SUMMER 2016 ONLINE COURSE OFFERINGS

Summer 2016 Online Course Offerings

Partial Distance

50410 ENGL 2060-1D Intro to Creative Writing
Partial Distance Learning. TR 11:00 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Pafford 306
Instructor: Dr. Melanie Jordan

50420 ENGL 6385-01D Young Adult Literature
100% Online, Session 2. Registration requires permission of the Director of Graduate Studies. Partial Distance Course. Two face-to-face meetings will be required. Days/time TBA. Email instructor for more info, if needed.
Instructor: Dr. Angela Insenga

100% ONLINE

50404 ENGL 1101-E01 English Composition I
100% Online, Session 2
Instructor: Prof. Jade Loicano

50407 ENGL 1102-E01 English Composition II
100% Online, Session 2
Instructor: Prof. Amy Ellison

50408 ENGL 1102-E02 English Composition II
100% Online, Session 2
Instructor: Prof. Lorraine Snaith

50421 XIDS 2100-E01 Arts and Ideas: Digital Humanities
100% Online, Session 4
Instructor: Dr. Laura Miller

50411 ENGL 2130-E01 American Literature
100% Online, Session 1
Instructor: Dr. Stacy Boyd

50412 ENGL 3405-1DW Professional & Technical Writing
100% Online, Session 1 Discipline Specific Writing course. http://www.westga.edu/dsw.
Instructor: Prof. Crystal Shelnutt

50415 ENGL 4003-1DW Studies in American Literature I: Women on the Road
100% Online, Session 2. Discipline Specific Writing course. http://www.westga.edu/dsw.
Instructor: Dr. Debra MacComb

50416 ENGL 4005-1DW Studies in American Literature II: The American Novel in Black & White
100% Online, Session 2. Discipline Specific Writing course. http://www.westga.edu/dsw.
Instructor: Dr. Joshua Masters

50417 ENGL 4106-1DW Studies in Genre: Indecent Exposure: Humor in American Literature and Film
100% Online, Session 2. Discipline Specific Writing course. http://www.westga.edu/dsw.
Instructor: Dr. Kevin Casper

50418 ENGL 4188-1DW Individual Authors: Shakespeare
100% Online, Session 2. Discipline Specific Writing course. http://www.westga.edu/dsw.
Instructor: Dr. Meg Pearson


 

50421 XIDS-2100-E01: Arts and Ideas: Digital Humanities, Dr. Laura Miller
Session IV, 100% ONLINE.

  • Description

    The humanities and digital technology have been linked for over fifty years: one of the earliest digital humanities projects involved a collaboration between IBM and a theologian in the 1950s to produce a concordance of St Thomas Aquinas’s works. This project and others like it eventually led to the creation of the NEH (National Endowment for the Humanities). Today, the humanities are so thoroughly integrated with technology that their digital interaction can be taken for granted: every time you log on to the library search databases to find an article for a class, or take an online class, you are part of that tradition. This class will take your digital humanities skills up to the next level by teaching you how to work with digital tools essential to interdisciplinary research, including data visualization, text analysis, network analysis, and the development of digital projects. We will explore the use of social media to conduct and disseminate humanities research and even edit Wikipedia. Class readings will complement these activities. The skills you develop in this class will serve you well in undergraduate research and will be applicable across a range of careers.

  • Texts

    All readings will be distributed/available online.

  • Requirements

    Three written assignments and an exam on digital humanities history and concepts, as well as online participation.

 

 

 

50412 ENGL 3405-1DW: Professional & Technical Writing, Prof. Crystal Shelnutt
Session I, 100% ONLINE.
DSW course.
 

  • Description

    English 3405 will introduce students to basic ethical and rhetorical concepts that govern a multitude of professional and technical situations. Highlighting the importance of the writing process, this course will concentrate on the fundamentals within professional writing communities in order to train students in effective and persuasive communication. Students will gain intensive practice in composing powerful audience-driven documents such as letters, memos, and job application materials, as well as instructions and formal reports. Covering a wide range of business principles—from gathering data through primary and secondary research to the planning and organizing of workplace genre sets—this course provides practical advice regarding the professional standards that students will encounter in their future careers.

  • Texts

    All online materials provided by link or by instructor

  • Requirements

    A portfolio of business-related documents, a short formal report, & miscellaneous team assignments.

 

 

50415 ENGL 4003-1DW: American Literature I, Dr. Debra MacComb
Women on the Road
Session II, 100% ONLINE.
DSW course.

  • Description

    In The Tramp in America, Tim Cresswell asserts “few modern nations are so thoroughly infused with stories of wandering, heroic migrancy and pilgrimage as are the Americans” (20); indeed, mobility in works such as The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Great Gatsby, and On the Road is conflated with self-making, seeming to consolidate the idea that America offers not only more space than most nations, but also greater social freedom. American myths of the road, however, largely reflect the historically privileged position of the white male. This course asks—and hopes to develop answers to--the question “what is the cultural work of women’s road narratives?” Do women’s road narratives challenge the iconic hero’s quest for freedom as a flight from domesticity? Does the trope of the road provide a textual space that allows women authors to destabilize powerful regimes of gender? What price is exacted for the pleasures of transgressive female mobility?

