• Undergraduate
  • Masters
  • Undergraduate
    • PHIL-2010 Introduction to Philosophy
      Description

      A historically framed introduction to philosophy,high-lighting major developments that have defined Western philosophical inquiry. Required for the major in Philosophy.

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    • PHIL-2020 Critical Thinking
      Description

      An investigation of logical fallacies and patterns of valid reasoning in primarily oral by also written discourse. Required for the major in Philosophy.

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    • PHIL-2030 Introduction to Ethics
      Description

      An introduction to the central concepts in ethics and an exploration of such contemporary ethical issues as abortion, genetic engineering, euthanasia, and capital punishment. Required for the major in Philosophy.

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    • PHIL-2130 Introduction to World Religions
      Description

      A comparative study of the beliefs and practices of several world religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course not only explores the history of these faiths and their early doctrinal and communal development, but their place in today's world.

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    • PHIL-3100 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy
      Description

      An exploration of such philosophers as the pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Epictetus, Augustine, Aquinas, and Occam. Required for Philosophy majors.

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    • PHIL-3110 Modern Philosophy
      Description

      An examination of such seventeenth- and eighteenth-century European philosophers as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant, with special attention to their metaphysical and epistemological theories. Required for Philosophy majors.

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    • PHIL-3120 American Philosophy
      Description

      This course considers metaphysical and epistemological questions by examining how they were treated by the thinkers who founded pragmatism, America¿s distinctive philosophical tradition. Philosophers covered may include classical American pragmatists, such as Peirce, James, Dewey, and Mead, as well as the contemporary American pragmatists, such as Rorty.

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    • PHIL-3140 Existentialism
      Description

      An examination of the historical development and representative themes of existentialism, beginning with Kierkegaard and Nietzsche and continuing through Sartre.

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    • PHIL-3160 Philosophy in Literature and Film
      Description

      An examination of significant philosophical and literary texts in terms of their thematic and/or conceptual interconnections.

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    • PHIL-3205 Theories of Religion
      Description

      Through an exploration of both scriptural and non-scriptural religious literature, this course considers may of the important themes of religion such as the nature and activity of God, the function of religious community, and the challenges of religious belief.

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    • PHIL-3220 Christian Thought
      Description

      This course examines the development of Christian thought from the New Testament to present day (e.g. feminist and liberation theologies). A sample of thinkers to be considered includes Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, Calvin, Schleiermacher, Barth, and Bultmann. Required for religion-track majors.

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    • PHIL-3301 History and Philosophy of Science
      Description

      A study of the historical development of science and a philosophical examination of scientific reasoning. Same as HIST 3301.

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    • PHIL-4100 Phenomenology
      Description

      An historical examination of such twentieth-century phenomenologists as Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Marcel, and Rocoeur.

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    • PHIL-4110 Philosophy of Law
      Description

      An exploration of the major philosophical concepts that underlie our idea of law as well as application of these ideas to issues in moral, legal, criminological, and social philosophy. Required for Pre-law Track majors.

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    • PHIL-4115 Political Philosophy
      Description

      An examination of significant themes in political philosophy, highlighting the way in which major concepts of political thought evolved from ancient Greece to contemporary western society. By critically examining the works of classical and modern political theorists (such as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Mill, Rawls and Nozick), we will explore such topics as the nature of the distributive justice. Required for Pre-law Track majors.

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    • PHIL-4120 Professional Ethics
      Description

      This course examines ethical questions that can arise in the professions and occupations, such as: Is my privacy violated when my job requires that I be tested for drugs? What should I do if I know that my employer is making an unsafe product? Should physicians ever lie to their patients? Do corporations have any responsibilities beyond making a profit for their shareholders? The course also examines more theoretical issues concerning professionalism and the professions, such as the nature of the relationship between professionals and clients and the connection between ordinary and professional morality. Required for Pre-law Track majors.

