sound composition by means of thesis-driven analytical prose, including at least ten pages of research-based writing.
Other policies
  • Departmental plagiarism policies
  • Other policy statements specific to this class should be included on the syllabus.
  • A detailed calendar of readings and assignments should be made available to the class at the first class meeting. A copy should be posted electronically and kept on file in the English department office.
  • Students should be expected to come to class, prepared and able to participate.
  • MLA style should be emphasized and required on out-of-class essays.
Last updated 8-9-04 --Email Susan Holland with problems or questions about the site.