No quizzes or pesky term papers. No parking problems or tuition fees. Just the best university professors and the most captivating lectures. Browse our upcoming lectures.

Come be part of a dynamic learning environment featuring the best of university faculty delivering talks on important, intriguing, and yes, curious topics of interested to everyone. Free and open to the public.

Register on Eventbrite to reserve seats and win door prizes.


The Harlem Renaissance and "The New Negro"

Dr. Stacy Boyd, Associate Dean of University College and Professor of English
Newnan Carnegie Library, View Directions
Tuesday, January 18, 6:00 reception, 6:30 talk
*no alcohol served*
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Join us for a thought-provoking conversation about the historical, cultural, and political landscapes surrounding what one scholar described as "Black America's spiritual coming of age.”

A Tale of Three Stadiums

Dr. Andy Walter, Professor of Geography
UWG Newnan, View Directions
Tuesday, February 1, 6:00 reception, 6:30 talk
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Join us for a discussion about Atlanta's new stadiums and what they reveal about the economic, political, and urban geographies underlying the recent and dramatic growth of the sports industry.

Revolution, Romanticism, and the Birth of the Guitar

Dr. Kyle Grimes, Professor of English, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Carrollton Center for the Arts, View Directions
Tuesday, February 15, 6:00 reception, 6:30 talk
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Early nineteenth-century Britain was a site of political revolutions, Romantic literature, and—surprisingly—the emergence of the guitar as a (semi-)respectable instrument. Join us for a musico-literary conversation exploring the relations between these political, cultural, and aesthetic movements.

Stranger than Fiction

Dr. Margaret Mitchell, Professor of English
Jordan's Ridge, Palmetto, View Directions
Tuesday, March 1, 6:00 reception, 6:30 talk
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A novelist demystifies the writing process, discussing how murder, madness, and a turn-of-the-century supermodel became the subject of her next book.

An Evening with Blackwell Prize-Winner, Amina Gautier

Dr. Amina Gautier, Professor of English, University of Miami
UWG Newnan, View Directions
Tuesday, March 15, 6:00 reception, 6:30 talk
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Join us for a reading by 2022 Blackwell Prize in Writing winner, Amina Gautier, author of three short story collections: The Loss of All Things, Now We Will Be Happy, and At-Risk. More than one hundred and thirty-five of her stories have been published in prominent literary journals. She is winner of numerous awards, including the prestigious Pen/Malamud Award for Excellence in the Short Story.

Art Meets Astronomy: Communicating Scientific Discoveries

Dr. Nick Sterling, Associate Professor of Physics, and Casey McGuire, Professor of Art
Newnan Carnegie Library, View Directions
Tuesday, March 29, 6:00 reception, 6:30 talk
*no alcohol served*
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For centuries, astronomy and art have been woven together through the production of images and artistic representations to communicate scientific results. Artist Casey McGuire and astronomer Nick Sterling will explore this relationship, from William Herschel’s photographs of the Moon and Percival Lowell’s false discovery of canals on Mars, to modern images from the world’s most powerful telescope.

Purple Letters and Loud Colors: Exploring Synesthesia

Dr. Christine Simmonds-Moore, Professor of Psychology
Jordan's Ridge, Palmetto, View Directions
Tuesday, April 12, 6:00 reception, 6:30 talk
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When we say that a particular color is "loud," whether we know it or not, we are employing a low-level form of synesthesia (mixing different senses or concepts). But what more might synesthesia teach us about creativity, consciousness, and unusual ways of knowing?

Opera Is Dead, Long Live Opera

Dr. Dawn Neely, Associate Professor of Voice and Director of UWG's Opera Workshop
Carrollton Center for the Arts, View Directions
Tuesday, April 26, 6:00 reception, 6:30 talk
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Critics have lamented for decades that opera is a dying art. But is opera really dying, or is it constantly being reborn? Join us to find out.