The Online Faculty Development Center is dedicated to supporting faculty in the design, development, and implementation of many online components of their technology-enhanced and partially and fully online courses at UWG. Our mission is to help faculty to become more effective in their online instruction so that our students are engaged and successful in the online and face-to-face aspects of their courses. We help our faculty succeed in their online teaching practice by identifying and supporting their professional development needs.

UWG Online has adopted the Quality Matters Rubric, which is a set of best practices for online course design based on extensive research into online student learning. We adopted the Quality Matter’s Rubric in an effort to meet the goals outlined in Complete College Georgia—University of West Georgia Campus Plan to continually improve our online courses. These standards help to ensure that the courses in an online degree program are consistent in delivery and function from the perspectives of the students. You will see references to Quality Matters (QM) standards throughout our material. To learn more about Quality Matters, see Quality Matters at UWG, and to receive more information and training, contact us.

  • Getting Started
  • First Week
  • Course Content
  • Access
  • Support
  •  Getting Started

    Before you jump to creating your content, you might find some of these resources helpful. 

    • CourseDen and Banner  

      Before You Begin

      It is important that you communicate with your department about what type of course (course designation) you are going to offer because course type may influence student rates and fees and impact program compliance. Will your students be meeting virtually or on campus? Will there be proctored exams? Information like this should be included in Banner and communicated to students before they register for their courses. Failure to provide this information may cause students to miss out on important class meeting times or feel they’ve incurred extra fees.  For more information, check out our Policies & Procedures page.

      CourseDen

      CourseDen, powered by GeorgiaVIEW (Brightspace by D2L), is the official UWG course management system providing 24-hour support, security, back-up, disaster recovery, and documentation of student information, course records, and content. Our Getting Started in CourseDen guide will provide you with some basic information about how to navigate the site. Log in here.

      If instructors use tools hosted on alternate servers, through which neither the USG or UWG has a service level agreement, the instructor is responsible for the security and maintenance of student records and course content, student support, and making sure that the use of the outside tools is in compliance with all university policies covering data security, records retention, etc., along with any legal requirements, such as FERPA (PDF). Students must still authenticate through CourseDen, and the course syllabus must be provided there. The authentication and posted syllabus are for accreditation and security guidelines.

      Student Access

      Start of Term: Students are added to courses in CourseDen prior to the beginning of the term. However, they will not have access to the course until 12 AM on the posted start date as programmed in Banner. If your course is still being updated, consider posting a disclaimer in the News section or hide all content from student view.

      End of Term: The official end date of the term is as stated in Banner. However, students will continue to have access to their courses in CourseDen until 11:59 PM 2-3 weeks into the following term. To adjust the course access dates and/or times, please contact the Faculty Development Center.

      What you need to know about Banner in relation to CourseDen

      • Banner is the official course record for enrollment and final grades.
        • Should students need to be dropped for non-participation, withdrawals, etc., UWG Online FDC does not advise unenrolling them in CourseDen until this action has occurred in Banner first. If students are removed from CourseDen first, when the database updates and pulls information from Banner, these students will be re-enrolled in CourseDen.
      • Check course rosters periodically.
        • When a student registers or adds a course in Banner, the student may not be able to log in to CourseDen for 24-48 hours. CourseDen and myUWG/Banner rolls do not auto-sync and may not match. The two systems must be synchronized through a manual process.
        • When a student drops a course in Banner, he/she may not be dropped in CourseDen. Instructors must compare the two systems and manually unenroll students as needed. We advise this action be completed after the last drop for nonpayment. Students are typically reinstated a week past the last drop/add day and every few weeks during the semester.
      • Instructors may be able to add missing students, other instructors, or teaching assistants - if they are in CourseDen. See how to add participants here.

