Learning Outcomes for Core Courses

(revised December 2012)

 

 

PHIL 2010: Introduction to Philosophy

·         Define and distinguish among the philosophical terms and concepts used in the course.

·         Describe the views of at least three major philosophers from the Western tradition.

·         Contrast the competing views of major philosophers on some of the philosophical
issues explored in the course.

·         Explain and critically assess the philosophical issues and theories explored in the
course.

·         Discuss in both oral and written discourse the philosophical theories and issues explored in the course.

These course-specific learning outcomes contribute to the departmental learning outcomes of the Philosophy Program by enabling students better to

·         discuss the general historical development of the discipline of philosophy, including the views of at least three major historical figures of philosophy; 

·         incorporate a philosophical position in oral and written communications;

·         critically outline and analyze philosophical issues;

·         exhibit critical thinking skills.

 

 

PHIL 2020: Critical Thinking

·         Identify deductive and inductive argumentation;

·         Distinguish fact and informed opinion from mere opinion in a variety of argumentative contexts;

·         Organize evidence and compose persuasive arguments, both orally and in writing;

·         Identify and distinguish formal and informal fallacies of reasoning;

·         Identify, develop, and analyze reasons in support of a conclusion.

These course-specific learning outcomes contribute to the departmental learning outcomes of the Philosophy Program by enabling students better to

·         incorporate a philosophical position in oral and written communications;

·         critically outline and analyze philosophical issues;

·         exhibit critical thinking skills.

 

 

PHIL 2030: Introduction to Ethics

·         Recognize and apply basic patterns of logical reasoning within ethical contexts;

·         Describe selected theories within meta-ethics and normative ethics, as well as selected arguments for and against those theories;

·         Describe positions and facts relevant to selected issues within applied ethics (such as abortion, human cloning and homosexuality);

·         Summarize the contributions of historically important figures (such as J. S. Mill and Immanuel Kant) to ethical thought;

·         Discuss in both oral and written discourse the ethical theories and issues explored in the course.

These course-specific learning outcomes contribute to the departmental learning outcomes of the Philosophy Program by enabling students better to

·         discuss the general historical development of the discipline of philosophy, including the views of at least three major historical figures of philosophy;

·         incorporate a philosophical position in oral and written communications;

·         critically outline and analyze philosophical issues;

·         exhibit critical thinking skills.

 

 

PHIL 2130: Introduction to World Religions

·         Describe, compare, and contrast the distinct beliefs and practices of the world’s religions.

·         Recognize and be able to discuss the historical and philosophical foundations of the major world religions.

·         Differentiate the various scriptures of the world’s religions based upon content, genre, and function within the religious community.

·         Engage critically one’s own views of religion, belief in the divine, or religious groups.

·         Develop intellectual sympathy with those of different religious worldviews.

These course-specific learning outcomes contribute to the departmental learning outcomes of the Philosophy Program by enabling students better to

·         discuss the general historical development of the discipline of philosophy, including the views of at least three major historical figures of philosophy;

·         incorporate a philosophical position in oral and written communications;

·         critically outline and analyze philosophical issues;

 





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This page last updated 12/14/2012.