Disclaimer: These are the courses from the current University of West Georgia course catalog. Not every course is offered each semester or even each academic year. To see which courses are offered for the current semester, please visit BanWeb and look at the Schedule of Classes link. For future offerings, please seek advisement with the department offering the course.
  • Undergraduate
  • Masters
  • Doctoral
  • Undergraduate
    • ABED-3100 Business Communication
      Description

      A study of written and oral business communication to develop process and theory skills including writing, speaking, listening, business meetings, teamwork, presentations, and cross-cultural communication. Students write standard business letters and deliver oral and written presentations and reports. Management concepts of business ethics and problem analysis are integrated with communication process and theory.

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    • ABED-4118 Web Page Design
      Description

      The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to Web design. Students will learn concepts related to planning and developing web sites by studying Web usability, multimedia, and Web 2.0 applications for business and education web sites. (same as MKTG 4818).

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    • ABED-4181 Independent Study
      Description

      Each professor will be responsible for specific course content, assignments, and course requirements based upon the nature of the course for each independent assignment.

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    • ACCT-2101 Principles of Accounting I
      Description

      A study of the underlying theory and application of financial accounting concepts. Requires overall GPA of 2.0.

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    • ACCT-2102 Principles of Accounting II
      Description

      A study of underlying theory and application of managerial accounting concepts. Requires overall GPA of 2.0.

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    • ACCT-3212 Financial Reporting I
      Description

      An in-depth study of the accounting and reporting processes and accounting theory together with current problems in reporting financial position and determining income. Includes study of valuation problems involving current assets; and property, plant, and equipment. AICPA Level I test fee is required.

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    • ACCT-3213 Financial Reporting II
      Description

      A continuation of ACCT 3212 with emphasis on the measurement and reporting of intangibles, liabilities, corporate capital, investments, and cash flows.

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    • ACCT-3214 Financial Reporting III
      Description

      A continuation of ACCT 3213 with emphasis on specific measurement and reporting problems including taxes, pensions, leases, accounting changes, disclosure issues, income recognition issues, partnerships, and foreign currency transactions.

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    • ACCT-3232 Managerial Accounting
      Description

      Cost Accounting principles and techniques applied to job order and process types of industry, planning, and control of the elements of production costs, and preparation of cost reports. Includes an introduction to standard costing concepts and variance analysis. Use of cost information for business policy implementation and cost topics.

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    • ACCT-3241 Fraud Examination
      Description

      A survey of how and why occupational fraud is committed, how fraudulent conduct can be deterred, and how allegations of fraud should be investigated and resolved. The increase level of complexity and the heightened awareness of frauds makes the ability to detect and address fraud in businesses a critical skills for accountants, auditors, managers, and investigators. The inter-disciplinary nature of the course makes it appropriate and useful for both accounting and non-accounting majors.

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    • ACCT-3251 Income Tax Accounting for Individuals
      Description

      A study of the Internal Revenue Code as it relates to individuals. Updated each offering to incorporate new tax laws, regulations, and rulings in print.

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    • ACCT-3285 Professional Seminar
      Description

      Students attend 14 presentations by: UWG Career Services; international, regional and local public accounting firms; nonprofit and governmental public accounting firms; corporate accountants; professional accounting organizations (IMA, GSCPAs, others); accounting educators; and professional examination review services. A professional resume must be prepared. This seminar is an Accounting BBA degree requirement.

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    • ACCT-4202 Financial Statement Analysis
      Description

      A study of the use of financial statements and managerial reports by managers and investors in decision making for day to day operations and long range planning.

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    • ACCT-4215 Financial Reporting IV
      Description

      A study of consolidated financial statements and nonprofit accounting.

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    • ACCT-4233 Strategic Cost Management
      Description

      The study of contemporary management control tools and business strategy.

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    • ACCT-4241 Accounting Information Systems
      Description

      A specialized in-depth accounting course which addresses documentation of accounting systems, including flowcharts; evaluation of internal control and the audit trail; impact of computers on internal control; and design of accounting systems.

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    • ACCT-4252 Income Tax Accounting for Organizations
      Description

      A study of the Internal Revenue Code as it relates to corporate, partnership, and fiduciary tax. The legal and tax aspects considered in selecting an organization form.

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    • ACCT-4261 Auditing
      Description

      The course is designed to give the student an understanding of auditing objectives and standards, and a working knowledge of auditing procedures and techniques. Standards, ethics, and legal responsibilities of the public accounting profession, as well as preparation of audit reports are emphasized.

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    • ACCT-4262 Assurance Services, Fraud and Ethics
      Description

      A study of assurance and advisory services, business risk assessment, new audit methodologies, fraud detection, ethics, and other contemporary auditing issues.

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    • ACCT-4265 Sustainability Accounting and Reporting
      Description

      An examination of the tripartite or triple bottom line reporting framework that highlights the economic, environmental, and social performance of an organization. Emphasis is placed on how sustainability creates shareholder value and on how sustainable performance helps investors, creditors, and other users distinguish between companies operating efficiently and those which are not.

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    • ACCT-4285 Special Problems in Accounting
      Description

      In-depth supervised individual study of one or more current problems of the accounting profession.

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    • ACCT-4286 Business Internship (Accounting)
      Description

      Practical accounting internship experience with a commercial firm or organization for selected upper division students.

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    • ANTH-1100 Faces of Culture
      Description

      Survey of cross-cultural similarities and differences from a global, anthropological perspective. The course features dramatic and unique film footage, embracing cultures from all continents, highlighting major lifestyles, and illustrating human adaptations to a variety of environments. The course also explores the ways in which North American culture fits into the broad range of human possibilities.

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    • ANTH-1102 Introduction to Anthropology
      Description

      A four-subfield introduction to the analysis and explanation of cultural similarities and differences. Discoveries, theories, problems, and debates on issues of fundamental importance to the understanding of human nature, society, and behavior.

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    • ANTH-1105 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
      Description

      An examination of humans from biological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics of survey and analysis include systems of human and non-human inheritance and evolution, primatology, origins, variation and adaptation, forensic anthropology, and interactions between biology and culture.

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    • ANTH-2001 Introduction to Archaeology
      Description

      Survey of Archaeology as a subfield of Anthropology. Content includes basic theoretical concepts, analytic methods, and interpretive models of scientific archaeology. Specific concerns include reconstruction of cultural systems and their adaptive patterns through recovery and analysis of material remains.

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    • ANTH-2002 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
      Description

      A broad ethnographic introduction to the customs and behaviors of people in several cultures. This class will examine a diverse range of contemporary cultures and explore different social structures, belief systems, and adaptations through exemplary case studies in the subfield of Cultural Anthropology.

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    • ANTH-2003 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
      Description

      An examination of humans from biological and evolutionary perspectives. Content includes non-human primates, human origins, modern human variation and adaptation, forensic anthropology, and interactions between human biology and culture.

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    • ANTH-3103 Archaeological Laboratory Methods
      Description

      Instruction in the techniques used in cleaning, cataloging, preserving, and analysis of excavated archaeological materials.

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    • ANTH-3110 Human Osteology
      Description

      This course will introduce students to the basics of skeletal biology and learn how to accurately identify the elements of the human skeleton. It will include the major landmarks of each skeletal element with an aim to understanding the functional morphology of bones in an individual and as an anatomical system.

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    • ANTH-3158 Economic Anthropology
      Description

      An anthropological investigation of how pre-industrial societies produced, distributed and consumed goods, resources, and services.

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    • ANTH-3170 Religion in America: The Shakers and Other Utopian Societies
      Description

      This hands-on religion course will focus on the practice of religion in historical and contemporary Utopian societies in the U.S. By examining the development and legacy of one of America’s most quintessential religious communities, the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing (known as the Shakers), students will gain a wide range of skills and opportunities to explore diverse approaches to religion, theory, and methodology in anthropology. We will also examine other Utopian religious societies as comparative examples. There will be a class travel component and additional Course Fees associated with this course during most semesters.

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    • ANTH-3180 Environmental Anthropology
      Description

      The focus of this course is on the relationship between cultural behavior and environmental phenomena. Local, regional, and global case studies will be used in examining the political and cultural ecology of resource use, adaptation, and degradation. Possible topics include environmental justice, deforestation, and conservation, industrial waste, and watershed management.

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    • ANTH-3186 Anthropology of Gender
      Description

      This course examines various theories of gender development and the positions of women and men cross-culturally.

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    • ANTH-3188 Ethnographic Field Methods
      Description

      This course will investigate and evaluate qualitative analysis in ethnographic field research. The course is participation intensive and will involve research in an actual field project.

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    • ANTH-3200 Directed Research
      Description

      This is a research project carried out under the guidance of a faculty member. Discussion of research areas with the faculty must be completed before registration. A formal report of the results of the research must be presented to the faculty of the Anthropology program.

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    • ANTH-3250 Field Methods in Physical Anthropology
      Description

      Instruction in and application of the various methods primatologists use in the field. This course will involve observations and directed research projects done on living primate populations.

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    • ANTH-4100 History of Anthropological Thought
      Description

      A survey of major conceptual and theoretical developments in anthropology from the early nineteenth century to the present.

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    • ANTH-4102 Archaeological Field Research
      Description

      Direct participation in all aspects of an archaeological excavation project. Instruction in research design, excavation techniques, recording procedures, data analyses, and field interpretation.

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    • ANTH-4105 Environmental Archaeology
      Description

      This course will examine long-term human-environmental interaction from an archaeological perspective.

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    • ANTH-4115 North American Archaeology
      Description

      A survey of the pre-Columbian cultural development of North America north of Mexico.

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    • ANTH-4125 Forensic Anthropology
      Description

      This course will include a detailed study of the human skeleton. Primary focus will be on the methods used to identify human remains within a legal context. Responsibilities and ethics of a forensic anthropologist will be discussed.

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    • ANTH-4130 Medical Anthropology
      Description

      This course provides a general introduction to concepts in medical anthropology, considering health, illness and healing from a biocultural standpoint. Topics covered include cross-cultural understandings of mental and physical health issues, global perspectives on health, and careers in medical anthropology.

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    • ANTH-4132 Human Life Cycle in Cross-Cultural Perspective
      Description

      A cross-cultural study of the social and cultural meanings of human experience through such phases as birth and death; adolescence; adulthood; and old age.

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    • ANTH-4134 Animals and Culture
      Description

      The relationship between humans and animals is complex, multidimensional and historically derived. This course will examine primary theories related to ecology and symbolism and identify the historical and contemporary role of animals in human society.

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    • ANTH-4144 Peoples and Cultures of Latin America
      Description

      An ethnohistorical and ethnographic perspective of indigenous peoples of Latin America (including Central America; South America, and the Caribbean), with an emphasis on the Inca State and contemporary Andean people.

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    • ANTH-4150 Human Evolution
      Description

      This course focuses on the evolution of humans and our nearest relatives using evidence from fossil record and genetic analysis. It places special importance on human origins while addressing modern and future human variability from perspectives both ethical and philosophical.

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    • ANTH-4155 Peoples and Cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa
      Description

      Study of selected African cultures with emphasis on social organization, belief systems, history, and politics.

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    • ANTH-4165 Primatology
      Description

      Study of living prosimians, monkeys, and apes, including social organization, feeding and ranging, community ecology, and conservation. Readings will focus on field studies of natural populations.

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    • ANTH-4170 Myth, Magic and Religion
      Description

      A comparative and cross-cultural approach to religious systems and theories on the anthropology of religion.

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    • ANTH-4173 Language and Culture
      Description

      A study of the history and perspectives of linguistic anthropology with special emphasis on the relationship between language and culture.

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    • ANTH-4181 Cultural Resources Management
      Description

      An examination of the history of the field of cultural resource management including major federal and state laws that govern the preservation of cultural resources. Attention will be given to archeological, historical, and architectural applications.

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    • ANTH-4184 Anthropology Capstone
      Description

      An examination of Anthropology as a profession--ethical considerations, selection of graduate school, research, and grant sources.

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    • ANTH-4186 Internship
      Description

      Practical experience with a public or private agency directly related to a field of anthropology.

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    • ANTH-4201 Artifact Analysis
      Description

      This course is a hands-on introduction to interpreting artifacts from archaeological sites that focuses on the analysis of flaked stone tools, prehistoric ceramics, shell, bone, and perishables artifacts, and historic artifacts.

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    • ANTH-4202 Rise and Fall of Ancient Civilizations
      Description

      This course explores the timing and diversity in the rise and fall of great civilizations around the world.

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    • ANTH-4204 Ice Age Peoples of North America
      Description

      The goal of this course is to explore the contributions of archaeology, human genetics, paleoanthropology, linguistics, vertebrate paleontology, and paleogeography in peopling of the Americas research. We will discuss how the evidence provided by these disciplines is used in the search of Ice Age Americans.

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    • ANTH-4881 Independent Study
      Description

      Title and description of the type of independent study to be offered will be specified on the variable credit form at time of registration. May be repeated three times for credit.

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    • ANTH-4885 Special Topics
      Description

      Individual topics in anthropology.

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    • ANTH-4900 Directed Reading
      Description

      Directed examination of a topic not normally offered by the program. Students must propose a detailed plan of reading stating precise learning objectives and secure the written consent of a supervising instructor before registration.

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    • ANTH-4983 Directed Research
      Description

      Directed field or laboratory research.

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    • ART-1006 Design I (2D)
      Description

      An introductory course dealing with the elements and principles of composition as they relate to the two-dimensional areas of the visual arts. For advising purposes, the Department of Art recommends that students take Design I (ART 1006) in conjunction with Drawing I (ART 1007).

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    • ART-1007 Drawing I
      Description

      Introduction to drawing using various media and dealing with landscapes, still-life, one- and two-point perspective, and the figure. Both clothed and nude models may be used. For advising purposes, the Department of Art recommends that students take Design I (ART 1006) in conjunction with Drawing I (ART 1007).

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    • ART-1008 Drawing II
      Description

      Drawing from the live model, both nude and clothed, focusing upon correct proportions and anatomy. A variety of drawing media will be used. For advising purposes, the Department of Art recommends that students take Design II (ART 1008) in conjunction with Drawing II (ART 1009).

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    • ART-1009 Design II (3D)
      Description

      An introductory course dealing with the elements and principles of composition as they relate to the three-dimensional areas of the visual arts. For advising purposes the Department of Art recommends that students take Design II (ART 1008) in conjunction with Drawing II (ART 1009).

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    • ART-1201 Introduction to Art
      Description

      An introduction to the elements of art and to the various media: sculpture, painting, graphics, and architecture. These will be considered in their historical and contemporary culture contexts.

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    • ART-2000 Oral Communication and the Visual Arts
      Description

      This course will develop a student's ability to formulate and organize thoughts about art in a clear and succinct manner and to give verbal expression to those ideas. Students will learn to analyze art and to formulate informed judgments about provocative issues pertinent to the visual arts.

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    • ART-2011 Art for Middle Grades
      Description

      This class is designed for the non-art major in middle grades education. The focus of the course will be on the development of lessons that encourage creative thinking through discipline based art education that is developmentally appropriate. Methods in art education include exploration of a variety of studio processes, as well as approaches to art history, art criticism and aesthetics. Interdisciplinary approaches to art education will be explored at the middle level.

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    • ART-2012 Art for Special Populations
      Description

      This class is designed for those students planning to enter the educational setting and teach special populations of students. The art curriculum in this course will be presented as a very child centered approach to art education, which has a primary goal the enhancement of the child's self esteem. Lessons are, therefore, presented as confidence builders that are designed to improve the general awareness and self-concept of the challenged student.

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    • ART-2201 History of Western Art I
      Description

      This course covers the history of visual arts from pre-history to the fourteenth century, focusing upon the western tradition.

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    • ART-2202 History of Western Art II
      Description

      This course covers the history of visual arts from the High Renaissance to the present, focusing on the Western tradition.

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    • ART-3000 Art for Early Childhood and Elementary
      Description

      This class is designed for the non-art major in early child hood education. The focus of the course will be to equip students to construct lessons that encourage creative thinking through art education and are developmentally appropriate for early childhood students. Methods in art education include exploration of a variety of studio processes as well as approaches to art history, art criticism, and aesthetics for the elementary student.

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    • ART-3011 Elementary Art Methods
      Description

      This course is designed for the art education major to focus on the developmental needs and abilities of students at the elementary level. Methods in art education include approaches to art pedagogy, production, criticism, and aesthetics utilizing a variety of age-appropriate studio media.

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    • ART-3012 Art for Pre-K and Special Populations
      Description

      This course is designed for the art education major to focus on the developmental needs and abilities of pre-kindergarten and special education students with emphasis on accommodations and adaptive strategies. Methods in art education include approaches to art pedagogy, production, criticism, and aesthetics utilizing a variety of age-appropriate studio media.

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    • ART-3060 Illustration: An Introductory Survey
      Description

      This course is intended to introduce the student to the field of graphic illustration, including the history, purpose, and ways of creating an illustration. Exercises and assignments will stimulate narrative and critical thinking skills, development of a personal style, and exploration of various solutions to the same problem. Students will be introduced to a variety of media, with flexibility in their choice of media for given assignments. Students will learn, based on a client’s needs for a specific project, what is the appropriate approach to an assignment.

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    • ART-3065 Introduction to Scientific/ Pre-Medical Illustration
      Description

      This course will familiarize the student with the art of scientific/pre-medical illustration, including the history, techniques, and varied applications. Students will acquire skills applicable to the fields of pre-medical, biological, botanical, entomological, archaeological, paleontological, anthropological and nursing illustration. Emphasis will be placed on the development of the student’s ability to accurately and clearly illustrate diagrammatically, narrative, and as a documentarian. Students will learn to incorporate and utilize research of the subject into their illustrations.

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    • ART-3100 Art Abroad: (Destination of Travel)
      Description

      The course will discuss some aspects of the local history and art as related to the travel program. The relationship between politics, culture and their impact on artistic styles is emphasized. The discipline of history gives us a global prospective of political and social events and as well as the evidence of the underlying causes of those events. Art tells us the style, the change, the expression of people witnessing or affected by these events and possibly contributing to them. This class brings those two disciplines together to show how history changed art or how art changed history. Course may be repeated for up to 15 credit hours.

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    • ART-3150 Studio Research Methods and Strategies Abroad
      Description

      This course will focus on the means to collect data or materials, which can be utilized in the initiation of the creative process-essentially, the gathering of ones own experiences to influence the creation of physically tangible works of art. Course may be repeated for up to 15 credit hours.

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    • ART-3151 Studio Studies Abroad
      Description

      This course will focus on the processing of the material or data gathered to initiate and support content development within a student’s artwork and overall development. Students will be presented with a variety of potential perspectives from which to conduct content development from observations, and the culmination of data collected in the creation of a student’s own artwork. Course may be repeated for up to 15 credit hours.

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    • ART-3210 Non-Western Art
      Description

      Lecture-based course on selected topics in non-Western art of Asia, Africa, Oceania, or the New World, studying artworks from within or across these cultures in their cultural and historical contexts. May be repeated up to 9 credit hours if the topic changes.

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    • ART-3215 History of Media & Methods: History & Concepts of Drawing
      Description

      Lecture-based art history course on selected topics in media and methods in art. May have focus on Drawing, Sculpture, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, or other distinctive area. The course will include investigation of the conceptual and the applied in specific topic area.. May be repeated up to 9 credit hours if the topic changes.

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    • ART-3220 Art of the Ancient World
      Description

      Lecture-based course on selected topics in the art of Ancient Egypt, Ancient Near East, Greece or Rome, studying artworks from within or across these cultures in their cultural and historical contexts.

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    • ART-3230 Medieval Art of Christian Europe and the Near East
      Description

      Lecture based course in religious and secular art in the Early Christian, Byzantine, Medieval, or Northern Renaissance periods, c. 100-1500 CE, including selected scripture, painting and architecture in historical and cultural context. May be repeated up to 9 credit hours if the topic changes.

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    • ART-3240 Italian Renaissance or Baroque Art
      Description

      A lecture-based course in Italian Renaissance or Baroque art, studying artwork from the period in historical and cultural context. May be repeated up to 6 credit hours if the topic changes.

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    • ART-3250 18th or 19th Century Art
      Description

      This is a lecture-based course on 18th or 19th century art which studies artwork in its historical and cultural aspects including Rococo, Neoclassical, Romantic or Realist movements. It focuses on the painting, sculpture, photography, graphic arts of the 18th or 19th century. May be repeated up to 6 credit hours if the topic changes.

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    • ART-3260 American Art
      Description

      Lecture-based course in American art, studying artwork in its historical and cultural context.

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    • ART-3270 Pre-World War II Modernism
      Description

      Lecture-based course on the art and architecture of the pre-World War II period, exploring the concepts and formal characteristics of 'modernism' in Western art.

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    • ART-3275 Art Since 1945
      Description

      Lecture-based course on art movements from 1945 to the present.

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    • ART-3280 Museum Seminar
      Description

      This course involves classroom study of the art collections and architecture of a city or country followed by a trip to visit what has been studied. The subject varies: American cities or abroad. Credit will vary by trip. Students enrolling in the summer Bayeux program will take 4 hours; others take 3 hours credit. May be repeated up to 16 hours credit.

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    • ART-3301 Beginning Ceramics
      Description

      This is a creative problem solving fine art studio course designed to serve as an introduction to the historical precedents, theories, processes and materials utilized in the realization and production of Contemporary Ceramic art. Emphasis will be placed on developing a variety of hand-building techniques and attaining a basic understanding of claybody composition and properties. Also included will be an introduction to slips, glazes, and firing techniques. In addition, this class will focus on developing content, and learning about artists (both ceramic artists and artists working in other media) of both past and present. We will consider Ceramics in a variety of contexts such as: Ceramics, Communication, Commentary, Commodity, Celebration and Critique.

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    • ART-3302 Intermediate Ceramics: Molds, Multiples, and Mechanical Means
      Description

      This is an intermediate course that provides students the opportunity to expand their technical skills, experience and critical thinking skills through the completion of a series of process specific projects. Each project requires research, an oral presentation and the production of personally derived artwork that utilizes the given process/technical information and reflects the assigned research.

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    • ART-3400 Graphic Design Survey for Non-Majors
      Description

      Graphic Design Survey for Non-Majors is a studio class teaching the basic principles and terminology of graphic design and typography, with an emphasis on the design process. Students will be able to apply these concepts and creative processes to visually communicate their ideas in a more effective way. Open to ALL UWG students. Art majors: course can count as Departmental Elective. ART 3400 will not count as a Graphic Design Concentration elective or substitute for any other concentration requirements.

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    • ART-3401 Graphic Design I
      Description

      An introduction to communication design with a strong emphasis on sound design and typographic principles, developing an understanding of structure, history, technology and application.

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    • ART-3402 Graphic Design II: Typography II
      Description

      Students integrate knowledge of typography with visual form and meaning. Design methodology and research are emphasized.

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    • ART-3403 History of Graphic Design
      Description

      This course provides art majors the opportunity to explore the historic perspectives, cultural relevance and technical aspects of graphic and design issues within the context of the contemporary profession of design. Study of historic print production processes will include printmaking and photography. Pre-requisites: ART 1006, 1007, 2201, Permission of Instructor. $75.00 lab fee request.

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    • ART-3601 Painting I: Watercolor
      Description

      This is one of two introductory painting courses, either of which fulfills the Art Core Painting requirement for Art majors and building on the knowledge base of the Art Foundation courses. This course uses watercolor as a vehicle for visual expression. Open-ended painting problems from both nature and the imagination will be presented. Students will mat and frame a selection of art works produced during the term.

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    • ART-3602 Painting II
      Description

      A painting course using oil, acrylic and/or other opaque media as a vehicle for continued progress in visual expression. Students will frame a selection of artwork produced during the term.

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    • ART-3701 Photography I
      Description

      This course explores the use of analog and digital, single lens reflex (SLR) cameras. Studio practice includes both digital and darkroom production, while learning a range of critical issues relevant to fine art photography.

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    • ART-3702 Photography II
      Description

      This course covers the use of analogue 35mm film cameras, traditional darkroom methods of image-making and analogue/digital hybrid processes. Conventional genres of image making such as still life, portraiture, and landscape are used as a means to explore contemporary issues. The course stresses continued development of personal visual vocabulary and understanding of historical and cultural implications.

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    • ART-3703 Photography III
      Description

      This course provides advanced experience with digital still image-making as well as virtual media, while addressing a range of critical issues relevant to contemporary digital media. The course also stresses continued development of personal visual vocabulary.

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    • ART-3704 Introduction to Time-Based Art (Video I)
      Description

      This course introduces the basic principles of current digital video and audio technology as a means of making time-based art. Traditional production techniques in cinematography, audio recording, non-linear editing, and lighting are taught. Students learn to work within a number of different genres including, documentary, narrative, experimental, and cross-genres. Weekly screenings of films and videos, assigned readings, and accompanying discussions will serve as a means to broaden students? critical and theoretical understanding of the mediums. Can be taken instead of ART 3702 (Photo II)

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    • ART-3801 Printmaking I: Survey
      Description

      A survey of the basic printmaking methods associated with relief and intaglio printmaking, including an introduction to book forms.

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    • ART-3802 Relief Printmaking
      Description

      Printmaking II will offer advanced experiences in relief printmaking including the introduction of color. In addition, students will develop image with text through a brief historical survey of letterpress printing.

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    • ART-3901 Introductory Sculpture
      Description

      An introduction into the four sculptural processes:Subtractive Method (carving); Additive Method (modeling);Substitutive Method (casting); and, Constructive Method (assembling). Emphasis is made on preliminary designing of mass, space and volume.

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    • ART-3902 Sculpture II
      Description

      Emphasis on this course is on acquiring technical skills and learning the safe and appropriate use of tools and materials in the fabrication of sculptural objects. Course also addresses the impact of material and technique upon form and content with the use of mass, space and volume.

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    • ART-3903 Sculpture III
      Description

      Emphasis of this course is on acquiring technical skill and learning the safe and appropriate use of tools and an expanded view of traditional and nontraditional materials in the fabrication of sculptural objects. Students will expand individual visual, vocabulary, technique, media and concepts through research, design and construction.

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    • ART-4000 Advanced Drawing
      Description

      Advanced visual art production and personal expression in drawing. May be repeated up to 15 credit hours.

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    • ART-4005 Advanced Life Drawing
      Description

      Drawing of the live model, both nude and clothed, continuing the mastery of both proportions and anatomy. A variety of drawing media will be used. May be repeated up to 15 credit hours.

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    • ART-4007 Digital Media For Artist
      Description

      This course is an introduction to Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Dreamweaver and Adobe Flash for all art majors. Students will create an online portfolio of their work with an emphasis on personal promotion and professionalism. Lessons will focus on bitmap and vector based imaging and the aesthetics of web design. Additional topics will include how to effectively work with color, text, font layout and other means of digital imaging.

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    • ART-4009 Art Curriculum and Classroom Management
      Description

      This class is designed for the art education major to apply educational principles of curriculum design and a variety of instructional strategies to the content of art education with an emphasis on classroom management. Methods in art education include approaches to art pedagogy, production, criticism, and aesthetics utilizing a variety of age-appropriate studio media. An internship in a prekindergarten and elementary level art class is a requirement of this course.

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    • ART-4010 Secondary Art Methods
      Description

      This course is designed for the art education major to focus on the developmental needs and abilities of students at the middle and secondary level as well as techniques for technology enhanced instruction. Methods in art education include approaches to art pedagogy, production, criticism, and aesthetics utilizing a variety of age-appropriate studio media. An internship in a high school and middle level art class is a requirement of this course.

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    • ART-4011 Student Teaching in Art Education
      Description

      Student teaching is the cumulating course of the teacher preparation program. It is typically viewed as a full class load and done primarily in a selected school under the guidance of an experienced supervising art teacher and the university supervisor. In art education students will complete a portion of the student teaching experience at the elementary level and another portion at the secondary level in order to receive vertical K-12 certification. Periodic seminars will be held on campus for students to meet as a group for discussion and instruction. 'C' or better required for certification.

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    • ART-4012 Student Teaching in Art Education
      Description

      Student teaching is the cumulating course of the teacher preparation program. It is typically viewed as a full class load and done primarily in a selected school under the guidance of an experienced supervising art teacher and the university supervisor. In art education students will complete a portion of the student teaching experience at the elementary level and another portion at the secondary level in order to receive vertical K-12 certification. Periodic seminars will be held on campus for students to meet as a group for discussion and instruction. 'C' or better required for certification.

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    • ART-4013 Student Teaching in Art Education
      Description

      Student teaching is the cumulating course of the teacher preparation program. It is typically viewed as a full class load and done primarily in a selected school under the guidance of an experienced supervising art teacher and the university supervisor. In art education students will complete a portion of the student teaching experience at the elementary level and another portion at the secondary level in order to receive vertical K-12 certification. Periodic seminars will be held on campus for students to meet as a group for discussion and instruction. 'C' or better required for certification.

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    • ART-4078 Junior Review
      Description

      All BA and BFA candidates must enroll and successfully complete ART 4078. (See department website for specific requirements for ART 4078). Art faculty will review juniors based on their portfolio, writings, presentation and transcript progress. Candidates will be assessed on the level of knowledge and skill base gain to date. Successful candidates will be allowed to enroll into their respective capstone courses (ART 4298 or ART 4998). Course May be repeated up to two additional times. Unsuccessful review on the third attempt may result in candidates being placed on probation or removed from their degree program. ART 4078 must be taken during a semester when the student is enrolled in 12 credit hours.

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    • ART-4212 History of Interiors
      Description

      A survey of architecture and furniture styles from Ancient time to the present, but with an emphasis on contemporary design.

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    • ART-4290 Modernist Criticism
      Description

      A discussion-based seminar based on intellectual and theoretical debates about modern and contemporary art, focusing on the concept of the avant-garde and the practice of art criticism. Readings are informed by theoretical developments such as psychoanalysis, semiotics, Marxist Art History, gender and race studies, post structuralism and visual culture debates.

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    • ART-4295 Special Topics in Art History
      Description

      Investigation of a particular topic, problem or issue in Art History with emphasis on those not covered in other art history courses.

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    • ART-4298 Senior Capstone in Art History I
      Description

      The first of a two-semester capstone sequence for Art History majors. In consultation with a committee, the student will finalize a thesis topic and complete research for a final project, to be completed and presented in ART 4299.

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    • ART-4299 Senior Capstone in Art History II
      Description

      The second of a two-semester capstone sequence for art history majors. In this semester, the student will finalize the written research paper and present it to the department, and pass oral examination by the faculty.