      • Did you know you can group course sections together, or Cross-list them, in to one CourseDen class? Cross-listing your course sections will make them easier to manage: you then have only one place to upload course materials or manage the grade book to check on multiple sections of your class. This has to be done well in advance of the term start date and before building the course. Failure to do so could result in the loss of content and student data in the process of combining the courses. Please use the Registrar’s integrated Crosslisting Form found under Faculty Services on the Banweb tab once you've logged in to MyUWG.
    • Faculty Training

      Throughout the Course Development website, you will see references to various tools within CourseDen (such as Calendar, Email, and Discussion) and software (such as Turnitin, Smarthinking, and Collaborate), you can use to engage your students in the learning process.  UWG Online FDC offers online and face-to-face training on these tools and best practices via our regularly scheduled group training or one-on-one consultations at your convenience. For additional print and video tutorials, a schedule of upcoming workshops, and other helpful information, see the Online Faculty Training page here.

    • Using a Sandbox Course

      The UWG Online FDC can create an empty or blank "sandbox course." You are encouraged to use the sandbox to begin building a new course or to test new features or tools. 

      To request a sandbox course, please complete the Sandbox Request Form. All sandboxes are created empty. However, the FDC can include a 8 module template with basic UWG and QM compliant content (such as university policies and privacy statements). When completing the form, you will have the option to include the Basic Course Template in your sandbox course. Click here for more information regarding the Basic Course Template.

      If you would like to copy specific components or all of the content from your sandbox course into another course, click here for detailed instructions.

    • Instructional Tools

      CourseDen

      CourseDen is our Learning Management System. Our Getting Started in CourseDen guide will provide you with some basic information about how to navigate the site. “Tools” refers to items such as the Discussions, Dropbox, and Quizzes. You can find more tutorials for these tools on our training site.  Referring to the tools by name as they appear in CouseDen and organizing your material in the same order from module to module helps provide a sense of familiarity for students. It is also helpful if you use week or module numbers as well as topics when naming your tools as in this example:

      Week 1 Discussion – What is Psychology?

      Module 1 Dropbox – Psychology v. Sociology

      Learn more about CourseDen Tools by visiting the Online Faculty Training Page. It is important that you become familiar with some of these tools, such as Course Builder and Edit Course, as well as the tools linked above before you try to address course content issues.

      Supported Tools & Software

      There are a variety of third-party instructional tools and software you can use to engage students in your online class. If you want to know what tools we support and want to access the training, a list of faculty software and services can be found on the Software & Services tab of our Online Faculty Training page. If you know what you want to do, but don’t know which tool would work, check out this annotated technology list organized by task instead of by tool. A complete list of supported tools and software can be found at the bottom of the Software and Services tab on the Online Faculty Training page.

      Before proceeding, remember that students will need to know before courses begin if specific technology requirements will be required for the duration of the course. They should also be able to readily access the technology (QM Standard 6). Notify students ahead if they will need to download items such as Adobe Reader or Real Time Player. Expectations for students should also be included, such as what technology skills they should have in order to successfully participate in the course. For technology requirements for technology-enhanced and partially and fully online courses, see the Technology for Courses page, where you can also find privacy and accessibility statements for your syllabi.

    • Building your Online Syllabus

      Your syllabus can serve as the hub for your course and, in a legal sense, serves as a contract between you and your students. To create an effective syllabus, much planning is required. The UWG Online FDC has developed a Syllabus template and a Syllabus Checklist in accordance with the UWG 2007 IDP. They contain links to the Common Language for Course Syllabi (PDF) that is required to be in the syllabus of every course taught at UWG (Quality Matters Standards 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8).  Important information for your online students is included in this document. You might check out our Course Planning Worksheet to assist you in building your course and thus build a complete syllabus.

      In your syllabus, be sure to reference if any face-to-face meetings are required. Provide students with your “office hours” and your communication guidelines. Will you hold virtual office hours through Blackboard Collaborate or Google Hangouts? When should students expect to receive feedback, grades, and email responses? Which email account do you wish students to use (westga or CourseDen)? What are the technology requirements for your course?

      In a face-to-face course, you can clarify muddy points in your syllabus when you review the syllabus on during any class: For an online course, you don’t have this opportunity, so it is important that your syllabus or documents in your Start Here module be more comprehensive and contain all the information students will need to be successful in the course.

