Political Philosophy (PHIL 4115)

Spring 2003

Study Guide: Test 2: Hobbes, Locke, Marx, Mill, Rawls, Nozick

Wednesday April 30 (2pm to 4pm)

 

This test will be worth 30% of your total course grade. This is a timed test; you will have from 2:00pm to 4:00pm to complete the test.

 

You are required to provide your own blue book for the test. Blue books are mini notebooks designed especially for students to take tests with. They are available from the UWG Bookstore. They are available in two sizes: small and large. Since this is a final exam and I expect you to use all (or at least most) of the two hours you have to write your test, you may be better off using a large bluebook. Bluebooks are very inexpensive (less than $.50 each).

 

You will be required to write three essays. The questions will be drawn from the following list:

 

 

Hobbes

 

Discuss Hobbes' explanation of the source of political authorityN. At minimum, your discussion should cover what Hobbes has to say regarding:

         human nature

         the state of nature

         laws and rights of nature

         covenants

         the creation of the "commonwealth by institution"

 

Discuss Hobbes' account of governments created "by institution". At minimum, your discussion should cover what Hobbes has to say regarding:

         the rights of sovereigns by institution

         the types of commonwealth by institution, and which type is best

         the types of "liberty" possessed by the subjects of a commonwealth

 

Locke

 

Discuss Locke's explanation of the source of political authorityN. At minimum, your discussion should cover what Locke has to say regarding:

         the law of nature

         the state of nature

         the executive power of the law of nature (EPLN)

         how and why the EPLN is transferred

 

Discuss Locke's treatment of the subjects of the powers of government and the dissolution of government. At minimum, your discussion should cover what Locke has to say regarding:

         the separation of powers

         the general limit on legislative power

         the ways in which a government can lose authorityN

         rebellion

         an individual's ability to exit a community of which he is a part

 

 

Marx

 

Discuss Marx's views on the subjects of alienation and private property. At minimum, your discussion should cover:

         labor as a source of self-knowledge

         four forms of alienation

         the origin of alienation in private property

 

Discuss Marx's views on communism. At minimum, your discussion should cover:

         the history of the class struggle

         the advent of communism

         the materialist conception of history

         the disappearance of government

 

Mill

 

Discuss Mill's Harm Principle and his Utilitarianism, explaining both ideas in detail, the (alleged) tension between them, and whether that tension can be resolved.

 

Discuss Mill's Argument for Freedom of Thought and Expression, incorporating into your discussion the concepts of fallibilism, certainty, and genuine inquiry.

 

Rawls

 

Discuss Rawls' theory of justice. At minimum your discussion should cover:

         Rawls' concern with social justice

         the "original position" (including the "veil of ignorance")

         the two principles of justice (liberty and distributive justice)

         the Equal Opportunity Principle

         the Difference Principle

 

Nozick

 

Discuss Nozick's Entitlement Theory. At minimum your discussion should cover:

         the theory's three principles, and the principles of justice on which they're based

         end-result principles and historical principles

         how Nozick's account of distributive justice differs from that of Rawls

 

 



This outline of lecture notes may help you to locate relevant material.




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