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    • ART-4302 Intermediate Ceramics: 20th Century Studio
      Description

      This course expands the development of ceramic techniques aesthetics specific to the 20th century art movements: Futurism, Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, Pop/Funk, and Photorealism. Students will progress through each movement with assigned research and technical instruction that will foster an understanding of the role of Ceramics in each of these 'Fine Art' movements. Ceramic Tromp l'oeil techniques will be employed during the completion of a series of period influenced projects. At this level students learn a variety of kiln firing methods and kiln maintenance. Students are responsible for the firing of their own work. Additional emphasis will be placed on studio maintenance and operations. Students will also continue to extend their ceramic/art history and theory research to fuel the development of content in their own artwork.

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    • ART-4303 Intermediate Ceramics: Surface, Image and Text
      Description

      Intermediate Ceramics - Surface, Image and Text is a process premised intermediate course that provides students the opportunity to expand their technical skills, experience and critical thinking skills through the completion of a series or process specific projects. Each project requires research, an oral presentation and the production of personally derived artwork that utilizes the given process/technical information and reflects the assigned research.

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    • ART-4304 Advanced Ceramics
      Description

      Emphasis on individual expression with clay and ceramic glaze calculation. May be repeated up to 15 credit hours.

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    • ART-4400 Graphic Design Studio Problems
      Description

      This is a professional preparatory class in which students in the class operate as a design team that interacts directly with a variety of selected clients, with faculty supervision, to realize professional projects. The course will be a combination of discussion, lecture, client meetings, studio and production time, with client project assignments throughout the semester. This course fulfills the same requirement as ART 4403 or 4404 for all graphic design majors, but not both.

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    • ART-4403 Graphic Design III: Type and Image
      Description

      Design problems are studied holistically through assignments that stress dynamic relationships inherent in context, form and content to gain a deeper understanding of the development of design systems and concepts.

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    • ART-4404 Graphic Design IV
      Description

      Design studio problems that explore a variety of approaches to data systems, strategies, and applications. Research, conceptual development and presentation are emphasized.

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    • ART-4405 Graphic Design V
      Description

      An expansion of research into the structure, history, technology and application of sound graphic and typographic principles. Research, conceptual development and presentation are emphasized. May be repeated for up to (9) hours. Repeated courses may meet graphic design elective requirements.

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    • ART-4406 Graphic Design VI: Professional Portfolio
      Description

      Conceptual development and realization of an approved senior-level thesis project culminating in a Senior Exit Show. Research and presentation strategies are emphasized. May be repeated for up to (9) hours. Repeated courses may count towards the Graphic Design elective requirement.

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    • ART-4408 Mat & Methods in Graph Design
      Description

      This is an advanced typography course dedicated to exploring unconventional forms of typographic expression through rigorous and thoughtful experimentation. Both digital and analog methodologies will be explored. Course is repeatable for up to 12 hours. ART 4408 Materials & Methods in Graphic Design requires Permission of Instructor Only in addition to the completion of the following courses with a minimum grade of C: ART 1006, 1007, 1008, 1009, 2201, and 2202.

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    • ART-4586 Internship
      Description

      Students will secure a position with a company for field experience. Academic component includes written reports and/or visual presentations. Permission of the department is required. May be repeated up to 15 Credit hours; however, no more than 9 credit hours in a given semester.

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    • ART-4603 Painting III
      Description

      This course covers the techniques and materials of Acrylic painting and related paint products. It's conceptual emphasis will be the creative problem solving of specific compositional and formal issues in painting and will primarily reference issues of abstraction in modern and contemporary art, as well as non-western painting and design and craft models. Process, and creative and critical thinking methodology-technical, aesthetic and conceptual -is emphasized through the keeping of note/sketchbook journals. Oral presentations of supporting research and the creative work strengthen the understanding of the role of critical awareness of the subject. or 3602 with minimum grades of C.

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    • ART-4604 Painting IV
      Description

      An intermediate level painting course exploring visual expression through the use of combined media and art forms, and developing their ability to engage with critical concepts of specific concern to the discipline of painting. Studio discipline and research leading to resolved works will prepare students for self-directed work in advanced painting classes. Oral and written presentations of supporting research and the creative work strengthen the student's understanding of the role of critical awareness of their subject.

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    • ART-4605 Advanced Painting
      Description

      An advanced level course exploring visual expression in painting using the media of the student's choice. Open-ended problems will be presented. Self-directed work with special focus on developing a cohesive work of work that reflects the student's investigation of their role and definition of being an artist. Emphasis will be placed on increased professionalism appropriate to the student's stage in the program and with a view to their potential success as a professional artist. This course is repeatable for up to 15 credit hours.

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    • ART-4702 From Still to Moving Images
      Description

      This course is designed to provide advanced students with an in-depth investigation of the relationship between still and moving images. Students will create photographic prints and video work as well as other works that don?t fall easily into either category. An emphasis will be put on understanding the historic evolution of still and moving images and the use of lens-based imagery in contemporary art. Weekly film screenings will accompany critical readings.

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    • ART-4704 Documentary Photography
      Description

      This course is designed to give advanced students and in-depth experience studying and creating documentary images. Documentary projects are expensive investigations of a subject. Students will define a project with the assistance of the instructor and continue to investigate this project for the entire semester. Progress will be assessed through bi-monthly critiques and monthly submission of images. Whereas concept based art is meant to reflect the personal feelings of the artist and commercial photography is meant to convey ideas for a client, documentary is meant to reflect outwards on society. Projects should have some socio-political or cultural significance. Students will also learn about the history and major figures in documentary photography through slide lectures and readings.

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    • ART-4705 History of Photography
      Description

      This course is designed to give advanced students a comprehensive investigation of the history of photography. This course explores the technical innovations, cultural implications and the major figures in its history. Students will learn about the subject through lectures, readings and exams but they will also learn through hands-on projects using historic processes to make their own work. Major technical emphasis will be placed on the use of the large format view camera. note: this course can fulfill advanced coursework for photography majors, or an art elective for non-photo majors. It does not fulfill a 3000 or above art history requirement, nor is it a DSW certified course.

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    • ART-4706 Advanced Photography Studio
      Description

      Contingent on the approval of the instructor, the student will define a series of works delving into specific subject matter and/or technical interests. This course is meant to further the direction of the individual and prepare them for their senior exhibitions. The student will participate in the artistic community both through exhibiting or competing contract free-lance work and by completing a thesis paper or 10 or more pages, explaining the conceptual interests and processes used in their exhibition. May be repeated up to 15 credit hours.

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    • ART-4707 Professional Photography Assignments
      Description

      This course prepares students to make photographic images as professionals through learning appropriate technical skills. Students will be immersed in the many aspects of photography that are available once they leave the university. A strong emphasis will be placed on developing skills in artificial lighting, studio production, and basic corporate video production.

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    • ART-4708 Exp Prac in Lens-Based Media
      Description

      This course is designed to introduce advanced students to experimental, non-traditional, and alternative photographic and motion picture processes. Students will produce photographic series, time-based works, and other forms of art such as installations, 3-D objects, and projections. Projects will utilize an array of analogue and digital technologies in their production.

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    • ART-4803 Intaglio
      Description

      Printmaking III will offer advanced experiences in the intaglio method of printmaking including hard and soft ground etching, aquatint, spit bite and monoprinting. Color etching will be introduced, and exposure to book forms will continue.

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    • ART-4804 Lithography
      Description

      Printmaking IV offers an introduction to the history and processes of aluminum plate and stone lithography, and continued exposure to the book as an art form.

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    • ART-4805 Advanced Printmaking
      Description

      Advanced expressive problems at the undergraduate level in one or more of the following methods: relief, intaglio, or lithography. May be repeated up to 15 credit hours.

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    • ART-4821 Printmaking IV: Screenprinting
      Description

      Screenprinting is a versatile printmaking medium in which students can combine a variety of marks, including photographic, digital and autographic into images which can be printed on many surfaces (paper, canvas and other fabric, wood, plastic, glass, etc.) This course is an investigation into the techniques and conceptual possibilities of water-based screenprinting (serigraphy) with emphasis on an interdisciplinary approach.

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    • ART-4822 The Art of Letterpress Printing and the Book
      Description

      Letterpress and Printing and Book Arts will continue with advanced problems where Printmaking Survey (3801) ended. The utilization of moveable type (typesetting) will compare aesthetics, history and vocabulary with those of current computer based typesetting. Letterpress will explore fine letterpress printing and expressive typography while learning to operate the Vandercook SP20 Test Press. A variety of two and three dimensional formats will be considered for letterpress application, with an emphasis on the role of the book from its inception to current trends in the book arts.

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    • ART-4903 Sculpture IV
      Description

      Focus of this course is on individual visual vocabulary, expression and content through production of meaningful objects. Students will research and apply advanced techniques and issues in contemporary sculpture using a wide range of traditional and nontraditional materials.

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    • ART-4904 Advanced Sculpture
      Description

      This course focuses on advanced sculptural investigations and individual expression with traditional and nontraditional materials chosen by the student. Students demonstrate significant research in process, technique and materials to express individual ideas and aesthetics resulting in a portfolio of works. May be repeated up to 15 credit hours.

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    • ART-4985 Special Topics
      Description

      Individual studio problems in various topics or media relevant to the student's special interest and competence. May be repeated up to 15 credit hours.

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    • ART-4998 Senior Capstone Experience I
      Description

      Research and study within a studio concentration tha tculminates in the public presentation of the senior exhibition (ART 4899: Senior Capstone II). Students will be required to research this project and document its development prior to the presentation of the written capstone component. With the aid of their peers, advisors and faculty jurors' students will work through the articulation of their goals by active critiquing and self-assessment.

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    • ART-4999 Senior Capstone Experience II
      Description

      Continued research and advanced study within a studio/design concentration will culminate in the public presentation of the senior exhibition. Capstone Experience II will provide an opportunity to consolidate, expand and refine the skills that are essential to your discipline. The preparation of an oral defense for this final body of work, their creative thesis visual project, will undergo the critical review of an Art Faculty Committee prior to its public presentation in the Senior Fine Arts Exhibition. Additionally, the completion of the written component of the creative visual project, begun in ART 49XX, Capstone Experience I, will describe in full the processes and the outcomes of the senior research.

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    • ASTR-2313 Astronomy
      Description

      A survey of sky awareness, historical developments of astronomy, the solar system, stars, nebulas, and galaxies.

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    • ASTR-2313L Astronomy Laboratory
      Description

      An experimental introduction to the elementary tools of astronomy.

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    • ASTR-3033 Topics in Astronomy
      Description

      Topics about the solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. May not be taken by students who have completed PHYS 2313 and does not count toward a major in physics.

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    • BIOL-1010 Fundamentals of Biology
      Description

      Fundamentals of Biology will instruct students in basic biological phenomena and how organisms interact with their environments. Emphasis will be placed on humans and processes within the human biology. Topics will include: biological diversity, biological molecules, cells, organ systems, genetics and the interaction of man with his environment.

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    • BIOL-1010L Fundamentals of Biology Laboratory
      Description

      Laboratory component of the Fundamentals of Biology course (BIOL 1010). The lecture and lab courses must be taken during the same term.

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    • BIOL-1011 Biology of Human Reproduction
      Description

      The Biology of Human Reproduction is designed to familiarize students with the basic structure and function of the reproductive tract, Developmental processes, the genetics of reproduction and disease and dysfunctions of the reproductive tract. Topics of general interest such as birth control, sexually transmitted diseases, infertility and means of overcoming infertility will be discussed.

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    • BIOL-1012 Ecology and Environmental Biology
      Description

      Ecology and Environmental Biology is designed to familiarize non-major students with the basic structures and functions of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Based on this foundation, emphasis will be placed on ecological assessments of many current and pressing environmental issues that threaten the air, water and soil resources of earth. Same as ENVS 1012.

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    • BIOL-1013 Biology of AIDS and Infectious Disease
      Description

      The Biology of AIDS and Infectious Disease is designed to inform students about infectious diseases, how microorganisms cause diseases and how humans resist and fight infection. It will introduce students to several human organ systems and the common infections for those systems. The course will particularly focus on AIDS and HIV, the history, epidemiology, biology, diagnosis, and treatment of this particular disease.

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    • BIOL-1014 Nutrition
      Description

      A course designed to introduce students to the science of nutrition and how it impacts their lives.

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    • BIOL-1015 The Unseen World of Microbes
      Description

      Designed to introduce non-science majors to the diversity and importance of microorganisms and the role of these organisms play in the environment, industry, and out health. Designed for on-line delivery and contains an associated laboratory component.

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    • BIOL-1015L The Unseen World of Microorganisms Lab
      Description

      This laboratory is designed to accompany BIOL 1015. Students may take lecture without lab, however the lecture portion is a co-requisite or pre-requisite to this lab course. The lab modules consist of hands-on and virtual labs that are shipped to off-campus students.

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    • BIOL-1101 Freshman Biology Seminar
      Description

      This course surveys the University of West Georgia, the Biology Department, and the discipline of Biology, including opportunities for post graduate studies and careers. Students will be engaged by active learning assignments in critical thinking, scientific information retrieval, practical computer skills, and oral and written communication. Students will be introduced to resources and practices that can assist success in the classroom. Students are expected to attend and report on assigned presentations outside of class.

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    • BIOL-1107 Principles of Biology I
      Description

      This course is designed for the biology major, other science majors, and secondary science majors. An integrated plant- animal approach, including form, function, and development of organisms, their systematics, ecology and evolution. Students must enroll in BIOL 1107L in the same term.

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    • BIOL-1107L Principles of Biology I Laboratory
      Description

      The laboratory component for BIOL 1107. Lecture and lab must be taken in the same term.

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    • BIOL-1108 Principles of Biology II
      Description

      A continuation of BIOL 1107. Students must enroll in BIOL 1108L in the same term.

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    • BIOL-1108L Principles of Biology II Laboratory
      Description

      The laboratory component for BIOL 1108. Lecture and lab must be taken in the same term.

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    • BIOL-1110 Biological Diversity
      Description

      This course is an Introductory foundation-building course for Biology majors. It is designed to familiarize students with the distinguishing characteristics, taxonomy, evolutionary relationships, and economic importance of all domains of life. For Biology majors only. Does not fulfill core requirements.

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    • BIOL-2021 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
      Description

      An introduction to the structural and functional relationships in the human body. This course will introduce the student to the background material and the organ systems associated with protection, support, and movement, as well as, the systems which control and integrate body functions. Course is designed to be taken before Biology 2022. This course is not intended for biology or other laboratory science majors and cannot be used for credit toward those degrees. Students must enroll in BIOL 2021L in the same term.

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    • BIOL-2021L Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory
      Description

      The laboratory component of BIOL 2021. Students must enroll in BIOL 2021 in the same term.

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    • BIOL-2022 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
      Description

      A continuation of the study of the structural and functional relationships in the human body. This course will introduce the student to the structure and function of the organ systems associated with blood production, blood flow, respiration, digestion, excretion, reproduction and immunity. This course is designed to follow Biology 2021. This course is not intended for biology or other laboratory science majors and cannot be used for credit toward those degrees.

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    • BIOL-2022L Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory
      Description

      The laboratory component of BIOL 2022. Students must enroll in BIOL 2022 in the same term.

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    • BIOL-2030 Medical Microbiology
      Description

      Medical microbiology is a course designed for nursing and other allied health persons and is intended to introduce the student to the basic concepts and practices of microbiology, especially with regard to health and human disease. Lecture portions of the course will address the basic biology of microorganisms, pathogenic mechanisms, host defense and immunity, and microorganisms and human diseases. This course is not intended for biology or other laboratory science majors and cannot be used for credit toward those degrees. Students must enroll in BIOL 2030L in the same term.

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    • BIOL-2030L Medical Microbiology Laboratory
      Description

      The laboratory component of BIOL 2030. Students must enroll in BIOL 2030L in the same term.

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    • BIOL-2107 Principles of Biology I for Biology Majors
      Description

      This is the first of a two semester course designed for biology majors requiring a survey of fundamental topics in modern biology. Lectures build on a foundation of chemistry to develop current concepts of cell and molecular biology, genetics, evolution, and biological diversity. This course satisfies a core requirement of the Biology Major, but does not fulfill any of the requirements for general education.

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    • BIOL-2107L Principles of Biology I Lab for Biology Majors
      Description

      This is the laboratory component for the lecture course, BIOL 2017. Lecture and lab must be taken in the same semester.

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    • BIOL-2108 Principles of Biology II for Biology Majors
      Description

      This is the second of a two semester course designed for biology majors requiring a survey of fundamental topics in modern biology. Lectures build on a foundation of chemistry to develop current concepts of the form and function of plants and animals and of ecology. This course satisfies a core requirement of the Biology major but does not fulfill any of the requirements for general education.

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    • BIOL-2108L Principles of Biology II Lab for Biology Majors
      Description

      This is the laboratory component for the lecture course, BIOL 2108. Lecture and lab must be taken in the same semester.

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    • BIOL-2120 Biological Computer Applications
      Description

      A course designed to introduce sophomore Biology majors to basic computer applications that will provide knowledge and skills useful for advanced course work, professional studies, or employment in the biological sciences.

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    • BIOL-2130 Sophomore Biology Seminar
      Description

      A course designed to introduce biology majors to basic skills for critical reading of biological literature, methods for organizing information for oral presentation and which will assess the oral presentation skills of students. Students will learn methods for literature searches, the style of writing for biological literature, including research papers, review articles and short communications. Each student will select a topic for presentation, will research his or her topic and will present the researched information orally in a style acceptable for scientific presentations.

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    • BIOL-2983 Undergraduate Biology Research
      Description

      A course designed to allow students to conduct faculty- directed, independent research projects in areas of the biological sciences. The course may be repeated, but credit for BIOL 2983 may not apply toward biology degree requirements.

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    • BIOL-2985 Special Topics in Biology
      Description

      This course will cover various topics in biology at the lower division level. The topics will change from term to term. Courses may or may not involve laboratory instruction. Non-laboratory courses will offer 3 credit hours and laboratory courses will offer 4 credit hours.

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    • BIOL-3010 Biology for Middle Grades Education
      Description

      (Non-credit for biology major or minor.) A course that emphasizes the conceptual basis for the Georgia middle grades life sciences performance standards. This course broadens understanding of the fundamental concepts of animal organ systems, animal physiology, parts and functions of vascular plants, reproduction, and ecological principles. A foundational course in biology is assumed.

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    • BIOL-3134 Cell and Molecular Biology
      Description

      This course deals with the molecular aspects of cell structure and function,, emphasizing the chemical and molecular basis of cellular physiology. It also addresses genetic functions at the chromosomal and molecular levels, gene expression, and regulation.

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    • BIOL-3135 Ecology
      Description

      This course is designed to familiarize Biology majors with the factors controlling the structure and function of populations, communities, and ecosystems. The role of evolutionary processes in the structure and function of these systems will also be explored. Basic concepts will be synthesized and reinforced by investigating the dynamics of the aquatic life zones and terrestrial biomes on earth.

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    • BIOL-3221 Taxonomy of Flowering Plants and Ferns
      Description

      Taxonomy of flowering plants and ferns is designed to familiarize students with the important botanical features and methods used to identify vascular plant species. Emphasis will be placed on recognizing the distinguishing characteristics, taxonomic relationships, and ecological distribution of plant families common to Northwest Georgia.

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    • BIOL-3223 Vascular Plants
      Description

      Designed to familiarize students with four basic areas of plant biology: diversity, anatomy, physiology and ecology. Ferns, fern allies, gymnosperms, and angiosperms will be compared and contrasted through lecture and lab-based exercises.

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    • BIOL-3226 Natural History of Vertebrates
      Description

      Vertebrate natural history is studied in lecture, lab, and field. The taxonomy, phylogeny, identification, and general aspects of the behavior and ecology of freshwater fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals of the Southeast are studied. Local species are emphasized.

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    • BIOL-3231 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
      Description

      A lab oriented (dissection) course in the organogenesis and gross morphology of animal structure with an emphasis on functional and evolutionary modifications. Gross dissection and techniques used in morphology.

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    • BIOL-3232 Vertebrate Evolution
      Description

      Concepts of evolution with a review of the how animals with backbones developed through more than 400 million years.

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    • BIOL-3242 Evolution
      Description

      The principles and mechanisms of evolution in plants and animals, covering population phenomena, specification, sexual selection, life history strategies, behavior, adaption, systematics and biogeography.

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    • BIOL-3310 Microbiology
      Description

      Microbiology is the study of biological organisms and agents too small to see with the unaided eye. This course will introduce students to the diversity, physiology, anatomy, and genetics of microorganisms, with particular emphasis on the bacteria. It will also introduce students to key areas of microbiology, including medical microbiology, microbial ecology, food microbiology, and biotechnology. In the laboratory students will learn techniques for medical microbiology and biotechnology.

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    • BIOL-3513 Human Physiology
      Description

      A survey of the mechanisms involved in the function of the human body. Study is approached from the organ system level to address muscular, neural, hormonal, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, renal, and reproductive functions. Correlation will be made to the similarity between the demands placed on living systems regardless of whether the organism is multicellular or a single cell.

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    • BIOL-3526 Vertebrate Histology
      Description

      A microanatomical study of cell and tissue structure. Emphasis is on the complex nature of tissues and how the cellular associations within the tissue contribute to the overall functions of the tissues. Laboratory is devoted to preparation and interpretation of tissue samples.

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    • BIOL-3621 Genetics and Medical Genetics
      Description

      The major emphasis of this course is the study of both basic and advanced genetic principles and genetic analysis methods that can be applied to all eukaryotic organisms. The secondary emphasis of this course will be the study of human medical genetics.

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    • BIOL-3825 Research Methods
      Description

      Specially designed to meet the needs of future teachers, students design and carry out four independent inquiries, which they write up and present in the manner that is common in the scientific community. Course is restricted to UTEACH students.

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    • BIOL-4241 Entomology
      Description

      The study of insects. This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of insect taxonomy, morphology, physiology, behavior, and evolution. The relationships between insects and humans, other animals, and plants will be examined. The influences of insects on culture, religion, art, history, and colonization will be discussed. The laboratory will be devoted primarily to developing an understanding of insect identification.

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    • BIOL-4242 Invertebrate Zoology
      Description

      This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of taxonomy, morphology, physiology, and evolution of the more common invertebrate phyla. The distribution and interspecific relationships among invertebrates and other forms of life will be presented and discussed. The laboratory will be devoted primarily to developing an understanding of invertebrate morphology and classification.

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    • BIOL-4245 Ichthyology
      Description

      The biology, systematics and taxonomy of fishes with an emphasis on the biodiversity/biogeography of fishes in the state of Georgia.

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    • BIOL-4266 Molecular Ecology
      Description

      This course examines the use of molecular genetic data to the understanding of ecological and evolutionary processes in the natural populations such as genetic diversity, dispersal, gene flow and phylogeography. This course will also examine how molecular genetic data is utilized to study behavioral mechanism such as mate selection and foraging. Application of molecular ecology principles to conversation will also be explored.

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    • BIOL-4315 Bacterial Genetics
      Description

      Bacterial Genetics is an advanced microbiology course which focuses on the molecular genetics of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Topics addressed include the nature of the bacterial chromosome, the multi-step process of DNA replication, DNA damaging agents and mutations, DNA repair systems, mechanisms of gene transfer and antibiotic resistance, and the regulation of gene expression. The laboratory component reinforces concepts learned in lecture and familiarizes students with modern techniques used in genetic engineering and biotechnology.

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    • BIOL-4321 Applied and Environmental Microbiology
      Description

      Course is designed to expose students to the importance of micro organisms in industry and in the environment. Lab exercises focus on microbial growth, interactions with environmental factors and use in industrial applications such as treatment of sewage. Same as ENVS 4321.

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    • BIOL-4325 Advanced Medical Microbiology
      Description

      Advanced medical microbiology is designed to inform students of current developments in the areas of clinical and medical microbiology. The course will focus on mechanisms of pathogenesis and host defense. Discussion of new and emerging infectious agents will be addressed.

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    • BIOL-4424 Wildlife Habitat Ecology
      Description

      This course is designed to familiarize biology majors with the ecology and management of terrestrial wildlife habitats. Ecological concepts and principles relevant to wildlife habitat structure and function will be evaluated from the individual, population, community, ecosystem, and landscape levels of organization. Management practices that affect the structure and function of wildlife habitats will be evaluated for agricultural and forest ecosystems. Concepts will be synthesized and reinforced by investigating the habitat requirements for a variety of wildlife species in the southwestern United States.

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    • BIOL-4440 Aquatic Ecology
      Description

      A study of biological, chemical, and physical components and interactions in freshwater systems. Field labs include a study of reservoirs and streams in west Georgia. A three-day field trip to the Georgia coast or the Okefenokee Swamp is required.

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    • BIOL-4441 Animal Behavior
      Description

      A study of the mechanisms and adaptive functions of behaviors. The genetics, development, physiology, and ecology of behaviors are investigated with an evolutionary approach.

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    • BIOL-4445 Marine Biology
      Description

      The biology, systematics and taxonomy of marine organisms with an emphasis on the ecological principles that influence their biogeography.

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    • BIOL-4450 Terrestrial Ecology
      Description

      This course provides an in-dept study of the processes controlling the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems. Basic concepts will be synthesized and applied comparing and contrasting the dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems in the Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and Mountain Regions of the Southeastern United States.

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    • BIOL-4503 Biological Perspectives: Biochemistry
      Description

      This course is designed to study the interactions of biochemical pathways and the control systems that function to regulate cell and whole body metabolism. This course emphasizes the regulation of biochemical pathways as opposed to the mechanisms involved in each enzymatic step within a given pathway.

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    • BIOL-4520 Developmental Biology and Embryology
      Description

      A course combining the fundamentals of embryology with the genetic and molecular analysis of embryonic development.

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    • BIOL-4539 Comparative Physiology
      Description

      This course is designed to study the similarities and differences in how various animals have solved a wide variety of physiological problems imposed by the natural world in which they exist. The student will investigate the functions of the different organ systems in invertebrates and vertebrates. The main goal of this class is to focus on the observation of how problems in nature are solved by various organisms. A complete understanding of the physiology of the human is an absolute prerequisite for this course as this will be the point of reference for most discussions.

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    • BIOL-4541 Plant Physiology
      Description

      This course is designed to give students a hands-on approach to understanding the metabolic activities of how plants grow develop throughout their lifecycles. Emphasis will be placed on plant environmental interactions, stress physiology, growth regulators, mineral nutrition, translocation, photosynthesis/respiration, and root/shoot physiology.

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    • BIOL-4666 Evolutionary Genomics
      Description

      This course covers the techniques by which genome sequences and genome functions are analyzed. This course also examines topics in evolutionary genomics such as comparative genomics, evolution of duplicate genes, evolution of genome structure and organization, evolution of protein function and evolution of gene expression.

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    • BIOL-4727 Essentials of Immunology
      Description

      Essentials of immunology is designed as an introduction to the immune response. The student will obtain a broad, comprehensive understanding of the principles of immunology. The course will focus on a detailed study of antigen-antibody interactions, humoral immunity, and cell-mediated immunity. Medically important syndromes, including AIDS, will be discussed to reinforce the principles of immunology.

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    • BIOL-4728 Bacterial Pathogenesis
      Description

      Bacterial Pathogenesis introduces students to the field of medical microbiology and the study of infectious disease. Topics covered include a discussion of environmental and host factors involved in bacterial infection and disease, an introduction to epidemiology and nosocomial infections, an overview of innate and acquired host defenses, and an extensive survey of bacterial pathogens with special emphasis on virulence factors and molecular mechanisms underlying disease processes. An online, virtual laboratory component will focus on methods routinely used to isolate, culture, and identify bacterial pathogens.

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    • BIOL-4729 Medical Virology
      Description

      Medical virology is designed as an introduction to viruses that are involved in human disease. The student will obtain a broad, comprehensive understanding of the principles of virology using specific medical examples. The course will focus on a detailed study of the viral structure, replication gene expression, pathogenesis, and host defense.

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    • BIOL-4730 Emerging Pathogens
      Description

      The emerging pathogen course is designed to inform students of the dramatic changes and current developments in the area of infectious disease. The course will focus on the evolving microorganisms and the reasons that the pathogens emerged. Also the course will include discussions on the mechanisms of pathogenesis and the host defense.

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    • BIOL-4731 Introduction to Toxicology
      Description

      The primary objective of the course is to present students with the concepts and practical applications of the science of toxicology. This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the principles of toxicology, focusing on the biochemical, physiological, and ecological effects of various toxicants. The use of toxicology in biomedical, pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and environmental research will be examined and discussed.

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    • BIOL-4732 Biology of Aging
      Description

      Since the beginning of time , the fear of aging has preoccupied mankind. Only recently we are gaining insights into important clues about biological process of aging. In this course we will focus on some of the ideas about aging put forward by early alchemists to modern molecular biologists. Biological principles behind anti-aging, aging intervention agents, and life-style options will be discussed.

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    • BIOL-4733 Nutrition
      Description

      Biology 4733 is a general science course for science majors. This course provides a basic understanding of the fundamentals of human nutrition and builds from what biology majors already know about physiology, biochemistry and general biology. It uses a scientific approach to apply the logic of sciences in understanding the individual's diet so that they are prepared to make decisions about health and nutrition. Emphases are placed on digestion, absorption and functions of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, nucleic acids, vitamins, minerals, water, and accessory nutrients. This course also integrates energy balance, weight control, health, diseases, metabolism, and cultural diversity. This course is only for those who have learned metabolic pathways and chemistry, which set it apart from the lower level core curriculum course, Biology 1014.

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    • BIOL-4734 Neuroscience
      Description

      Biology 4734W is an upper level Discipline-Specific Writing science course. This course will provide an understanding of human neuroanatomy, physiology and pharmacology of the nervous system and its voluntary and autonomic target and sensory organs. Other topics will include cognition, neural disorders and disorders of movement. Students taking this course should have passed BIOL 3513 (Physiology) CGEN 2411 (Organic Chemistry I) or BIOL 4503 (Biochemistry).

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    • BIOL-4981 Independent Study
      Description

      Independent study of topics not offered in the current term. Independent study is only available for topics addressed by current courses if the topical course will not be offered during the academic year, or if the scheduling of the topical course is such that it will require a delay in timely completion of the degree for the student.

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    • BIOL-4983 Advanced Undergraduate Biology Research
      Description

      A course designed to allow students to conduct faculty- directed, independent research projects in areas of the biological sciences. The course may be repeated, but credit for BIOL 4983 may be applied toward biology degree requirements for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

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    • BIOL-4984 Senior Biology Seminar
      Description

      The senior biology seminar is designed to prepare students for oral presentation of biological research and concepts and to allow a mechanism for feedback on presentation skills. Biology majors are required to first enroll in sophomore biology seminar. Students who have conducted research projects may present their own research results. Students who have conducted research projects may present their own research results. Others may present information from current biological research literature.

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    • BIOL-4985 Special Topics in Biology
      Description

      Specific titles will be announced for each term in class schedules and will be entered on transcripts.

