ASA STYLE GUIDE FOR UWG SOCIOLOGY CLASSES

 

            This style guide is a modified version of the American Sociological Association Style Guide (2nd ed.).    It was designed to be used in undergraduate classes; however, it does not supersede specific instructions given by individual instructors.

 

FORMAT

 

            All text – including the title page, abstract, references and tables or figures – should be double-spaced.  A standard font size (e.g., Times New Roman 12, Arial 12) should be used.  Margins should be set at 1.25 on all four sides.  The paper should be stapled.  The pages should be numbered.

 

            The title page (or cover sheet) should include the title of the paper, your name, the course title, the words “University of West Georgia” and the date. This information should be arranged vertically.

 

            An abstract follows the title page.  It should be one paragraph and approximately 150 words in length.  Some instructors may not want an abstract.

 

            The body should begin on a new page, and the title should appear at the top of this page.

 

            References should begin on a separate page following the body of your paper.  The word “References” should be centered at the top of the page.

 

            Each figure (chart, illustration, photograph) and table should be given a descriptive title.  Tables should be numbered consecutively, as should figures.  The title should be placed at the top. For the tables, headings should be written out, not abbreviated, for all columns and rows.  If the figure or table is derived from a secondary source, the source should be listed at the bottom. According to the instructor’s directions, figures and tables will be included in the body of the paper or located after the references.  In all cases, an indication of the figure or table should be mentioned in the text, e.g., (See Table 1).  See pages 9 and 10 for examples of figures and tables.

 

CITATIONS IN THE TEXT

 

            Authors’ last names and publication dates are included in all citations.  Do not put punctuation between the names and the dates.  Page numbers are also used if the reference is to specific passages or if it involves a direct quote.

 

1.         If the author’s name is in the text, simply put the date of publication in parentheses, e.g., … according to Holland (2002).

 

2.         If the author’s name is not in the text, put the name and date of publication in parentheses, e.g., … (Houvouras 2005)

 

3.         If the cited text has two authors, list both authors, e.g., … (Arrigo and Williams 2004). 

 

4.         If the cited text has three authors, list all authors in the first citation and use the first author and “et al.” in subsequent citations, e.g., (Krebs, Costelloe and Jenks 2003) becomes (Krebs et al. 2003) in later citations.

 

5.         If the text being cited has more than three authors, use “et al.” in all citations, e.g., in a study of short term treatment (Stone et al. 2004).

 

6.         Page numbers go after the publication date.  A colon separates the date and the pages.  Omit the space between the colon and the pages, e.g., “… issues that arise in most courts” (Fuller 2006:284).

 

7.         A series of references should be alphabetized or put in chronological order (consistently throughout the paper) and separated by semicolons, e.g., … (LaFountain 2003; Luken and Vaughan 2003a).

 

8.         For works with organizational authorship or without an author, provide minimum identification, e.g., … (U.S. Bureau of the Census 2004).

 

9.         For citation of a reprint of an earlier version, include the earlier publication date in brackets prior to the recent version, e.g., … ([1899] 2003).

 

REFERENCES

 

 

BOOKS

 

Omit the state of publication if the city is New York.

Put a colon between the title and subtitle.

 

Book – single author

Last name, First name, Initials.  Date of publication.  Title of the Book in Italics.  City of publication, postal initials for state of publication: Publisher.

 

Fuller, John Randolph.  2006.  Criminal Justice: Mainstream and Crosscurrents.  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice-Hall.

 

Book – two or more authors

Last name, First name, Initial “and” First name Initials Last name.  Date of publication.  Title of the Book in Italics.  City of publication, postal initials for state of publication: Publisher.

 

Arrigo, Bruce A. and Christopher R. Williams.  2004.  Theory, Justice and Social Change: Theoretical Implications and Critical Applications.  New York: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

 

Note: If there are more then two authors, do not put a comma between the names of the next-to-last and the last author.

 

Anonymous source

1. Do not use the word “Anonymous” to designate the author.

2. If the author’s name can be discerned from the work itself, put it in brackets.

3. If the author’s name cannot be determined, begin with the title.  Put a leading article at the end of the title.

 

Title of the Book, Article.  Publication date.  City, ST: Publisher.

 

Worst Way to Learn: The Government’s War on Education, The.  1997.  San Luis Obispo, CA: Blakeside.

