The Department of Psychology at the University of West Georgia is unique in that our theoretical roots are in humanistictranspersonal, andcritical psychology. Our courses range from classically humanistic concerns - like the centrality of human subjective experience in psychology, holistic approaches to psychological understanding, human growth and development, and the enhancement of human potential - to contemporary attention to transpersonal and spiritual horizons. Themes such as the meaning of genuine community, sociality, understanding oneself and others, and the myriad ways through which we grow and develop are central to our academic learning environment.

For more information, please see the Academic Catalog. A program map, which provides a guide for students to plan their course of study, is available for download in the Courses tab below.

  • Overview
  • Cost
  • Courses
  • Faculty
  • Admissions
  • Dates
  • Objectives
  • Overview

    The Department of Psychology at the University of West Georgia is unique in that our theoretical roots are in humanistictranspersonal, andcritical psychology. Our courses range from classically humanistic concerns - like the centrality of human subjective experience in psychology, holistic approaches to psychological understanding, human growth and development, and the enhancement of human potential - to contemporary attention to transpersonal and spiritual horizons. Themes such as the meaning of genuine community, sociality, understanding oneself and others, and the myriad ways through which we grow and develop are central to our academic learning environment.

    Program Location

    Carrollton Campus

    Method of Delivery

    In-residence

    Accreditation

    The University of West Georgia is accredited by The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

    Credit and transfer

    Total semester hours required: 120

  • Cost

    This program may be earned entirely face-to-face. However, depending on the courses chosen, a student may choose to take some partially or fully online courses.

    Save money

    UWG is often ranked as one of the most affordable accredited universities of its kind, regardless of the method of delivery chosen.

    Details

    • Total tuition costs and fees may vary, depending on the instructional method of the courses in which the student chooses to enroll.
    • The more courses a student takes in a single term, the more they will typically save in fees and total cost.
    • Face-to-face or partially online courses are charged at the general tuition rate and all mandatory campus fees, based on the student's residency (non-residents are charged at a higher rate).
    • Fully or entirely online courses are charged at the general tuition rate plus an eTuition rate BUT with fewer fees and no extra charges to non-Residents.
    • Together this means that GA residents pay about the same if they take all face-to-face or partially online courses as they do if they take only fully online courses exclusively; while non-residents save money by taking fully online courses.
    • One word of caution: If a student takes a combination of face-to-face and online courses in a single term, he/she will pay both all mandatory campus fees and the higher eTuition rate.
    • For cost information, as well as payment deadlines, see the Bursar's Office website

    There are a variety of financial assistance options for students, including scholarships and work study programs. Visit the Office of Financial Aid for more information.

  • Courses

    Downloads

    General

    To Be Admitted Into The B.A. Program In Psychology, students must: have at least 45 completed hours of academic credit, earned a C or better in PSYC 1101, and have earned a grade of B or better in any three (3) Psychology (PSYC) courses (at any level).

    • PSYC-1030 - Personal Relationships

      Experiential exploration through personal interactions. Designed to encourage the development of sensitivity to feelings, attitudes, and beliefs of one's self and others.

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    • PSYC-1101 - Introduction to General Psychology

      A broad survey of the major topics in psychology including, but not limited to, research methodology, biological and social factors influencing behavior, development, learning, memory, personality and abnormal.

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    • PSYC-2003 - Statistics in Psychology

      This course provides an introduction to the application and interpretation of basic statistics used in the behavioral sciences: descriptive statistics, simple hypothesis testing and two-variable regression.

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    • PSYC-2010 - Psychology as a Human Science

      This gateway course is intended to introduce beginning psychology majors to the major philosophical and methodological alternatives to psychology a natural science. This exploration will include: third and fourth force psychologies, integrative psychology, postmodernism, psychoanalysis, phenomenology, eco-psychology, qualitative research methodologies, narrative psychology, critical psychology, literature, mythology. This course will serve as preparation for more advanced study in the UWG major.

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    • PSYC-2220 - Qualitative Research Methods

      This course provides an historical and philosophical overview of the foundations of qualitative research methodology as well as the major research strategies and design in qualitative research. This course is intended for undergraduate students planning to conduct qualitative research.

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    • PSYC-2230 - Quantitative Research Methods

      This course provides an historical and philosophical overview of the foundations of quantitative research methodology as well as the major research strategies and design in quantitative research.

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    • PSYC-3150 - Abnormal Psychology

      An examination of psychological disorders ranging from everyday suffering and interpersonal problems to severe disorders and their treatment.

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    • PSYC-3800 - Psychology of Mind and Body

      This course examines the effect of psychological experiences on bio-physiological processes. Topics discussed include: Psychoneuroimmunology, state dependent learning, therapies (e.g., biofeedback, meditation, hypnosis, guided imagery, etc.), disciplines (e.g., yoga, tai chi, etc.), and philosophical conceptions of mind/body relations.

