Assistant Professor of Philosophy

Biography

Dr. Garner’s teaching and research interests range from ancient Greek philosophy to the history of metaphysics, philosophy of religion, continental philosophy, and critical theory broadly. He also translates French philosophy and co-organizes the Georgia Ancient Philosophy Seminar (GAPS), which is an annual discussion seminar open to both academics and non-academics. His first book, The Emerging Good in Plato's Philebus, appeared in 2017 with Northwestern University Press. His essays and reviews have also appeared in Idealistic StudiesMETA: Research in Hermeneutics, Phenomenology, and Practical PhilosophySociety for Ancient Greek Philosophy NewsletterAncient PhilosophyBryn Mawr Classical ReviewContinental Philosophy Review; and Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology. For more information, visit: http://johnvgarner.wordpress.com/.

Education / Degrees

  • B.A., Religion, Honors Program of the Florida State University, 2005
  • Ph.D., Philosophy, Villanova University, 2014
  • Courses Taught
  • Course Sections and Syllabi

    Fall 2018 Sections

    • PHIL-2020 (Critical Thinking) Section: 01
    • PHIL-3100 (Ancient & Medieval Philosophy) Section: 01
    • PHIL-4300 (Senior Seminar) Section: 01W

    Spring 2018 Sections

    • PHIL-2010 (Intro to Philosophy) Section: 01
    • PHIL-2010 (Intro to Philosophy-Honors) Section: 25H
    • PHIL-3110 (Modern Philosophy) Section: 01

    Fall 2017 Sections

    • PHIL-2020 (Critical Thinking) Section: 01
    • PHIL-3100 (Ancient & Medieval Philosophy) Section: 01
    • PHIL-3140 (Existentialism) Section: 01

    Spring 2017 Sections

    • PHIL-2020 (Critical Thinking) Section: 01
    • PHIL-2020 (Critical Thinking) Section: 02
    • PHIL-4385 (Sp. Topics: German Idealism) Section: 01W

    Fall 2016 Sections

    • PHIL-2020 (Critical Thinking) Section: 01
    • PHIL-3100 (Ancient & Medieval Philosophy) Section: 01
    • PHIL-4230 (Philosophy of Religion) Section: 01W

    Summer 2016 Sections

    • PHIL-2010 (Introduction to Philosophy) Section: 01 View Syllabus

    Spring 2016 Sections

    Fall 2015 Sections

    • PHIL-2020 (Critical Thinking) Section: 01
    • PHIL-2020 (Critical Thinking) Section: 02
    • PHIL-2020 (Critical Thinking) Section: 03
    • PHIL-3100 (Ancient & Medieval Philosophy) Section: 01

    Spring 2015 Sections

    • PHIL-2010 (Introduction to Philosophy) Section: 02
    • PHIL-2010 (Introduction to Philosophy) Section: 03
    • PHIL-2010 (Introduction to Philosophy) Section: 05
    • PHIL-2020 (Critical Thinking) Section: 01
  • Publication List

    Book: John V. Garner, 'The Emerging Good in Plato's Philebus,' 2017. [View Publication]

    Book Translation: Castoriadis, Cornelius, 'Postscript on Insignificance: Dialogues with Cornelius Castoriadis' trans. John V. Garner and Gabriel Rockhill. New York: Continuum Press, 2011 [View Publication]

    Others: https://johnvgarner.wordpress.com/publications/ [View Publication]

  • Skills and Resources

    Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy

    Philosophy in the ancient Greek world--which itself emerged in dialogue with near-Eastern sources--sparked a movement of thought and dialogue that has immeasurably influenced the intellectual history of the West and of the whole world. This influence has impacted not only philosophy but also science, religion, ethics, and all of the humanities. Some of the most well-known of its figures include Pythagoras, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, the Epicureans, Cicero, the Neoplatonists, and Augustine.

    Francophone Philosophy

    The Francophone world has arguably been the most productive site of creative philosophizing in the 20th and 21st centuries.

    Philosophy of Religion

    Philosophy of religion is the study of the human condition insofar as it relates to faith; or it is the philosophical study of the meaning or essence of religion, religious thinking, or religious practices. Unlike Sunday School or a theology class, which usually take scripture, tradition, or mystical experience as basic authorities, a course on the philosophy of religion examines arguments for the plausibility, truth, or meaning of religious claims. Believers and non-believers, theists and atheists, scientists, priests, and psychologists may all engage in the philosophy of religion.