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    • BIOL-4986 Biological Internship
      Description

      Students wishing to enter an internship experience will be provided with a written statement of understanding, defining the nature of the experience and the expectations for student performance. The degree of involvement for the particular experience will be used to determine credit hours received. Variable Credit Course 1-6 hours. May be repeated for up to 12 hours.

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    • BRFV-4210 Home, School and Community
      Description

      This course is designed for students who are currently employed or who are preparing to work in early childhood settings. This course will help students to establish and maintain positive and productive working relationships with families within the context of the urban community to benefit the well being of the growing child. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline will be part of the course.

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    • BRFV-4220 Special Education Strategies for Young Learners: Birth to Age Five
      Description

      This course provides information on curricula, instructional strategies, service environments, and staffing roles for teachers of young (0-5) children with disabilities.

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    • BRFV-4230 Methods for Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten
      Description

      This course is designed to familiarize students with developmentally appropriate programs for preschool children in inclusive classroom settings.

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    • BUSA-1900 Surfing the Internet for Success
      Description

      An introduction to Internet basics such as using e-mail, participating in electronic discussion groups, and exploring the World Wide Web (WWW). Emphasis will be on using the Internet as a useful source of information for the social sciences, business education, consumer decision making, and career planning. This course satisfies the two-hour institutional priority listed under Area B.

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    • BUSA-1901 Personal and Consumer Law
      Description

      A course designed to familiarize students with the legal environment in which they live. This includes the operation of the U.S. legal system, alternative dispute resolution and conflict management, and rights and obligations arising in various consumer, domestic, business, and employment contexts.

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    • BUSA-1910 Using Information Technology Today and Tomorrow
      Description

      A course designed to assure a basic level of computer applications literacy, to include word processing, presentations software, LAN, e-mail and Internet utilizations.

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    • BUSA-1XXX University Syst Studies Abroad
    • BUSA-2106 Legal and Ethical Environment of Business
      Description

      An introduction to the legal, regulatory, and ethical environment of business, considering the interrelationship and impact of political, social, cultural, environmental, technological, international, and diversity issues. Requires overall GPA of 2.0.

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    • CEPD-2121 Organizational Leadership
      Description

      Theoretical approaches to organizational leadership will be emphasized. Developing a practical use of skills and methods for immediate application will be stressed.

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    • CEPD-3200 Skills and Ethics in Human Services
      Description

      This undergraduate course is an introduction to the basic communication and group management skills required of effective human service workers, and the legal and ethical considerations that accompany human services work. Students will learn strategies for active listening, effective communication, understanding and managing group dynamics, and identifying and responding to legal and ethical issues in the workplace.

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    • CEPD-4101 Educational Psychology
      Description

      An introduction to the psychological theories and principles applied to the classroom. The course will include aspects of learning, motivation, classroom management, and assessment. Emphasis will be placed on developmentally designed instruction for all students.

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    • CEPD-4106 Seminar in Residence Hall Staff Education
      Description

      The purpose of the class is to provide the resident assistant with additional training that will assist in job performance and to provide supplemental learning activities that will allow individuals to explore new arenas of self-awareness.

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    • CEPD-4150 Tests and Measurements
      Description

      This course is concerned with the theory and practice of educational and psychological measurement. The focus is on the technology of measurement rather than on the development of skill in the use of any given measuring instrument. Classroom test construction will be emphasized.

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    • CEPD-4200 Working with Diverse Populations in Human Services
      Description

      This course provides knowledge, skills and awareness related to the effective delivery of human services to diverse populations in contemporary society.

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    • CHEM-1000 Workshop for CHEM 1151K
      Description

      Workshop/discussion for Chemistry 1151.

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    • CHEM-1001 Workshop for CHEM 1211K
      Description

      Workshop/discussion for Chemistry 1211K.

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    • CHEM-1002 Workshop for CHEM 1152K
      Description

      Workshop/discussion for CHEM 1152K

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    • CHEM-1003 Workshop for CHEM 1212K
      Description

      Workshop/discussion for CHEM 1212K

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    • CHEM-1100 Introductory Chemistry
      Description

      A one semester course covering some basic concepts and applications of chemistry for non-science majors. There is an optional laboratory component.

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    • CHEM-1100L Introductory Chemistry Laboratory
      Description

      Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1100.

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    • CHEM-1151K Survey of Chemistry I
      Description

      First course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic, and biochemistry for allied health professions and non-science majors. Topics to be covered include: elements and compounds, chemical equations, organic nomenclature, and molecular geometry. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. MATH 1111 may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-1152K Survey of Chemistry II
      Description

      Second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic, and biochemistry for allied health professions and non-science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.

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    • CHEM-1211 Principles of Chemistry I
      Description

      First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. MATH 1113 and CHEM 1211L may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-1211K Principles of Chemistry I and Lab
      Description

      First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/ .

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    • CHEM-1211L Principles of Chemistry I Lab
      Description

      Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1211.

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    • CHEM-1212 Principles of Chemistry II
      Description

      Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include chemical bonding, properties of solids, liquids and gases, solutions, equilibria, acids and bases, solubility, thermodynamics, kinetics and electricity. Corequisite: CHEM 1212L

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    • CHEM-1212K Principles of Chemistry II and Lab
      Description

      Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.

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    • CHEM-1212L Principles of Chemistry II Lab
      Description

      Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1212.

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    • CHEM-1230K Accelerated Principles of Chemistry
      Description

      Designed for the student with superior pre-college preparation. Principles of chemistry will be explored in an integrated class/laboratory setting. Topics will include reactions and reaction stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, properties of solids, liquids and gases, solutions, equilibria, acids and bases, solubility, thermodynamics and kinetics, and electrochemistry. May not be taken for credit after successful completion of CHEM 1212.

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    • CHEM-2083 Selected Projects in Chemistry
      Description

      Title and description of course to be specified at time of offering.

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    • CHEM-2130 Sophomore Chemistry Seminar
      Description

      A course designed to introduce Chemistry majors to current literature and career opportunities in Chemistry and allied fields. Faculty will present brief seminars pertaining to their research and topics of current interest. Students will carry out literature searches and make oral and/or written presentations on topics chosen in consultation with the instructor(s).

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    • CHEM-2411 Organic Chemistry I
      Description

      The first course of a two semester sequence which provides a broad introduction to the basic principles, theories and applications of the chemistry of carbon compounds. Topics will include modern structural theory, organic nomenclature, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and kinetics, and an introduction to functional group chemistry. Also covers the interpretation of IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy for the structure determination of organic compounds. CHEM 2411L may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-2411L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
      Description

      Emphasis of this laboratory will be on fundamental techniques and will provide experience with purification, physical and spectroscopic characterization and synthesis of organic substances.

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    • CHEM-2422 Organic Chemistry II
      Description

      The second course will systematically explore reactions of carbon-containing compounds and the mechanistic pathways involved in these processes. Reactions that will be discussed include functional group transformations, oxidation, reductions, cyclo-additions and carbon-carbon bond formation. The course begins to teach the student how to systematically design a multi-step synthesis of complex organic compounds. CHEM 2422L may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-2422L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
      Description

      Emphasis of this laboratory will be on synthesis and characterization of organic substances will be included.

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    • CHEM-3010 Law and Administration of Chemicals
      Description

      Categories of hazardous chemicals, their origin, impact on society, state and federal regulations, handling, storage and disposal will be discussed. Case studies of hazardous chemicals will include asbestos, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, batteries. Regulations, particularly RCRA, CERCLA, OSHA, TSCA, SARA, NEPA, HMTA, CWA will be discussed.

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    • CHEM-3130 Modern Forensic Science
      Description

      Case-oriented approach will be used to explore selected topics of forensic science. These include: (1) the scientific and technological foundation for the examination of evidence; (2) the scope of expert qualifications and testimony, the legal status of scientific techniques, and the admissibility of the results in evidence; (3) the analysis of trace evidence including glass, soil, hair, fibers, gunpowder residues and bullet fragments; (4) forensic toxicology and pharmacology are applied to the analysis of alcohol, poisons, and drugs; and (5) the characterization of blood and other body fluids. The cases which stimulate the exploration of these areas include: the O.J. Simpson case, the John Kennedy assassination, the Jeffery Lindberg baby kidnapping, and the Tylenol poisonings. Not applicable as a Chemistry elective for students majoring or minoring in chemistry.

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    • CHEM-3140 Drugs and Drug Abuse
      Description

      An examination of the current and historical patterns of alcohol, drug use, abuse, and control. Emphasis will be given to the patterns of usage, way these drugs affect body and types of rehabilitation centers. See CRIM 3242. Not applicable as a Chemistry elective for students majoring or minoring in Chemistry.

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    • CHEM-3310K Analytical Chemistry
      Description

      This course emphasizes skills needed for a student to function as a professional analytical chemist. The student will be firmly grounded in the areas of gravimetric and volumetric analysis, equilibria, quantitative spectroscopy, electrochemistry and chromatography. Special emphases will be placed on writing skills.

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    • CHEM-3422 Organic Chemistry II
      Description

      The second course will systematically explore reactions of carbon-containing compounds and the mechanistic pathways involved in these processes. Reactions that will be discussed include functional group transformations, oxidation, reductions, cyclo-additions and carbon-carbon bond formation. The course begins to teach the student how to systematically design a multi-step synthesis of complex organic compounds. CHEM 3422L may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-3422L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
      Description

      Emphasis of this laboratory will be on synthesis and characterization of organic substances will be included.

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    • CHEM-3510 Survey of Physical Chemistry
      Description

      This course is a survey course for students who do not need the more rigorous full-year sequence in physical chemistry. The course includes thermodynamics, chemical and phase equilibria, electrochemistry, kinetics and other topics in physical chemistry.

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    • CHEM-3521 Quantum Chemistry
      Description

      This course is an introduction to elementary quantum mechanics and its applications to selected chemical systems. Topics include an introduction to operators, 'particle in a box', harmonic oscillator, atomic structure, chemical bonding, atomic spectroscopy, rotational, vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of small molecules, and elementary statistical mechanics. MATH 2664 or MATH 3303 may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-3522 Chemical Thermodynamics
      Description

      This course develops standard topics in classical physical chemistry, with primary emphasis on chemical thermodynamics. The course includes physical and chemical properties of real and ideal gases, the law of thermodynamics and their application to physical and chemical systems, chemical and phase equilibria, kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics, transport properties, and the application of quantum mechanics to thermodynamics in statistical mechanics. MATH 2654 or MATH 3303 may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-3550L Physical Chemistry Laboratory
      Description

      In this course, students will demonstrate their understanding of the physical basis and general applications of experimental techniques in physical chemistry. In particular, they will demonstrate their ability in applying the theories from thermodynamics, kinetics, quantum mechanics and spectroscopy to interpret experimental data. They will also learn how to maintain a laboratory notebook - collect data in a professionally acceptable way. Finally, they will demonstrate their ability to communicate their data and results to others. CHEM 3521 or CHEM 3522 may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-3810 Chemical Process Principles
      Description

      An introductory engineering approach to material and energy balance for physical and chemical processes are developed. Gas behavior, systems of units, material properties, thermophysical and thermochemical concepts are discussed. Emphasis is on the application of material and energy balances to steady and unsteady state physical and chemical processes.

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    • CHEM-3825 Research Methods
      Description

      Specially designed to meet the needs of future teachers, students design and carry out four independent inquiries, which they write up and present in the manner that is common in the scientific community. Course is restricted to UTEACH students.

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    • CHEM-3830 Engineering Thermodynamics
      Description

      An introductory engineering approach to thermodynamics for physical and chemical processes is developed. Applications of first and second laws, engines, refrigeration and compression cycles, equations of states, fluid properties, corresponding states will be emphasized.

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    • CHEM-3885 Selected Topics in Chemical Engineering
      Description

      Title and description of course to be specified at time of offering. May be repeated for credit.

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    • CHEM-4003 History and Philosophy of Science
      Description

      A study of the historical development of major areas of science and the philosophical examinations of scientific methods and results.

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    • CHEM-4081 Independent Study
      Description

      A topic is chosen in consultation with a faculty member.

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    • CHEM-4083 Faculty Directed Research
      Description

      A research project carried out under the guidance of a faculty member. Discussion of research areas with the faculty and preliminary work involving literature searching and planning should be completed before the senior year. Both a formal oral and written report of the results of the research must be presented to the faculty of the Department of Chemistry. ACS track students cannot use this as a Chemistry elective. Non-ACS track students can use up to 3 credit hours as a Chemistry elective.

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    • CHEM-4084 Senior Seminar
      Description

      Restricted to senior chemistry majors. This course is designed to prepare students for oral presentation of chemical research. An oral defense of the students senior research project is required.

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    • CHEM-4086 Internship in Chemistry
      Description

      Students will secure a position with a company for field experience. May be used for a chemistry elective only by consent of the department.

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    • CHEM-4185 Selected Topics for Teachers
      Description

      Course is designed for pre- and in-service teachers. Title and description of course to be specified at time of offering. May be repeated for credit. May be used for major or minor in chemistry only by consent of department.

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    • CHEM-4330K Instrumental Analysis
      Description

      This is a course designed for chemistry majors that covers the use of instrumentation for chemical analysis. Topics will include optical spectroscopy, NMR, mass spectrometry and selected topics in polarimetry, voltammetry and chromatography. In this class, we will discuss the theory behind the analysis (with a strong emphasis on quantum mechanics and spectroscopy), instrumental operation (that covers the electronics and optical components of instruments), and the data analysis and interpretation (which includes signal processing, Fourier transformation, and statistical analysis). There is a three hour laboratory component to the course. Laboratory exercises will familiarize students with electronics, applications of spectroscopy, chemical instrumentation and data analysis.

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    • CHEM-4340 Surface Chemistry
      Description

      This course introduces elementary concepts of modern surface chemistry. Considerations of thermodynamics, kinetics, surface structure, electronic structure, and catalysis and reactivity will be explored using examples from the current literature. Surface chemistry, draws upon all areas of chemistry; therefore, a solid background in calculus, physics, and chemistry is assumed.

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    • CHEM-4350L Techniques of Surface Chemistry Laboratory
      Description

      This laboratory course is designed to familiarize a student to modern techniques of surface science. The technique includes scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, auger electron spectroscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy, and ion sputtering. Design considerations of vacuum systems will be explored. Since all techniques are on-site, this will be a interactive hands on experience.

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    • CHEM-4385 Advanced Topics in Analytical Chemistry
      Description

      Advanced topics in analytical chemistry provides the student exposure to current topics and problems unique to the field of analytical chemistry. This course will be offered periodically with the topics announced by the faculty involved.

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    • CHEM-4410 Organic Medicinal Chemistry
      Description

      This course covers a wide variety of medicinal drugs, their actions in the body, and ultimately their metabolism and excretion.

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    • CHEM-4485 Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry
      Description

      Building upon the students' background in organic chemistry, these courses will explore in greater depth selected advanced topics in organic chemistry. Selected topics such as advanced synthesis, reaction mechanism, molecular orbital theory, spectroscopy, stereochemistry and physical organic chemistry will be offered.

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    • CHEM-4585 Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry
      Description

      Building upon the students' background in required courses in physical chemistry, this course will explore in greater depth selected topics in physical chemistry. These will be chosen from atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, statistical mechanics, and dynamics of chemical reactions.

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    • CHEM-4610 Inorganic Chemistry
      Description

      The wave nature of electrons is applied to atomic structure and periodic trends. Inter and intramolecular bonding models are used to interpret the chemical and physical properties of various materials, from simplistic diatomic molecules to structurally complex molecular and ionic systems. Thermodynamic principles are used to determine the relative stability of inorganic compounds.

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    • CHEM-4611 Structure and Bonding
      Description

      Fundamental quantum mechanical principles are applied to atomic structure and the periodic properties of the elements. The structure and reactivity of ionic and molecular systems are qualitatively analyzed by using bonding models such as valence bond theory, group symmetry and molecular orbital theory. The Band Theory is used to investigate the insulating/conducting properties of solids.

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    • CHEM-4612 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
      Description

      The thermodynamic, kinetic, and quantum mechanical properties of inorganic compounds are investigated. Bonding models are used to explain the physical and chemical properties of organometallic, main group, and heavy metal systems. Nuclear properties of the elements are explored and nuclear models are compared.

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    • CHEM-4685 Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry
      Description

      Advanced topics in inorganic chemistry exposes the students to current topics and problems in the field of inorganic chemistry.

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    • CHEM-4711 Biochemistry
      Description

      The first of two semester sequence in biochemistry covering the general physical and chemical properties of biomolecules and the metabolism. Topics will include biomolecular structure and function, first-order enzyme kinetics, glycolysis and carbohydrate metabolism, Kreb's cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid catabolism and biosynthesis, metabolism and utilization of amino acids, biologically important amines and regulation of metabolism.

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    • CHEM-4712 Physical Biochemistry
      Description

      Covers bio- chemistry and spectroscopy of biomolecules. Topics include protein folding, protein stability, protein-DNA interactions, physical chemistry of biomembranes, kinetics (beyond first order), molecular mechanics and dynamics, NMR spectroscopy (fluorescence, circular dicroism, laser spectroscopy), mass spectrometry and xray crystallograph.

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    • CHEM-4720L Biochemistry Laboratory
      Description

      The laboratory course will emphasize the principles discussed in the lecture courses Biochemistry I and Biochemistry II. Half of the course will place emphasis on experiments that introduce students to the practices of protein separation, purification, quantification and assays. The other half of the course will emphasize principles from physical biochemistry and spectroscopy of biomolecules. Experiments will examine macromolecular structure and stability; protein folding; lipid bilayer structure and dynamics and enzyme kinetics. This course will provide students with experience in instrumental techniques that are used in research and industrial facilities.

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    • CHEM-4910L Tools and Applications in Chemical Research and Practice
      Description

      Tools and Applications in Chemical Research and Practice is a 3 credit hour laboratory based course that introduces students to a research experience using a series of small-scale, multi-week research modules. This capstone course capitalizes on previous knowledge and skills from multidisciplinary chemistry courses and focuses on a narrow problem in a practical application. Each module begins with skill building activities followed by and in-depth exploration of one aspect of the problem allowing students access to research experiences as part of the mainstream curriculum.

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    • CHEM-4913L Advanced Synthesis Laboratory
      Description

      This laboratory course involves non-trivial synthesis of organic and inorganic molecules by a variety of advanced techniques (vacuum line, inert atmosphere, high/low temperature, etc.). Spectroscopic (FT-NMR, IR, UV, etc.) and computational methods are used to investigate characterize, and compare experimental and theoretical properties of the synthesized molecules. Special emphasis will be placed on writing skills. CHEM 4611 or CHEM 4612 may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-4920 Environmental Chemistry
      Description

      This course is an introduction to the practice of modern environmental chemistry. Topics include pollutants in water, soil, and the atmosphere; equilibria in aqueous systems; experimental methods in environmental analyses; toxicological chemistry; current environmental problems. The laboratory will consist of EPA-approved methods of analyses.

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    • CHEM-4930 Chemical Kinetics
      Description

      This course focuses on macroscopic rates of chemical reactions as a tool to a molecular level understanding. The emphasis is on an integrated approach to view examples drawn from various subdisciplines within chemistry, namely organic, inorganic and biological. Topics include integrated rate laws, experimental techniques in chemical kinetics, steady state approximation, mechanisms of organic, inorganic, and enzyme reactions, catalysis, collision theory, and elementary activated complex theory.

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    • CHEM-4940 Industrial Chemistry
      Description

      Commercial production of everyday and specialty chemicals will be discussed with emphasis on raw materials, chemistry, equipment, environmental impact. Typical industries: inorganic acids/bases, hydrocarbon derivatives, aromatics, petroleum refining, polymers, pesticides/fertilizers, paper/pulp, pharmaceuticals, soaps/detergents.

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    • CHEM-4985 Selected Topics in Chemistry: An Integrated Approach
      Description

      This course focuses on selected topics in chemistry which may consist of spectroscopy, magnetic resonance or stereo chemistry. The emphasis is on an integrated approach to view examples that transcend sub-disciplines within chemistry, namely inorganic, organic, physical, analytical, and biochemistry.

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    • CISM-2201 Foundations of Computer Applications
      Description

      An introduction to management information systems that focuses on emerging technologies and examines how programs such as Microsoft Office can be used in making business decisions. There is a heavy emphasis on Excel as students format and modify worksheets, use advanced formulas, and create charts and pivot tables. Requires overall GPA of 2.0.

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    • CISM-3330 Management of Information Systems
      Description

      This course introduces students to the study of organizations as systems supported by information processing. Students will be able to distinguish needs for information at different levels in organizations. They will be able to evaluate information system decisions. They will analyze business information problems using formal methods.

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    • CISM-3340 Data Resource Management and Design
      Description

      Application of development tools and languages (e.g., DBMS, Visual Basic, etc.) for business problem solving in a database environment.

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    • CISM-3350 Information Systems Research
      Description

      This course introduces students to basic research concepts. Additionally, students demonstrate their ability to recognize and understand emerging MIS-related technology.

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    • CISM-4310 Business Systems Analysis and Design
      Description

      Develop knowledge for business systems analysis and design processes including familiarization with tools and techniques of SA/D and development of problem solving skills.

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    • CISM-4330 Enterprise Architecture
      Description

      An introduction to the theoretical and practical issues related to Enterprise Architecture (EA). EA is the organizing structure for business processes and IT infrastructure. Top performing organizations know how to design their business processes and IT infrastructure for success of their current operations, and the most successful companies know how to expand their EA to enable innovation and to seize a competitive advantage for the future. This course will introduce students to EA concepts and will equip students with design thinking tools and knowledge needed to extend an organization’s EA. Specific emphasis will be placed on using SAP enterprise systems design tools. Same as MGNT 4330.

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    • CISM-4350 Enterprise and Decision Support Systems
      Description

      An introduction to the theoretical and practical issues related to enterprise and decision support systems. Will introduce students to the technologies involved in these systems and will examine the need to share, communicate, and manage organizational information for integration and decision making. Specific emphasis will be placed on using enterprise systems such as Greenway's PrimeSuite or SAP's enterprise system.

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    • CISM-4355 Cyber Security
      Description

      Business and government are facing a rapidly expanding need for information security professionals. This course surveys important skills in information security program design, networking and application security, the development of information security safeguards and information security auditing, disaster recovery, policy development, identity management, and effective threat assessment. This course is only for MIS majors.

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    • CISM-4382 Special Problems in Management Information Systems
      Description

      In-depth, supervised, individual study of one or more current problems of a business organization.

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    • CISM-4386 Business Internship (Management Information Systems)
      Description

      Practical internship experience with a commercial firm or organization for selected junior or senior students. (Students will be given a written agreement specifying course credit hours and grading system to be used).

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    • CISM-4390 Business Intelligence and Data Mining
      Description

      This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of business intelligence and several data mining software tools that enable organizations to strive for business intelligence.

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    • CMWL-2100 Intro to Health and Community Wellness
      Description

      This undergraduate course is an introduction to the Health and Community Wellness degree. Through this course, students will discover the many aspects of an undergraduate degree in Health and Community Wellness, including an overview of the classes required, the current and future opportunities available with a degree in this field, the potential opportunities, certifications, and work experiences which students can pursue, and introductory knowledge of the two concentrations within the degree: Community Education and Care; and Fitness and Wellness Leadership.

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    • CMWL-3100 Lifespan Development
      Description

      This undergraduate course is a study of human growth and development from birth through aging and death. The course focuses on areas of physical, cognitive, social, personality, and emotional development as a series of progressive changes resulting from the biological being interacting with the environment. The course will study factors affecting these changes within historical, multicultural, and societal perspectives.

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    • CMWL-3110 Program Evaluation in Community Settings
      Description

      This course is designed to prepare students to effectively and efficiently participate in program evaluation in community settings. Students will learn the fundamentals of program evaluation theory, ethics, design, measurement, and data analysis and outline a program evaluation proposal. Students will also examine the issues and practices in planning and conducting program evaluations in community settings. A service learning component of 5 hours is required.

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    • COMM-1100 Human Communication
      Description

      This course is a broad approach to oral communication skills including intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, and public speaking. Students in this course will be expected to participate in discussions on a frequent basis, take 12 short online quizzes, complete a variety of unit assignments and take a proctored final exam. For more information on this institution's ecore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/

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    • COMM-1110 Public Speaking
      Description

      A study of the principles and practice of public speaking with an emphasis on the organization of material and the vocal and physical aspects of delivery in various public speaking situations.

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    • COMM-1115 Debate Practicum
      Description

      Instruction and practice in competitive debate. Emphasis on skills necessary for intercollegiate debate, including research and strategy. Debate team membership is not prerequisite, but the focus is exclusively college debate.

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    • COMM-1154 Introduction to Mass Communications
      Description

      An introductory, yet critical examination of the historical development, and paramount economic, legal/policy, ethical, political, and social effects issues concerned with mass media, i.e., books, newspapers, magazines, recordings, radio, movies, television, the internet, public relations, and advertising. Particular attention given to competition, convergence, and mass media's impact on society, as well as society's impact on mass media.

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    • COMM-2110 Intercultural Communication
      Description

      This course will focus on developing awareness and skillsets needed to communicate across geographic and cultural lines. Topics include methods for improving oral, written, and interpersonal communication skills needed in a diverse society and within a global context.

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    • COMM-2254 Media Ethics
      Description

      Examination of the major classical and contemporary ethical philosophies. Application of ethical decision-making models to media issues, particularly freedom of speech, economic pressure, invasion of privacy, and the public's rights.

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    • COMM-2285 Special Topics
      Description

      Variable topic courses offered on a limited or pilot basis to explore or extend study of select, contemporary mass media and public relations issues.

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    • COMM-3301 Writing & Reporting for Newspapers
      Description

      Basic procedures and techniques for writing and reporting for newspapers. Emphasis on news style and judgment as well as ethical and legal issues.

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    • COMM-3302 Public Affairs Reporting
      Description

      This writing-intensive course builds upon the student’s basic skills attained in COMM3301, Writing & Reporting for Newspapers. Public Affairs Reporting concerns coverage of government and community events such as city council meetings, hearings, and press conferences. The course also includes writing for beats, editorials, columns and reviews.

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    • COMM-3303 Layout and Design
      Description

      Basic editing and makeup procedures for newspapers and other print publications. Includes copy editing, headline writing, page makeup, and basic graphic principles.

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    • COMM-3305 Short-Form Screenwriting & Analysis
      Description

      This is a writing workshop where students will investigate various story-telling styles, structures and techniques, and implement these analyses in the development of stories written for the screen. Students will also engage with marketing and promotional texts within the field.

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    • COMM-3310 Persuasion
      Description

      Theories and inquiry into strategies for the creation of and ethical use of persuasive messages including historical and contemporary perspectives in various communication contexts. Special focus on oral presentation of persuasive content and analysis of ethical persuasive strategies.

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    • COMM-3313 Public Relations Principles
      Description

      A survey of the role, responsibilities, and potential of modern public relations. Includes developement of basic techniques needed for effective public relations programs.

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    • COMM-3330 Advanced Communication Skills
      Description

      Analysis and application of interpersonal, small-group, and mediated communication skills as effective speaking, listening, negotiation, conflict management, presentation, and media interviewing.

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    • COMM-3350 Telecommunication and Electronic Media Industries
      Description

      A continuation of COMM 1154, examining contemporary industry and social issues facing telecommunication and electronic media. Particular attention given to analysis of structure and process, revenue sources, programming and services, audience research, and effects.

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    • COMM-3351 Radio Program Production
      Description

      Instruction in the operation of radio technology and introduction to the production of radio programs. Opportunity for practical experience with the university radio station.

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    • COMM-3352 Fundamentals of Television Production
      Description

      Instruction in the operation of television studio and digital video technology and introduction to the production of television and digital video messages. Emphasis on electronic newsgathering, television studio production, and digital video editing techniques.

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    • COMM-3353 Fundamentals of Film & Video Production
      Description

      Fundamental techniques in producing, scripting, shooting, directing and editing film and video projects, with an emphasis on single camera narrative production for independent distribution.

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    • COMM-3354 Digital Social Media and Society
      Description

      An introduction to the foundations, applications, and techniques of digital social media. Opportunities for practical experience developing blogs and other social media content, and exploring the relation of these emerging technologies to traditional mass communication media within society.

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    • COMM-3355 Media Programming and Management
      Description

      Expounds upon principles discussed in COMM 3350 - Telecommunications and Electronic Media Industries, and offers an in-depth examination of the historical, legal, and professional practices involved in programming and managing the electronic media. Emphasis will focus on the processes of selecting, scheduling, promoting, and evaluating programming for commercial radio and television networks and stations, cable television, public radio and television, and online. Moreover, management issues and programming terminology, strategies, and economics will be discussed.

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    • COMM-3356 Film and Culture
      Description

      A study of the evolution and significance of the motion picture as a specialized form of artistic experience and as a form of Mass Communication.

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    • COMM-3357 Diversity and Mass Media
      Description

      Survey and critical analysis of scholarship concerned with the relationship between mass media, public relations, and selected populaces who have been given peripheral attention, i.e., minorities, women, lower socioeconomic class, and those who are aging or have physical disabilities. Emphasis on the cultural impact of media and public relations in terms of representations, audience effects, and industry demographics, as well as media literacy and advocacy.

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    • COMM-4402 Feature Writing
      Description

      Application and analysis of techniques for writing magazine and newspaper features and commentaries.

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    • COMM-4403 Photojournalism
      Description

      A study of the history, techniques and importance of photographs for the print media, along with their evolving role in convergent and online media, inlcuding analysis of the aesthetic and social impact of photographs. Practice in the production of documentary photographs appropriate for print and online news delivery, as well as the photographic essay, using digital photography and digital editing tools.

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    • COMM-4405 Sound Design
      Description

      This workshop-based skills course explores the communicative uses of sound in audio-visual media, with an emphasis on early and deliberate decision-making about what listeners hear. A number of technically-driven creative skills projects are supported by an examination of the history of sound recording practices, the origins and development of the field of sound design, and critical listening and viewing exercises.

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    • COMM-4406 Digital Cinematography & Image Design
      Description

      This workshop-based skills course explores the communicative potential of the moving image. Students will analyze and practice deliberate strategies of image-making to produce intended effects for viewers. Through critical viewing and analysis, reading, skills exercises and a number of technically-driven creative projects, students will develop the expressive resources of the moving image for a broad use in audio-visual media.

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    • COMM-4407 Film & Video Post-Production
      Description

      Students will work with the various aspects of film and video editing, synthesizing technology, creative storytelling, visual effects, motion graphics and sound editing, along with digital distribution formats and strategies.

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    • COMM-4413 Public Relations Cases
      Description

      Analysis of public relations cases and situations. Includes analysis of application of principles, processes, and theories of public relations to case management.

