In 1907, the Bonner Plantation became home to the Fourth District A&M (Agricultural and Mechanical) School. Construction of the building started that year, and opened in 1908, withJohn Holland Melson as the first principal. Due to the depression, the school was still under construction when it opened. The school started without chairs, desks, heating or cooling, or an adequate water source. Through donations of local organizations, the school was able to get seating and farming equipment for their students. During World War I, military training began; students learned military dress, and how to handle weapons. Principal Melson resigned in the early parts of 1920. Melson’s successor, Irvine Sullivan Ingram, took over as principal on April 22, 1920 and remained president of the institution until 1960. In 1929, legislation started to end all A&M Schools, and for the West Georgia region that meant only one of the three A&M Schools could become a Junior College. Powder Springs’ and Bowden’s Schools were shut down, and in 1933 the Carroll County A&M School became the West Georgia Junior College.  West Georgia College Map
  • In 1907, the Bonner Plantation became home to the Fourth District A&M (Agricultural and Mechanical) School. Construction of the building started that year, and opened in 1908, withJohn Holland Melson as the first principal. Due to the depression, the school was still under construction when it opened. The school started without chairs, desks, heating or cooling, or an adequate water source. Through donations of local organizations, the school was able to get seating and farming equipment for their students. During World War I, military training began; students learned military dress, and how to handle weapons. Principal Melson resigned in the early parts of 1920. Melson’s successor, Irvine Sullivan Ingram, took over as principal on April 22, 1920 and remained president of the institution until 1960. In 1929, legislation started to end all A&M Schools, and for the West Georgia region that meant only one of the three A&M Schools could become a Junior College. Powder Springs’ and Bowden’s Schools were shut down, and in 1933 the Carroll County A&M School became the West Georgia Junior College. 
    West Georgia College Map

Principal Melson

President Ingram

In 1933, when the West Georgia Junior College opened, it started with seventeen faculty members, many of which buildings were named after. President Ingram began to change the curriculum to what he called the differentiating purpose. He did not want the college to be just another junior college; instead, he wanted it to be a college that promoted rural education and teacher training for rural schools. Created in 1933, The West Georgian was the College’s first newspaper. President Ingram worked with the Rosenwald organization to start an experimental rural education program. The proposed program would be a cooperative program between West Georgia College and the Carroll County Board of education. It would allow teachers in training to teach in local schools, increase aid to African American elementary schools, and to increase the number of teachers in the local schools. In the first decade of the college, the first academic clubs appeared, such as the Glee Club, Drama Club, and Debate Club. During the same time, there were purely social clubs created as well, such as Delta Packa Cards and the Cue Ball club. In 1935, West Georgia College was setup as a National youth Administration (NYA) Center, and 1940, with the onset of World War II, the West Georgia NYA was one of three chosen to become National Defense Units. As a National Defense Unit, they produced garments and other military supplies for the war. Women started to take over the metalworking and machining jobs, as the men went off to war in 1942, and due to the men going off to war the College became almost an all girl’s school. Along with the NYA work the students of West Georgia College were also lending a hand on local farms, where there were not enough farm hands to harvest the crops. After World War II the G.I. Bill allowed veterans to attend college, and for West Georgia this meant an increase in their enrollment. With a growing demand from returning veterans for a West Georgia College football team, President Ingram allowed the creation of a new football team. In 1958, the College transitioned from a Junior college to a Senior College, and the football team was disbanded. President Ingram retired as President in 1960; however, during his time as both Principal and President he led the school from an A&M school through to a Senior College. He helped expand the school, and increase enrolment.

  • Principal Melson

    President Ingram


    In 1933, when the West Georgia Junior College opened, it started with seventeen faculty members, many of which buildings were named after. President Ingram began to change the curriculum to what he called the differentiating purpose. He did not want the college to be just another junior college; instead, he wanted it to be a college that promoted rural education and teacher training for rural schools. Created in 1933, The West Georgian was the College’s first newspaper. President Ingram worked with the Rosenwald organization to start an experimental rural education program. The proposed program would be a cooperative program between West Georgia College and the Carroll County Board of education. It would allow teachers in training to teach in local schools, increase aid to African American elementary schools, and to increase the number of teachers in the local schools. In the first decade of the college, the first academic clubs appeared, such as the Glee Club, Drama Club, and Debate Club. During the same time, there were purely social clubs created as well, such as Delta Packa Cards and the Cue Ball club. In 1935, West Georgia College was setup as a National youth Administration (NYA) Center, and 1940, with the onset of World War II, the West Georgia NYA was one of three chosen to become National Defense Units. As a National Defense Unit, they produced garments and other military supplies for the war. Women started to take over the metalworking and machining jobs, as the men went off to war in 1942, and due to the men going off to war the College became almost an all girl’s school. Along with the NYA work the students of West Georgia College were also lending a hand on local farms, where there were not enough farm hands to harvest the crops. After World War II the G.I. Bill allowed veterans to attend college, and for West Georgia this meant an increase in their enrollment. With a growing demand from returning veterans for a West Georgia College football team, President Ingram allowed the creation of a new football team. In 1958, the College transitioned from a Junior college to a Senior College, and the football team was disbanded. President Ingram retired as President in 1960; however, during his time as both Principal and President he led the school from an A&M school through to a Senior College. He helped expand the school, and increase enrolment.



