Family Trees and Ge neology

Important events in history are often shaped by common, everyday individuals. The story of the South's struggle to industrialize is no different. After the Civil War, hundreds of impoverished farmers and their families migrated from all over Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, North and South Carolina looking for work in the mills. The families who came to Banning dedicated years of hard labor, putting in twelve hour days or more in the loud, stuffy shop floors. Because of their determination, Banning, even as a small, rural factory, takes its place along side the hundreds of other mills which transformed the South into an Industrial society. We may not know the names of all the individuals who contributed to Banning's success, but we recognize their contributions none-the-less. Below are a few profiles of families who made up the tight-knit community at Banning while participating in a phenomenon which would push the South into the 21st century.

Each family tree has been constructed with the aid of oral histories, photographs, census data, and newspaper articles.

Paul and Minnie Brown

Below the visitor will find biographical information about the Brown and Thompson families through the eyes of Paul and Minnie. In addition to their helpful oral histories and shared photographs, information pulled from the 1930s census assists in building a more complete story of these two families.

Paul Brown was born on January 25, 1922 in Spalding County, Georgia. His father, David Wilson Brown was born September 29, 1873 in Carroll County, Georgia. David made his living as a hosiery mill operator until the Depression. Between 1911 and 1915, he was the Superintendent at Banning’s hosiery mill, known then as Sock Town. On March 17, 1895, David married Mattie Gray. Mattie was born June 10, 1879 also in Carroll County, Georgia. After they were married, Mattie worked as a homemaker. David and Mattie had five children; Chester Glen, William Herbert, Exer Erline, and Paul were all born in Carroll County. One son, Benjamin Frank was born in Maryville, Tennessee.

 

When their children were growing up, the Brown’s lived on a farm near Clem, Georgia. (Not far from Banning). In 1941, when Paul was 19, he went to work at Banning as a machine operator. In his own words, Paul “operated machinery which twisted threads together. The thread was placed on cones by what is known as winders that made it ready for shipping.” Paul earned $15 a week.

David Brown and Mattie Gray
David Wilson Brown and Mattie Grey

 

Like many couples working at Banning, Paul met his wife on the job. He and Minnie E. Thompson worked the same shift and were passengers in a neighbor's vehicle that carried them and other mill hands to Banning.

Minnie standing on the old Chattahoochee River Bridge, age 17


William and Sarah Thompson

 

 

Minnie was born November 1, 1922 in Carroll County, Georgia. Her father, William Asbury Thompson was born on April 6, 1890 also in Carroll County. He worked at Banning as a textile work and later as a farmer and minister at Antioch Primitive Baptist Church, located a few miles from Banning Mill. His wife, Sarah Elizabeth Freemen was born on May 29, 1890 in Carroll County. They were married in 1908 at the tender age of 18. William and Sarah had seven children; Lois M., Alvis M., Roy W., Salathiel, Nezzie, Minnie, and Tom who all grew up around Banning.

 
 
RoyThompson
Tom Thompson


1930 Census data from Banning Mills

Name
Relation
Sex
Color
Age
Married?
Married Age
Occupation
Industry
Road
State
William Thompson
Head
M
W
39
Married
18
textile worker
Cotton Mill
Villa Rica
Georgia
Sarah Elizabeth
Wife
F
W
39
Married
18
none
-
Villa Rica
Georgia
Lois M.
Daughter
F
W
20
Single
-
textile worker
Cotton Mill
Villa Rica
Georgia
Alvis M.
Daughter
F
W
19
Single
-
textile worker
Cotton Mill
Villa Rica
Georgia
Roy W.
Son
M
W
16
Single
-
textile worker
Cotton Mill
Villa Rica
Georgia
Salathiel
Son
M
W
13
Single
-
none
-
Villa Rica
Georgia
Nezzie
Daughter
F
W
9
Single
-
none
-
Villa Rica
Georgia
Minnie E.
Daughter
F
W
7
Single
-
none
-
Villa Rica
Georgia

 

Minnie worked at Banning from age 16 to 19 as a winder operator. In her own words, “I operated a winding machine that wound thread on cones. The finished product was ready for shipment.” Like the Browns, the Thompson family moved from the mill village to a farm in their later years. Thus, Minnie had to carpool to work and as cupid would have it, met her future husband, Paul.

 

Minnie at age 16

Paul and Minnie Brown are still married, very much in love, and living in sunny Florida! (In Paul’s words, “the land of the three C’s, canes, crutches, and Cadillac’s!') When asked what he remembered most about Banning, Paul replied, “At one time Banning was a very active small town that provided employment for many people. During that time, I also met the girl of my life and have been happily married for years”. Minnie recalled, “playing with children when I was young, as there was plenty of children to be with. And [when I was] older, swimming in Snake Creek and walking over the bridge at the old mill.” Although their responses differ, Paul and Minnie both have fond memories of their time at Banning. (Not that the work was easy, but their social experiences memorable).
Paul and Minnie after they were married in 1942.