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    • COMM-4414 Public Relations Management
      Description

      Public Relations Management provides students insights regarding key concepts, theoretical perspectives, essential skills and abilities, and critical thinking and problem solving skills necessary for effective communication within an organization and with its stakeholders. Topics include issues management, risk management, relationship management, crisis planning and preparation, case studies, and developing communication plans.

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    • COMM-4421N Practicum-The West Georgian
      Description

      Practical experience with the campus newspaper, The West Georgian, that primarily includes general and specialty news writing and reporting on deadline, editorial decision-making, interviewing, copy editing, photojournalism, and layout and design across traditional and emerging digital media platforms. Emphasis is placed on news style and judgment, localization, and ethical and legal issues. Repeatable; Maximum of 3.0 credits hours may be applied to the Mass Communications major.

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    • COMM-4421P Practicum: Bluestone Public Relations Firm
      Description

      Practical experience with the student-managed public relations firm that primarily includes hands-on experience through service learning and experiential learning projects for private, nonprofit, and public sector clients. Emphasis is placed on strategic planning, research, data analysis, campaign development, copywriting, promotional design, and use of social media across traditional and digital media platforms. Repeatable; Maximum of 3.0 credit hours may be applied to the Mass Communications major.

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    • COMM-4421R Practicum - The WOLF Internet Radio
      Description

      Practical experience with the campus radio station, The WOLF Internet Radio, that primarily includes editing, management, on-air experience, producing, programming, promotions, production, and remotes across traditional and emerging digital media platforms. Repeatable; Maximum of 3.0 credit hours may be applied to the Mass Communications major.

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    • COMM-4421T Practicum - UTV13
      Description

      Practical experience with the campus television station, UTV13, that primarily includes anchoring, directing, editing, field and studio camera operation, news gathering, producing, reporting, scripting, studio and field production, and switching across traditional and emerging digital media platforms. Repeatable; Maximum 3.0 credit hours may be applied to the Mass Communications major.

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    • COMM-4444 Public Relations Campaigns
      Description

      This public relations capstone course applies knowledge and skills learned in previous public relations courses in the planning, execution, and evaluation of a client campaign. Provides students the opportunity to gain a positive client evaluation and a quality product to use in their portfolios.

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    • COMM-4450 Broadcast News Writing and Reporting
      Description

      Coaching and practice in gathering, writing, and reporting television and radio news under deadline. Particular attention given to news style and judgment as well as aesthetic, ethical, and legal issues. Ability to shoot and edit field video is required.

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    • COMM-4451 Public Relations Writing
      Description

      A study and application of principles and techniques for writing across traditional and emerging digital media platforms. Emphasis on informational and persuasive writing for public relations.

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    • COMM-4452 Advanced Film and Video Production
      Description

      Direct involvement with the scripting, planning, producing, direction and post-production of film, television, or video programs under the supervision of the instructor. Emphasis on the advanced creative, organizational and managerial aspects of film, television, and video production.

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    • COMM-4454 Media Law
      Description

      Examination of the legal context regulating print, telecommunication and electronic media as well as advertising and public relations industries. Emphasis on libel, slander, privacy, copyright, free press/fair trial and obscenity law. This course is restricted to Seniors.

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    • COMM-4455 Critical Issues in Mass Communications
      Description

      Exploration and analysis of critical, contemporary issues concerned with the relationship between mass media and society. Emphasis on critical, creative, and collaborative thinking to reach considered judgments and position students to be media literate, responsible, and responsive 21st century mass media and public relations professionals.

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    • COMM-4481 Independent Study
      Description

      Variable topic courses offered on an individual basis to explore or extend study of specialized mass media and public relations scholarship. Students must collaborate with instructor to outline learning objectives, and curriculum to achieve them.

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    • COMM-4484 Mass Communications Research Methods
      Description

      A survey of qualitative and quantitative research methods, data analysis and reporting procedures, including opportunities to conduct, analyze, evaluate, interpret, and communicate research.

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    • COMM-4485 Special Topics
      Description

      Variable topic courses offered on a limited or pilot basis to explore or extend study of select, contemporary mass media and public relations issues.

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    • COMM-4486 Internship
      Description

      A hands-on, supervised, media field experience to apply and test knowledge and skills, and to network with professionals. Internship must be approved by internship coordinator. To be approved, internship must offer experiential learning in Convergence Journalism, Digital Media & Telecommunication, Film & Video Production, and/or Public Relations; require majors to intern 45 hours for each credit hour enrolled or 135 hours if enrolled 3 credit hours; assign interns an immediate supervisor who has academic credentials and/or professional experience in the discipline. Prerequisites: Major; Junior or Senior; ENGL 1102 Minimum Grade: C; COMM 1154 Minimum Grade: C; Nine credit hours of COMM 3000-4000 level courses; and Major GPA of 2.5 or above.

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    • CRIM-1100 Introduction to Criminal Justice
      Description

      This course provides an overview of the criminal justice system in the United States. Topics covered include definitions and measures of crime, fear of crime, victims of crime, law enforcement, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice.

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    • CRIM-2000 Survey of Criminology
      Description

      This course will provide an overview of issues and controversies in criminology. In addition to a survey of the major criminological series, the course concentrates on the major types of crimes committed in America society. Additionally, students will be exposed to how major societal institutions impact upon crime control efforts. Finally, problems associated with the measurement of crime are considered.

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    • CRIM-2245 Juvenile Delinquency
      Description

      This course will examine the types and patterns of juvenile delinquency and the social and institutional context within which delinquency occurs. Major theories of delinquency will be presented. The juvenile justice system will be discussed with a focus on historical changes and contemporary challenges.

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    • CRIM-2272 Introduction to Law Enforcement
      Description

      Law enforcement in America will be examined at the federal, state and local levels. The history of law enforcement, the structure and functions of law enforcement agencies and the role of police in society will be covered. In addition, the course will explore the management of police and the challenges facing police administrators.

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    • CRIM-2273 Criminal Procedure
      Description

      Criminal Procedure covers the major U.S. Supreme Court decisions regarding law enforcement. These cases provide the boundaries which facilitate as well as limit the actions of law enforcement officers in such activities as: 'stop and frisk', arrest, questioning, surveillance, vehicle stops and searches, as well as search and seizures which yield evidence admissible at trial. Also emphasizes legal reasoning and interpretation as well as the fundamental elements of case briefing and jurisdiction.

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    • CRIM-2274 American Criminal Courts
      Description

      This course introduces students to the history, traditions, and philosophy of criminal courts in America. It focuses on the organizational structures of the courts at the local, state, and federal levels. Students will learn about the various legal actors(e.g., judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys) and the roles they play in the courtroom. Finally, this course examines the nature of criminal law and the procedures that must be followed when defendants enter the judicial system from arraignment to sentencing.

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    • CRIM-2275 Introduction to Corrections
      Description

      Corrections in America will be examined at the federal, state and local levels. The history of incarceration, the structure and functions of jails, prisons, and community corrections and the role of corrections in society will be covered.

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    • CRIM-3240 Criminological Theory
      Description

      An overview of the major historical developments in criminological theory, with an emphasis on basic assumptions, concepts, and propositions of criminological theories of crime.

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    • CRIM-3241 Corrections
      Description

      A study of the past, present, and future trends, issues and philosophies of corrections. Particular emphasis will be placed on the issues and concerns of the maximum security prison.

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    • CRIM-3242 Drug Abuse
      Description

      An examination of the current and historical patterns of alcohol and drug use, abuse, and control. Strong emphasis will be given to patterns of usage and types and kinds of programs used by helping agencies in the rehabilitation process. Same as CHM 3140.

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    • CRIM-3323 Criminal Law
      Description

      Covers the fundamental elements of criminal law such as mens rea and actus reus as well as crimes such as murder, burglary, assault and battery. Significant cases and articles on historically well-established crimes will be examined as will some of the contemporary and more controversial crimes or instances of crime. Legal reasoning interpretative skills will be emphasized.

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    • CRIM-3333 Victimology
      Description

      Provides an in-depth analysis of the victims of crime. This course focuses on the historical development of victimology, which emerged in the 1940's as an independent field of study as well as surveying some of the more recent works by contemporary thinkers.

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    • CRIM-3411 Criminal Investigations
      Description

      This course examines the basic principles of criminal investigation. Coverage includes study of current investigative procedures used in handling of crime scenes, interviews, evidence, surveillance, report writing, modus operandi, and technical resources. In addition, this course explores theories, philosophies, and concepts related to prevention, apprehension, and suppression of crimes.

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    • CRIM-3705 Criminal Profiling
      Description

      Examines sociological and psychological evidence that can be useful in the context of criminal investigations. Explores the types of questions that profiling attempts to answer; the aspects of crimes, crime scenes, and criminals that profilers are interested in; and, the general types of information often contained within criminal profiles. Concludes by looking at specific types of crimes for which profilers are sometimes employed, including sociological and psychological characteristics of serial arsonists, rapists, and murders.

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    • CRIM-3900 Social Science and the Legal System
      Description

      Critically examines the relationships between the social sciences and the legal system with particular attention to the participation of mental health professionals in the resolution of legal issues. Analyzes select socio-legal controversies that lie at the forefront of this emerging interdisciplinary relationship. Specific topics addressed include: the prediction of dangerousness; competency to stand trial, be executed, represent oneself, and refuse treatment; the insanity defense; jury selection; jury decision-making; eyewitness testimony and accuracy concerns; and the testimony of children in court.

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    • CRIM-3983 Directed Criminology Research
      Description

      This course provides students the opportunity to engage in faculty-directed research by working on an independent project or by working as an assistant to a faculty member. May be taken twice for credit toward the degree.

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    • CRIM-4000 Research Methodology
      Description

      An introduction to the logic and procedures of quantitative and qualitative research methods. Focuses on research design, use of computer and statistical packages, date interpretation, the relation of research and theory, and the writing of scientific research reports.

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    • CRIM-4001 Survey Research Methods
      Description

      This course will introduce one of the most common research methods used in the field of criminology: the survey. Topics covered will include sampling, modes of conducting surveys, question wording, and dealing with non-response. In the later part of the semester, students will gain practical knowledge of the topic by conducting live telephone interviews.

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    • CRIM-4003 Statistics for Social Sciences
      Description

      Provides a systematic, precise, and rational perspective based on probability theory. Learn descriptive and inferential statistics and computer application of statistical packages. Same as PSYC 4003 and SOCI 4003.

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    • CRIM-4004 Managing Data
      Description

      CRIM 4004 Managing Data 3/0/3 This course teaches students to build and manage databases using SPSS. An emphasis is placed on working with large national data sets, including those available through the U.S. Census Bureau and the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research. Although a basic understanding of research methods and statistics is helpful, it is not necessary for this course. PRE-REQUISITES: CRIM 1100

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    • CRIM-4200 Violent Crime
      Description

      This class provides an overview of violent crime in America. It will offer the student readings which incorporate research on violence, theoretical causes of violent crime, and the application of current knowledge to social policy. Course topics include the patterns of violent crime, theoretical explanations of violence, prevention of violent crime, and the punishment/treatment of violent offenders.

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    • CRIM-4211 Police Deviance
      Description

      The main focus of this course is on examining a variety of contemporary issues in police deviance. Controversies have arisen regarding officer misconduct, racial profiling, excessive use of force and noble cause corruption. The controversies provide a context for studying the ethics of police deviance.

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    • CRIM-4230 Ethics and Criminal Justice
      Description

      Focuses on major moral theories and ethical decision making in the field of criminal justice. Conflicting loyalties, competing social demands, and subcultural strains specific to criminal justice will be explored.

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    • CRIM-4231 Women in the Criminal Justice System
      Description

      This course will introduce students to the participation of women in the criminal justice system. Offenses committed by females, laws peculiar to females, and the treatment of females by the system will be explored. Women as professionals and their impact on the system will also be discussed.

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    • CRIM-4232 Family Violence
      Description

      This course will examine family violence from both a personal and social perspective. Research and theory in family violence will be discussed, along with types of relationships, incidence, prevalence, inter-personal dynamics, contributing factors, consequences, social response and services. Prevention strategies will be explored.

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    • CRIM-4233 Gangs
      Description

      This course will examine the history of youth gangs in the U.S. and how gangs have changed over time. Students will learn about contemporary gangs and their activities, why youths join gangs and how gangs relate to the larger society.

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    • CRIM-4248 International Comparative Justice
      Description

      An interdisciplinary course which looks at the justice systems of such countries as: England, France, China, Japan, South Africa and the Islamic States as well as a brief look at the history of the Western Legal Tradition. Comparisons are made for the purpose of answering such questions as: What do the various notions of justice entail? How do they differ? Why? How are they enframed by their philosophical and belief systems? How do the outcomes of their applications of justice differ?

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    • CRIM-4250 Crime Prevention
      Description

      This course will examine the roles of the criminal justice system and the private sector in preventing crime. The historical developments of crime prevention methodologies including: community involvement, education, and awareness programs, governmental intervention, target hardening, and environmental design will be discussed and their impacts will be critically assessed. In addition, students will be introduced to contemporary crime prevention strategies and the techniques for evaluating prevention programs.

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    • CRIM-4255 Youth, Crime and Community
      Description

      This course will examine juvenile crime within a larger social context, exploring the positive and negative contributions of the individual, the family, peer, schools and the larger community. Intervention strategies will be assessed, and a model will be presented for community action that can reduce/prevent juvenile crime.

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    • CRIM-4277 Police in Society
      Description

      The role of police in society changes as other demographic, social and political changes occur. This course will explore the challenges facing police today in terms of community relations, special populations, accountability and opening their ranks to more women and minorities.

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    • CRIM-4279 Race and Crime
      Description

      This course examines the relationship between race, ethnicity, and crime and racial issues confronting the criminal justice system. Students will explore how other minority groups are treated by the criminal justice system. The course also examines how classical and contemporary theories are used to explain racial biases in the criminal justice system.

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    • CRIM-4280 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice
      Description

      This course will focus on a particular issue being dealt with by the criminal justice system today. Students will critically examine the issue and related research and theories. The social context of the issue will be explored as well as possible actions to address the problem.

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    • CRIM-4284 Senior Capstone
      Description

      The Senior Capstone course is designed to ensure that the graduates of the Criminology program are equipped with the skills necessary to pursue further study or to take a job in the criminal justice system or other professional agency. The class requires students to demonstrate oral and written communication skills. Additionally students will be required to develop materials that will be helpful in finding employment.

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    • CRIM-4286 Internship
      Description

      The internship provides students an opportunity to gain supervised work experience in an agency in their major area of study.

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    • CRIM-4293 Correctional Programs
      Description

      A course in correctional programs at the local, state, and federal levels including youth probation and parole. The organization and administration of correctional systems will be examined with particular attention given to control, classification, discipline, treatment, and post-release procedures for the juvenile and adult offenders.

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    • CRIM-4402 Prison Law
      Description

      This course will examine the ever changing field of correctional law. It will focus on the evolution of inmate rights, the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court's willingness to get involved in the executive branch's business of running prisons, and the current court's movement away from the micro-managing of prisons in America.

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    • CRIM-4650 Corporate and White Collar Crime
      Description

      This course presents an examination of corporate and white collar crime in the United States including definitional issues, typologies, theories, victimization, enforcement, and the sanctioning of organizations & individuals.

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    • CRIM-4693 Sports, Crime, and Society
      Description

      The study of sports as a socializing influence within society. The analysis of the role of sports, the subculture of sports, the linkages with violence and crime, as well as other unintended consequences of sports in America and the world. Same as SOCI 4693.

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    • CRIM-4712 Law and Society
      Description

      This course will introduce students to the liberal arts study of law. Students will investigate legal institutions and the law as social phenomena through readings and case studies.

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    • CRIM-4911 Terrorism
      Description

      This course examines domestic and international terrorism. It looks at the theories concerning the causes of terrorism and the various ways that individuals and institutions respond to terrorism. The 'war on terrorism' is examined for its unintended consequences.

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    • CRIM-4981 Directed Readings
      Description

      Title and description of the type of independent study to be offered will be specified on the variable credit form students must complete before registering for the class. May be repeated three times for credit.

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    • CRIM-4983 Senior Thesis
      Description

      This course gives senior criminology majors the opportunity to conduct significant, independent, empirical research under the supervision of a faculty thesis directory. Students are required to make an oral and written presentation of their research. May be taken twice for credit toward the degree.

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    • CS-1000 Practical Computing
      Description

      A hands-on introduction to the use of personal computers and software: input/output devices, graphical user interfaces, terminology, and software.

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    • CS-1020 Computers and Society
      Description

      A hands-on introduction to the use of personal computers and software, with an introductory examination of the effects of computer technology on contemporary society. Topics will include productivity applications, creation of Web pages, and societal and ethical issues in computing; privacy, security, censorship, and the changes in work, school, and entertainment fostered by computing.

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    • CS-1030 Introduction to Computer Concepts
      Description

      An introduction to the concepts, usage, and uses of computers. Topics include the social and ethical aspects of computing; the Internet, including the creation of Web pages; overview of computer architecture, operating systems, and applications; an introduction to algorithms and programming using Visual BASIC.

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    • CS-1300 Introduction to Computer Science
      Description

      This course introduces two fundamental aspects of computer science--abstraction and design--as students learn to develop programs in a high-level programming language. Students will study and implement a variety of applications, including graphics and scientific simulations. The course assumes no prior background in programming or computer science.

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    • CS-1301 Computer Science I
      Description

      This course explores the three fundamental aspects of computer science--theory, abstraction, and design--as the students develop moderately complex software in a high-level programming language. It will emphasize problem solving, algorithm development, and object-oriented design and programming. The course assumes prior experience in programming.

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    • CS-1302 Computer Science II
      Description

      This course continues the exploration of theory, abstraction, and design in computer science as the students develop more complex software in a high-level programming language.

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    • CS-2100 Introduction to Web Development
      Description

      An introduction to the design and implementation of web pages and sites: foundations of human-computer interaction; development processes; interface, site and navigation design; markup and style-sheet languages; site evaluation; introduction to client-side scripting.

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    • CS-3110 System Architecture
      Description

      An introduction to systems architecture and its impact on software execution. Topics include digital logic and digital systems, machine level representation of data, assembly level machine organization, memory systems organization, I/O and communication, and CPU implementation.

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    • CS-3151 Data Structures and Discrete Mathematics I
      Description

      An integrated approach to the study of data structures, algorithm analysis, and discrete mathematics. Topics include induction and recursion, time and space complexity, and big-O notation, propositional logic, proof techniques, sorting, mathematical properties of data structures, including lists.

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    • CS-3152 Data Structures and Discrete Mathematics II
      Description

      A continuation of CS 3151. Topics include sets, relations and functions, graphs, state spaces and search techniques; automata, regular expressions, and context free grammars; NP-completeness.

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    • CS-3201 Program Construction I
      Description

      The craft and science of software construction: effective practices, principles, and patterns for building correct, understandable, testable and maintainable object-oriented code.

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    • CS-3202 Program Construction II
      Description

      A continuation of CS 3201: effective practices, principles and patterns for building correct, understandable, testable, and maintainable code using a variety of programming paradigms, programming languages and system architectures.

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    • CS-3211 Software Engineering I
      Description

      An introduction to the software development life cycle and contemporary software development methods. This course places special emphasis on object-oriented systems. Students are expected to complete a medium scale software project.

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    • CS-3212 Software Engineering II
      Description

      Software development methods for large scale systems. Management of software development projects. Software engineering standards. Students are expected to complete a large scale software project.

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    • CS-3230 Information Management
      Description

      This course covers principles of database systems. Topics include theory of relational databases, database design techniques, database query languages, transaction processing, distributed databases, privacy and civil liberties. Students are expected to complete a project in database design, administration, and development.

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    • CS-3270 Intelligent Systems
      Description

      Application and survey of problem-solving methods in artificial intelligence with emphasis on heuristic program- ming, production systems, neural networks, agents, social implications of computing, and professional ethics and responsibilities.

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    • CS-3280 System and Network Administration
      Description

      This course covers fundamental concepts of computer networks and their management. Topics include network security, routing, configuration and installations of network services, network monitoring and performance tuning, message encryption, task automation, process management, file systems, and kernel configuration. Students are expected to complete a project that covers the essentials of set-up, configuration, and administration of networked servers and clients.

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    • CS-4225 Parallel and Distributed Systems
      Description

      This course covers the concepts and challenges of concurrent systems. Topics include multi-threaded programming, scheduling, and synchronization, network architecture, parallel computing architecture, multimedia networking, and mobile and ad-hoc networks. The course will also discuss emerging technologies in these areas.

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    • CS-4310 Game Design and Development
      Description

      This course will explore the basic design principles and practices employed in developing computer games. Topics will include game design, graphics, animation, storytelling, and network and multi-player issues.

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    • CS-4981 Independent Study
      Description

      Individual study in computer science through a mutual agreement between the student and a computing faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 hours credit. Departmental consent is required for use of this credit toward a major or minor in computer science.

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    • CS-4982 Computing Capstone
      Description

      This course integrates core topics of computer science body of knowledge, teamwork, and professional practices through the implementation of a large scale project.

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    • CS-4983 Directed Research
      Description

      Individual research in computer science through a mutual agreement between the student and a computing faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 hours credit. Departmental consent is required for use of this credit toward a major or minor in computer science.

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    • CS-4985 Special Topics
      Description

      Topics in Computer Science designed to give students knowledge at the frontier of a rapidly changing field.

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    • CS-4986 Computing Internship
      Description

      A hands-on, supervised field experience in computing. Students will create and present a comprehensive portfolio documenting the field experience. Maybe repeated for a total of 6 hours credit. Grading is S/U.

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    • ECED-0001 Early Childhood Block I
    • ECED-0002 Early Childhood Block II
    • ECED-0003 Early Childhood Block III
    • ECED-3214 Exploratory Activities in Music and the Fine Arts
      Description

      An introductory course that surveys methods and activities to teach fundamental skills in movement/dance/drama, art and music in the early childhood/elementary curriculum. Field experience required. Admission to Teacher Education. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 3271, ECED 3282 and READ 3251, or with Advisor approval.

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    • ECED-3271 Integrating Curriculum, Instruction, and Classroom Management for Pre K-5 Classrooms
      Description

      Students will examine theories and models for designing curriculum, instruction, and classroom management in Pre-K through fifth grade classrooms. Students will also observe and apply these theories and models during a field based experience.

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    • ECED-3282 Practicum I
      Description

      Students are placed in a designated early childhood/elementary site. Requirements include observing children and planning and implementing learning activities with the guidance of a qualified supervisor. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 3214, ECED 3271 and READ 3251 or with advisor approval.

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    • ECED-4251 Assessment and Correction Mathematics Education
      Description

      Overviews development of acquisition of mathematical concepts. The assessment/correction process is examined. Teaching strategies appropriate to children with learning difficulties are described. Individual assessment and analysis of a particular child's mathematical problems, including teaching to this analysis are developed in case study form. Current research on teaching mathematics to children with special needs is examined. Knowledge of teaching strategies and the assessment/correction process will be applied during field experience. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 4284, READ 3263 and READ 4251 or with advisor approval.

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    • ECED-4251L Assessment and Correction Clinical Lab
      Description

      This course requires the supervised and coordinated diagnosing and correcting of students in K-5 classrooms. The lab experiences shall require demonstration of the content knowledge and pedagogical skills acquired in ECED 4251 - Assessment and Correction in Mathematics Education.

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    • ECED-4261 Teaching Content and Process: Social Studies Education
      Description

      Students will examine the current content and methodology of social studies education for young learners (grades P-5). Students will design and implement learning experiences that incorporate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes appropriate for an elementary social studies program. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 4262, ECED 4263, ECED 4283, and READ 3262 or with Advisor approval.

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    • ECED-4262 Teaching Content and Process: Science Education
      Description

      Students will examine content, methodology, skills, and materials used to teach science to children in grades P-5 by means of course discussions and assignments, field placements/assignments and course readings. Emphasis will be placed on developmentally appropriate practices and integration with mathematics and other appropriate subject areas.

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    • ECED-4263 Teaching Content and Process: Science Education
      Description

      Mathematics education content, methods and materials which are appropriate for the cognitive development of the young child from Pre-K to Grade 5 will be investigated. Students will apply knowledge of content, methods and materials during field experience. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 4261, ECED 4262, ECED 4283 and READ 3262 or with advisor approval.

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    • ECED-4283 Practicum II
      Description

      Students are placed in a designated early childhood/ elementary site. Requirements include observing children and planning and implementing learning activities with the guidance of a qualified supervisor. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 4261, ECED 4262, ECED 4263 and READ 3262 or with advisor approval.

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    • ECED-4284 Practicum III
      Description

      Application for field experience required prior to enrollment. Students are placed in a designated early childhood/elementary site. Requirements include observing children and planning and implementing learning activities with the guidance of a qualified supervisor.

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    • ECED-4285 Special Topics
      Description

      Titles and descriptions of specific courses to be inserted at time of offering. May be repeated for credit.

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    • ECED-4286 Teaching Internship
      Description

      Students will be involved 15 weeks (one semester) in a full-time, supervised and directed classroom setting. Application to field experience required prior to enrollment Must be taken concurrently with ECED 4289; a practicum/intership fee will be charged.

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    • ECED-4287 Teaching Internship I
      Description

      Students will be in a full-time, supervised and directed classroom setting. Application to field experience required prior to enrollment Provisionally certified students only. A practicum/internship fee will be charged.

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    • ECED-4288 Teaching Internship II
      Description

      Students will be in a full-time, supervised and directed classroom setting. Application to field experience required prior to enrollment. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 4289.

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    • ECED-4289 Teaching Internship Seminar
      Description

      Designed to engage interns in a critical reflection of issues, topics materials and skills appropriate to their professional development and teaching experience during their internship. Will also serve as a capstone experience for satisfying exit requirements of the program. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 4286 or ECED 4288.

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    • ECON-2100 Economics for Everyone
      Description

      The economic principles of demand, supply, markets and the economic issues of inflation, unemployment and government spending will be among the topics covered.

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    • ECON-2105 Principles of Macroeconomics
      Description

      A study of the economy as a whole including production, economic fluctuations, inflation, unemployment, public policy, and international economics. Requires overall GPA of 2.0.

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    • ECON-2106 Principles of Microeconomics
      Description

      A study of the individual elements of an economy, including demand, supply, price, firms, production, costs, profits, market structures, income determination and international trade. Requires overall GPA of 2.0.

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    • ECON-3400 Consumer Economics
      Description

      Emphasis is placed on basic and useful information needed for effective personal spending, saving, and budgeting.

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    • ECON-3402 Statistics for Business I
      Description

      Course emphasis is on applications of statistics in business . Topics include methods of presenting data, numerical measures and correlation, probability theory and probability distributions, sampling distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing.

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    • ECON-3406 Statistics for Business II
      Description

      This course covers basic quantitative tools for use in strategic and business decision making. Topics include decision analysis, linear regression, forecasting, linear programming and waiting line models.

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    • ECON-3410 Macroeconomic Policy
      Description

      Intermediate analysis of macroeconomic problems such as inflation, unemployment, and economic growth and effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy in combating these problems. International implications of policy also emphasized.

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    • ECON-3411 Intermediate Microeconomics
      Description

      The course develops models of the economic behavior of consumers, firms, and government. The topics include: supply and demand, competitive equilibrium and the role of prices in resource allocation, non-competitive market structures, game theory and strategy, externalities, public goods and public policy.

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    • ECON-3420 Economic History of the United States
      Description

      Examines the historical foundation of American economic growth and development from the colonial period to the twentieth century. Focuses on institutional and structural changes and processes of growth.

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    • ECON-3425 Economic Geography
      Description

      A study of the spatial organization of economic activities. Introduces and critiques theories of location and economic development and structural relationships among cities. Same as GEOG 3253.

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    • ECON-3440 History of Economic Thought
      Description

      This course covers the evolution of economic ideas and theories, their social and philosophical preconceptions, and uses to which they have been put in developing policy and their influence upon modern economics. Topics include ancient and medieval economic thought, mercantilism, physiocracy, classical and neoclassical schools, socialist and Marxian critiques, Austrian school, and institutional economics.

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    • ECON-3450 Economics of Sports
      Description

      This course will be a survey of the theory and literature of the economics issues relevant in professional and college- college level sports. Topics include ticket pricing, public funding of arenas or stadiums, labor issues, and antitrust policy.

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    • ECON-3458 Economic Anthropology
      Description

      A cultural approach to how societies produce, distribute and consume goods, services and resources. Same as ANTH 3158.

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    • ECON-3460 Forecasting
      Description

      A study of the nature of business fluctuations and their underlying causes. Emphasis is on the application of various forecasting techniques with regard to analyzing and projecting future business and economic conditions at the national, regional, industry, and firm levels.

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    • ECON-3480 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
      Description

      This course surveys the issues arising from the interaction of economic and ecological systems, the suitability of the market mechanism to allocate natural and environmental resources, and policy options when markets fail. Applications include energy, climate change, pollution control, land use, fishery management, and water scarcity.

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    • ECON-3490 Ethical, Moral, and Philosophical Foundations of Capitalism
      Description

      This course is designed to explore the moral, ethical, and economic foundations of the capitalist system. The economic prespectives of thinkers such as M. Friedman, F.A. Hayek, J.M. Keynes, Karl Marx, Ayn Rand and Adam Smith will be compared and contrasted. This course will address current issues such as corporate social responsibility, the role of government in the economy, and the implications of personal economic philosophies on individual decision making.

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    • ECON-4410 Money and Banking
      Description

      An introductory study of the types and functions of money and financial intermediaries, money creation and control, monetary and fiscal policy, international finance, and the effects of these upon domestic incomes, employment, prices, and interest rates.

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    • ECON-4420 Labor Economics
      Description

      Involves an in-depth study of the economic theories related to the labor market with emphasis placed on managerial and policy applications. Topics covered include labor supply and demand, discrimination, and the economic impact of unions and collective bargaining.

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    • ECON-4440 Public Finance
      Description

      A study of the equity and economic effects of government spending programs, taxes, and debt. The course is primarily applied microeconomics. Same as POLS 4204.

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    • ECON-4450 International Economics
      Description

      The course covers the history, institutions, policy and theory of international economic relations.

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    • ECON-4470 Comparative Economic Systems
      Description

      The course compares and contrasts the forms of economic organization.

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    • ECON-4475 Introduction to Econometrics and Analytics
      Description

      The course emphasis is on applications of econometrics and techniques in business analytics. Topics include methods of presenting data, numerical measures and correlation, estimation, linear/non-linear regression, limited dependent variables, simultaneous equations/instrumental variables, models of duration, and the use of these models in decision making processes. SAS business analytics software will be used in this course.

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    • ECON-4480 Urban and Regional Economics
      Description

      A study of the economic organization of urban areas and regions. Emphasis is on the analysis of urban land use and real estate markets, contemporary urban problems and public policies, and current issues in urban and regional economic development.

