erin.dawn.whitfield@emory.edu

2/28/2019, Lisa Gezon


Job title and duties:

Animal behavior management specialist, lead. Duties: hire some out of college. Monitor animal behavior (mental health), primate welfare. Yerkes – Emory

Animal care technician:

Tulane national primate research center. First job out of college. Internship at zoo atlanta helped.

Anthropology and career:

most co-workers are psychologists. She brings a different perspective. She got in because gained additional skills: worked night at first. Learned how to identify animals in pain and care for them medically, did some minimal vet tech duties. Anthropology: recognizes hierarchies, matriarchies. Identify primate culture. She recognizes it is not just about what’s in the brain. They do behavioral research: how to identify hierarchies and how to solve problems with bullying, for example. Move or train them.

How did UWG prepare you?

Skeletal work-Osteology. Ability to apply that to their bodies. Important for vet tech. Language and Culture: primate language section. Snipes: culture – always! Makes her think about things differently.

She also did a lemur field school. It helped with data collection.

Bachelors in anthropology good because….

it opened my mind to the whole world. I could do so many more thing with my life (other than just a teacher). Gave more opportunities. Different way of viewing the world and thinking about how we interact and how to interact with other people.


Blurb:

Coming out of UWG, Erin Whitfield was determined to have a career in primatology – study and work with primates. She got her first job right out college at the Tulane National Resarch Center as an animal care technician. She now works as a lead animal behavior management specialist at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center.

Leads:

Sophia Nyman also works at Yerkes. “research specialist”