Thanks to Paul and Minnie Brown for all there help on the Banning Mill Documentation Project! Old friends can contact Paul and Minnie at Pappaw1922@aol.com.

Holder Family Tree
Families of Lewdy and Bash Holder

PARENTS CHILDREN SPOUSES GRAND
CHILDREN
SPOUSES GREAT GRANDCHILDREN SPOUSES GREAT GRAND
CHILDREN
          Viola b. 1897    
          Vesta A. b. 1902    
      Henry Allen Sarah Luvena Grichard George A. b. 1906    
      b. 1876 b. 1876 Allen Wilson b. 1913 Marty, Ruth, & Ethelene Allen, Mike, & Penny
  James M. ?     Albert Lloyd b. 1917    
Lewdy Holder b. 1847/8   James Holder Sallie Alice b. 1894    
b. 1829 in SC     b. 1871 b. 1873 Buna b. 1899    
married Robert            
Martha b. 1849   ?        
b. 1831              
  ?   John R. Mary Loveless & Pearl Daniel John b. Dec. 12, 1920 Mary  
          boy    
  ?       Ruth    
      ?        
          Lillie    
Bash Holder     John Paul Sallie b. 1918    
d. April 1887 Wilson Russell Elizabeth Smith

b. April 10, 1892
d. March 28, 1977

  Christine ?    
marries b. Nov. 29, 1866 b. Jan. 24, 1871     b. 1915    
Carrie Smith d. Dec. 29, 1907   Render William        
      b. Nov. 17, 1905
d. Sept. 14, 1981
       

Bash Holder died of the measles in an outbreak that affected sixty other Banning residents.
Henry Allen worked at the Banning cotton mill, but later returned to farming. He is best remembered for his successful grocery store which he opened circa 1925, shortly after the mill closed the company owned store.
(For more information on the Holder grocery store, see Wilson Holder's comments on the Oral History page.)
Both Paul and Render Holder worked in the cotton mill as unskilled laborers.

Thomas and Tallie Tolbert

PARENTS     Husband Thomas Tolbert Wife Tallie          
        b. 1850 d. 1914-1919   b. 1853          
CHILDREN/SPOUSES Ed Tolbert Annie Charles W. Tolbert Siddie William M. Tolbert Zena Paul Tolbert Effie Bertha Tolbert ? Lewis Tolbert ?
  b. 1882 b. 1882 b. 1887 b. 1891 b. 1888 b. 1894 b. Jan. 10, 1891
d. July 1, 1990
b. 1892 b. 1893   b. 1896  
GRANDCHILDREN Ray b. 1902 Thelma M. b.1914 Alvis b. 1913 Oscar W. b.1913 ?   ?  
  Ruby b. 1903 Essie Pauline b. 1917 Curtis b. 1915 Tyrus W. b.1916        
  boy b. 1910 Andrew W. b. 1920 Edwin b. 1919 Carl H. b. 1919        
      Charles Everett b.June 28, 1923     James T. b. 1922        
              Hazel b. 1924        
              Ionogene b. 1926        
Thomas and Tallie lived at New Manchester, Sweetwater (today Lithia Springs, GA) in their youth. The couple was carried by Sherman to the stockade in Kentucky during the Civil War. While at the stockade they were married. When the war ended, they returned to Georgia to start a family. Throughout his life, Thomas worked as a carpenter and miller at Banning. His wife, Tallie seems to have stayed home with the children until she was widowed between 1914 and 1919. At age 66 she worked as a laborer in the cotton mill. She lived with her son Lewis on a farm outside of Banning until her death.

Thomas and Tallie's oldest child, Ed, worked in the cotton mill at Banning as a seeder in 1900. Throughout his lifetime, Charles W. worked as a doffer, miller, farmer, carpenter, and night watchman at Banning. His brother, Will M. also worked as a laborer at the mill. Paul Tolbert played baseball for the company team when he was working at the mill. In his later years he labored as a farmer. Their youngest son, Lewis, was also employed at Banning.

Edd Tolbert, born 1882, third from left, with "Grandpa Lenderman, Claude Pallune, and Joe Prichett"

Charles Tolbert and Bill Lenderman
Effie and Paul Tolbert
Oscar Tolbert
Eunice Rice and Thelma Tolbert
Essie Pauline Tolbert and Mary Lee
Charles Everett Tolbert

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