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    • ECON-4481 Independent Study in Economics
      Description

      Directed program of independent study or specific research topics.

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    • ECON-4484 Seminar in Economics
      Description

      The course is the capstone course for all economics majors. The course will change topics and focus. The course will include an evaluation of the students understanding of economic principles.

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    • ECON-4485 Special Topics in Economics
      Description

      Title and description of specific courses to be specified at time of offering. Course may be repeated with permission up to a maximum of 10 hours credit.

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    • ECON-4486 Internship in Economics
      Description

      Work experience with a business, government agency or other organization.

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    • ECSE-3214 Exploratory Curriculum for Pre-K-5 Classroom
      Description

      This course provides students with the basic pedagogical skills and developmentally appropriate practices for teaching exploratory curriculum (drama, art, music, physical activity, and health) in Pre-K-5 classrooms, including children with mild disabilities. The course will provide foundational pedagogy for candidates to begin their pre-service experience creating and evaluating lesson plans, exploring various instructional strategies, and methods for effective planning and instruction. Students will also apply knowledge of content, methods and materials during field experience.

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    • ECSE-4761 Teaching Content and Process: Social Studies Dual Certificate
      Description

      Candidates will examine the current content and methodology of social studies education for young learners (grades P-K) including those with disabilities. Candidates will explore ways to differentiate instruction to meet the needs of all learners. Candidates will design and implement learning experiences and that incorporate the knowledge and skills appropriate for an elementary social studies program. Field experience required.

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    • ECSE-4762 Teaching Content and Process: Science Dual Certificate
      Description

      Students will examine curricular content, methodology, classroom organization and management, and materials used to teach science to children in grades P-5 by means of course discussions and assignments, field placements/assignments, and course readings. Emphasis will be placed on developmentally appropriate practices, teaching students with mild disabilities in science, and the integration of science with mathematics and other appropriate subject areas.

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    • ECSE-4763 Teaching Content and Process: Math Dual Certificate
      Description

      Mathematics education content, methods and materials which are appropriate for the cognitive development of the young child from Pre-K to Grade 5 will be investigated by means of course discussions and assignments, field placements/assignments, and course readings. Students will apply knowledge of content, methods and materials during field experience. Emphasis will be placed on developmentally appropriate practices for teaching mathematics to all children in Pre-K-5 classrooms, including children with mild disabilities.

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    • ECSE-4764 Teaching Content and Process: Literacy Dual Certificate
      Description

      Candidates will examine the theories, materials, and methods of literacy instruction. Candidates will explore ways to differentiate instruction to meet the needs of all learners. Students will design and implement learning experiences that incorporate knowledge and skills appropriate for an elementary literacy program.

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    • ECSE-4783 Practicum I
      Description

      Students are placed in a designated early childhood/elementary site that includes students who have and studentswho do not have disabilities. Requirements include children and planning and implementing learning activities with the guidance of a qualified supervisor.

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    • ECSE-4784 Practicum II
      Description

      Students are placed in a designated early childhood/elementary site that includes students who have and students who do not have disabilities. Requirements include observing children and planning and implementing learning activities with the guidance of a qualified supervisor.

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    • ECSE-4786 Teaching Internship
      Description

      Teaching one semester in the public schools under the supervision of an experienced, qualified classroom teacher on the level and in the field of early childhood and /or special education. A student teaching seminar (ECSE 478) accompanies student teaching.

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    • ECSE-4789 Teaching Internship Seminar
      Description

      Information and issues related to student teaching in the public schools under the supervision of an experienced, qualified classroom teacher on the level and in the field of early childhood and/or special education.

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    • EDRS-4042 Introduction to Classroom Assessment
      Description

      This course provides an introduction to important concepts of classroom assessment including the nature of assessment, its purposes, and essential assessment practices in relation to national/state/county-mandated assessments. Students will be able to define assessment and learn about the different types of classroom assessment, implementation of formative and summative assessments, evaluation and selection of assessments, the development of aligned assessments, and the uses of assessment to improve learning and instructional practice.

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    • EDUC-2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary Issues in Education
      Description

      This course engages students in observations, interactions and analyses of critical and contemporary educational issues. Students will investigate issues influencing the social and political contexts of educational settings in Georgia and the United States. Student will actively examine the teaching profession from multiple vantage points both within and outside the school. Against this backdrop, students will reflect on and interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a diverse culture and examine the moral and ethical responsibilities of teaching in a democracy. A field component totaling 10 hours is required.

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    • EDUC-2120 Exploring Sociocultural Perspectives on Diversity in Educational Contexts
      Description

      This course is designed to equip future teachers with the fundamental knowledge of understanding culture and teaching children from diverse backgrounds. A field component totaling 10 hours is required.

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    • EDUC-2130 Exploring Learning and Teaching
      Description

      Explore key aspects of learning and teaching through examining your own learning processes and those of others, with the goal of applying your knowledge to enhance the learning of all students in a variety of educational settings and contexts. A field component totaling 10 hours is required.

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    • ENGL-1101 English Composition I
      Description

      A composition course focusing on skills required for both effective writing for various rhetorical situations and critical reading of texts. In writing, students must demonstrate competency in argumentation, and writing that is strengthened by the use of multiple textual sources.

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    • ENGL-1102 English Composition II
      Description

      The course serves as a continuation of English 1101 and as an introduction to more sophisticated study of argument and textual analysis, focusing on the composition of increasingly and complex analytical essays about written and visual texts. Students must demonstrate advanced competency in critical analysis and interpretation of texts.

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    • ENGL-2000 American Speech
      Description

      An investigation of the varieties of speech communities in America, emphasizing the practical applications of dialectology and discourse analysis.

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    • ENGL-2050 Self-Staging: Oral Communication in Daily Life
      Description

      An introduction to the performative basis of oral communication and self-presentation.

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    • ENGL-2060 Introduction to Creative Writing
      Description

      This course serves and an introduction to the art of creative writing - from learning the elements involved in literary production, to gaining the critical skills necessary in assessing works by established authors, to crafting some of your own literary artifacts. Students will study the process of creative writing from a wide range of historical and cultural examples, and learn to model their artistic endeavors on the works of publishing practitioners. They will also investigate the convergence of creative personal experience and creativity and the reception of literary arts in the public domain. May count for credit in Core Area C.

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    • ENGL-2080 Introduction to the Art of Film
      Description

      A consideration of the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. This is an introductory course that assumes no prior knowledge of film.

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    • ENGL-2110 World Literature
      Description

      A survey of important works of world literature. Required for English majors. Course equivalents ENGL 2111 and ENGL 2112.

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    • ENGL-2111 World Literature I
      Description

      A survey of important works of world literature from ancient times through the mid-seventeenth century. Prerequisites: ENGL 1102. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/

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    • ENGL-2112 World Literature II
      Description

      World Literature II is a survey of important works of world literature from the mid-seventeenth century to the present.

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    • ENGL-2120 British Literature
      Description

      A survey of important works of British literature. Required for English majors.

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    • ENGL-2130 American Literature
      Description

      A survey of important works of American Literature. Required for English majors. Course equivalents ENGL 2131 and ENGL 2132.

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    • ENGL-2131 American Literature I
      Description

      A survey of American literature from the pre-colonial age to the mid-nineteenth century.

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    • ENGL-2132 American Literature II
      Description

      A survey of American literature from mid-nineteenth century to the present. An eCore course.

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    • ENGL-2180 Studies in African-American Literature
      Description

      An examination of representative African-American literary texts, with particular attention to the defining aesthetic principles of the tradition.

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    • ENGL-2190 Studies in Literature by Women
      Description

      An exploration of significant literary texts by female authors, with particular attention to the emergence of what might be called a female aesthetic and issues of gender identity.

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    • ENGL-2XXX University Syst Studies Abroad
    • ENGL-3000 Research and Methodology
      Description

      A gateway course that introduces students to representative critical approaches that they will encounter in the major. Emphasis will be given to research skills, methodology and analytical writing. Required for the major and minor in English. Only six hours of upper division work may be taken before the completion of this course. Enrollment requires permission of academic coordinator. Not offered in the summer session.

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    • ENGL-3010 Writing for Business
    • ENGL-3160 Philosophy in Literature and Film
      Description

      An examination of significant philosophical, literary, and filmic texts in terms of their thematic and/or conceptual interconnections. Same as PHIL 3160.

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    • ENGL-3200 Intermediate Creative Writing
      Description

      An introduction to the genre-specific workshop in either fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, screenwriting, or play writing. May be repeated up to 6 hours as topics vary. No more than 2 courses may be counted toward the major in English. Pre-requisites: ENGL 2060 or XIDS 2100 (The Creative Process).

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    • ENGL-3300 Studies in American Culture
      Description

      An introduction to American studies as an area of critical inquiry, including a study of the theories and methods used in the field and readings of significant works that have shaped it. Required for the minor in American Studies. Same as HIST 3300. (No more than two [2] 3000-level courses may be counted toward the major in English.)

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    • ENGL-3350 Introduction to Africana Studies
      Description

      An introduction to Africana studies as an area of critical inquiry, including a study of the theories and methods used in the field and readings of significant works that have shaped it. Required for the minor in Africana studies. Same as HIST 3350.

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    • ENGL-3400 Pedagogy and Writing
      Description

      This class serves as a survey of major foundational philosophies and pedagogical practices in the field of Rhetoric and Composition. The course works to connect such theories to meaningful practice in the instruction of writing. Built in components include research, both reflective and theoretical writing, and field experiences in both college classrooms and the University Writing Center.

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    • ENGL-3405 Professional and Technical Writing
      Description

      Intensive practice in composing powerful audience-driven documents in a variety of real-world business, professional and technical contexts. Students will also learn how to make effective business-related presentations supported with appropriate documentary and visual aids.

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    • ENGL-4000 Studies in British Literature I
      Description

      Topics rotate: Medieval Literature: An examination of medieval English literature in its various aspects, considering texts intheir historical context. Renaissance Literature: An investigation of Renaissance literature in its various aspects, including, but not limited to, poetry, prose, and drama, and a consideration of that literature as a part and product of its historical period. Seventeenth Century British Literature: An investigation of significant issues, themes, and ideologies in selections of seventeenth-century British literature studied in terms of their original cultural context. Eighteenth Century British Literature: A topic-centered examination of drama, fiction, poetry and other textual expression from Restoration and eighteenth-century Britain. Works may be studies in their historical, political, cultural and aesthetic context.

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    • ENGL-4002 Studies in British Literature II
      Description

      Topics rotate: British Romanticism: An investigation of issues, themes, and ideologies in selections of British Romantic literature studies in terms of their original cultural context. Victorian Literature: An in-depth analysis of Victorian literature in its original historical, political, cultural and aesthetic contexts. Twentieth-Century British Literature: An in-depth examination of selected twentieth-century texts from the British Isles studied in the context of relevant social, political and cultural issues. Contemporary British and American Literature: An examination of selected texts produced in the last thirty years in the British Isles and the United States.

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    • ENGL-4003 Studies in American Literature I
      Description

      Topics rotate: Colonial and Early American Literature: An examination of representative literary works from exploration and discovery through the era of the new American republic. American Romanticism: An examination of representative American literary works from the nineteenth century through the Civil War. American Realism and Naturalism: An examination of the American literary arts based in an aesthetic of accurate, unromanticized observation/representation of life and nature that flourished in the post-Civil War era.

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    • ENGL-4005 Studies in American Literature II
      Description

      Topics Rotate: Twentieth-Century American Literature: An in-depth examination of ideas and issues prevalent in twentieth-century American literature in its historical, political, cultural and aesthic context. Contemporary British and American Literature: An examination of selected texts produced in the last thirty years in the Brish Isles and the United States.

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    • ENGL-4106 Studies in Genre
      Description

      An intensive examination of the formal, social, cultural and historical contexts of a single literary genre as well as the theoretical concerns that underlie its analysis. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters.

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    • ENGL-4108 Studies in the Novel
      Description

      This course will emphasize the development of the British novel from the seventeenth century through the present or the American novel from the late eighteenth century through the present in relation to literary, cultural, intellectual, technological, and aesthetic changes in Britain or America.

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    • ENGL-4109 Film as Literature
      Description

      An examination of films as texts through historical, aesthetic, thematic, and/or cultural questioning and analysis. Typical offerings may include Film and the Novel; Representations of Women in Film, Teen Cultures in Film, etc. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

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    • ENGL-4170 Studies in African-American Literature
      Description

      An examination of the African-American tradition in literature.

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    • ENGL-4180 Studies in Regional Literature
      Description

      An examination of the literature of a specific region and the forces that shape its regional literary identity within the larger national contexts of the British Isles or the United States. Frequent offerings in Southern literature will rotate with other topics. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

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    • ENGL-4185 Studies in Literature by Women
      Description

      An investigation of aesthetic and cultural issues pertinent to the production of literature by women. Typical offerings will rotate among topics related to literature by women in the United States, the British Isles, or other parts of the world. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

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    • ENGL-4188 Studies in Individual Authors
      Description

      An examination of the career of a single literary figure in the context of literary history. Frequent offerings in Shakespeare and Chaucer will rotate with courses in a variety of other figures from several literary traditions. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Shakespeare may be taken for up to six (6) hours, if topic varies, with department chair's permission.

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    • ENGL-4210 Advanced Creative Writing
      Description

      An intensive writing experience in one of the following genres: fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, screenwriting, or playwriting. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

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    • ENGL-4238 Methods for Teaching Secondary English
      Description

      This compulsory course, taught by English Department faculty, unites theory and practice to produce sound pedagogical strategies for the teaching of English. In it, teachers-in-training will learn refined instructional strategies and deepen their understanding of the foundation from which such approaches develop. As a result, they will begin to fashion teaching selves through recursive discussion, concentrated research, analytical writing, repeated field observation, and practical implementation.

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    • ENGL-4286 Teaching Internship
      Description

      This course involves teaching one semester in the public schools at the secondary level in English under the supervision of an experienced, qualified English teacher. Seminars in English secondary education are scheduled as an integral part of the student teaching experience and will provide students with numerous and varied opportunities to plan, deliver, evaluate, and revise secondary English educational strategies. Such a learning environment, based on developing best practices and sound pedagogical modeling in the field, serve as part of an ongoing and comprehensive portfolio assessment process.

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    • ENGL-4295 Studies in Young Adult Literature
      Description

      An examination of a wide range of literary texts appropriate for use in grades 7-12, focused so that students will develop an understanding of the basic reading processes, including reading assessment, comprehension strategies, and techniques for corrective reading, as well as a series of effective methodologies for promoting the critical appreciation of literature. Also covered are issues relating to the rights and responsibilities of various groups (including teachers, school administrators, and parents) involved in designing and implementing a literature curriculum. Cross-listed with SEED 4295. Only counts toward the major in English for students seeking teacher certification.

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    • ENGL-4300 Studies In English Language
      Description

      A sustained analysis of a particular linguistic theme, an approach to, or a regional expression of the English language. Regular offerings in the history of the English language and its development from Anglo-Saxon to contemporary varieties of world English and in English grammar will rotate with other topics. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

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    • ENGL-4310 Studies in Literary Theory
      Description

      An examination of a particular facet of or approach to literary theory and/or criticism. Typical offerings may include History of Literary Theory, Cultural Studies, Feminist Theory, Comparative Literature, etc. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

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    • ENGL-4381 Independent Study
      Description

      Guided investigation of a topic not addressed by regularly scheduled courses. Students must propose a detailed plan of readings, articulating precise learning objectives, and secure the written consent of both a supervising instructor and of the department chair. Not more than one (1) Independent Study may count toward the major in English without the chair's permission.

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    • ENGL-4384 Senior Seminar
      Description

      A capstone seminar designed to integrate students' learning in the discipline. Required for the English major. Not offered during the summer session.

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    • ENGL-4385 Special Topics
      Description

      An examination of a topic in literature, theory, and/or writing that transcends the boundaries of the fixed curriculum. Typical offerings might include Literary Representations of the War in Vietnam, Nature Writing and the Environment, and Representations of Aging in Literature. Requires permission of the department chair to repeat.

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    • ENGL-4386 Internship
      Description

      A supervised practicum within a career-related setting that is writing-, editing-, tutoring-, and/or teaching-intensive. Enrollment is contingent on approval of proposed internship activities by both instructor and department chair.

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    • ENGR-1113 Introduction to Engineering
      Description

      An introduction to the field of engineering.

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    • ENGR-1173 Computer Graphics/Introduction to Visual Communication and Engineering Design
      Description

      Computer-aided engineering design fundamentals. Projection theory, sketching, creative design, and geometric modeling.

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    • ENGR-3113 Statics
      Description

      Elements of statics in one, two, and three dimensions, centroids, analysis of structures and machines, friction.

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    • ENGR-3123 Dynamics
      Description

      The kinematics and kinetics of particles and extended rigid bodies moving in a plane.

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    • ENGR-3133 Mechanics of Deformable Bodies
      Description

      Definition and analysis of stress and strain, applications to axially loaded elements, torsion of circular shafts and beam bending, plasticity, column stability.

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    • ENGR-3810 Chemical Process Principles
      Description

      An introductory engineering approach to material and energy balance for physical and chemical processes is developed. Gas behavior, systems of units, material properties, and thermophysical and thermochemical concepts are discussed. Emphasis is on the application of material and energy balances to steady and unsteady state physical and chemical processes. Same as CHEM 3810.

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    • ENGR-3830 Engineering Thermodynamics
      Description

      An introductory engineering approach to thermodynamics for physical and chemical processes is developed. Applications of first and second laws, engines, refrigeration and compression cycles, equations of states, fluid properties, corresponding states will be emphasized.

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    • ENGR-3885 Selected Topics in Chemical Engineering
      Description

      On successful completion of this course, the student will be able to understand and apply specific principles of science and engineering to chemical engineering problems.

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    • ENVS-2202 Environmental Science
      Description

      This course is an interdisciplinary course integrating principles from biology, chemistry, ecology, geology, and non-science disciplines as related to the interactions of humans and their environment. Issues of local, regional, and global concern will be used to help students explain scientific concepts and analyze practical solutions to complex environmental problems. Emphasis is placed on the study of ecosystems, human population growth, energy, pollution, and other environmental issues and important environmental regulations. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/

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    • ENVS-4886 Internship
      Description

      The Internship provides students an opportunity to gain supervised work experience in an agency in their major area of study. Repeatable up to 6 hours. Requires consent of advisor.

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    • ENVS-4900 Senior Capstone
      Description

      Students may elect to complete a laboratory or field research project, an academic service- learning project (internship) or other research relevant to career objectives. Content of project must focus on issue or problem within the state of Georgia. they will present the results of their projects in a professional conference format.

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    • ENVS-4981 Directed Study
      Description

      Directed Study affords students an opportunity to pursue work in academic areas that go beyond courses they have already completed or to pursue work in areas where specific courses are not offered.

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    • ETEC-1101 Electronic Technology in the Educational Environment
      Description

      This course is an introduction to using personal computers to communicate with individuals and organizations and to access, store, and analyze information. Emphasis is on exploring the role of technology in present and future learning experiences. Topics include the digital divide, virtual communities, telecommuting, job search and readiness, e-commerce, globalization, privacy versus security, and intellectual property in cyberspace. Students will use their practical technology skills to create word-processed documents, an electronic presentation, and a Web page. Prerequisites: Beginning level skill in Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint. Exited Learning Support in Reading and English. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/

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    • EURO-3234 Introduction to the EU
      Description

      An introduction to the history, institutions, and policies of the European Union. The course also examines the role of the EU as a global actor, including its relations with the United States.

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    • EURO-4130 EU Law & Legal Systems
      Description

      A study of EU legal institutions and processes in the context of international law and in comparison to those of the United States.

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    • EURO-4160 Federalism and Multilevel Governance in the EU
      Description

      A comparison of multilevel governance and policymaking in the European Union with that of the United States and other federal systems.

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    • EURO-4230 Doing Business in the EU
      Description

      A study of business protocol in the EU compared to the United States. The course focuses on institutions and rules which impact the business environment for domestic and international firms, and on how political decisions affect the business environment.

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    • EURO-4260 European Monetary Union
      Description

      An examination of the history and evolution of the European Economic and Monetary Union and its impact on the United States and the global economy.

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    • EURO-4330 EU Science & Technology Policy
      Description

      An examination of EU science and technology policy compared to that of the United States. The course examines how governments can encourage scientific and technological innovation and whether government can (or should) try to limit or control technological innovation.

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    • EURO-4430 EU Environmental Policy
    • EURO-4530 European Social Policy
      Description

      This course examines the history of social policy in the European Union, and the course focuses on the current social policy arrangements in Europe and in the European Union. We will examine gender policy, education, child care, elder care, and other policies in the context of improving social conditions in the domestic policy arena.

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    • EURO-4630 Communications and Media
      Description

      A comparison of communications and media in the EU with the United States. The course examines media law, policies, and practices in voice telephony, the Internet, and social media.

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    • EURO-4730 EU Foreign Policy
      Description

      An examination of the foreign policy of the EU. Examines how EU foreign policy is made, the intersection of national and EU foreign policies, and EU policies regarding key issues in countries and areas of the world.

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    • EURO-4760 US-EU Relations
      Description

      An examination of relations between the United States and the European Union, including US-EU cooperation on global issues and the future of Transatlantic relations in a changing world.

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    • EURO-4830 EU Studies Capstone
      Description

      A capstone course for students in the EU Studies certificate program. The course explores selected topics in a way that allows students to synthesize their knowledge of the EU.

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    • FILM-1000 Georgia Film Academy I
      Description

      This course is the first of a two-course certificate program which will provide an introduction to the skills used in on-set film production, including all forms of narrative media which utilize film-industry standard organizational structure, professional equipment and on-set procedures. In addition to the use of topical lectures, PowerPoint presentations, videos and hand-outs, the course will include demonstrations of equipment and set operations as well as hands-on learning experiences. Students will: 1. Identify and describe film production organizational structure. 2. Define job descriptions in various film craft areas, names, uses, and protocols. 3. Explain the connections between these areas, names, uses, and protocols on-set. 4. Operate full lighting and grip equipment. 5. Summarize the above knowledge for purposes of self-marketing.

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    • FILM-2000 Georgia Film Academy II
      Description

      This course is the second of a two-course certificate program designed specifically to provide students with a basic level of on-set film production skills, knowledge and experience with film-industry standard organizational structure, professional equipment and on-set procedures. The skills and knowledge gained in Course I will form a foundation for students to be able to perform at an entry-level on working productions. This course will focus on professional-level productions, on which students will have roles in on-set and pre-production crafts. Students will: 1. Demonstrate knowledge of on-set protocols and relationships. 2. Demonstrate basic abilities in multiple entry-level on-set jobs.* 3. Interpret and apply instructions from on-set supervisors. 4. Summarize the above experiences for purposes of self-marketing. *May include Camera, Lighting, Electrical, Security, Second Unit Director/Assistant Director, Art Department (Set Decorator/dressing, Production Design, Props), Set Construction, Makeup/Hair Department, Wardrobe Department, Sound Department, Post-Production (editing), Production Assistant, Locations, Script Supervisor (Continuity), Production Office, Production Accounting.

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    • FILM-2080 Introduction to the Art of Film
      Description

      Students will consider the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. Students will watch a wide range of films from a variety of countries and historical moments in film history and will have the chance to explore many issues such as framing, photographic space, film shot, editing, sound, genre, narrative form, acting style, and lighting in the context of wider discussions of the weekly films. This is an introductory course and assumes no prior knowledge of film. Students will be evaluated primarily on the basis of weekly postings, a shot-by-shot analysis, and exams. Weekly screening on Monday nights.

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    • FILM-2100 History and Theory of Film
      Description

      This course will explore major developments in film history, theory and criticism. Students will become familiar with several different film movements in the development of the art form and will be introduced to basic ideas in film theory. Through a variety of film movements and historical periods, students will develop an understanding of the cultural, industrial, and political contexts for some of the most significant debates about film. Specific topics covered will include Russian formalism, the history of classic Hollywood cinema, the French new wave, recent global cinemas, as well as alternatives to Hollywood in the United States. Class time will be divided between the discussion of the historical movements and critical texts and the application of those texts to a primary cinematic text. Students will be evaluated on the basis of weekly postings, participation in discussion, essay exams and formal writing opportunities.

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    • FILM-3200 Screenwriting
      Description

      A study of the genres, structures and mechanics of screenwriting as well as the experience of writing, reading and revising a screenplay.

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    • FILM-4081 Independent Study
      Description

      Guided investigation of a topic not addressed by regularly scheduled courses. Students must propose a detailed plan of readings, articulating precise learning objectives, and secure the written consent of both a supervising instructor and of the department chair.

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    • FINC-3501 Personal Financial Management
      Description

      A non-technical course of general application stressing personal financial planning, budgeting, savings and investments, small business ownership, estate planning, and retirement income.

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    • FINC-3511 Corporate Finance
      Description

      Financial functions in the modern corporation with emphasis on its managerial aspects.

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    • FINC-4521 International Finance
      Description

      Designed to focus on the application of finance concepts in the international environment.

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    • FINC-4531 Intermediate Corporate Finance
      Description

      An in-depth study of financial planning and management with emphasis on capital structure and dividend payout policies, cost of capital and capital budgeting, and working capital management. The course serves as a framework for understanding a broad range of corporate financial decisions. Cases and directed readings are used extensively.

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    • FINC-4532 Problems in Corporate Finance
      Description

      An examination of various topics in finance including bankruptcy and reorganization, mergers and acquisitions, lease financing, and others. The course emphasizes logical financial decision making techniques through the examination of underlying theories and through problem solving. Problem cases, and directed readings are used extensively.

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    • FINC-4541 Investment Analysis
      Description

      A study of the investment process with concentration on the formulation of a sound investment program for both individuals and institutions.

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    • FINC-4542 Portfolio Management
      Description

      The course is designed to focus on creating, managing, and evaluating investment portfolios to meet specific objectives and risks.

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    • FINC-4561 Bank Management
      Description

      Analysis of functions and operations of commercial, investment, and savings banks. Primary emphasis is on investment, financial structure and the bank's role in determining financial variables and resource allocation.

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    • FINC-4571 Derivative Markets
      Description

      An in-depth study of options and futures markets. Topics will include the institutional structure of options and futures markets, pricing models, and hedging techniques.

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    • FINC-4585 Special Topics in Finance
      Description

      Title and description of specific course to be specified at time of offering. Course (with different title and description) may be repeated with Department Chair's permission up to a maximum of 6 hours of credit.

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    • FINC-4586 Business Internship (Finance)
      Description

      Practical finance internship experience with a commercial firm or organization for selected upper division students.

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    • FORL-1XXX University Syst Studies Abroad
    • FORL-2200 Survey of National Literatures
      Description

      An introductory survey of a national literature other than English. The subject will vary and will be chosen from among the following: Classical Greece and Rome, China, France, Francophone countries, Germanic countries, Italy, Spain, Latin-American countries. All readings are in translation. No knowledge of the foreign language(s) in question is necessary. Course may be repeated with a different subject.

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    • FORL-2300 Topics in National Literatures
      Description

      Readings from a variety of literary texts drawn from one or more national literatures other than English. The subject will vary, as for example, travel literature, myths/legends, science fiction, drama.

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    • FORL-3111 World Film
      Description

      This course will offer film viewings and analysis of films selected from different national traditions, several of which will always be represented. Readings in Film History and Theory will be used to illuminate selected films from differing cultures and traditions (French, German, Spanish, Latin American, Japanese, etc.) All films have subtitles and all readings are in English. No knowledge of the foreign language (s) in question is necessary. Course may be repeated with a different subject.

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    • FORL-4185 Topics in Language and Literature
      Description

      Content of course varies. This course focuses on topics related to the study of culture, literature, film, and/or linguistics. Taught in English. Course may be repeated for credit with different topic. (Possible topics: Language, Society, and Culture; Arab Women in Literature and Film; Applied Linguistics in the Foreign Language Classroom; U.S. Latino Culture and Literature, etc.)

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    • FORL-4300 Seminar in Global Studies
      Description

      An interdisciplinary study of a selected culture, involving history, politics, sociology, and economics, as well as literature, art, music and spiritual life. The course includes a trip to the area studied.

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    • FORL-4485 Topics in National Film Traditions
      Description

      This course will offer film viewings and analysis within individual national traditions. Readings in Film History and Theory will be used to illuminate selected films from a national tradition (French, German, Spanish, Latin American, Japanese, etc). All films have subtitles and all readings are in English. No knowledge of the foreign language(s) in question is necessary. Course may be repeated with a different subject.

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    • FORL-4501 Foundations of Language Development
      Description

      This course is designed primarily for future and novice language teachers, introduces students to theories of first and second language development. It is a requirement for all students completing the P-12 initial certification track in French and Spanish.

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    • FORL-4502 Methods of Foreign Language Teaching
      Description

      A course designed for students to develop skills and strategies in teaching and planning foreign language instruction at the secondary level.

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    • FORL-4586 Teaching Internship
      Description

      This course consists of teaching in a public school under the supervision of an experienced, qualified classroom teacher. Students whose programs require a 3 hour, 2 semester internship may repeat the course for a total of 6 hours. These students may take the first three hours after completing two FORL courses.

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    • FREN-1001 Elementary French I
      Description

      Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French and to the culture of French-speaking regions.

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    • FREN-1001C Elementary French I - Block
      Description

      Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French and to the culture of French-speaking regions.

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    • FREN-1002 Elementary French II
      Description

      Continued listening, speaking, reading and writing in French with further study of the culture of French-speaking regions. Pre-requisite: FREN 1001 with a grade of C or better or two years high school study.

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    • FREN-1002C Elementary French II - Block
      Description

      Continued listening, speaking, reading and writing in French with further study of the culture of French-speaking regions. Pre-requisite: FREN 1001 with a grade of C or better or two years high school study.

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    • FREN-1XXX University Syst Studies Abroad
    • FREN-2001 Intermediate French I
      Description

      A continuation of FREN 1002, FREN 2001 provides a solid base of thematic vocabulary and grammar structures together with a varied sampling of literary readings, communicative activities, and cultural information.

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    • FREN-2002 Intermediate French II
      Description

      Emphasis on applying reading skills to texts in different disciplines, on the continued development of writing and speaking skills, and on the functional use of grammar.

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    • FREN-2010 Intermediate Conversation
    • FREN-3002 French Composition
    • FREN-3100 Composition and Conversation
      Description

      Extensive practice in written and spoken French. Includes grammar review, vocabulary expansion, and composition and conversation practice on contemporary cultural/literary topics. Can be taken three times for credit with different content.

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    • FREN-3210 Topics in French Literature
      Description

      An introduction to the analysis of French literature through the study of selected text and authors of major French literary movements. The focus of the course may vary from the thematic approach to a study of literary genres.

