Sociology Majors Procure Skills that Employers Look For 

  • Critical thinking
  • Analytic problem-solving
  • Data literacy
  • Skillful and effective oral and written communication
  • Collaboration
  • Adaptability
  • Cultural intelligence
  • Dedication to inclusivity
  • Ability to develop effective interpersonal relationships with a diverse group of people

With its emphasis on data collection and analysis, critical thinking, and effective communication, Sociology prepares students to answer complex questions and work toward social justice. By helping students understand human behavior and the dynamics of the social world, the UWG Sociology Program prepares students for careers in a variety of fields. 

Careers in Social and Community Services

One of the most common fields entered by graduates with a Sociology degree is social and community service agencies. These employers recognize that sociology graduates are eager to alleviate problems facing society--often within certain populations such as children, the homeless, or prisoners. 

Careers in Research and Data Analysis (In Government or Private Sector)

Research jobs are available to social science graduates at all levels of education. Graduates with a BS in Sociology may find employment first as data analysts (entry-level) or in the management of data collection. There are social science research positions to be found in public sector organizations such as The Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Census Bureau, the Centers for Disease Control, and many state-level agencies. Other research jobs with the government may include working in transportation, housing, agriculture, labor, or policy groups. Private sector employers such as the Rand Corporation, GALLUP, and the National Opinion Research Center also hire social scientists.

Careers in Teaching/Education

After earning a Bachelor's degree in Sociology and obtaining the proper certification, you can become a teacher in an elementary or secondary school. You might also find employment at a college or university in offices such as admissions, or in an institutional research center.

Careers in Business and Industry

By helping you understand key social factors such as culture, race, ethnicity, gender, and power, an undergraduate degree in Sociology prepares you for work in a host of different businesses and industries. More than most majors, Sociology is fundamental to understanding and appreciating diversity and championing inclusion--necessities in today’s business world. Moreover, the research methods you master in your degree program are applicable to many fields in business, including: human resources, advertising, marketing and consumer research, sales, and management.

Careers in the Justice System/Law

A degree in Sociology gives you a unique perspective with which to confront the complexities of our society’s criminal justice system. Sociology graduates are trained to understand the role of power in the definition of normal vs. deviant behavior across time, space, and culture; how laws are defined and enforced; how social control is determined, to whom it is applied, and to what extent; and the intersections of race, poverty, and gender in the criminal justice system.

Take a look at a recent study finding that Sociology graduates’ salaries typically double ten years after graduation:

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1536504220902206

The American Sociological Association is a great resource for sociologists of all levels of education. Find out what sociologists do and which careers are waiting for graduates:

https://www.asanet.org/research-and-publications/research-sociology/research-briefs/what-are-they-doing-bachelors-degree-sociology-data-brief-current-jobs

American Sociological Association Careers Information

https://www.asanet.org/careers/careers-sociology

Look at What Our Alumni are Doing

Recent Sociology graduate Alexis Glaubitz is the Program Coordinator for the National Down Syndrome Congress, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of individuals with Down syndrome. In her position, she creates programming--such as educational parent webinars--and provides family members and allies the tools they need to advocate for policy improvements. She also provides local communities with resources and information about Downs Syndrome to improve public awareness.

Alexis states:

“If you want to help people or work to alleviate social problems, Sociology is the right degree for you. So many non-profit organizations are working to solve sociological issues.

The Sociology Program at UWG is awesome. Each professor and all staff members are always there to help motivate you and help you become successful. I am proud to be a UWG Sociology alum."