Appointed as President in August 1961, Dr. James E. Boyd would lead the school through its next era of changes. With the increases inWest georgia Callege map, 1966 enrollment President Boyd and his chief administrators worked on campus expansion plans. The expansion plan called for twenty-two new buildings to handle the predicted growth of the College. Dr. David Griffin, of the History Department, initiated both the Social science and history Academic honors societies. Along with the student body growth, also came an increase in the curriculum. Introduction of new majors and degrees allowed the students more options. West Georgia College started to integrate the college with its first African American student in 1963, Mrs. Lillian Williams, who during her time at West Georgia College was able to complete her degree without issues. The African American population steadily grew over the next few decades, and the first SGA approved African American organization on campus was the Black Student Alliance. In 1969, Coach Roger Kaiser started the first integrated Basketball team. During the late 1960s and the early 1970s, had issues of drugs, alcohol, and promiscuous sex. The issues of drugs, alcohol, and open sex had made their way to the newspapers, which lead to a decrease in the approval of the College by Carroll County locals and decreased the enrollment rate. Between 1970 and 1973 there were campus underground newspapers, which recorded the counterculture movements on campus.  President Boyd resigned in the middle of a term, and so Dr. George W. Walker became acting President until early 1972 when Dr. Ward Pafford became president. Due to the negative press about the Drugs and open sex on Campus the enrollment rates; there were bomb threats and drug arrests, however during the next few years the issues settled down. The College’s first Gay rights groups was chaired by Ara Dostourian in 1972. By 1974, the enrollment rate started to increase and the campus had gradually calmed down, however President Pafford resigned 1974.
  • Appointed as President in August 1961, Dr. James E. Boyd would lead the school through its next era of changes. With the increases inWest georgia Callege map, 1966 enrollment President Boyd and his chief administrators worked on campus expansion plans. The expansion plan called for twenty-two new buildings to handle the predicted growth of the College. Dr. David Griffin, of the History Department, initiated both the Social science and history Academic honors societies. Along with the student body growth, also came an increase in the curriculum. Introduction of new majors and degrees allowed the students more options. West Georgia College started to integrate the college with its first African American student in 1963, Mrs. Lillian Williams, who during her time at West Georgia College was able to complete her degree without issues. The African American population steadily grew over the next few decades, and the first SGA approved African American organization on campus was the Black Student Alliance. In 1969, Coach Roger Kaiser started the first integrated Basketball team. During the late 1960s and the early 1970s, had issues of drugs, alcohol, and promiscuous sex. The issues of drugs, alcohol, and open sex had made their way to the newspapers, which lead to a decrease in the approval of the College by Carroll County locals and decreased the enrollment rate. Between 1970 and 1973 there were campus underground newspapers, which recorded the counterculture movements on campus.  President Boyd resigned in the middle of a term, and so Dr. George W. Walker became acting President until early 1972 when Dr. Ward Pafford became president. Due to the negative press about the Drugs and open sex on Campus the enrollment rates; there were bomb threats and drug arrests, however during the next few years the issues settled down. The College’s first Gay rights groups was chaired by Ara Dostourian in 1972. By 1974, the enrollment rate started to increase and the campus had gradually calmed down, however President Pafford resigned 1974.


Administrators spitting seeds July 1975, Dr. Maurice K. Townsend took over as President of the College. During the late 1970s, the basketball and baseball teams had good records of accomplishment, and in 1981, President Townsend re-established the football team. The football team was more successful than was expected. Before 1980, Love Valley had a small duck pond, which was drained and the gazebo was built years later. After years of success, West Georgia College wanted to increase its status to a University, and in 1989, they submitted the application to the board of regents. However, due to financial reasons the board of regents refused the application. Due to the education departments, many successes they received much needed space in 1993 when the education annex began its construction. May 16, 1993, President Maurice Townsend died, and ended his 18 years as President. President Townsend was one of the longest running presidents, other than President Ingram.
  • Administrators spitting seeds
    July 1975, Dr. Maurice K. Townsend took over as President of the College. During the late 1970s, the basketball and baseball teams had good records of accomplishment, and in 1981, President Townsend re-established the football team. The football team was more successful than was expected. Before 1980, Love Valley had a small duck pond, which was drained and the gazebo was built years later. After years of success, West Georgia College wanted to increase its status to a University, and in 1989, they submitted the application to the board of regents. However, due to financial reasons the board of regents refused the application. Due to the education departments, many successes they received much needed space in 1993 when the education annex began its construction. May 16, 1993, President Maurice Townsend died, and ended his 18 years as President. President Townsend was one of the longest running presidents, other than President Ingram.