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    • PHIL-4130 Feminist Philosophy
      Description

      The aim of this course is to examine critically the central arguments of various feminist theories; to explore what it means to have a feminist approach to philosophical problems of epistemology, identity, morality, freedom, and human nature; to identify the presuppositions of theories; and to recognize the problematic principles of essentialism and exclusion from a more informed standpoint.

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    • PHIL-4150 Analytic Philosophy
      Description

      An introduction to analytic philosophy, the predominant tradition of philosophy in America and England during the 19th and 20th centuries. Areas of philosophy to be covered may include the philosophy of language, metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, and ethics. Philosophers covered may include Frege, Moore, Wittgenstein, Russell, Ayer, Ryle, Austin, Quine, and Putnam.

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    • PHIL-4160 Symbolic Logic
      Description

      An intensive introduction to the elements of deductive logic essential to scientific reasoning, computer programming, mathematics, and everyday problem-solving.

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    • PHIL-4220 Hermeneutics
      Description

      Hermeneutics is the philosophical discipline investigating the process of textual interpretation. How do we know how to interpret what we read? Is the meaning of a text what the author intended? How would we know what an author intended? Should we understand a text within a historical context? This course addresses the development of the hermeneutic tradition through the primary tests of such influential philosophers as Friedrich Schleiemacher, Martin Heidegger, Hans-Georg Gadamer, and Paul Ricoeur.

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    • PHIL-4230 Philosophy of Religion
      Description

      An examination of philosophical arguments about such religious questions as the existence of God, the problem of evil, the relationship between faith and reason, and the concept of human destiny. Required for Religion Track majors.

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    • PHIL-4240 Philosophy of Friendship and Love
      Description

      The aim of this course is to examine critically the historical theories of friendship and love through examining important primary philosophical texts; to explore what it means to love and how such notions of love and friendship changed throughout the centuries; to grasp the value and meaning of friendship and love as social and personal elements; and to recognize the historical nature of definitions and questions of friendship and love.

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    • PHIL-4300 Senior Seminar
      Description

      The aim of this course is to examine current theoretical and practical issues about the discipline of philosophy; to reflect upon and analyze implications of students' course of study; to read and discuss the debates surrounding the topic of the seminar; to develop, research, and execute a rigorous philosophical argument relating to the topic of the seminar; and to develop the skills of leading class discussion and presenting an academic paper. Required for Philosophy majors. Students must have obtained Senior level status.

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    • PHIL-4381 Independent Study
      Description

      Guided investigation of a topic not addressed by regularly scheduled courses. Students must propose a detailed plan of readings, articulating precise learning objectives, and secure the written consent of both a supervising instructor and of the department chair. Not more than two (2) Independent Study courses may count toward the major in Philosophy without the chair's permission.

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    • PHIL-4385 Special Topics
      Description

      An examination of a topic in philosophy that transcends the boundaries of the fixed curriculum. Requires permission of the department chair to repeat.

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  • Masters
    • PHIL-5100 Phenomenology
      Description

      A historical examination of such twentieth-century phenomenologists as Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Mealeau-Ponty, Marcel and Ricoeur.

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    • PHIL-5120 Professional Ethics
      Description

      This course examines ethical questions that can arise in the professions and occupations, such as: Is my privacy violated when my job requires that I can be tested for drugs? What should I do if I know that my employer is making an unsafe product? Should physicians ever lie to their patients? Do corporations have any responsibilities beyond making a profit for their shareholders? The course also examines more theoretical issues concerning professionalism and the professions, such as the nature of the relationship between professionals and clients and the connection between ordinary and professional morality.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • PHIL-5381 Independent Study
      Description

      Guided investigation of a topic not addressed by regularly scheduled courses. Students must propose a detailed plan of readings, articulating precise learning objectives, and must secure the written consent of both a supervising instructor and the department chair.

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    • PHIL-5385 Special Topics
      Description

      An examination of a topic in philosophy that transcends the boundaries of the fixed curriculum. Requires permission of the department chair to repeat.

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