    • Communication Expectation

      Communicating to develop relationships, establish your presence, and to personalize your course

      In a face-to-face courses, you and your students see each other and are in each other’s presence at least once a week. In an online course, students can feel as if they are stuck out in the proverbial stratosphere because they don’t have the opportunity to sit in front of you and ask questions. Online students need to know that their questions can be answered in a reasonable amount of time when they are feeling lost in the course or when they don’t understand a concept or an assignment. They also need a sense of your presence in the course, so that they don’t feel isolated and alone. Providing students with timely feedback on their assignments also gives students a sense of your presence and provides additional learning opportunities. Students learn more effectively when they receive frequent and meaningful feedback (Quality Matters General Standard 3, Specific Standard 3.5)

      You can increase your sense of presence by communicating early and often with your online students via

      • email
      • announcements/news
      • posts in the online discussions
      • being present during posted online hours via Collaborate, Google Hangout, or other online video-conferencing tool
      • providing personalized and timely feedback on assignments
      • creating introductory videos

      Here are some best communication practices to get you started:

      • Email students one week before course starts and welcome them to class.

      • Clarify your email policy (do you require students to use CourseDen email or their westga gmail accounts?) and let them know your expected response time. Letting students know how often or when you will be checking your emails decreases their anxiety (when you don’t respond in the 5 minutes that they might hope for) and means that you don’t have to check your emails 10 times a day. It is suggested that you check the email account you've asked them to use at least once per day.

      • Clarify your voicemail policy (let them know if you don’t check or respond to voicemails) and if you use voicemail, reply within 12-24 hours (let them know your weekend policy if different).

      • Check out alternative means of communication other than email: synchronous chat sessions, web conferencing, video emails, and so on.

      • Provide students with your communication rules and netiquette guidelines. Check out these resources for more on netiquette.

      • Introductory Discussion: Have students introduce themselves to each other the first week in an online discussion. Ask them a question unique to your course to make the introductions more interesting. Introduce yourself, too, and include professional and appropriate personal information.

      • Clarify the course objectives and ensure that they are clear, measurable, appropriate for the course, and specific.

      • Clarify assignments and explain how module or unit objectives support course objectives and how the assignment will be graded. Check out our rubrics resource for more help.

      • Set up small groups in which students can mentor and support each other.

      • Share clear expectations on what you expect from students regarding participation, time spent in course each week, and so on.

      • Email students at least once a week (or post in the news area) to provide:
        • Learning objectives for each unit
        • Summary of what was just learned
        • Notification of any changes to course schedule
        • Encouragement


      Each time you communicate with your students, you offer them a chance to get to know you better. It also allows you an opportunity to share with them your relationship with the material and how you see the field of study. In short, it allows you to personalize your course and to provide your students with an opportunity to get to know you. When students can form a connection to their instructor (and their peers), they are more likely to persist in the course when they face challenges.

      Communicating Online Presence Resources
  • First Week

    Please note that students are not granted immediate access to a course once they have registered in BanWeb. This enrollment process can take up to 48 working hours to complete, and students can add a course through Thursday of the first week of classes. Consider not beginning instruction the first week of the semester and using this week to have students introduce themselves to you and others, become familiar with the learning management system, download and install software, and gather course materials (especially for those students who need to order textbooks). Do let students know if your course relies heavily upon the textbook: many students view textbooks as optional unless they know they will be using it often. If your course schedule requires that you begin intense instruction during the first week, please provide accommodations for students who join the class late.

    • Week of Welcome

      During the first week, just as in a first class meeting, you want to go over the course syllabus, policies, and requirements, get to know your students and tell them a little about yourself, and find out what your students know about your topic. Here are a few activities you might consider for your first week of class or at least during the add/drop period:

      • Pre-test to assess entry-level knowledge
      • Have students download appropriate software and learn how to use it
      • Have students introduce themselves using the online discussion and share what they already know about the material
      • Include a syllabus quiz to encourage students to learn course policies
      • Direct student to the CourseDen Training & Free Resources for Students course found under the Orientations role in CourseDen
      • Direct student  to the UWG Online Orientation Options page, which includes information about SmarterMeasure - an online readiness survey, and other great resources.
    • Start Here Module

      In addition to your introductory activities, you will need to include various course and institutional policies and services. In order to address many of these requirements, you may request a "Start Here" module from UWG Online FDC and edit it as you see fit. This module contains the following HTML files & links:

       To request that the Start Here module be added to your course, contact UWG Online at 678-839-6248 or email us at online@westga.edu

    • Course Schedule

      Providing students with a course schedule will help guide your students to how the learning process will be structured and carried out. The schedule should contain the learning activities and due dates for the activities in each module or unit as well as drop/add and course withdrawal dates for the term.  The course schedule could be provided to students in your syllabus or as a stand-alone document, such an editable HTML content file. A course schedule is one of the items in the Start Here module (see above) that can be placed in your course in CourseDen.

