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INNOVATION IN SCIENCE

Be a pioneer. Explore new ideas, develop new techniques, and ride the cutting edge of scientific enquiry. When you Go West, there’s no telling what you’ll discover.

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At UWG, students in our M.S. program are part of a progressive and supportive community. Thesis-track students work closely with faculty advisors to pursue advanced research, set milestones, and achieve their goals.

Our state-of-the-art building features well-appointed research labs, technology-enhanced classrooms, and graduate student offices.

Contemporary Curriculum

Our program allows you to curate a custom plan of study based on relevant classes from many biological subdisciplines.

Face-to-Face Learning

Course work is taught in person by our highly-trained biology faculty with decades of real-world experience.

Experiential Learning

Students participate in a capstone group project and paid internships that prepare you for, and often lead to, full-time positions after graduation.

MS Biology Information

It’s all about flexibility: the M.S. in Biology program offers two tracks that allow students to pursue different career goals. Our thesis track prepares students to work in research and academic careers with government agencies, universities, environmental consultants, and laboratories. Thesis track applicants should contact potential faculty mentors  prior to applying to the program. Our non-thesis track is geared toward students who want to expand their biological knowledge primarily through coursework in preparation for teaching, industry, or professional degree programs, including medical and veterinary schools. To apply to our program or view admission requirements and deadlines, visitUWG Graduate Admissions. Program specific questions should be directed to our graduate program coordinator, Dr. Melissa Johnson.

  • BIOL 5000/6000 seven, 3-credit graduate courses in Biology
  • BIOL 6984 Graduate Seminar (four, 1 credit per semester)
  • BIOL 6983 Graduate Research, 9 credits minimum
  • BIOL 6999 Thesis, 2 credits
  • Total 36 credit hours

A combination of 5000-level and 6000-level courses may be used to complete graduate degree requirements, but at least 18 credit hours of the degree program should be at the 6000 level. A topic for thesis research should be identified before the end of the second semester of the degree program. The degree candidate should submit a brief thesis proposal to the advisory committee at this time and schedule a thesis defense before the end of the last semester of the degree program. The advising committee may approve up to two course substitutions from departments other than biology if such substitutions are appropriate to the research interests or career goals of the student.

Thesis Track Degree Information

  • BIOL 5000/6000 ten, 3-credit graduate courses in Biology
  • BIOL 6984 Graduate Seminar (four, 1 credit per semester)
  • BIOL 6995 Comprehensive Exam (2 credits)
  • Total 36 credit hours

A combination of 5000-level and 6000-level courses may be used to complete graduate degree requirements, but at least 18 credit hours of the degree program should be at the 6000 level. The comprehensive examination will be administered by the advisory committee before the end of the last semester of the degree program.

Non-thesis Track Degree Information

Land Your Dream JobLand Your Dream Job

Student creating a woodblock print at UWG

Land Your Dream Job

There’s no telling where you’ll go! Many alumni from our program have pursued advanced degrees or worked in the public and private sectors. Employers of alumni include: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Georgia Department of Transportation, and the University System of Georgia. In addition, others have gone on to work with various environmental contractors and in experimental clinical trials.

Students use photography to examine animal coexistenceStudents use photography to examine animal coexistence

Thalia Young, Biology Student

Students use photography to examine animal coexistence

Anyone with a social media account sees a dozen animal pictures each day. But that doesn’t come close to the nearly 10,000 critter photos that University of West Georgia biology majors Joanne Wasdin and Thalia Young examined during spring semester.

Continue ReadingStudents use photography to examine animal coexistence