 

 

Editions of Books

Indicate the edition after the title.

 

Schwalbe, Michael.  2005.  The Sociologically Examined Life: Pieces of the Conversation. 3rd ed.  New York: McGraw-Hill.

 

Volumes of Books

As is the case for editions of books above, indicate the volume number after the title, e.g., “Vol. 5.”  If you are citing all volumes of a book, indicate the number of volumes after the title, e.g., “3 vols.”

 

Translations

As is the case for editions of books above, indicate the translator after the title, e.g., “Translated by Geraldine McIntosh.”

 

Republished Books

(Books that have gone out of print and are reissued later.  Do not use this for more recent editions or publication in paperback)

Note the original publication date in brackets and then the current publication date, e.g., “[1899] 2003.”

 

ARTICLES AND BOOK CHAPTERS

Chapters and Articles from Collected Works

Last name, First name, Initial.  Date. “Chapter Title in Quotes.”  Pp. pages in Book Title in Italics, edited by Editor’s initials Last name. Place of publication: Publisher.

 

LaFountain, Marc.  2003.  “Phenomenology of Violence.”  Pp. 496-498 in Encyclopedia of Murder and Violent Crime, edited by E. Hickey.  Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

 

Articles from Journals

If journal pages are numbered consecutively within a volume year, as is the case with most journals, do not list the issue number.  If each issue begins with page 1, then include the issue number or month after the volume number.

 

Do not put a punctuation mark after the journal title.

 

Holland, Laurel.  2002. “Reconceptualizing Social Movement Abeyance: The Role of Internal Processes and Culture in Cycles of Movement Abeyance and Resurgence.”  Sociological Focus 35:297-314.

 

Articles with Multiple Authors

Krebs, Christopher P., Michael Costelloe and David Jenks.  2003.  “Drug Control Policy and Smuggling Innovation: A Game-Theoretical Analysis.”  Journal of Drug Issues 33:133-160.

 

Two or More Articles in One Year by the Same Author(s)

Luken, Paul and Suzanne Vaughan.  2003a.  “‘Active Living’: Transforming the Organization of Retirement and Housing in the U.S.”  Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 30:145-169.

     —.  2003b. “Living Alone in Old Age: Institutionalized Discourse and Women’s Knowledge.” Sociological Quarterly 44: 109-131.

 

Articles That Are Not Yet Published

 

Carter, J. Scott and Mamadi Corra.  Forthcoming.  “Changing Attitudes Toward Women, 1972-1998: Are Religious Fundamentalists Becoming Progressively More Liberal Over Time?”  Michigan Sociological Review.

 

Articles from Newspapers and Magazines

Toner, Robin and David E. Rosenbaum.  2005.  “Senate Takes Up Bid to Overhaul Social Security.”  The New York Times, April 26, pp. A1, A16.

 

UNPUBLISHED PAPERS AND REPORTS

Stone, Sandra S., N. Jane McCandless, Michelle Lague, Sharise Thurman and Donald Wilkinson.   2004.  “Program Evaluation of the 90-Day, or Short Term Treatment Program Operated by the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice.”  Final Report Submitted to the Children and Youth Coordinating Council.  Unpublished Report.

 

PRESENTED PAPERS

Houvouras, Shannon K.  2005.  “Raging Hormones? Women’s Construction of Childbearing Emotions.”  Presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Sociological Society, April, Charlotte, NC.

 

DISSERTATIONS AND THESES

Lague, Michelle.  2004.  “The Benefits of Therapeutic Horsemanship Activities for Older Adults: An Exploratory Study.”  M.A. thesis, Department of Sociology and Criminology, State University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA.

 

ELECTRONIC SOURCES

Newspaper Article

Fitzsimmons, Steve.  2005.  “County Schools Budget up 8.3%.”  Times-Georgian Online, April 26.  Retreived April 26, 2005 (http://www.times-georgian.com).

 

Journal Article

Wright, II, Earl.  2005.  “W.E.B. DuBois and the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory.”  Sociation Today 3.  Retrieved August 30, 2005  (http://www.ncsociology.org/sociationtoday/v31/wright.htm).

 

Web Page

White House.  2004.  “Fact Sheet: Expanding Homeownership for All Americans.  Retrieved March 26, 2004 (http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2004/03/print/20040315-3.html).