      The course schedule suggests a sequence of the activities for the student to complete. Similar to face-to-face classes, multiple assessment activities may be used to measure students’ mastery of learning objectives. Sequenced activities allow students to complete items in a timely and meaningful manner. The sequence also allows for students to build on previously learned material gained throughout the course (General Standard 3).

      Sample Course Schedule

      Week

      Begin Date

      End Date

      Topic/Activity

      Assignment Name

      & Due Date

      1

      Aug 10 Aug 15

      Start Here Module, Syllabus Quiz (Week 1 homework)

      Online Introductions

      Sunday night at midnight Note add/drop dates for this week

      2

      Aug 16  

      Module Name: Online Discussions, Term Paper topic

      Sunday night at midnight

      3

         

      Module Name: Online Discussions, Week 3 Homework

      Sunday night at midnight

      4

         

       

       

      5

         

       

       

      6

         

       

       

      7

         

      Topic Name Module: Online Discussions

      Sunday night at midnight  Note upcoming end of withdrawal with W period

      8

         

      Midterm Exam (two hours)

      Saturday night at midnight

      9

         

       

       

      10

         

       

       

      11

         

       

       

      12

         

      Term Paper

      Sunday night at midnight

      13

         

       

       

      14

         

       

      Sunday night at midnight

      15

         

      Final Exam – Proctored at UWG or approved off-campus site

      Saturday, April 18, 3:00-6:00 pm or Friday, April 24, 5:00-8:00 pm at UWG in X building, room #

      Disclaimer: All times are Eastern Standard Time (EST). Schedule may change at the instructor’s discretion. All changes will be noted in the News/Announcements section.

       

  • Course Content
    • Design and Development

      Plan Your Course

      To begin, map out your course on paper and decide how you will meet course objectives and assess learning. This map will likely become your Course Schedule. Once your assessments have been chosen, you will need to select the best method or tool . Call UWG Online during any point in this process, sign up for one of our training sessions on designing and teaching an online course, or use any of our other resources. Ask to see our adaptable templates and/or example courses, and join in the many opportunities for peer-to-peer sharing.

      Please see the recommended timeline and checklist for planning and developing your fully online or technology-enhanced course. For additional help, schedule your one-on-one consultation with the UWG Online Faculty Development Center team today. 

      Clear Navigation

      Besides communicating early and often with your students, it is essential that students know how to navigate their way through your course. Consider including a Start Here module (contact UWG Online to request one) in your course with instructions on students first steps. One of the best ways to increase students’ ability to locate information is to be consistent and repetitive by using the same design principles in each module. In addition to the module content, including a weekly overview and a module checklist provides students with a sense of familiarity and purpose. In general, include

      • a weekly overview  section (see below for details)
      • content materials (printed (HTML preferred)  and audio-visual materials, links to outside sources
      • assignment descriptions with rubrics (or detailed descriptions of how you will grade them)
      • self-assessments and graded assessments
      • a summary section with a checklist.

      Providing these in the same order in each module provides students with a sense of familiarity and mastery. It is a small task for you, but it makes a big difference to students.

      Design Models

      There are several design models you can use to put your course together, such as the ADDIE model, backwards course design, or others available through the Design & Development Resources below. You can also use the Course Worksheet to help plan your course. In planning your course, you need to think about what you want your students to learn and which competencies you want them to develop. Then you need to select activities that will best help them reach these goals. We provide more information on how to develop effective learning objectives below.