During the summer of 1994, West Georgia College got its new president Dr. Beheruz N. Sethna. President Sethna was a hand on president that helped students that September move into their dorms. He conducted classes, when he had the chance, and conducted scholarly research. June 12, 1996, the College finally became a University, and that started a whole new era for the once small A&M School. Under President Sethna’s presidency enrollment increased every year, except for dropping only in 1996 when standards of enrollment were raised. The institution embraced the motto: “Educational excellence in a personal environment.” The Advanced Academy of Georgia opened in 1995, giving extraordinary high school students the opportunity to take actual college classes and live on campus. In 1998, the university received approval for its first doctoral program. Under President Sethna’s leadership, the university obtained approval for classification as a SACS Level VI institution, its highest certification level, and implemented Georgia’s first Honors College. From 2010 – 2014 campus facilities expanded significantly. Examples include the Coliseum in 2010, a new Bookstore and University Stadium in 2011, the Center Point Suites in 2012, renovations to the Library in 2012, additional seating areas across campus and the Visual Arts Building in 2012 and the Nursing building in 2013. Residence and dining facilities opened on the East side of campus in 2013-2014. In September of 2005, after the devastation that Hurricane Katrina left in Louisiana, UWG opened its empty resident hall, Roberts Hall to 187 evacuees, ranging from 2 - 70 in age. They collaborated with local emergency and medical groups to make sure that the evacuees had everything they needed during their stay. In 2006, due to several considerations including pressure from the NCAA to eliminate the use of team names associated with Native Americans, the university changed its mascot from the Braves to the Wolves. By 2013, plans were underway to relocate UWG’s Newnan location to the historic Newnan Hospital in downtown Newnan. The Newnan Center offered a complete array of core courses, as well as dual enrollment for high school students, two full undergraduate programs and five full graduate programs. From 1994 to 2013, UWG increased its enrollment by about 50%, increased its land holdings by more than 70%, more than doubled its square footage, more than doubled the number of degrees awarded, and increased its endowment to more than ten times its 1994 level. Dr. Sethna
  • During the summer of 1994, West Georgia College got its new president Dr. Beheruz N. Sethna. President Sethna was a hand on president that helped students that September move into their dorms. He conducted classes, when he had the chance, and conducted scholarly research. June 12, 1996, the College finally became a University, and that started a whole new era for the once small A&M School. Under President Sethna’s presidency enrollment increased every year, except for dropping only in 1996 when standards of enrollment were raised. The institution embraced the motto: “Educational excellence in a personal environment.” The Advanced Academy of Georgia opened in 1995, giving extraordinary high school students the opportunity to take actual college classes and live on campus. In 1998, the university received approval for its first doctoral program. Under President Sethna’s leadership, the university obtained approval for classification as a SACS Level VI institution, its highest certification level, and implemented Georgia’s first Honors College. From 2010 – 2014 campus facilities expanded significantly. Examples include the Coliseum in 2010, a new Bookstore and University Stadium in 2011, the Center Point Suites in 2012, renovations to the Library in 2012, additional seating areas across campus and the Visual Arts Building in 2012 and the Nursing building in 2013. Residence and dining facilities opened on the East side of campus in 2013-2014. In September of 2005, after the devastation that Hurricane Katrina left in Louisiana, UWG opened its empty resident hall, Roberts Hall to 187 evacuees, ranging from 2 - 70 in age. They collaborated with local emergency and medical groups to make sure that the evacuees had everything they needed during their stay. In 2006, due to several considerations including pressure from the NCAA to eliminate the use of team names associated with Native Americans, the university changed its mascot from the Braves to the Wolves. By 2013, plans were underway to relocate UWG’s Newnan location to the historic Newnan Hospital in downtown Newnan. The Newnan Center offered a complete array of core courses, as well as dual enrollment for high school students, two full undergraduate programs and five full graduate programs. From 1994 to 2013, UWG increased its enrollment by about 50%, increased its land holdings by more than 70%, more than doubled its square footage, more than doubled the number of degrees awarded, and increased its endowment to more than ten times its 1994 level.
    Dr. Sethna