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    • PSYC-3900 - Personality Theories

      This course examines the major theories of personality and motivation. The major concerns to be addressed are the nature and purpose of the personality-theorizing activity and its relationship to the theorizing person.

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    • PSYC-4000 - Humanistic Psychology

      This course is an in-depth exploration of the field of humanistic psychology, which is the central focus of the West Georgia Department of Psychology. The course is primarily intended for Psychology Majors, to provide them with the guiding ideas, theories, philosophies, methods, and topics which inform aspects of many of the other courses offered by the Department.

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    • PSYC-4010 - Theories of Psychology

      A comparative examination of several of the major theoretical perspectives alive in psychology today (psychodynamic, behavioral, humanistic/existential/transpersonal, cognitive, biological, social/critical). These perspectives will be taken up as both providing comprehensive models for living as well as establishing divergent foundations for research and practice. An important emphasis will be appreciating the coherence of each perspective while also being able to move between them.

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    • PSYC-4884 - Integrative Seminar

      An attempt to help the student put into perspective his or her understanding of psychology and to put this into meaningful context of his or her general education. Comprehensive assessment. Senior status required.

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  • Faculty
  • Admissions

    Guidelines for Admittance

    Each UWG online degree program has specific requirements that you must meet in order to enroll.

    Admission Process Checklist

    1. Review Admission Requirements for the different programs and guides for specific populations (non-traditional, transfer, transient, home school, joint enrollment students, etc).
    2. Review important deadlines:
      • Fall semester: June 1 (undergrads)
      • Spring semester: November 15 (undergrads)
      • Summer semester: May 15 (undergrads)
        See program specific calendars here
    3. Complete online application
      Undergraduate Admissions Guide

      Undergraduate Application

      Undergraduate International Application

    4. Submit $40 non-refundable application fee
    5. Submit official documents

      Request all official transcripts and test scores be sent directly to UWG from all colleges or universities attended. If a transcript is mailed to you, it cannot be treated as official if it has been opened. Save time by requesting transcripts be sent electronically.

      Undergraduate & Graduate Applicants should send all official transcripts to:
      Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Murphy Building
      University of West Georgia
      1601 Maple Street
      Carrollton, GA 30118-4160
    6. Submit a Certificate of Immunization, if required. If you will not ever be traveling to a UWG campus or site, you may apply for an Immunization Exemption. Contact the Immunization Clerk with your request.
    7. Check the status of your application

    Contact

    Dr. Jeffrey Reber
    Psychology Department
    678-839-0604
    jreber@westga.edu

  • Dates

    Specific dates for Admissions (Undergraduate only), Financial Aid, Fee Payments, Registration, Start/End of term, Final Exams, etc. are available in THE SCOOP.

  • Objectives

    Theoretical Dexterity—Graduates of the psychology program will have developed a deep understanding of the dominant themes, conflicts, and perspectives within the discipline, as well as the ability to employ, critically evaluate, and shift among various perspectives when required. Specifically, they will

    • Articulate and employ the major perspectives of psychology including biological/neuroscientific, behavioral, cognitive, psychoanalytic, critical, humanistic, and transpersonal psychology.
    • Compare, contrast and describe advantages and limitations of these perspectives.
    • Discuss overarching themes, persistent questions, or enduring conflicts in psychology such as the interaction of heredity and environment, or the interaction of mind and body.

    Application of Learning—Graduates of the psychology program will be able to effectively and judiciously apply psychological concepts and perspectives to the major domains of life outside the classroom. Specifically, they will

    • Identify and evaluate the source, context, and credibility of information.
    • Articulate how psychological principles can be used to explain social issues and inform public policy.
    • Critically evaluate popular media reports of psychological research.

    Historical-Cultural Context—Graduates of the psychology program will demonstrate a keen awareness of the ways that culture and history have shaped the discipline and affect its practitioners. Specifically, they will

    • Recognize how sociocultural contexts influence the application of psychological ideas.
    • Narrate the history of psychology, including the evolution of methods, the theoretical conflicts, and the sociocultural contexts of the field.
    • Understand how privilege, power, and oppression may affect prejudice, discrimination, and inequity.

    Personal Development—Graduates of the psychology program will gain knowledge about their identity, values, aspirations, emotions, strengths and weaknesses. Specifically, they will

    • Identify their personal and professional values.
    • Demonstrate insight into, and awareness of, their emotions, motives, and attitudes using psychological ideas and principles.

    Career Discernment and Preparation—Through close collaboration with faculty, graduates of the psychology program will have an understanding of the major career areas in psychology and an intimate knowledge of their own inclinations and vocations toward a particular area of work. Specifically, they will

    • Describe preferred career paths in conjunction with their advisor and on the basis of an accurate self-assessment of abilities, achievement, motivation, and work habits.
    • Apply knowledge of psychology (e.g., decision strategies, life-span processes, psychological assessment, types of psychological careers) to the formulation of career choices.