      Create Engaging Content

      Sometimes we know what we want to do (create a voice-over PowerPoint, for example), but not what tool to use in order to complete that task. Here is an annotated technology for instructors to help you figure out what tool you need to learn in order to accomplish your task. For a list of more tools to help you create engaging content, check our the Software & Services tab on our Online Faculty Training page. Using the "Insert Stuff" button in CourseDen, you can embed in your course GALILEO's Films on Demand (follow link to see the thousands of films available in the sciences, social sciences, humanities, business, and health). Or, to enliven your class and give students an upfront look at the cultural and political milestones in our history (since 1895), check out the A.P. and British Movietone channels to see the 550,000 archival videos recently uploaded onto YouTube.

      Chickering and  Gamson, in their oft cited paper, “Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education” outline the most effective teaching principles that work for face-to-face and online courses:

      • encourage faculty-to-student interaction
      • encourage student-to-student interaction
      • promote active learning
      • communicate high expectations
      • facilitate time on task
      • provide rich, rapid feedback
      • respect diverse learning

      We encourage you to integrate these best practices into your course. For additional practices and strategies, a number of resources are provided below. If you would like to discuss any of these topics with regards to your course(s) or if you would like assistance implementing them, please contact the UWG|Online Faculty Development Center.

      Design & Development Resources
    • Communication Expectations

      Communicating to develop relationships, establish your presence, and to personalize your course

      In a face-to-face courses, you and your students see each other and are in each other’s presence at least once a week. In an online course, students can feel as if they are stuck out in the proverbial stratosphere because they don’t have the opportunity to sit in front of you and ask questions. Online students need to know that their questions can be answered in a reasonable amount of time when they are feeling lost in the course or when they don’t understand a concept or an assignment. They also need a sense of your presence in the course, so that they don’t feel isolated and alone. Providing students with timely feedback on their assignments also gives students a sense of your presence and provides additional learning opportunities. Students learn more effectively when they receive frequent and meaningful feedback (Quality Matters General Standard 3, Specific Standard 3.5)

      You can increase your sense of presence by communicating early and often with your online students via

      • email
      • announcements/news
      • posts in the online discussions
      • being present during posted online hours via Collaborate, Google Hangout, or other online video-conferencing tool
      • providing personalized and timely feedback on assignments
      • creating introductory videos

      Here are some best communication practices to get you started:

      • Email students one week before course starts and welcome them to class.
      • Clarify your email policy (do you require students to use CourseDen email or their westga gmail accounts?) and let them know your expected response time. Letting students know how often or when you will be checking your emails decreases their anxiety (when you don’t respond in the 5 minutes that they might hope for) and means that you don’t have to check your emails 10 times a day. It is suggested that you check the email account you've asked them to use at least once per day.
      • Clarify your voicemail policy (let them know if you don’t check or respond to voicemails) and if you use voicemail, reply within 12-24 hours (let them know your weekend policy if different).
      • Check out alternative means of communication other than email: synchronous chat sessions, web conferencing, video emails, and so on.
      • Provide students with your communication rules and netiquette guidelines. Check out these resources for more on netiquette.
      • Introductory Discussion: Have students introduce themselves to each other the first week in an online discussion. Ask them a question unique to your course to make the introductions more interesting. Introduce yourself, too, and include professional and appropriate personal information.
      • Clarify the course objectives and ensure that they are clear, measurable, appropriate for the course, and specific.
      • Clarify assignments and explain how module or unit objectives support course objectives and how the assignment will be graded. Check out our rubrics resource for more help.
      • Set up small groups in which students can mentor and support each other.
      • Share clear expectations on what you expect from students regarding participation, time spent in course each week, and so on.
      • Email students at least once a week (or post in the news area) to provide:
        • Learning objectives for each unit
        • Summary of what was just learned
        • Notification of any changes to course schedule
        • Encouragement

      Each time you communicate with your students, you offer them a chance to get to know you better. It also allows you an opportunity to share with them your relationship with the material and how you see the field of study. In short, it allows you to personalize your course and to provide your students with an opportunity to get to know you. When students can form a connection to their instructor (and their peers), they are more likely to persist in the course when they face challenges.