  • Texts

    Possible works include Mary Rowlandson’s The Sovereignty and Goodness of God, Susanna Rowson’s Charlotte Temple, Caroline Kirkland’s A New Home, Who’ll Follow?, Louisa May Alcott, “Behind a Mask,” Sarah Orne Jewett’s The Country of the Pointed Firs, and Frances Watkins Hopkins’ Iola Leroy; or, Shadows Uplifted. All texts will be available online.

  • Requirements

    Twice weekly contributions to online discussion, short reading questions, two 5-6 page essays and a final exam.

 

 

50417 ENGL 4106-1DW: Studies in Genre: Humor, Dr. Kevin Casper
Indecent Exposure: Humor in American Literature and Film
Session II, 100% ONLINE.
DSW course.

 
  • Description

    Goethe said of the author that their joking and jesting ideas conceal problems within the text. Freud offered a correction, suggesting that jokes and jests might actually touch on the solution to problems. In either case, what is suggested is that humor’s rhetorical power resides less in what it means and more in what it does. This course will explore the complex rhetorical situations that make humor work and, sometimes more importantly, cause it to fail.

  • Texts

    Books: On Humour by Simon Critchley; The Best of Simple by Langston Hughes; Without Feathers by Woody Allen; Portnoy’s Complaint by Philip Roth. Films: A Piece of Work by Ricki Stern; Bridesmaids by Paul Feig; American Movie by Chris Smith; Blazing Saddles by Mel Brooks.

  • Requirements

    Active participation, mid-term and final exam, two reading responses, research paper.

 

 

50418 ENGL 4188-1DW: Individual Authors: Shakespeare, Dr. Meg Pearson
Shakespeare in Action
Session II, 100% ONLINE.
DSW course.

 
  • Description

    Think you hate Shakespeare? Feel a little scared of his crazy language? You’re wrong. This completely online course will introduce you to the plays of Shakespeare with an emphasis upon making these plays come to life. We’ll read the plays, we’ll watch the plays, we’ll hear the plays. Assignments will be creative and incorporate multimedia, including audio, film, television, podcasts, and more. Make Shakespeare your own this summer!

  • Texts

    FREE OPEN ACCESS TEXTBOOK

 

 

50420 ENGL 6385-01D: Seminar in Special Topics, Dr. Angela Insenga
“A Body Catch a Body”: YA, Bookending, and Adolescent Literacy
Session II, Partial Distance Course. Two face-to-face meetings will be required. Days/time TBA. Email instructor for more info, if needed.
Registration requires permission of the Director of Graduate Studies.

  • Description

    Teaching adolescents to become steadfast readers and better thinkers can make any teacher feel like Holden Caulfield, who imagines catching children as they run headlong off of a cliff into adulthood as his sole vocation. Dr. Joan Kaywell’s Adolescent Literature as a Complement to the Classics (2010) plays at being catcher, as it encourages instructors to deploy YA in conjunction with canonical texts to solve common classroom problems related to comprehension, application, and analysis. “Bridging to the classics,” as it is called, allows teachers in schools with restrictive curricula to connect familiar literature to any number of classic texts they must teach to reluctant readers. The advent of Common Core in 2012 instituted more standards that require critical engagement with--and writing about--texts, both fictional and informational. New curricula that include more age-appropriate literatures and expanded genres for study resulted from these new objectives. And, while Kaywell’s heuristic still works to engage students in our Common Core era, we must also develop new strategies to deepen thinking skills further. Bookending, the method foregrounded in this YA literature course, uses high-quality YA literature to frame spaces in which we can teach reading skills and better introduce modes of sustained, higher-order thought in the ELA classroom. Bookending, then, positions us on the cliff, allowing us to hand out critical parachutes before kids jump. Summer seminarians will experience five modules, each of which uses YA literature to frame a particular set of historical, social, and literary issues. We will read each primary text before practicing graduate-level analysis along with teacherly planning that are related to ideas that exist between the bookends our representative texts create. All efforts will enhance our collegiate-level literacy and help us to develop classroom strategies for different learners in the secondary environs. Required assignments will include 2 scholarly projects; 5 student-created and led online discussion topics; and 3 Colloquies. To succeed, students must also possess webcams, high speed internet access, and smart technology. Pinterest, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope accounts for academic use are also required. Finally, our class will meet face-to-face at mid-term and during the final examination period, so travel to campus is required on these days.

  • Required Book(ends) in their Respective Modules

    Deenie, by Judy Blume, and Cut, by Patricia McCormick; Mockingbird, by Kathryn Erskine, and Wonder, by R.J. Palacio; Athletic Shorts, by Chris Crutcher, and Written in the Stars, by Lois Duncan (selected short stories from each); Chains and Forge, both by Laurie Halse Anderson; Will Grayson, Will Grayson, by John Green and David Levithan, and All American Boys, by Brendan Kiely and Jason Reynolds; Various supplemental readings, provided in each Module.

  • Requirements

    2 Scholarly Projects; 5 Student-created and lead online discussion topics; 3 Colloquies.