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    • FREN-3211 Topics in French Culture
      Description

      Introduction to contemporary French and Francophone culture through the study of films, popular music, media, newspapers art, and/or television shows. May be taken up to four times for credit with different content.

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    • FREN-3212 Topics in Francophone Cinema
      Description

      Introduction to Francophone cinema through the discussion and analysis of French-language films placed within their cultural and historical context. Can be taken twice for credit with different content.

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    • FREN-3220 Survey of French Literature I
      Description

      A study of selected works by major writers of the Middle Ages, sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

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    • FREN-3221 Survey of French Literature II
      Description

      A study of selected works by major French writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

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    • FREN-3300 French Phonetics & Phonology
    • FREN-3450 Business French
      Description

      An intensive and extensive study of the principles governing the structure of the French language. As a culmination of series of courses introducing students to oral and written communication, this course teaches students the finer points of grammar and allows them to refine their language skills.

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    • FREN-4000 Advanced French Translation
      Description

      This course will provide students the opportunity to gain skills translating French to English as well as English to French.

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    • FREN-4150 Advanced Grammar and Linguistics
      Description

      Intensive study of the principles governing the structures of the French language. In this course students will refine and extend their language skills.

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    • FREN-4210 French Literature and Film
      Description

      A comparative approach to the study of French literature and its cinematic adaptation and/or a thematic approach to selected literary texts and films.

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    • FREN-4220 Contemporary French Literature
      Description

      A study of selected works by major French writers of the twentieth century.

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    • FREN-4230 Classical French Drama
      Description

      A study of the major dramatists of the seventeenth century.

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    • FREN-4240 French Poetry
      Description

      An introduction to the study of poetry and poetics followed by an in-depth analysis of selected poems from one of the major French literary movements (Romanticism, Symbolism, Surrealism, etc.).

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    • FREN-4310 Francophone Civilization
      Description

      An introduction to the cultural diversity of the French speaking world through the study of authentic materials from Europe, Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and Canada.

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    • FREN-4320 French Civilization and Culture
      Description

      A study of the evolution of French couture and civilization from past to present through an exploration of France's major historical, artistic, and social development.

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    • FREN-4484 Senior Capstone
      Description

      Students will prepare a portfolio in which they will assess their linguistic and cultural knowledge acquired in courses already taken and courses taken during the Capstone semester. At least 51% of this course will be on-line. Portfolios will be prepared electronically and consist of a web page. This format will ensure that the student has the ability to use current technology and be able to utilize a wide range of resources used in the modern workplace, the language classroom, and graduate school. Students will be required to pass an oral proficiency interview.

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    • FREN-4785 Special Topics in French
      Description

      Readings, reports, and/or directed study abroad.

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    • GEOG-1013 World Geography
      Description

      An introduction survey of world geography with attention given to demographic, political, cultural, economic, and environmental characteristics of regions of the world. Especially recommended for education majors.

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    • GEOG-1111 Physical Geography
      Description

      An introduction to physical geography, surveying weather, climate, vegetation, soils, landforms, water resources, and their spatial interrelations and distributions.

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    • GEOG-1112 Weather and Climate
      Description

      An introduction to weather and climate including influences on the biosphere (ecosystems and biomes). This course looks at local, regional, and global geographic relationships among atmospheric and biospheric systems, including an introduction to climate change. .

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    • GEOG-1112L Weather and Climate Laboratory
      Description

      An introduction to weather and climate including influences on the biosphere (ecosystems and biomes). This course looks at local, regional, and global geographic relationships among atmospheric and biospheric, including an introduction to climate change. Students will engage in hands-on, field-based environmental observations in the laboratory.

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    • GEOG-1113 Landform Geography
      Description

      An introduction to Earth-surface processes and landforms. Students will observe and interpret a variety of landscapes in terms of the fundamental processes and factors that have shaped them through time, including water, wind, and tectonic forces.

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    • GEOG-1113L Landform Geography Laboratory
      Description

      An introduction to Earth-surface processes and landforms. Students will observe and interpret a variety of landscapes in terms of the fundamental processes and factors that have shaped them through time, including water, wind, and tectonic forces. Students will engage in hands-on, field- based observations in the laboratory. Students will gain experience in the interpretation and integration of geospatial information including topographic and geologic maps, as well as aerial photographs and satellite imagery.

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    • GEOG-2010 Political Geography
      Description

      A foundations course which looks at the basis of political territory, international law and boundaries-both on the land and on the sea. This course identifies basic geopolitical units and their geographical expression--including states, nation states and supranational territories--and identifies the rules that govern sovereignty, territorial definition and international interactions at the borders. Special attention is given to the concept of nationalism and its role in redefining the contemporary global map.

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    • GEOG-2083 Introduction to Geographical Analysis
      Description

      An introduction to the practice of geographic research. The course takes a comprehensive approach to the research process in geography, including the development and formulation of research questions, the role of academic literature, identifying and working with relevant data sources, the application of qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis, and written and oral presentation of research findings.

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    • GEOG-2202 Environmental Science
      Description

      This course will focus on the key principles of environmental science, paying special attention to environmental systems and human interactions with these systems. The aim of the course is to give the student a solid, scientifically based understanding of the earth's current environment and how to analyze, assess, and begin to address human populations' impact on this environment.

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    • GEOG-2202L Environmental Science Lab
      Description

      This lab course will bring key principles of environmental science to a lab setting. The aim of the lab exercises is to give the student a hands-on experience involving basic observation, evaluation, and assessment of environmental themes and problems.

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    • GEOG-2253 Geographies of Economic Development
      Description

      This course explores the process of economic development under conditions of globalization. The focus is upon development theory, development and underdevelopment, debt and indebtedness, the construction of 'The Third World', and the creation of economic dependency. Special attention is paid to 'developing' areas or the world, including Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, South Asia, and others, where regionalized and national economic development theories, developed in the post World War II era which have subsequently challenged the so-called Washington Consensus and American development discourses.

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    • GEOG-2503 Cultural Geography
      Description

      A study of the earth as the home of the human race. The earth is here divided into particular world regions, which are studied in turn. Emphasis is given to the concept of culture and how it interacts in particular geographic regions with history, economics, politics, and demography.

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    • GEOG-2505 Human Impacts on the Environment
      Description

      This course examines the extent to which human activities have altered the natural environment--how much they have influenced animal species; vegetation systems; soils; water bodies and their quality; regional geomorphology; and the atmosphere. Policies, programs, and global extent of human environmental impact included.

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    • GEOG-2553 Introduction to GIS and Mapping Sciences
      Description

      An introduction to GIS, mapping and geospatial sciences. Topics include introductory GIS, map projections, land partitioning systems, map reading, map analysis, GPS, map making, aerial photography, and remote sensing. This course will guide students to GIS, mapping sciences and emerging geospatial technologies.

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    • GEOG-3010 Rethinking Geopolitics
      Description

      This course analyzes the field of contemporary geopolitical theory and the new 'critical geopolitics'. Beginning with an exploration of geopolitics in the 19th century, the course identifies the way in which strategic worldviews have influenced geographical thinking at all levels. Contemporary critical geopolitics--classic political, territorial and strategic thought of late 20th century-- is discussed.

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    • GEOG-3020 Political Geography
      Description

      Political geography is concerned with the spatial dynamics of power relations. This course focuses particularly on the nation-state, exploring the logic of the state and how it manages to legitimize itself as the dominant arbiter of political power. The course will also look at interactions between states and how they compete to control and dominate territory and resources.

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    • GEOG-3085 Selected Topics in Regional Geography
      Description

      Analysis of resource endowments, patterns of occupancy, and aspects of economic and political organization in different regions. The course may be repeated for additional credit with differing content. Title and hours of credit will be supplied at the time of offering.

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    • GEOG-3253 Economic Geography
      Description

      A study of the economy and its geographical structures and patterns. Introduces and critiques theories of location and economic landscapes and processes and develops a conceptual framework of the economy that encompasses the constitutive roles of spatial relations and nature-society relationships. and structural relationships among economic activities. Same as ECON 3425.

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    • GEOG-3300 Population Geography
      Description

      This course in population geography introduces the basic methods of demography as well as the impacts population dynamics have on society and its economy through time and space.

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    • GEOG-3405 Geographies of Sustainability
      Description

      A study of the inherent geographical challenges and possible solutions to a global economic system that is quickly depleting scarce resources while causing rapid environmental strain.

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    • GEOG-3563 Remote Sensing and GIS Integration
      Description

      This course introduces the principles of remote sensing and explores the practical integration of remote sensing with geographic information systems.

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    • GEOG-3643 Urban Geography
      Description

      Introduction to urban processes and patterns, including: global urbanization and the origin of cities; urban hierarchies and systems of cities; global cities; uneven economic growth and the functional specialization of cities; economic restructuring, migration, regional policies, dynamics of urban property markets; changes in population job location, housing, mobility and neighborhoods; ethno-cultural diversity, and spatial inequalities; and planning, politics and policy issues in North American cities.

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    • GEOG-3644 Atlanta's Geographies
      Description

      This course examines the geographic dimensions of the city of Atlanta and its metropolitan region. Students will gain an understanding of the historical, urban, social, economic, political and physical patterns and processes shaping the city and metro area at different geographic scales: at the local and metro scales, the city's growth and internal structure; at the regional scale, the city's role in the American South; and at the national and global scales, the city's dynamic position in wider urban, economic and social systems.

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    • GEOG-3713 Meteorology
      Description

      A study of weather and climate, including atmospheric properties and processes, and atmospheric influences on Earth's surface environment, at a variety of spatial and time-scales.

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    • GEOG-3723 Physiography of United States
      Description

      A study of the physiographic regions of the United States, including the genesis and distributional patterns of major regional landforms, soils, and vegetation. Emphasis is placed on the cartographic interpretation of regional features.

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    • GEOG-3800 Biogeography
      Description

      Biogeography is the subdiscipline of Geography that deals with the distribution, ranges, and limits of plants and animals over space and time. This class will focus on the processes and patterns of plant distribution in the contemporary landscape, stressing the development of North American vegetation. The course will cover topics evolution as it relates to Quaternary migration and distribution, North American biomes, disturbance ecology, invasive species, environmental stewardship, climate change, and field methods.

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    • GEOG-3900 Ecological Climatology
      Description

      Ecology and Climatology are two vastly different disciplines. Ecology is concerned with the interactions of organisms with their environments and Climatology is the study of the long-term physical state of the atmosphere. There two disciplines were not combined until the advent of global climate models in the 1970s. Ecological climatology is the interdisciplinary framework used to understand the functioning of the terrestrial ecosystems as part of the climate system. Specifically, how do changes in land cover influence short-term and long-term weather patterns.

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    • GEOG-4013 Globalization
      Description

      This course offers a survey and analysis of the multiple dimensions (economic, political, cultural, environmental, urban, ideological) of globalization and its role in shaping contemporary world geographies. The course will situate globalization in the context of capitalism's historical and geographical development and will focus on the changes and processes that have shaped world geographies since the late 1960s. Students will acquire both empirical and theoretical understandings by studying competing concepts and explanations of globalization and its impacts and applying them to current day events and issues.

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    • GEOG-4082 Directed Problems
    • GEOG-4084 Senior Seminar: Why Geography Matters
      Description

      A capstone course for Geography majors focusing on the integration and application of geographic concepts, theories, and techniques in the context of selected contemporary issues, events, or processes. Also includes an overview of the discipline's history as well as current intellectual developments.

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    • GEOG-4086 Internship
    • GEOG-4103 Geography of Soils and Water
      Description

      A survey of water and soil resources including process formation and the distributional characteristics of water features and soil types.

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    • GEOG-4253 Senimar in Economic Geography
      Description

      Study of advanced topics in economic geography. Specific titles will be announced for semester offered and will be entered on transcripts. May be repeated for additional credit as topics change.

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    • GEOG-4400 Energy and Sustainability
      Description

      This course will focus on the links between energy use and environmental degradation. Physical processes and social dynamics will be considered in order to understand the complex issues of energy production, demand, and consumption. In this class students will practice expressing informed opinions about current environmental energy debates, examine the social aspects of energy issues, and consider alternative energy futures.

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    • GEOG-4403 Water Resources Planning
      Description

      An introduction to the evolution and current practice of water resources management in the United States. Emphasis on principles of multiple objective resource evaluation and project design.

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    • GEOG-4500 Moral Geographies
      Description

      A study of the intersection between ethics and geography. This course takes up issues such as the geographical conditioning of norms and values, the geographical dimensions of responsibility, and the ethical dilemmas involved in our current social geography. As will be revealed in the course, many of the issues covered in human geography, from globalization and border making to migration and environmental degradation, are linked to deeply seated, yet contested norms.

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    • GEOG-4503 Culture, Space, and Place
      Description

      This seminar explores cultural geography from a critical perspective. Students are asked to consider the relationship between culture and development, post-colonial cultural theory, gender and race, feminist theory, cultural hybridity and globalization, and the new cultural spaces of the 21st century. The focus in upon identifying the geographical dimensions of conflicts, underlying the construction of culture, understanding culture as a discursive project, and appreciating culture as a power relationship.

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    • GEOG-4553 Geographic Information System
      Description

      An introduction to the use of Geographic Information Systems, including GIS theory, data input, spatial analysis, and final output.

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    • GEOG-4554 Computer Cartography
      Description

      Computer-assisted map design and production.

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    • GEOG-4562 Airphoto Interpretation and Photogrammetry
      Description

      Study on airphoto interpretation and photogrammetry. Topics include digital airphotos, correcting airphoto distortions, orthophoto generation, stereoscopy and DEM generation, airphoto interpretation techniques, and mapping with airphotos.

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    • GEOG-4564 Contemporary Remote Sensing Applications
      Description

      This course applies remote sensing techniques to contemporary topics like image classification, LiDAR, natural resources, urbanization, water, or climate. Students will learn how to process remote sensing data and will develop remote sensing application projects.

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    • GEOG-4643 Seminar in Urban Geography
      Description

      Study of advanced topics in urban geography. Specific titles will be announced for semester offered and will be entered on transcripts. May be repeated for additional credit as topics change.

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    • GEOG-4700 Global Environmental Change
      Description

      This is an advanced course on the evidence for, and theories of, environmental variability over time. Students will become familiar with environmental change before and since the Industrial Revolution. Attention will be paid to natural environmental mechanisms and the human activities of industrial societies which modify them.

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    • GEOG-4753 Contemporary GIS Applications
      Description

      This course focuses on principles, methods, and applications of GIS technologies. It emphasizes hands-on opportunities to learn technical skills and best practices. Students will learn how to process different types of GIS data and will develop an individual project to design, implement and run GIS models.

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    • GEOG-4755 GIS Database Design
      Description

      This is an advanced course in GIS databases and enterprise GIS database implementation. It is focused on the creation and administration of GIS databases. It introduces the concepts of database structure and the integration of spatial and attribute data. Topics include metadata creation, database development, querying, and administration. This class includes lectures, lab assignments, exams, and student-directed projects.

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    • GEOG-4757 Programming and Customization in GIS
      Description

      This is an advanced course in GIS focusing on application development and customization. Programming languages are used to develop GIS applications. In this course students will gain a solid understanding of the fundamentals of customization and programming in a GIS environment. Programming languages supporting GIS applications such as VBA and Python will be introduced. This class includes lectures, lab assignments, exams, and student-directed projects.

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    • GEOG-4800 Advanced Topics in Biogeography
      Description

      An integrative course that examines concepts and knowledge from physical geography, geology, ecology, anthropology and evolutionary biology. This course will cover advanced topics on the origin and dispersal of plants and animals, biotic communities, ecological relationships and the impact of human activity on the biosphere.

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    • GEOG-4893 Practicum in GIS
      Description

      This is an applied practicum that fosters effective use of GIS. Students who successfully complete the course are able to create, manipulate, and manage geographic data to perform analysis tasks, to visualize geographic data, and to use geographic data analyses to support decision making. This course is designed to equip students with skills needed in the geospatial field.

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    • GEOG-4900 Dendrochronology
      Description

      Dendrochronology is one of the most versatile disciplines in the physical and cultural sciences. The science uses tree rings that are dated to their exact year of formation to analyze the temporal and spatial patterns of processes in the physical and cultural sciences. The science takes advantage of the fact that trees are nature's ultimate environmental monitoring stations. They are immobile, they assimilate events in the environment, they have their own special language, and they can't lie (although sometimes they make searching for the truth quite challenging). In this course, you'll learn how to read the language of trees and how to use this information to learn about past and present environmental processes that may shed light on your particular research questions.

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    • GEOL-1011K Introductory Geosciences I
      Description

      This course covers Earth materials and processes. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/

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    • GEOL-1121 Introductory Geosciences I: Physical Geology
      Description

      Acquaints students with geological concepts, processes, and earth materials and their effects on mankind and the environment. Topics include rocks and minerals,volcanoes, earthquakes, rivers, glaciers and the dynamic forces that move continents, build mountains, and create ocean basins.

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    • GEOL-1121L Physical Geology Laboratory
      Description

      This modern, non-mathematical, introductory course acquaints students with basic geological concepts, processes, and earth materials and their effects on man and his environment. Emphasis is on processes shaping the surface of the earth (volcanoes, earthquakes, rivers and glaciers) and the dynamic forces which move continents, build mountains, and create ocean basins.

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    • GEOL-1122 Introductory Geosciences II: Historical Geology
      Description

      Application of modern geological and biological concepts to interpret earth history. Acquaints students with fossil evidence for tracing the origin and evolution of life. Emphasis placed on developing a broad understanding of the origin and development of the earth and solar system, concepts of sea-floor spreading and plate tectonics and the evolution of the earth's atmosphere and life.

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    • GEOL-1122L Historical Geology Laboratory
      Description

      This course teaches students to use basic, modern geological and biological concepts to interpret earth history. It will acquaint them with the fossil evidence for tracing the origin and evolution of life. Emphasis is placed on developing a broad understanding of the origin and development of the earth and solar system, concepts of sea floor spreading and plate tectonics and the evolution of the atmosphere and life.

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    • GEOL-1123 Environmental Observations
      Description

      Trains students in the protocols required for certification to participate in the Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment GLOBE Program.

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    • GEOL-1123L Environmental Observations Laboratory
      Description

      Laboratory exercises to supplement lectures of GEOL 1123.

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    • GEOL-2002 Applied Computing for Geosciences
      Description

      An introduction to computer hardware, software and techniques used for acquiring, storing, analyzing, and presenting scientific data, particularly geologic and hydrologic data. Emphasis will be placed on commonly used and widely available software such as word processing, spreadsheet and database programs as well as mapping and drafting programs commonly used in the sciences.

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    • GEOL-2313 Descriptive Astronomy
      Description

      A survey of sky awareness, historical development of astronomy, the solar system, stars, nebulae, galaxies.

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    • GEOL-2313L Descriptive Astronomy Laboratory
      Description

      An experimental introduction to the elementary tools of astronomy.

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    • GEOL-2503 Introduction to Oceanography
      Description

      Introduces science and non-science majors to the biological, chemical, physical, and geological features of the oceans. Acquaints students with the topography and geologic history of the oceans, sea-floor spreading, plate tectonics, atmosphere/ocean interaction current movements, and ocean biology and chemistry . The course also will discuss sources of food, energy, mineral resources, as well as environmental issues affecting the sea. Satisfies Area D1 Core Requirements.

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    • GEOL-2553 Geology of the National Parks
      Description

      The study of the geologic processes that formed our national parks. Selected national parks and monuments are used to illustrate fundamental geologic processes such as volcanism, sedimentation, glaciation, stream and shoreline erosion, and crustal deformation among others.

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    • GEOL-3003 Field Methods
      Description

      A practical course that familiarizes students with basic instruments and techniques used by Geologists to collect structural, stratigraphic, topographic and other data in the field.

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    • GEOL-3004 Field Geology and Geologic Mapping
      Description

      A practical course that familiarizes students with basic instruments and techniques used by Geologists to collect structural, stratigraphic, topographic and other data in the field.

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    • GEOL-3014 Mineralogy and Crystallography
      Description

      The origin and physical properties of the more common minerals and their crystal forms. Megascopic recognition of specimens, their mineral associations, and a brief introduction to modern x-ray diffraction. CHEM 1211 may be taken concurrently.

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    • GEOL-3024 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology
      Description

      A study of the classification and origin of igneous, and metamorphic rocks. The geologic processes that form these rocks are studied by examining rock samples in the field and laboratory using hand sample, microscopic, and chemical techniques. Petrologic problems are studied at the local, regional, and global scales.

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    • GEOL-3034 Structural Geology
      Description

      The recognition, description, and interpretation of primary and secondary rock-structures. Laboratory and field periods will be spent using both graphical and instrumental techniques necessary for describing and interpreting common structural deformation features. In addition to laboratory and classroom examples, each student is required to complete a lithologic and structural mapping project.

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    • GEOL-3042 Optical Mineralogy
      Description

      Students will be introduced to the Polarizing microscope and to the techniques for the identification of minerals in thin section.

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    • GEOL-3043 Optic Mineralogy and Petrography
      Description

      Course will introduce students to the theory and practice of optical mineralogy and petrography; the systematic study of non-opaque rocks and minerals under the microscope.

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    • GEOL-3053 Sedimentary Petrology
      Description

      The description, classification and interpretation of sedimentary rocks. Using observations from modern sediments, and hand specimens and thin sections of sedimentary rocks, students will apply the principle of uniformity to interpret sedimentary processes and environments.

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    • GEOL-3603 Environmental Geology
      Description

      The interaction between human activity and geologic processes. Included are natural hazards such as earthquakes, landslides, volcanoes, and flooding, human induced problems such as groundwater pollution, erosion and the exploitation of natural resources including rivers, shorelines, petroleum, and ores. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of underlying natural processes and the prediction and mitigation of problems.

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    • GEOL-3825 Research Methods
      Description

      Specially designed to meet the needs of future teachers, students design and carry out four independent inquiries, which they write up and present in the manner that is common in the scientific community. Course is restricted to UTeach students.

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    • GEOL-4003 Geomorphology
      Description

      Characteristics, classification, genesis and evolution of major earth surface features (land forms) and their associations (landscapes). The conceptual framework will involve understanding lithologic, structural, climatic temporal, and process controls. Includes applied aspects of humans as geomorphic agents and geomorphic processes as natural hazards. Topographic map and air photo interpretation will be stressed.

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    • GEOL-4014 Geochemistry
      Description

      Chemical realms of the earth and geologic materials, chemistry of geologic processes, geochemical cycles, and special topics.

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    • GEOL-4024 Paleontology
      Description

      Classification, biology, distribution and diversity of major invertebrate animals with a fossil record. The course is designed to integrate modern biological concepts as applied to fossil organisms. Students will study fossil organisms to develop an understanding of the principles of evolution, stratigraphic correlation, and paleoecology.

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    • GEOL-4033 Stratigraphy and Geochronology
      Description

      Examines the various ways to constrain time in the geologic record, within the context of local, regional, and global change. Students will explore aspects of tectonic, biological and chemical evolution, mainly in sedimentary basins. Students will acquire broad knowledge of major stratigraphic tools and will understand their applications.

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    • GEOL-4034 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy
      Description

      Course illustrates how observations from sediments and sedimentary rocks in the field and laboratory can be used to identify formative processes and depositional environments. This methodology is central to the analysis of depositional basins and to an understanding of the geologic time scale.

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    • GEOL-4044 Engineering Geology
      Description

      Introduction to principles of soil and rock mechanics. Discussion and experimental exercises ranging from basic field identification to advanced procedures for estimating soil rock mechanical properties.

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    • GEOL-4063 Plate Tectonics
      Description

      A study of the processes of crustal evolution by plate tectonics. Topics include a brief review of geophysical techniques, discussions of plate tectonics and sea-floor spreading, and a survey of mountain building processes through time.

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    • GEOL-4074 Regional Applications of Field Geology
      Description

      An intense, four-week field excursion which provides a variety of field-oriented applications of major geologic principles. This course includes both regional syntheses of geological data and in-depth analysis of specific geological features and areas.

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    • GEOL-4082 Geological Problems
      Description

      Detailed assignments in specific areas of geology. Satisfies deficiencies or permits in-depth pursuit of the student's research in particular geological topics. Title to be supplied at the time of offering.

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    • GEOL-4083 Environmental Geochemistry
      Description

      The geochemistry of the earth's lithosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere and the human modifications to these systems that cause environmental problems. Special topics include acid rain, greenhouse effect, toxic trace elements, landfills, energy usage and radon.

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    • GEOL-4084 Hydrogeology
      Description

      An investigation of groundwater and the earth's hydrologic cycle. Examines the physical aspects of groundwater occurrence and movement, and provides an introduction to contaminant transport and chemical hydrogeology. Lab exercises will acquaint students with hydrogeology field methods and equipment.

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    • GEOL-4093 Risk Assessment
      Description

      A multidisciplinary investigation into the major societal issue of increasing impacts of natural hazards. Examines property damage and loss of life caused by geologic hazards (earthquakes, landslides, volcanoes,meteorological hazards hurricanes, tornadoes, floods) and others (fires, technological hazards, biohazards). A major focus will be on social science issue of planning, politics, economics and their control on management of high hazard areas, vulnerability assessments, and mitigation.

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    • GEOL-4103 Dinosaurs!
      Description

      A multidisciplinary investigation into the morphology, classification and identification of the dinosaurs; the environmental, climatic, and geographic conditions on earth during the time of the dinosaurs; and the biological principles involved in understanding the origin, evolution, and extinction of the dinosaurs. Techniques for using dinosaurs to teach children of all ages the fundamentals of science will be explored.

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    • GEOL-4203 Geology of Georgia
      Description

      Directed toward science and science education majors, this course investigates the geology of the state of Georgia. Students learn fundamental geological principles necessary for deciphering Earth history. The geologic history of Georgia's geologic provinces is explored. Topics include coastal hazards, water in Georgia, landforms and mineral resources of Georgia.

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    • GEOL-4501 Geology Seminar
      Description

      A program of study, discussion, readings and presentations concerning the significant interrelationships of a wide variety of basic geological concepts. Topics may also include career paths, licensing and other matters concerning the profession of Geology. Advanced geology students , faculty, and outside speakers interact within a seminar framework designed to increase the geological maturity of the students.

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    • GEOL-4604 Economic Geology
      Description

      Introduction to geology and economics of non-energy mineral resources. Emphasis placed on the descriptive geology and origin of economic mineral concentrations within the context of their overall geologic settings. Lab exercises will involve identification and characterization of representative ore suites from important mineral deposits. Students will complete a research project on exploring for or developing a major ore deposit or mineral/rock resource. A fieldtrip is anticipated to examine the geology, exploration methodology, development, and permitting issues related to mineral/rock production. Students will also prepare for and take the National Association of State Boards of Geology, Fundamentals of Geology (FG) professional licensing exam.

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    • GEOL-4985 Selected Topics in Geology
      Description

      Title and description of course to be specified at time of offering. May be repeated for credit.

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    • GLOB-4000 Capstone Seminar
      Description

      This Capstone seminar is designed to integrate the various experiences of students in their interdisciplinary endeavors. Specific aspects of globalization will be examined at an advanced level.

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    • GLOB-4186 Internship in Global Studies
      Description

      Students may receive academic credit for personal experience in the field of global studies. Credit hours apply toward the major.

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    • GLOB-4981 Directed Readings in Global Studies
      Description

      In depth, individualized research on specific global problems and issues.

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    • GLOB-4985 Problems in Global Studies
      Description

      Specialized areas of analysis in a subfield of global studies with the specific titles announces in the class schedule and entered on the students' transcripts. Students may repeat the course for credit as topics change.

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    • GRMN-1001 Elementary German I
      Description

      An introduction to the German language and the culture of the German-speaking world. Beginning of a survey of basic German grammar and the development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Some aspects of everyday life in the German-speaking world will also be introduced. Institutional option: Work with other media (audio, video, and/or computer) outside of class is required.

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    • GRMN-1001C Elementary German I - Block
      Description

      An introduction to the German language and the culture of the German-speaking world. Beginning of a survey of basic German grammar and the development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Some aspects of everyday life in the German-speaking world will also be introduced. Institutional option: Work with other media (audio, video, and/or computer) outside of class is required.

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    • GRMN-1002 Elementary German II
      Description

      The second part of an introduction to the German language and culture of the German-speaking world. Completion of the survey of basic German grammar and further development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Aspects of everyday life in the German-speaking world will also be introduced. Institutional Option: Work with other media (audio, video, and/or computer) outside of class is required.

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    • GRMN-1002C Elementary German II - Block
      Description

      The second part of an introduction to the German language and culture of the Germanspeaking world. Completion of the survey of basic German grammar and further development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Aspects of everyday life in the German-speaking world will also be introduced. Institutional Option: Work with other media (audio, video, and/or computer) outside of class is required.

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    • GRMN-2001 Intermediate German I
      Description

      This is the third course in a four-course sequence and is open to students with three years of high school or two semesters of college German or the equivalent.

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    • GRMN-2002 Intermediate German II
      Description

      This is the fourth course in a four-course sequence and is open to students with four years of high school or three semesters of college German or the equivalent.

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    • GRMN-3101 Conversational German
      Description

      Intensive practice of spoken German with emphasis on the expansion of vocabulary, idiom, and cultural awareness as well as enhanced skill in pronunciation and expression.

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    • GRMN-3102 German Composition
      Description

      Acquisition of organizational and writing skills through grammar review and expansion, vocabulary enhancement, and compositions based on contemporary and cultural topics.

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    • GRMN-3450 German for Careers
      Description

      A variable content course with emphasis on the vocabularies and culture of economics/business or the social sciences.

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    • GRMN-3986 Total Immersion in German
      Description

      Participants in this course will agree to speak only German for a specified amount of time, from 48 hours to three weeks. Students are required to participate in organized events and activities including films, tasks such as cooking or clean-up, discussion, and games, all facilitating student communication in German. Some quiet study and reading periods will allow consolidation of vocabulary gains and help relieve stress, a natural and necessary component of total immersion. The total immersion experience is highly intense and sometimes uncomfortable, but often produces remarkable results in terms of increased fluency.

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    • GRMN-4170 Advanced Language Skills
      Description

      An intensive and extensive study of the principles governing the structure of the German language. In this course students will refine and extend their language skills.

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    • GRMN-4200 Seminar in German Literature
      Description

      Variable content ranging from literary periods, genres, or authors, such as Romanticism, the Novelle, or the Age of Goethe.

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    • GRMN-4210 Turn of the Century German and Austrian Culture
      Description

      This course will analyze a variety of texts- short stories, plays, novels, films, architecture, and painting -- from and about turn of the century Germany and Austria, with some emphasis on cultural and ideological practices. Discussion, papers and texts will be in German. Students may not receive credit for GRMN 4210 and the XIDS course of the same title.