      Communicating Online Presence Resources
    • Building your Online Syllabus

      Your syllabus can serve as the hub for your course and, in a legal sense, serves as a contract between you and your students. To create an effective syllabus, much planning is required. The UWG Online FDC has developed a Syllabus template and a Syllabus Checklist in accordance with the UWG 2007 IDP. They contain links to the Common Language for Course Syllabi that is required to be in the syllabus of every course taught at UWG (Quality Matters Standards 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8).  Important information for your online students is included in this document. You might check out our Course Planning Worksheet to assist you in building your course and thus build a complete syllabus.

      In your syllabus, be sure to reference if any face-to-face meetings are required. Provide students with your “office hours” and your communication guidelines. Will you hold virtual office hours through Blackboard Collaborate or Google Hangouts? When should students expect to receive feedback, grades, and email responses? Which email account do you wish students to use (westga or CourseDen)?

      In a face-to-face course, you can clarify muddy points in your syllabus when you review the syllabus during any class: For an online course, you don’t have this opportunity, so it is important that your syllabus or documents in your Start Here module be more comprehensive and contain all the information students will need to be successful in the course.

    • Learning Objectives

      Learning Objectives & Alignment

      Course-level and Module/unit objectives should be measurable and observable. Module level learning outcomes need to be consistent with the course-level objectives (QM General Standard 2). To create effective learning objectives or outcomes, you want to select action verbs at the appropriate level for the course and the assessments you plan to use.  Bloom’s Taxonomy provides the easiest selection of action verbs organized by level of thinking.


      To create learning objectives, think about the goals of the course, the level of the course, and how you can measure what you want them to learn. As you create your module activities, assignments, and assessments, you want to keep your learning objectives in mind so that they reflect and/or align with the goals and levels of learning (QM Standards 2, 3, 4, 5, 6). The resources below provide information and training for creating effective learning objects. Contact the Online Faculty Development Center (678-839-5289) for assistance with for more advanced training and assistance with learning objectives.

      Learning Objective Resources

    • Weekly Overviews

      Students greatly benefit from having an overview for each module that includes:

      • General course-level objectives addressed
      • Module or weekly learning objectives (more specific than course-level)
      • Reading assignments
      • Assignments due this week
      • Assignments upcoming
      • Lectures (audio, video, text, Power Point) to integrate
      • Learning activities and how they support the learning objectives
          • online discussion topics
          • group projects
          • other

      As addressed by General Standards 2 and 4 of Quality Matters, instructions can be provided to students in a variety of ways, such as bullet points or a narrative. Include the goal and purpose of the lesson. The instructions should provide a clear expectation and sequence of steps to the students so they may successfully complete the stated learning objectives and understand how the activities support those objectives(QM General Standard 3). You can also include a checklist for each module.

    • CourseDen as Emergency Backup

      Even if your class is an on-campus/face-to-face class, you can use CourseDen/D2L as an emergency backup in the event of a campus closure. This plan could include things like emailing your students or utilizing CourseDen/D2L in order to communicate, to share assignments, and to give class quizzes. With resources such as CourseDen at your fingertips, you can easily maintain an "emergency teaching and learning area" just for your class.

      However, do consider the context of the situation: For example, in the cases of extreme weather, you may have online/hybrid students who are stranded, without power, and/or lacking in Internet access. Please be understanding and prepared to adjust assignments, deadlines, and schedules where needed.

      For more ideas on how to use CourseDen as an emergency backup, click here.

  • Access
    • Accessibility

      Using different media to present content to students can address various learning styles, language barriers, and disabilities. Providing equivalent materials is helpful for those with visual, auditory, and cognitive disabilities. Some examples of equivalent materials are providing text materials in a format that allows screen readers to be used and including transcripts or captions for audio and video materials. Avoid using PDFs such as scanned books, excerpts, and articles unless text equivalents are provided because most screen readers cannot read them. CourseDen contains the integrated screen reader ReadSpeaker, which works best with HTML files. to learn more, check out the Software and Services tab on our Online Faculty Training page.

      ReadSpeaker icon from CourseDen

      For those including videos, YouTube and Camtasia are popular tools for captioning. Check out this link for information about how to caption your YouTube videos.

      Finally, be sure to include accessibility statements for all tools and resources used in your course. For sample accessibility statements to include, see our Technology Requirements page.

