For more information, please see the Academic Catalog.

Accreditation

The University of West Georgia is accredited by The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

Credit and transfer

Total semester hours required:

This program may be earned entirely face-to-face. However, depending on the courses chosen, a student may choose to take some partially or fully online courses.

Save money

UWG is often ranked as one of the most affordable accredited universities of its kind, regardless of the method of delivery chosen.

Details

  • Total tuition costs and fees may vary, depending on the instructional method of the courses in which the student chooses to enroll.
  • The more courses a student takes in a single term, the more they will typically save in fees and total cost.
  • Face-to-face or partially online courses are charged at the general tuition rate and all mandatory campus fees, based on the student's residency (non-residents are charged at a higher rate).
  • Fully or entirely online course tuition rates and fees my vary depending on the program. Students enrolled in exclusively online courses do not pay non-Resident rates.
  • Together this means that GA residents pay about the same if they take all face-to-face or partially online courses as they do if they take only fully online courses exclusively; while non-residents save money by taking fully online courses.
  • One word of caution: If a student takes a combination of face-to-face and online courses in a single term, he/she will pay both all mandatory campus fees and the higher eTuition rate.
  • For cost information, as well as payment deadlines, see the Student Accounts and Billing Services website

There are a variety of financial assistance options for students, including scholarships and work study programs. Visit the Office of Financial Aid's website for more information.

General

An introductory course that will include material from mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. Elementary calculus will be used.

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The lab component for PHYS 2211 which must be a co-requisite.

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An introductory course that will include material from electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics. Elementary calculus will be used.

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The lab component for PHYS 2212 which must be a co-requisite.

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Computational Track

Electronic principles, basic circuits and components, theory and applications of powers supplies, amplifiers and oscillators. (At level of Simpson.)

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Electronic applications of digital logic circuitry, flip-flops and registers, sequential logic circuitry and design. (At the level of Simpson.)

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Advanced mathematical methods required for the most comprehensive exposition of both classical and modern physics. (At the level of Boas.)

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Introductory numerical methods in physics, including the application of computer techniques to a variety of physical problems at the level of Cook.

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General Track

Students are required to take the following two courses as well as any other additional advanced physics course.

Thermodynamic laws and applications. (At the level of Black and Hartley).

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Electrostatic fields and potentials, conductors, dielectrics, magnetic fields, magnetic materials, electromagnetic induction, and Maxwell's equations. (At the level of Griffiths.)

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Physical Track

Principles of Newtonian mechanics, mathematical techniques, conservation laws, introduction to orbit theory, rigid body dynamics, and accelerated coordinate systems. (At the level of Davis.)

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Thermodynamic laws and applications. (At the level of Black and Hartley).

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Electrostatic fields and potentials, conductors, dielectrics, magnetic fields, magnetic materials, electromagnetic induction, and Maxwell's equations. (At the level of Griffiths.)

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A study of the failure of classical mechanics to describe experiments like Black Body Radiation, the Photoelectic Effect, the Michelson-Morley experiment and others which led physics into the worlds of special relativity and wave mechanics. Topics in wave mechanics include the Bohr Theory and its extension into the Schrodinger Equation with applications.

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