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    • GRMN-4220 German Culture through Film
      Description

      This course offers an introduction to 20th century history and culture through the depictions and interpretations of aspects of social history in German film and painting. Discussions and papers will be in German. Students may not receive credit for GRMN 4220 and the XIDS course of the same title.

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    • GRMN-4230 Kafka and the Kafkaesque in Literature and Film
      Description

      This course offers in introduction to Kafka's life and work and examines his influence on 20th century thought and art. In the process we will both broaden and personalize our understandings of 'kafkaesque', that most fashionable of adjectives. Discussion, papers and readings will be in German. Students may not receive credit for GRMN 4230 and the XIDS course of the same title.

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    • GRMN-4240 Mystery and Horror in German Literature and Film
      Description

      This course traces the mystery and horror genres from their 'beginnings' in German Romanticism through early German film (including emigres to Hollywood and Hitchcock, who was schooled in Germany) to New German Film of the 70's and 80's Discussion, readings and paper will be in German. Students may not receive credit for GRMN 4240 and XIDS course of the same title.

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    • GRMN-4250 Contemporary German Cinema
      Description

      German cinema has changed radically in the past twenty years moving more and more toward Hollywood styles, big budgets, Hollywood ideologies. We will trace this change in German cinema from the days of the New German Cinema and its highly intellectual and artistic goals (Fassbinder, Wenders, Herzog, von Trotta, Schlondorff) to today's much more co-opted German film industry(Tykwer, Farberbock, Peterson, Kraume, and Ruzowitzsky).

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    • GRMN-4260 Austrian Literature and Culture
      Description

      This course will examine a selection of representative works of Austrian culture, including literature, music, and the visual arts, within the context of Austrian history from the time of the Hapsburg Empire to the present day Austrian Republic. Discussion, readings, and writing assignments are in German.

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    • GRMN-4300 German Civilization
      Description

      Taught in English. Recommended for students minoring in German, but does not count in the minor.

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    • GRMN-4484 Senior Capstone
      Description

      Students prepare individual electronic portfolios in which they assess their linguistic and cultural knowledge. Students will be required to pass an oral proficiency interview.

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    • GRMN-4501 Foreign Language Teaching in Elementary Schools
      Description

      This course is designed for students seeking a degree in Foreign Language Education. The objective is to prepare qualified foreign language teachers for elementary school. This course treats the principles of foreign language methodology applied to elementary school teaching, and includes class observations, planning of instruction, and field experience.

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    • GRMN-4502 Methods of Foreign Language Teaching
      Description

      A course designed for students to develop skills and strategies in teaching and in planning foreign language instruction at the secondary level.

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    • GRMN-4785 Special Topics in German
      Description

      Readings, reports, and/or directed study abroad.

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    • GRMN-4986 Internship in Germany
      Description

      In addition to working in a German company in Germany, students must at least furnish a long written report on the work experiences. Additional requirements are added for each additional hour of credit. May be repeated up to two times for a maximum of 5 hours credit. The grade is based upon the quality of the written products and on an interview with the returning stude

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    • HIST-1111 Survey of World History/Civilization I
      Description

      A survey of global history to 1500. This course examines ancient and medieval civilizations to deepen understanding of the political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of World history. Emphasis is given to comparative themes, the study of causal relationships and patterns of change and continuity over time; and the social significance of ethnicity, gender, race, and class in historical events and study.

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    • HIST-1112 Survey of World History/Civilization II
      Description

      A survey of global history from 1500 to the present. Beginning with European oceanic expansion and the emergence of a global network of exchange, this course examines the impact of major technologies, economic systems, political ideologies, and cultural traditions that unite and divide the human community. Emphasis is given to the study of causal relationships and patterns of change and continuity over time, as well as the social significance of ethnicity, gender, race, and class in historical events and study.

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    • HIST-2111 U S History I (to 1865)
      Description

      Explores the major themes and issues in American history from early settlement through the end of the American Civil War. Emphasizes the political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of United States history; causal relationships and patterns of change and continuity over time; and the significance of ethnicity, gender, race, and class in historical events.

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    • HIST-2112 U S History II (since 1865)
      Description

      Explores the major themes and issues in American history from the end of the American Civil War to the present. Emphasizes the political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of United States history; causal relationships and patterns of change and continuity over time; and the significance of ethnicity, gender, race, and class in historical events.

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    • HIST-2302 The Historian's Craft: Methodology
      Description

      Examination of history as a discipline and as a craft, concentrating on the research and interpretive skills used by historians. Should be taken in the second year of the history major's degree program.

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    • HIST-3300 Studies in American Culture
      Description

      An introduction to American Studies as an area of critical inquiry, including a study of the theories and methods used in the field and readings of significant works that have shaped it. Required for a minor in American Studies. Same as ENGL 3300.

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    • HIST-3301 History and Philosophy of Science
      Description

      A study of the historical development of major areas of science and the philosophical examination of scientific methods and results.

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    • HIST-3311 Ancient Near East and Classical World
      Description

      The development of ancient Near Eastern, Greek and Roman civilizations and their impact on the development of western civilization.

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    • HIST-3312 Near East in Middle Ages
      Description

      The development of Byzantine and Islamic Civilizations and their impact on the development of modern Eastern Europe, Balkans, Near East, and North Africa.

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    • HIST-3313 Near East in Modern Times
      Description

      A political social, economic, cultural and religious survey of the Balkans, Near East and North Africa, from the Ottoman Empire to the present.

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    • HIST-3315 Civilization of India
      Description

      An introduction to socio-cultural history of the Indian subcontinent focusing on the formative culture, and Western impact, the synthesis emerging in the 20th century, and the spread of Indian ideas to East and Southeast Asia. Students will normally be expected to have taken the basic courses in U.S. and Global History.

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    • HIST-3318 Africa through the Era of the Slave Trade
      Description

      Selected themes in Pre-colonial African history: foundations of human settlement, the impact of religions, trade, state formation. The course will cover various regional developments from antiquity to the eve of European conquest.

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    • HIST-3319 The Making of Modern Africa, 1820-Present
      Description

      An survey of modern Africa from the end of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade to the present.

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    • HIST-3321 Western Europe in Middle Ages
      Description

      The development of Medieval Latin Civilization and its impact on the development of Modern Europe.

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    • HIST-3323 17th and 18th Century Europe
      Description

      A political, social, economic and cultural study of Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries.

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    • HIST-3326 Colonial Latin America
      Description

      A survey of Latin America from the pre-Columbian period through 1830, with special emphasis on the conquest, colonial administration and economy, race and society, international rivalries, and separation from Spain and Portugal.

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    • HIST-3327 Latin America Since Independence
      Description

      A topical analysis of Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean states since c. 1820.

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    • HIST-3341 Britain to 1688
      Description

      From the Roman invasion to the Glorious Revolution, this course examines the key events, institutions, and individuals responsible for the creation of a British kingdom and its emergence as a European power.

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    • HIST-3342 Britain since 1688
      Description

      This class examines the political, economic, social, and cultural history of Britain and its empire from the Glorious Revolution to the present.

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    • HIST-3350 Introduction to Africana Studies
      Description

      An introduction to Africana studies as an area of critical inquiry, including a study of the theories and methods used in the field and readings of significant works that have shaped it. Required for the minor in Africana studies. Same as ENGL 3350.

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    • HIST-3351 Imperial Russia
      Description

      An examination of social, political, economic and cultural development in Russian history from Peter the Great to the Revolution of 1917.

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    • HIST-3361 American Diplomacy
      Description

      History of American foreign policy from the Revolution to the present.

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    • HIST-3362 African-American History to 1865
      Description

      A survey history of African-Americans in the United States from the African past through the American Civil War.

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    • HIST-3363 African-American History Since 1865
      Description

      A survey history of African-Americans in the United States from 1865 to the present, with emphasis on the evolution of black leadership in the twentieth century.

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    • HIST-3500 Junior Historiography Seminar
      Description

      This course aims to prepare students for Senior Seminar by focusing on analysis of historiographical debate and by guiding students in developing a prospectus for their own future research. Topics vary with instructors. This course is writing-intensive. Prerequisite: HIST 2302 Methodology 3 credits

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    • HIST-4010 Teaching Methods for History
      Description

      This course is intended to introduce students to the practice of teaching history. It is designed to help students succeed as history educators. We will focus on developing the skills necessary to teach history effectively by incorporating the latest scholarship with the newest technological innovations and pedagogical strategies. We will also work with primary sources, identifying exceptional sources and developing strategies for students to engage these sources. This course will devote special attention to developing teaching strategies for students enrolled in middle grades (6-8) and high school (9-12). Students will also learn to use the Georgia and National Performance Standards (Common Core) to develop history curriculum.

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    • HIST-4209 Greek and Roman Warfare
      Description

      This course surveys the main developments in the mechanics of Greek and Roman warfare weapons, strategy, and tactics from the Mycenaean period to the Byzantine Empire. At the same time, attention will be paid to the function of warfare in society, and its impact on political and social history.

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    • HIST-4210 Pagans and Christians in Late Antiquity
      Description

      This course considers the history of the interactions between Christians and the adherents of other religions in the Roman Empire from the 30's AD to the early fifth century AD.

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    • HIST-4230 War, State, and Society in Early Modern Europe
      Description

      An exploration of the relationship between military, social, and political factors in Europe from the 1400s to the end of the 1700s.

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    • HIST-4232 The Enlightenment
      Description

      An exploration of the movement that dominated intellectual and cultural developments in 18th century Europe, seen within its broader political, social, and economic context.

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    • HIST-4235 France Before the Revolution
      Description

      Traces the development of the French monarchical state from the 15th to the 18th century, when France became a dominant European power.

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    • HIST-4250 The First World War
      Description

      Examines the political, economic, social, cultural, and military history of what George Kennan called the seminal catastrophe of the twentieth century.

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    • HIST-4251 The Second World War
      Description

      HIST 4251/5251 The Second World War This course explores the Second World War, focusing primarily on the history of the military campaigns in Europe and the Pacific. It also examines topics such as the economic sinews of war, civil-military relations, technology and warfare, wartime diplomacy, and war and atrocity.

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    • HIST-4285 Special Topics in European History
      Description

      Courses on European history topics not usually offered by the department.

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    • HIST-4385 Special Topics in World History
      Description

      Courses on topics in world history not usually offered by the department.

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    • HIST-4400 Introduction to Public History
      Description

      An examination of the development, philosophies, and activities in the field of public history and the ethical issues which public historians face.

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    • HIST-4401 Theory and Practice of Oral History
      Description

      An examination of the philosophy, ethics, and practice of oral history, with specific training in interview and transcription techniques, and the use of oral history in historical research and analysis.

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    • HIST-4402 Introduction to Archival Theory and Practice
      Description

      An introduction to the principles of archival theory and management from appraisal and acquisitions through arrangement, description, preservation, and public access. Includes a practicum experience.

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    • HIST-4403 Introduction to Museum Studies
      Description

      An introduction to the philosophy, theory and practice of museum work and a survey of various functions of a museum, including collections, research, education and interpretation, exhibits, and administration.

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    • HIST-4404 History of American Architecture
      Description

      A survey of American architecture in its social and cultural context from colonial America through the present, with a particular focus on how to analyze and document historic buildings.

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    • HIST-4411 European Renaissance in Global Perspective
      Description

      Europe in the early modern era, focusing on the cultural and political history of the Renaissance, the development of overseas empires and the evolution of a scientific world view.

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    • HIST-4413 The Atlantic World 1450-1800
      Description

      A transnational perspective emphasizing connections between Europe, Africa, and the Americas from the period of European maritime exploration to the age of revolution. Topics include the expansion of empires and mercantile capitalism, slavery and the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and interactions between Europeans, Africans and Native Americans.

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    • HIST-4414 French America
      Description

      Explores French colonial efforts in North America and the Caribbean from the 16th to the 19th centuries, including Canada, Louisiana, and Haiti.

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    • HIST-4417 19th Century Europe, 1789-1914
      Description

      Study of European, social, cultural and political history from 1789 to 1914, with particular emphasis on how different cultures and classes understood Europe's lurch into modernity. Prerequisites: 3 credits global history; 3 credits U.S. history; or permission.

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    • HIST-4418 20th Century Europe
      Description

      A study of the political and social history of Europe in the 20th century with emphasis on the continuity of events and their interrelation.

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    • HIST-4419 The Cold War
      Description

      A political and social survey of the origins of the Cold War, its development and conclusion.

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    • HIST-4420 The Holocaust
      Description

      An analysis of the Holocaust, emphasizing aspects of modern European and Jewish history, the origins of European anti- Semitism, and the varied experiences of camp inmates, resisters, perpetrators, bystanders and liberators.

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    • HIST-4421 Mexico Since Independence
      Description

      An introduction to the history of Mexico since independence, with special emphasis on selected political, economic and social themes, including U.S.-Mexican relations.

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    • HIST-4422 U.S. and Latin American Relations
      Description

      An introduction to the history of relations between Latin America and the United States from 1783 to the present, focusing on the political, economic and social interaction between Americans and Latin Americans.

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    • HIST-4423 Women and Gender in the Ancient World
      Description

      This course aims to introduce students to the roles of women of all social classes in different periods of Ancient Greece and Rome, as well as the problems of studying women's history in the Greco-Roman world. The course will combine a chronological approach with the thematic one, as each week will focus on women's roles and participation in a specific period and/or sphere of activity, such as religion, politics, the dramatic stage, the family and household, and law.

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    • HIST-4424 Apartheid and the New South Africa
      Description

      An introduction to the history and historiography of South Africa through selected economic, environmental, social and political themes.

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    • HIST-4430 The Vietnam War
      Description

      An examination of the historical background, events, and impact of the Vietnam War.

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    • HIST-4432 The Roman Republic
      Description

      This course combines a chronological approach with a thematic one, in order to address such topics as evolution of the government system, social conflict, religion, the Roman family, and the Roman army over the course of the Roman Republic from the expulsion of the kings to the assassination of Julius Caesar.

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    • HIST-4433 Introduction to Modern China
      Description

      An introduction to the modernization process within China from 1500, emphasizing East-West conflict and the emergence of the People's Republic of China.

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    • HIST-4436 French Revolution -- Napoleon
      Description

      Europe from 1789-1815, with particular emphasis upon France. A study of the French Revolution as the classic model from modern revolutions.

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    • HIST-4437 France Since 1815
      Description

      A survey of French history from Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo in 1815 to the present Fifth French Republic. An examination of the role of French influence on European and world cultures over the last two centuries.

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    • HIST-4440 Modern Germany
      Description

      A political and social study of Germany since unification with heavy emphasis on the 20th century (1871-Present).

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    • HIST-4441 Modern Ireland, 1780 to Present
      Description

      A political, social, and cultural study of Ireland since 1780 with special emphasis on the evolution of Irish nationalism and Anglo-Irish relations. The roots and history of 'the Troubles' in Northern Ireland will also be explored.

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    • HIST-4443 Introduction to Modern Japan
      Description

      An introduction to the history of Japan, emphasizing the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Japanese immigration to the United States, and Japanese-American relations.

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    • HIST-4446 Soviet Russia
      Description

      An analysis of Soviet history from the October Revolution of 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, with an emphasis on Stalinism and post-Stalin developments.

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    • HIST-4451 Colonial America, 1492-1763
      Description

      The history of early America, from the Age of Discovery through the establishment and growth of England's New World colonies, with emphasis on the evolution of American society and culture.

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    • HIST-4452 The American Revolution, 1763-1783
      Description

      A study of the origin of America's break with Great Britain with emphasis on the causes of the Revolution, the course of the War of Independence, and the establishment of the new nation's political, social, and cultural institutions.

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    • HIST-4453 The American Republic, 1783-1815
      Description

      The political, diplomatic, economic, and social history of the United States from the end of the American Revolution through the War of 1812.

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    • HIST-4454 Jacksonian America 1815-1848
      Description

      American history from the end of the War of 1812 to the Mexican War, with emphasis on politics and society. Western expansion also will be emphasized.

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    • HIST-4455 Civil War and Reconstruction: 1848-1877
      Description

      American history from the end of the Mexican War to the Compromise of 1877, with special attention to the political, military, and social history of the Civil War.

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    • HIST-4461 Environmental History
      Description

      A study of American understanding of ecology, wilderness, resource usage, conservation, agriculture, technology, and natural hazards from colonial times to the present.

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    • HIST-4463 American Military History
      Description

      The history of American warfare from the colonial conflicts through the wars of the 20th century, with emphasis on society's impact on warfare and warfare's impact on American society.

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    • HIST-4464 American Sports History
      Description

      Traces the history of the development of American sports from the Colonial period to the present with emphasis on the social, cultural, economic, and political factors that are involved.

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    • HIST-4465 US Society and Culture to 1865
      Description

      Examines the most important social and cultural trends in America from the colonial period to the end of the Civil War.

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    • HIST-4466 U.S. Society and Culture Since 1865
      Description

      Examines the most important social and cultural trends in the U.S. since the Civil War.

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    • HIST-4467 Women in American History to 1890
      Description

      An examination of the diverse experiences of women and their impact on American History up to 1877.

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    • HIST-4468 Women in American History Since 1890
      Description

      An examination of the diverse experiences of women and their impact on the history of the United States since 1877.

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    • HIST-4469 The Civil Rights Movement
      Description

      The history of the Civil Rights Movement with emphasis on major leaders, organizations and events in the twentieth century black freedom struggle.

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    • HIST-4471 The Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 1877-1920
      Description

      Explores the social, political, cultural, economic, and diplomatic history of the U.S. from the end of Reconstruction to the aftermath of World War I.

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    • HIST-4472 The Rise of Modern America, 1920-1945
      Description

      Explores the social, political, cultural, economic, and diplomatic history of the U.S. from the end of World War I to the end of World War II.

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    • HIST-4473 Recent America: The U.S. Since World War II
      Description

      Explores the social, political, cultural, economic, and diplomatic history of the U.S. in the second half or the twentieth century.

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    • HIST-4474 History of Georgia
      Description

      A survey of Georgia history from prehistory to the present, emphasizing politics and society.

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    • HIST-4475 Southern Families and Communities
      Description

      A study of the approaches to researching and analyzing the history of the varied families and communities in southern history.

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    • HIST-4476 The Old South
      Description

      A study of the American South from the Colonial Period through the Reconstruction, with special attention on nineteenth century politics and society. Ideas and events leading to secession and Civil War are particularly emphasized.

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    • HIST-4477 The New South
      Description

      A study of the American South since 1865, including the interaction of economic, political, social, and cultural factors, especially in the context of struggles in rural and urban communities and in the textile industry.

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    • HIST-4478 American Religion to 1800
      Description

      A study of the history of American religious beliefs, practices, and influences on American society, from its colonial settlement to 1800.

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    • HIST-4479 American Religion Since 1800
      Description

      A study of the history of American religious beliefs and practices, and religion's influence on American society, from 1800 to the present.

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    • HIST-4481 Independent Study
      Description

      Individual study, with the instructor, taken by majors with permission of the chair and instructor on a topic not regularly offered by the department. May involve a research paper, field research, or reading and discussion.

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    • HIST-4484 Senior Seminar
      Description

      A thematic and capstone course to integrate the student's experience in the field of history. Topics vary with instructors. Complements the course 'The Historian's Craft' and assesses a major's progress.

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    • HIST-4485 Special Topics
      Description

      Courses on topics not usually offered by the department.

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    • HIST-4486 Public History Internship
      Description

      Experience in applying history in a museum, historical society, archive, historic preservation agency or other public history setting. Students must maintain a journal and develop a portfolio of their work.

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    • HIST-4505 American Foreign Policy since 1898
      Description

      This course is designed as an upper division reading course in American foreign policy. This course will discuss the foreign policy process, the history of American foreign policy and its traditions since 1898, and a variety of approaches to understanding foreign policy. The goal of the course is to provide students with the theoretical and analytical tools needed to understand the history and current processes of American foreign policy. The course will incorporate current events in American foreign policy, as well as historical discussion, as a means of demonstrating the academic concepts of the course in practice.

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    • ISCI-2001 Life and Earth Science
      Description

      This course is an integrative, interdisciplinary approach to the study of life and earth science. It introduces basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities for students to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about their environment. The laboratory component of the course allows students to have hands-on experience with scientific ideas and principles. Satisfies area F or Early Childhood Education.

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    • ISCI-2002 Physical Science
      Description

      This is an interdisciplinary, activity based science course satisfying Area F requirements of the Early Childhood Education program. Topics in physical science and astronomy will be covered to address content covered by the Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) for K-5. The laboratory will incorporate inquiry based teaching and learning opportunities for the students.

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    • LIBR-1101 Information Literacy and Research
      Description

      This course is an introduction to academic research and the efficient and effective use of the library and information resources and technology, using an academic library as a laboratory setting for hands-on experience in the scholarly communication process.

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    • MATH-1001 Quantitative Skills and Reasoning
      Description

      This course is an alternative in Area A of the Core Curriculum and is not intended to supply sufficient algebraic background for students who intend to take Pre-calculus or the Calculus sequence for science majors. This course places quantitative skills and reasoning in the context of experiences that students will likely encounter. It emphasizes processing information in context from a variety of representations, understanding of both the information and the processing, and understanding which conclusions can be reasonably determined.

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    • MATH-1101 Introduction to Mathematical Modeling
      Description

      This course is an introduction to mathematical modeling using graphical, numerical, symbolic, and verbal techniques to describe and explore real-world data and phenomena. Emphasis is on the use of elementary functions to investigate and analyze applied problems and questions, supported by the use of appropriate technology, and on effective communications of quantitative concepts and results. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/

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    • MATH-1111 College Algebra
      Description

      This course is a functional approach to algebra that incorporates the use of appropriate technology. Emphasis will be placed on the study of functions, their graphs, inequalities, and linear, quadratic, piece-wise defined, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Appropriate applications will be included. Credit for this course is not allowed if the student already has credit for a higher-numbered mathematics course. Credit for this course is not allowed if the student already has credit for MATH 1113 or higher.

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    • MATH-1113 Precalculus
      Description

      This course is designed to prepare students for calculus, physics, and related technical subjects. Topics include an intensive study of algebraic and transcendental functions accompanied by analytic geometry. Credit for this course is not allowed if the student already has credit for MATH 1634. If course is taken through eCore, course is 3 credit hours.

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    • MATH-1401 Introduction to Statistics
      Description

      The course is a course in basic statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, distributions, hypothesis testing, inferences, correlation, and regression. Prerequisites: Math 1101 Mathematical Modeling, 1111 College Algebra, or 1113 Precalculus or approved equivalent. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/

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    • MATH-1413 Survey of Calculus
      Description

      A survey of the differential and integral calculus of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions is given. Detailed applications to problems and concepts from business, economics and life science are covered.

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    • MATH-1501 Calculus I
      Description

      Topics to include functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, antidifferentiation, the definite integral, and applications. Prerequisites: Math 1113 - Pre-calculus or its equivalent. For more information on this institution's eCore courses, please see http://www.westga.edu/~ecore/

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    • MATH-1634 Calculus I
      Description

      The first of a three-course sequence in calculus. Limits, applications of derivatives to problems in geometry and the sciences (physical and behavioral). Problems which lead to anti-derivatives.

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    • MATH-2008 Foundations of Numbers and Operations
      Description

      This course is an Area F introductory mathematics course for early childhood education majors. This course will emphasize the understanding and use of the major concepts of numbers and operations. As a general theme, strategies of problem solving will be used and discussed in the context of various topics.

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    • MATH-2009 Sophomore Seminar
      Description

      The impact of mathematics in the real world will be presented in the form of lectures, computer labs, and seminars offered by the department of mathematics faculty. The course includes problem solving sessions involving competition problems (e.g. Putnam, MCM, IMO,...) and the use of the technology and computer Algebra systems, such as Maple and Matlab. The course also explores applications of mathematics to the real world, its history and connection to other sciences through projects and reports. A final exam will assess their understanding of the subject matter discussed throughout the course.

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    • MATH-2063 Introductory Statistics
      Description

      (Non-credit for mathematics major or minor). A non-calculus based introduction to methods of descriptive statistics, probability, discrete and continuous distributions, and other fundamental concepts or statistics. variance will be covered. Appropriate technology, a graphing calculator or statistical software package, will be used.

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    • MATH-2644 Calculus II
      Description

      A continuation of MATH 1634. The definite integral and applications, calculus of transcendental functions, standard techniques of integration, sequences and series.

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    • MATH-2654 Calculus III
      Description

      A continuation of MATH 2644. Topics include functions of two, three, and more variables, multiple integrals, and topics in vector calculus.

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    • MATH-2853 Elementary Linear Algebra
      Description

      A concrete, applied approach to matrix theory and linear algebra. Topics include matrices and their connection to systems of linear equations, Gauss-Jordan elimination, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and diagonalization. The use of mathematical software is a component of the course.

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    • MATH-3003 Transition to Advanced Mathematics
      Description

      A transition course to advanced mathematics. Topics include logic, set theory, properties of integers and mathematical induction, relations, and functions.

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    • MATH-3243 Advanced Calculus
      Description

      A rigorous introduction to the fundamental concepts of single-variable calculus. Topics included the real numbers, limits, continuity, uniform continuity, differentiation, integration, and sequences and series.

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    • MATH-3303 Ordinary Differential Equations
      Description

      Modeling with and solutions of ordinary differential equations, including operators, Laplace transforms, and series; systems of ODE's, and numerical approximations.

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    • MATH-3353 Methods of Applied Mathematics
      Description

      Solutions of PDE's using orthogonal function systems. Studies of classical boundary-value problems, including the heat equation, wave equation, and potential. Integral transform and numerical methods of solutions.

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    • MATH-3703 Geometry for P-8 Teachers
      Description

      (Non-credit for mathematics major or minor.) Special emphasis for teachers of grades P-8. Logic; real numbers; basic and transformational geometry; measurement, including the metric system; problem solving; methods and materials for teaching mathematics at the P-8 level. A continuation of MATH 2703.

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    • MATH-3803 Algebra for P-8 Teachers I
      Description

      (Non-credit for mathematics major or minor.) Special emphasis for teachers of grades P-8. Broadens understanding of the fundamental concepts of algebra, with particular attention to specific methods and materials of instruction. Special emphasis for teachers of grades P-8.

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    • MATH-3805 Functions & Modeling
      Description

      This is a mathematics course designed to address the unique needs of future teachers of mathematics. It is required of UTEACH math majors and also counts toward their mathematics degree. In the course, students engage in explorations and lab activities designed to strengthen and expand their knowledge of the topics found in secondary mathematics. Course is restricted to UTEACH students.

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    • MATH-3825 Research Methods
      Description

      Specially designed to meet the needs of future teachers, students design and carry out four independent inquiries, which they write up and present in the manner that is common in the scientific community. Course is restricted to UTEACH students.

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    • MATH-4003 Dynamical Systems
      Description

      A computational introduction to dynamical systems. Topics include discrete and continuous systems, bifurcations, stability, and chaos: Julia and Mandelbrot sets, applications to biology and physics.

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    • MATH-4013 Numerical Analysis
      Description

      The practices and pitfalls of numerical computation. Topics include floating point representations; precision, accuracy, and error; numerical solution techniques for various types of problems; root finding, interpolation, differentiation, integration, systems of linear and ordinary differentiation.

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    • MATH-4043 Number Theory
      Description

      An in-depth study of selected topics in number theory.

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    • MATH-4103 Operations Research
      Description

      An introduction to linear and nonlinear programming. Topics include the formulation of linear programming models; the simplex method, duality and sensitivity; integer programming, the use of spreadsheets and software applications to solve constrained optimization problems.

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    • MATH-4153 Applied Mathematical Modeling
      Description

      An introduction to the creation and use of mathematical models. Mathematical techniques will be developed and applied to real systems in areas including chemistry, biology, physics and economics. Students will be expected to make written and oral presentations in a professional manner. This course will emphasize the creation and testing of models and discussions of errors and forecasting. Students will work on projects singly and as part of a group.

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    • MATH-4203 Mathematical Probability
      Description

      A calculus based statistics course with a strong emphasis on probability theory. Exercises are both theoretical and applied, including both discrete and continuous probability distributions such as the Binomial and Normal. The course provides the underlying theory and mathematically derived techniques of Statistics. Hypothesis testing for various parameters and regression are also discussed in this course.

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    • MATH-4213 Mathematical Statistics
      Description

      A continuation of MATH 4203, this course introduces certain discrete and continuous distributions such as the Poisson, Gamma, T and F. The course also provides an introduction to multivariate distributions. Estimation techniques such as the method of moments and maximum likelihood are discussed along with properties such as unbiasedness, efficiency, sufficiency and consistency of estimators.

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    • MATH-4233 College Geometry
      Description

      An introduction to Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries developed with the study of constructions, transformations, applications, and the rigorous proving of theorems.

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    • MATH-4253 Real Analysis
      Description

      An introduction to measure theory and integration. Topics include metric spaces, measure and integration, elementary functional analysis, and function spaces.

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    • MATH-4313 Advanced Ordinary Differential Equations
      Description

      Advanced topics in the theory of ordinary differential equations. Topics include existence theory, linear systems, phase plane analysis, asymptotic behavior of solutions, stability of linear systems, Lyapounov's second method and applications.

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    • MATH-4353 Complex Analysis
      Description

      A study of the theory of complex functions and their applications, including analytic and elementary functions; derivatives and integrals; The Cauchy Integral Theorem and contour integration; Laurent series; the theory of residues; conformal mapping; and applications.

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    • MATH-4363 Partial Differential Equations
      Description

      Studies of classical boundary-value problems, including the heat equation, wave equation, and potential equation. Solution methods including characteristics, separation of variables, integral transforms, orthogonal functions, Green's functions, Fourier series.

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    • MATH-4413 Abstract Algebra I
      Description

      The first of a two-course, in-depth, rigorous study in topics in the theory of groups, rings and fields.

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    • MATH-4423 Abstract Algebra II
      Description

      A continuation of MATH 4413. Topics include linear groups, group representations, rings, factorization, modules, fields, and Galois Theory.

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    • MATH-4473 Combinatorics
      Description

      An introduction to combinatorics. Topics include the pigeonhole principle, combinations, permutations, distributions, generating functions, recurrence relations, and inclusion-exclusion.

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    • MATH-4483 Graph Theory
      Description

      An introduction to the fundamental concepts of graph theory. Topics include isomorphisms, Euler graphs, Hamiltonian graphs, graph colorings, trees, networks, planarity.

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    • MATH-4513 Linear Algebra I
      Description

      The first course in a comprehensive, theoretically-oriented, two-course sequence in linear algebra. Topics include vector spaces, subspaces, linear transformations, determinants, and elementary canonical forms.

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    • MATH-4523 Linear Algebra II
      Description

      A continuation of MATH 4513. Topics include rational and Jordan forms, inner product spaces, operators on inner product spaces, and bilinear forms.