      Accessibility Resources
    • Copyright

      Copyright is especially important in the online environment because copyrighted works are transmitted once they are put online and that transmission falls under the TEACH Act (see below).  Copyright is the protection for authors of original material, which includes works that are literary, dramatic, musical, or artistic in nature. There are a number of rights afforded to copyright owners under federal law, which include, but are not limited to, the reproduction, distribution, and adaptation of their work. For more information please refer to USG’s Copyright Policy and UWG’s Copyright, File Sharing, and Piracy policy.

      For an excellent, fun, and easy-to-read article on copyright and fair use, check out Thomas Tobin’s article in the Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration.

      Access to Online Materials

      According to the Technology, Education, and Copyright Harmonization (TEACH) Act of November 2002, there are a number of guidelines to follow when sharing material within learning management systems maintained by the institution http://www.usg.edu/legal/teach_act/#access

      1. Authentication
        To meet TEACH Act’s standards, the university must use a secure authentication technology to restrict access of copyrighted materials within courses. Official learning management systems like Brightspace by D2L meet the requirements of TEACH Act.
      2. Current Enrollment
        Access is limited to students currently in the course.
      3. Time Limit
        The duration for using copyrighted material should be limited, such as to a single session. This can be achieved through settings within CourseDen by utilizing the Selective Release feature.
      4. Amounts: Displays
        The display of material in the online classroom should be comparable to material shown in the face-to-face environment.
      5. Amounts: Performances
        How much of the material that can be performed or displayed without a license is dependent on the type of work. In general, only limited and reasonable portions of works should be made available. However, entire nondramatic literary and musical works may be performed, but not any piece of work that is developed only for online instruction.
      6. Download Control
        Measures must be taken to prevent the downloading of copyrighted material. This can be achieved by streaming video or audio files to avoid downloading. Images should also be presented in such a way that limits printing or saving.
      Copyright Resources
    • OERs
      Open Education Resources are free, online educational materials that are created under a Creative Commons license so that they can be used or adapted by others. An extensive list of over 180 sites of Open Education Resources organized by type and topic are available for faculty. 
  • Support

    If you need support with computer technology, antivirus software, myUWG access, or network access, you can contact Information Technology Services (ITS).

    Information Technology Services (ITS)

    (678) 839-6587
    http://www.westga.edu/its/

    For assistance with CourseDen or other online instructional services (Smarthinking, Blackboard Collaborate, course development) contact the UWG Online Helpdesk from 8:00 AM - 5:00 AM.

    UWG Online Helpdesk

    (678) 839-6248

    For help with CourseDen (part of the GeorgiaVIEW system) or other online instructional services outside of normal business hours (24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year), contact the University System of Georgia’s D2L Help Center.

    University System of Georgia D2L Help Center
    https://d2lhelp.view.usg.edu/ (search enabled help center)
    1-855-772-0423

    For help with Banner or Banweb, contact the Registrar’s office or check out the Registrar Faculty Resource page.

    Registrar’s Office
    (678) 839-6438

    See the Faculty Toolkit for additional resources and to find links to the departments responsible for various concerns. If the Faculty Toolkit does not provide adequate direction, use the Maxient report form to document and report any concern related to a UWG student. This form is only checked during regular business hours, so call campus security for emergencies: 678-839-6000.

    More UWG Resources

    Academic Calendar
    Proctored Exams
    Online Instruction Calculator
    Distance Librarian
    Student Handbook
    Center for Academic Success
    Help for Students in Distress
    Reporting Academic Integrity Incidents
    Plagiarism Tutorial and helpful links (library)

    CourseDen Maintenance Calendar

    Routine, periodic maintenance is essential to keep GeorgiaVIEW operating smoothly. Both GeorgiaVIEW environments must undergo scheduled maintenance on the 1st & 3rd Fridays of each month. The complete schedule can be found here.

    During the maintenance windows, the GeorgiaVIEW service will be temporarily unavailable. Faculty should schedule quiz and assignment submission deadlines BEFORE the maintenance period begins (10:00pm instead of midnight). Students should plan to complete work BEFORE the maintenance begins. GeorgiaVIEW is usually returned to service 1-2 hours after maintenance begins. However, the entire window is always reserved in case additional work is necessary.