 

REFERENCE LIST EXAMPLE

 

References

 

Arrigo, Bruce A. and Christopher R. Williams.  2004.  Theory, Justice and Social Change: Theoretical Implications and Critical Applications.  New York: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Carter, J. Scott and Mamadi Corra.  Forthcoming.  “Changing Attitudes Toward Women, 1972-1998: Are Religious Fundamentalists Becoming Progressively More Liberal Over Time?”  Michigan Sociological Review.

Fitzsimmons, Steve.  2005.  “County Schools Budget up 8.3%.”  Times-Georgian Online, April 26.  Retreived April 26, 2005 (http://www.times-georgian.com).

Fuller, John Randolph.  2006.  Criminal Justice: Mainstream and Crosscurrents.  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice-Hall.

Holland, Laurel.  2002. “Reconceptualizing Social Movement Abeyance: The Role of Internal Processes and Culture in Cycles of Movement Abeyance and Resurgence.”  Sociological Focus 35:297-314.

Houvouras, Shannon K.  2005.  “Raging Hormones? Women’s Construction of Childbearing Emotions.”  Presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Sociological Society, April, Charlotte, NC.

Krebs, Christopher P., Michael Costelloe and David Jenks.  2003.  “Drug Control Policy and Smuggling Innovation: A Game-Theoretical Analysis.”  Journal of Drug Issues 33:133-160.

LaFountain, Marc.  2003.  “Phenomenology of Violence.”  Pp. 496-498 in Encyclopedia of Murder and Violent Crime, edited by E. Hickey.  Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Lague, Michelle.  2004.  “The Benefits of Therapeutic Horsemanship Activities for Older Adults: An Exploratory Study.”  M.A. thesis, Department of Sociology and Criminology, State University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA.

Luken, Paul and Suzanne Vaughan.  2003a.  “‘Active Living’: Transforming the Organization of Retirement and Housing in the U.S.”  Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 30:145-169.

    —.  2003b. “Living Alone in Old Age: Institutionalized Discourse and Women’s Knowledge.” Sociological Quarterly 44: 109-131.

Schwalbe, Michael.  2005.  The Sociologically Examined Life: Pieces of the Conversation. 3rd ed.  New York: McGraw-Hill.

Stone, Sandra S., N. Jane McCandless, Michelle Lague, Sharise Thurman and Donald Wilkinson.   2004.  “Program Evaluation of the 90-Day, or Short Term Treatment Program Operated by the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice.”  Final Report Submitted to the Children and Youth Coordinating Council.  Unpublished Report.

Toner, Robin and David E. Rosenbaum.  2005.  “Senate Takes Up Bid to Overhaul Social Security.”  The New York Times, April 26, pp. A1, A16.

White House.  2004.  “Fact Sheet: Expanding Homeownership for All Americans.  Retrieved March 26, 2004 (http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2004/03/print/20040315-3.html).

Wright, II, Earl.  2005.  “W.E.B. DuBois and the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory.”  Sociation Today 3.  Retrieved August 30, 2005 (http://www.ncsociology.org/sociationtoday/v31/wright.htm).

Worst Way to Learn: The Government’s War on Education, The.  1997.  San Luis Obispo, CA: Blakeside.


 

 

TITLE PAGE EXAMPLE

                                                                                                           

 

 

 

 

Poverty in the United States: 1950-2000

Jane Addams

Social Inequality

University of West Georgia

April 2, 2005


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

TABLE EXAMPLE

 

 

Table 1: 2005 HHS Poverty Guidelines

Persons in
Family Unit

48 Contiguous
States and D.C.

Alaska

Hawaii

1

$ 9,570

$11,950

$11,010

2

12,830

16,030

14,760

3

16,090

20,110

18,510

4

19,350

24,190

22,260

5

22,610

28,270

26,010

6

25,870

32,350

29,760

7

29,130

36,430

33,510

8

32,390

40,510

37,260

For each additional
person, add

 3,260

 4,080

 3,750

SOURCEFederal Register, Vol. 70, No. 33, February 18, 2005, pp. 8373-8375.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

FIGURE EXAMPLE

 

 

Figure 1: Suffragists picketing in front of the White House, 1917.

SOURCE: Records of the National Woman’s Party, Library of Congress.