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    • MATH-4613 Introduction to Topology
      Description

      An elementary but rigorous study of the topology of the real line and plane and an introduction to general topological spaces and metric spaces. Emphasis placed on the properties of closure, compactness, and connectedness.

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    • MATH-4713 Probability and Statistics for P-8 Teachers
      Description

      Non-credit for mathematics major or minor. Special emphasis for teachers of grades P-8. Broadens understanding of the fundamental concepts of probability and statistics, with particular attention to specific methods and materials of instruction.

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    • MATH-4753 Trigonometry and Calculus for the P-8 Teacher
      Description

      Non-credit for mathematics major or minor. An introduction to the foundations of trigonometry, analytic geometry, and calculus. Designed especially for teachers of grades P-8. Helps promote a better understanding of the content, scope, and sequence of the P-12 mathematics curriculum.

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    • MATH-4773 Number Theory for P-8 Teachers
      Description

      Non-credit for mathematics major or minor. Elementary number theory with emphasis on relevance to teaching at the P-8 level.

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    • MATH-4803 Analysis of Variance
      Description

      This course involves a thorough examination of the analysis of variance statistical method including hypotheses tests, interval estimation, and multiple comparison techniques of both single-factor and two-factor models. Extensive use of a statistical computer package, Minitab, will be a necessary part of the course.

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    • MATH-4813 Regression Analysis
      Description

      This course involves a thorough examination of both simple linear regression models and multivariate models. The course requires extensive use of statistical software for confidence intervals, statistical tests, statistical plots, and model diagnostics.

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    • MATH-4823 Applied Experimental Design
      Description

      This course provides an introduction to design and analysis of planned experiments. Topics will include one and two-way designs; completely randomized designs, randomized block designs, Latin-square and factorial designs. Use of technology will be an integral part of this course.

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    • MATH-4833 Applied Nonparametric Statistics
      Description

      This course will involve the study of several nonparametric tests including the Runs test, Wilcoxon signed rank and rank sum test, Kruskal, Wallis and Friedman F test. These tests will include applications in the biological sciences, engineering, and business areas. A statistical software package will be used to facilitate these tests.

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    • MATH-4843 Introduction to Sampling
      Description

      This course will consider applied principles and approaches for conducting a sample survey, designing a survey, and analyzing a survey.

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    • MATH-4853 An Introduction to the History of Mathematics
      Description

      The development of mathematics from prehistoric times through late 19th century/early 20th century is explored. Emphasis is given to key people, problems, cultural influences for various historic periods that have shaped what we think of as contemporary mathematics. Prerequisite: Completion of core-level mathematics, ENGL 1102 or consent of instructor.

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    • MATH-4863 Algebra for P-8 Teachers II
      Description

      Non-credit for mathematics major or minor. A continuation of MATH 3803. Topics include inverse, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations and inequalities ;matrices and determinants; sequences and series; the Binomial Theorem; and mathematical induction.

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    • MATH-4885 Special Topics in Applied Statistics
      Description

      This course will be taught from a variety of statistical topics such as statistical quality control, applied time series, game theory, etc. Prerequisite: Dependent upon course title.

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    • MATH-4983 Senior Project
      Description

      A faculty-directed independent research project culminating in the writing of a paper and an oral presentation of the results of the project. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a mathematics major.

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    • MATH-4985 Special Topics in Mathematics
      Description

      Courses in selected areas upon demand. Titles will be specified at time of offering.

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    • MEDT-3401 Integrating Technology into the Curriculum
      Description

      Hands-on technology integration techniques are provided, scaffolding form the student's basic computer skills to foster skills in five interrelated areas of instructional proficiency: (1) Georgia's Performance Standards for Curriculum, (2) integration of modern and emerging technologies into instructional practice, (3) classroom management in classrooms, computer labs and 21st century learning environments, (4) new designs for teaching and learning, and (5) enhanced pedagogical practices. Satisfies the Georgia Special Technology Requirement. Minimum of 9 hours of upper level major courses.

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    • MGNT-3600 Management
      Description

      A study of the basic concepts and processes of management. The course includes the study of legal, social political environment with specific emphasis on the behavioral perspectives in organizations.

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    • MGNT-3602 Business Law
      Description

      A course designed to expand the student's understanding of the legal and ethical environment in which businesses operate, including a study of the law of sales, commercial paper, and secured transactions under the uniform Commercial Code, debtor/creditor law, bankruptcy, real and personal property, insurance, selected types of business organization, and professional liability.

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    • MGNT-3605 Organizational Behavior
      Description

      The focus of this course is on individual, group and organizational behavioral factors and the managerial perspective on processes, techniques, and practices to improve effectiveness, efficiency, and work satisfaction.

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    • MGNT-3615 Production and Operations Management
      Description

      This course is designed to emphasize the strategic importance of operations management to the overall performance of the organization. Students will study the basic principles required to organize and manage both service and manufacturing firms. Topics include issues such as work design, inventory control, supply chains, scheduling, quality control, lean operating systems, and project management.

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    • MGNT-3616 Human Resource Information Systems
      Description

      This course will teach students the architecture, applications, and benefits of Human Resource Information Systems. It will show them how an HRIS with artificial intelligence decision/support capabilities can improve the HR processes by using a shared database of information about jobs, people and the organization.

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    • MGNT-3618 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
      Description

      Study to isolate and examine for solution the significant problems encountered by men and women who establish and manage small businesses.

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    • MGNT-3625 Contemporary Issues in Management
      Description

      Title and description of specific courses to be specified at time of offering. Course may be repeated with permission, up to a maximum of 10 hours.

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    • MGNT-3627 Managing Cultural Differences
      Description

      A course designed to enable students to become more competitive in their chosen career fields by developing in them an understanding of the importance of increasing global economic interdependence and the challenges of relating to people from other countries or cultures. Same as SOCI 3273.

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    • MGNT-3630 Environmental Law
      Description

      An introduction to the legal and regulatory aspects of environmental law, its history and sources, its reliance on scientific principles as well as its relationship to business management.

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    • MGNT-3633 Research Methods for Managers
      Description

      This course is designed to introduce students to basic approaches for conducting research in a business environment. A special emphasis is placed on research methods and tactics that are applicable to enhancing management practice, organizational effectiveness, and organizational survival. Students will be introduced to various pathways to knowledge, research method design, data collection, data analysis, reporting of research results, the peer review process, and applied research.

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    • MGNT-3635 New Venture Management
      Description

      This course is designed to introduce students to issues encountered during a business start-up. Students will be required to write their own business plan.

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    • MGNT-4330 Enterprise Architecture
      Description

      An introduction to the theoretical and practical issues related to Enterprise Architecture (EA). EA is the organizing structure for business processes and IT infrastructure. Top performing organizations know how to design their business processes and IT infrastructure for success of their current operations, and the most successful companies know how to expand their EA to enable innovation and to seize a competitive advantage for the future. This course will introduce students to EA concepts and will equip students with design thinking tools and knowledge needed to extend an organization’s EA. Specific emphasis will be placed on using SAP enterprise systems design tools. Same as CISM 4330.

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    • MGNT-4355 Cyber Security
      Description

      Business and government are facing a rapidly expanding need for information security professionals. This course surveys important skills in information security program design, networking and application security, the development of information security safeguards and information security auditing, disaster recovery, policy development, identity management, and effective threat assessment. Same as CISM 4355. May only be taken by Management majors when it is cross-listed.

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    • MGNT-4610 Logistics
      Description

      Logistics represents the market-driven activities necessary to plan and control procurement, production and inventory, and distribution. The planning and control aspects of these activities and the interfaces among these activities are the subjects of this course. Logistics has four major parts: Production and inventory control, procurement, distribution, and the relationships among and integration of these areas.

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    • MGNT-4615 Manufacturing Processes
      Description

      Manufacturing processes define the methods that companies use in designing, producing, and delivering goods and services required by customers. This course contains four major topics: Industrial facilities management, process design and development, manufacturing, and their relationships.

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    • MGNT-4616 Project Management
      Description

      This course is a study of the fundamental processes for planning, budgeting, monitoring, controlling, and terminating projects within organizations. There will be an emphasis on utilizing project-related software within the context of completing course assignments.

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    • MGNT-4620 Human Resource Management
      Description

      A study of the planning, acquisition, and administration of Human Resources in organizations. Includes case studies and applications of problem solving techniques.

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    • MGNT-4621 Applications in Human Resource Management
      Description

      This course allows you to apply the concepts learned in the basic human resources HR course. Through case analysis, role playing, and assigned projects, you will gain an appreciation of and experience with the types of situations that HR professional face on a routine basis. Additionally, you will become adept at using research tools used by HR professionals to address situations with which they may not be familiar. Further, you will receive exposure to the journals, websites, and professional organizations that HR practitioners use to stay abreast of changes in the field.

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    • MGNT-4625 International Management
      Description

      International operations of American firms, impact of international competition in the domestic market; organization for international production, marketing, financing, international markets, resources, institutions, managerial problems arising out of governmental relations.

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    • MGNT-4626 Women and Work
      Description

      A course designed to familiarize students with the history of women and work, present role of women in the workplace, and current issues affecting working women; and to develop in students skills and strategies for dealing with issues related to women and work. Same as SOCI 4103.

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    • MGNT-4630 Dispute Resolution in Contemporary Organizations
      Description

      Analysis of the causes and consequences of conflicts in and among organizations with strategies and processes for their effective resolution. The course will cover the sources of organizational conflicts, strategies for conflict avoidance, approaches for conflict resolution, and traditional and alternative dispute resolution methods.

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    • MGNT-4640 Employment Law
      Description

      Development, current status, and implications of legislation court rulings, and government agencies' decisions in equal employment opportunity, employee protection, employment contracts, individual employment rights, income and retirement security, and international employment, as well as emerging issues in human resource management, as related to the effective management of human resources.

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    • MGNT-4660 Strategic Management
      Description

      An integrative approach to the study of the total enterprise from the executive management's point of view--the environment in which it operates, the direction management intends to head, management's strategic plan and the task of implementing and executing the chosen strategy. Must be taken no earlier than one semester before graduation and provided completion of Core Area F business courses and MGNT 3600, MKTG 3803, FINC 3511 and ECON 3402. Must have senior standing.

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    • MGNT-4680 Human Resources Practicum
      Description

      This course allows management students nearing completion of their undergraduate program to work with local practitioners to complete a management consulting project. Students will expand their knowledge of concepts and practices in the field by conducting research related to a particular HR problem. Students will make written and oral reports on their findings and recommendations.

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    • MGNT-4681 Compensation Management
      Description

      This course will teach economic concepts and legislative requirements relating to compensation concepts and practices. Students will learn the concepts and procedures for developing and administering a compensation program.

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    • MGNT-4682 Special Problems in Management
      Description

      In-depth supervised, individual study of one or more current problems of a business organization.

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    • MGNT-4686 Business Internship (Management)
      Description

      Practical managerial internship experience with a commercial firm or organization for selected junior or senior students. (Students will be given a written agreement specifying course credit hours and grading system to be used.)

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    • MKTG-3801 Art of Selling and Personal Dynamics
      Description

      A basic survey of how ethical selling integrates into modern business. This course emphasizes selling as a profession, development and implementation of sales techniques, managing time, and selling your ideas. Experimental exercises and video feedback techniques are used through out the course.

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    • MKTG-3803 Principles of Marketing
      Description

      Study of marketing policies and practices in the flow of goods and services to the customer/consumer.

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    • MKTG-3804 Business Challenges
      Description

      Students working with clients from the business community develop a research brief and questionnaire. Innovative data collection methodologies are employed. Statistical analysis is then performed on the data and reports are presented orally and in writing.

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    • MKTG-3805 Real Estate Principles
      Description

      Emphasis on principles and fundamental concepts. Course provides basic information for the student preparing for a career in real estate, also helps the consumer learn how to select, finance, and maintain real property either for a home or for investment purposes.

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    • MKTG-3808 Business Research
      Description

      This course is designed to meet the rapidly growing need for a systematic approach to the business research process, and its implementation in terms of strategic decision making. Both primary and secondary sources of information are considered along with research design, measurement, sampling, data collection, processing, analyses, and interpretation.

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    • MKTG-3809 Advertising Practices
      Description

      The integrative role of advertising in persuasive communication in business and related fields. Includes procedures for organizing, developing, and implementing effective media decisions.

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    • MKTG-3810 Social Media and Online Marketing
      Description

      This course will examine the impact of social media and the internet on marketing strategy. Topics will include an exploration of social media technologies and applications such as Facebook, blogs, Twitter, wikis, YouTube, etc. Students will learn how to develop an online presence, leverage these technologies and use the power and impact of Web 2.0 in implementing successful marketing strategies.

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    • MKTG-3839 Retail Management
      Description

      Emphasis on planning, staffing, organizing and controlling for profitable retail merchandising and store operation.

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    • MKTG-4805 Sales Management
      Description

      Sales management is a course designed to teach prospective managers the skills of salesperson management. Topics include motivating, controlling and evaluating salespersons for results. Trends and recent developments in sales management will also be covered.

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    • MKTG-4808 Marketing Information Systems and Research
      Description

      The emphasis in this course is on conceptualizing and conducting a marketing research project as well as using research as an aid for marketing decision making. Both primary and secondary sources of information are considered, along with defining the research problem, research design, measurement and scaling, questionnaire construction, sampling, data analysis, and interpretation. The SPSS statistical software package is used for data management and analysis.

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    • MKTG-4818 Business Web Design
      Description

      The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to Web design. Students will learn concepts related to planning and developing web sites by studying Web usability, multimedia, and Web 2.0 applications for business and education web sites. (Same as ABED 4118).

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    • MKTG-4823 Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      Description

      Logistics and Supply Chain Management represents the market-driven activities necessary to plan and control procurement, production and inventory, and distribution. The planning and control aspects of these activities and the interfaces among these activities are the subjects of this course. Logistics has four major parts: Production and inventory control, procurement, distribution, and the relationships among and integration of these areas.

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    • MKTG-4831 Business-to-Business Marketing
      Description

      A focused study of marketing to other businesses, institutions, and the government. The buying behavior of organizations as customers is explored in addition to how the marketing strategy for such customers differs from that used for consumer products and services. Other topics include customer relationship management (CRM), supply chain management, and distribution strategy.

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    • MKTG-4861 Services Marketing
      Description

      A study of the unique problems associated with the marketing of services including alternative strategies with which to improve service marketing effectiveness.

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    • MKTG-4864 Consumer Behavior
      Description

      A comprehensive analysis of the factors in human behavior which influence the choice and the use of products and service.

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    • MKTG-4866 International Marketing
      Description

      This course deals with the problems and perspectives of marketing across national boundaries. It focuses on cultural, legal, social, economic, and behavioral differences that affect marketing strategies, and the marketing mix in global markets. The importance of international trade agreements and organizations and the global business environment is emphasized.

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    • MKTG-4868 Marketing Metrics
      Description

      The Marketing Metrics Course will provide students with a methodology to measure and track marketing performance. The course has three primary objectives: Learn and understand key marketing metrics; Employ Microsoft Excel to analyze a firm's marketing performance through marketing metrics; Use the resulting analyses to make optimal marketing decisions.

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    • MKTG-4870 Marketing Management
      Description

      The focus of this integrative senior level course is on the analysis, planning, implementation, and control of marketing programs in a competitive environment. Decision making will be emphasized and the case method and/or interactive computer simulations will form the basic learning emphasis in the course.

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    • MKTG-4881 Independent Study in Marketing
      Description

      In-depth supervised individual study of one or more current marketing problems in a business organization.

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    • MKTG-4885 Special Topics in Marketing
      Description

      The study of selected contemporary marketing topics of interest to faculty and students.

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    • MKTG-4886 Marketing Internship
      Description

      Practical marketing related experience with a previously approved business firm for selected junior or senior students.

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    • MUSC-1000 Comprehensive Music Laboratory
      Description

      Attending formal musical performances and participating in studio and ensemble laboratories at least one hour per week as specified by the Department of Music. Music majors and minors are required to enroll for a grade of S or U.

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    • MUSC-1100 Music Appreciation
      Description

      A listener's guide to Western classical music styles through recordings, through live performances, and through other media. Meets Core area C Humanities and Fine Arts requirement.

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    • MUSC-1110 Survey of World Music
      Description

      A listener's guide to non-Western musical styles through recordings, through live performances, and through other media. The course surveys selected music from various cultures throughout the world. Meets Core area B Institutional Options requirement.

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    • MUSC-1120 Survey of Jazz, Rock, and Popular Music
      Description

      A listener's guide to Jazz, Rock, and Popular musical styles through recordings, through live performances, and through other media. Meets Core area C Humanities and Fine Arts requirement.

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    • MUSC-1201 Class Piano I
      Description

      Beginning group piano study for non-music majors. Fundamentals and development of technical and functional skills, including keyboard theory and technique, music reading, sight reading harmonization, transposition, and improvisation.

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    • MUSC-1202 Class Piano II
      Description

      Continuation of MUSC 1201. Beginning group piano study for non-music majors. Fundamentals and development of technical and functional skills, including keyboard theory and technique, music reading, sight reading, harmonization, transposition, and improvisation with more emphasis on keyboard theory, including major scales, and four-part harmony, sight reading, transposition, improvisation, harmonization, and repertoire. Introduction to chord progressions using secondary chords in major and minor keys, accompaniment styles, and improvisation. May be exempted by departmental exam.

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    • MUSC-1210 Group Classical Guitar
      Description

      Group instruction in classical guitar including fundamentals of hand positions, tone production, practice techniques, music reading, and literature. May be repeated for credit. Course does not meet Principal or Secondary Applied course requirements for music major degree programs.

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    • MUSC-1250 The Elements of Music
      Description

      A pre-theory course focusing on the study of the common elements of music(i.e: melody, harmony, rhythm, timbre, texture, form, and expressive qualities) and their interaction, and the ability to employ this understanding in aural, verbal, and visual analyses. Includes an introduction to the keyboard and use of the singing voice. Uses the tools of music technology. Course intended for non-music majors or for those students who are not prepared to enroll in MUSC 1301 and/or MUSC 1401.

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    • MUSC-1301 Music Theory I
      Description

      An initial study of music fundamentals, theory, literature, score reading, and STB part writing. MUSC 1401 must be taken concurrently. Students complete assignments by using traditional methods and by using the tools of music technology.

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    • MUSC-1302 Music Theory II
      Description

      Continuation of MUSC 1301 to seventh chords and secondary dominant chords, chromatic harmony (augmented and Neapolitan sixth chords) through ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth chords. Students complete assignments by using traditional methods and by using the tools of music technology. MUSC 1402 must be taken concurrently.

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    • MUSC-1401 Aural Skills I
      Description

      Laboratory for development of music literacy, sight-singing diatonic melodies, executing basic rhythmic patterns, and training the ear to hear major and minor tonalities. Includes orientation to technology laboratory. MUSC 1301 must be taken concurrently.

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    • MUSC-1402 Aural Skills II
      Description

      Continuation of MUSC 1401, including sight-singing major and minor melodies development of rhythm skills and training the ear to hear functional harmonic progressions. Introduction to sight-singing chromatic melodies, further development of rhythm skills, and training the ear to hear chromatic harmonic progressions. Students complete assignments by using traditional methods and by using the tools of music technology. MUSC 1302 must be taken concurrently.

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    • MUSC-1501 Keyboard Skills I
      Description

      Beginning keyboard study for music majors. Fundamentals and development of technical and functional skills, including keyboard theory and technique, music reading, sight reading, harmonization, transposition, and improvisation. May be exempted by departmental examination. Should be taken concurrently with MUSC 1301 and 1401.

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    • MUSC-1502 Keyboard Skills II
      Description

      Continuation of MUSC 1501. Fundamentals and development of technical and functional skills, including keyboard theory and technique, music reading, sight reading, harmonization, transposition, and improvisation with more emphasis on keyboard theory, including major scales and four-part harmony, sight reading, transposition, improvisation, harmonization, and repertoire. Introduction to chord progressions using secondary chords in major and minor keys, accompaniment styles, and improvisation. May be exempted by departmental exam. Should be taken concurrently with MUSC 1302 and 1402.

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    • MUSC-2301 Music Theory III
      Description

      Continuation of MUSC 1302. Review of tonal tertian harmony: introduction to musical forms and analytic techniques of Baroque and Classical music. Students complete assignments by using traditional methods and by using the tools of music technology. MUSC 2401 must be taken concurrently.

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    • MUSC-2302 Music Theory IV
      Description

      Continuation of MUSC 2301. Forms and analytic techniques of Romantic and Impressionist music. Introduction to styles, forms, and analytic techniques of twentieth-century music, including serial, jazz, and electronic. Students complete assignments by using traditional methods and by using the tools of music technology. MUSC 2402 must be taken concurrently.

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    • MUSC-2401 Aural Skills III
      Description

      Continuation of MUSC 1402, including sight-singing advanced chromatic melodies, further development of rhythm skills and aural analysis skills. Students complete assignments by using traditional methods and by using the tools of music technology. MUSC 2301 must be taken concurrently.

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    • MUSC-2402 Aural Skills IV
      Description

      Continuation of MUSC 2401, including sight-singing advanced modulatory melodies, sight-singing atonal melodies, further development of rhythm skills. Students complete assignments by using traditional methods and by using the tools of music technology. MUSC 2302 must be taken concurrently.

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    • MUSC-2501 Keyboard Skills III
      Description

      Continuation of MUSC 1502 with emphasis on more difficult repertoire, reading four-part harmony, chord progressions using secondary chords in major and minor keys, various types of seventh chords, diatonic triads in major and minor keys, accompaniment styles, improvisation, and repertoire. May be exempted by departmental exam.

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    • MUSC-2502 Keyboard Skills IV
      Description

      Continuation of MUSC 2501 with emphasis on modal, chromatic, and whole-tone scales, sight reading accompaniments of vocal and instrumental solos, transposition, improvisation, and repertoire including patriotic songs. Passing this course satisfies the departmental keyboard proficiency requirements. May be exempted by departmental exam.

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    • MUSC-2600A Principal Applied: Piano
      Description

      Private lessons for music majors at the lower-division level on the principal instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled.

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    • MUSC-2600B Principal Applied: Organ
      Description

      Private lessons for music majors at the lower-division level on the principal instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled.

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    • MUSC-2600C Principal Applied: Voice
      Description

      Private lessons for music majors at the lower-division level on the principal instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled.

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    • MUSC-2600D Principal Applied: Strings
      Description

      Private lessons for music majors at the lower-division level on the principal instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled.

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    • MUSC-2600E Principal Applied: Guitar
      Description

      Private lessons for music majors at the lower-division level on the principal instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled.

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    • MUSC-2600F Principal Applied: Flute
      Description

      Private lessons for music majors at the lower-division level on the principal instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled.

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    • MUSC-2600G Principal Applied: Oboe
      Description

      Private lessons for music majors at the lower-division level on the principal instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled.

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    • MUSC-2600I Principal Applied: Clarinet
      Description

      Private lessons for music majors at the lower-division level on the principal instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled.

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    • MUSC-2600J Principal Applied: Bassoon
      Description

      Private lessons for music majors at the lower-division level on the principal instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled.

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    • MUSC-2600K Principal Applied: Saxophone
      Description

      Private lessons for music majors at the lower-division level on the principal instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled.

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    • MUSC-2600L Principal Applied: Horn
      Description

      Private lessons for music majors at the lower-division level on the principal instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled.

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    • MUSC-2600M Principal Applied: Trumpet
      Description

      Private lessons for music majors at the lower-division level on the principal instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled.

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    • MUSC-2600N Principal Applied: Trombone
      Description

      Private lessons for music majors at the lower-division level on the principal instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled.

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    • MUSC-2600O Principal Applied: Euphonium
      Description

      Private lessons for music majors at the lower-division level on the principal instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled.

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    • MUSC-2600P Principal Applied: Tuba
      Description

      Private lessons for music majors at the lower-division level on the principal instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled.

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    • MUSC-2600Q Principal Applied: Percussion
      Description

      Private lessons for music majors at the lower-division level on the principal instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled.

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    • MUSC-2610A Non-Music-Major Applied: Piano
      Description

      Private lessons for non-music majors on an instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled. Requires departmental permission to enroll.

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    • MUSC-2610B Non-Music-Major Applied: Organ
      Description

      Private lessons for non-music majors on an instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled. Requires departmental permission to enroll.

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    • MUSC-2610C Non-Music-Major Applier: Voice
      Description

      Private lessons for non-music majors on an instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled. Requires departmental permission to enroll.

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    • MUSC-2610D Non-Music-Major Applied: Strings
      Description

      Private lessons for non-music majors on an instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled. Requires departmental permission to enroll.

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    • MUSC-2610E Non-Music-Major Applied: Guitar
      Description

      Private lessons for non-music majors on an instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled. Requires departmental permission to enroll.

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    • MUSC-2610F Non-Music-Major Applied: Flute
      Description

      Private lessons for non-music majors on an instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled. Requires departmental permission to enroll.

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    • MUSC-2610G Non-Music-Major Applied: Oboe
      Description

      Private lessons for non-music majors on an instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled. Requires departmental permission to enroll.

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    • MUSC-2610I Non-Music-Major Applied: Clarinet
      Description

      Private lessons for non-music majors on an instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled. Requires departmental permission to enroll.

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    • MUSC-2610J Non-Music-Major Applied: Bassoon
      Description

      Private lessons for non-music majors on an instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled. Requires departmental permission to enroll.

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    • MUSC-2610K Non-Music-Major Applied: Saxophone
      Description

      Private lessons for non-music majors on an instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is form the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled. Requires departmental permission to enroll.

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    • MUSC-2610L Non-Music-Major Applied: Horn
      Description

      Private lessons for non-music majors on an instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled. Requires departmental permission to enroll.

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    • MUSC-2610M Non-Music-Major Applied: Trumpet
      Description

      Private lessons for non-music majors on an instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled. Requires departmental permission to enroll.

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    • MUSC-2610N Non-Music-Major Applied: Trombone
      Description

      Private lessons for non-music majors on an instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled. Requires departmental permission to enroll.

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    • MUSC-2610O Non-Music-Major Applied: Euphonium
      Description

      Private lessons for non-music majors on an instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled. Requires departmental permission to enroll.

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    • MUSC-2610P Non-Music-Major Applied: Tuba
      Description

      Private lessons for non-music majors on an instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled. Requires departmental permission to enroll.

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    • MUSC-2610Q Non-Music-Major Applied: Percussion
      Description

      Private lessons for non-music majors on an instrument or voice. Lessons include studies in technical, stylistic, and aesthetic elements of artistic performance. Repertory studied is from the standard literature. All courses are repeatable for one or two hours of credit--one 25-minute lesson per week per credit hour. An applied music fee is charged per credit hour enrolled. Requires departmental permission to enroll.

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    • MUSC-2700 Wind Ensemble
      Description

      The study and performance of wind band literature from original, transcribed, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. Includes on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open by audition to music-major and non-music major students.

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    • MUSC-2710 Symphony Band
      Description

      The study and performance of wind band literature from original, transcribed, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. Includes on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open to music-major and non-music major students.

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    • MUSC-2720 Marching Band
      Description

      The study and performance of musical and visual programs for marching band. Includes the presentation of performances for home football games and for selected out-of-town games and exhibitions. Pre-season band camp required. Open to music-major and non-music-major students.

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    • MUSC-2730 Jazz Ensemble
      Description

      The study and performance of literature composed for jazz ensembles from original, transcribed, contemporary and diverse cultural sources. Includes on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open by audition to music-major and non-music major students.

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    • MUSC-2740 Chamber Winds
      Description

      The study and performance of literature composed for chamber wind and wind/percussion ensembles from original, transcribed, contemporary and diverse cultural sources. Includes on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open by audition to music-major and non-music major students.

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    • MUSC-2750 Concert Choir
      Description

      The study and performance of choral literature from traditional, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. Includes on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open to music-major and non-music major students.

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    • MUSC-2760 Chamber Singers
      Description

      The study and performance of literature composed for vocal chamber ensembles from traditional, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. Includes on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open by audition to music-major and non-music major students.

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    • MUSC-2770 Opera Workshop
      Description

      The study and performance of operatic literature from traditional, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. Includes on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open by audition to music-major and non-music major students.

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    • MUSC-2800A Small Ensemble: Keyboard Ensemble
      Description

      The study and performance of literature composed for small ensembles from traditional, original, transcribed, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. May include on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open by permission to music-major and non-music-major students.

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    • MUSC-2800B Small Ensemble: Collegium Musicum
      Description

      The study and performance of literature composed for small ensembles from traditional, original, transcribed, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. May include on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open by permission to music-major and non-music-major students.

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    • MUSC-2800C Small Ensemble: Guitar Ensemble
      Description

      The study and performance of literature composed for small ensembles from traditional, original, transcribed, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. May include on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open by permission to music-major and non-music-major students.

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    • MUSC-2800D Small Ensemble: Flute Choir
      Description

      The study and performance of literature composed for small ensembles from traditional, original, transcribed, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. May include on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open by permission to music-major and non-music-major students.

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    • MUSC-2800E Small Ensemble: Clarinet Choir
      Description

      The study and performance of literature composed for small ensembles from traditional, original, transcribed, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. May include on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open by permission to music-major and non-music-major students.

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    • MUSC-2800F Small Ensemble: Saxophone Choir
      Description

      The study and performance of literature composed for small ensembles from traditional, original, transcribed, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. May include on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open by permission to music-major and non-music-major students.

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    • MUSC-2800G Small Ensemble: Woodwind Ensemble
      Description

      The study and performance of literature composed for small ensembles from traditional, original, transcribed, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. May include on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open by permission to music-major and non-music-major students.

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    • MUSC-2800I Small Ensemble: Horn Choir
      Description

      The study and performance of literature composed for small ensembles from traditional, original, transcribed, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. May include on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open by permission to music-major and non-music-major students.

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    • MUSC-2800J Small Ensemble: Trumpet Choir
      Description

      The study and performance of literature composed for small ensembles from traditional, original, transcribed, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. May include on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open by permission to music-major and non-music-major students.

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    • MUSC-2800K Small Ensemble: Trombone Choir
      Description

      The study and performance of literature composed for small ensembles from traditional, original, transcribed, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. May include on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open by permission to music-major and non-music-major students.

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    • MUSC-2800L Small Ensemble: Tuba / Euphonium Ensemble
      Description

      The study and performance of literature composed for small ensembles from traditional, original, transcribed, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. May include on-campus and sometimes off-campus performances. Open by permission to music-major and non-music-major students.

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    • MUSC-2800M Small Ensemble: Brass Ensemble
      Description

      The study and performance of literature composed for small ensembles from traditional, original, transcribed, contemporary, and diverse cultural sources. May include on-