Campus Awareness Response & Evaluation (CARE) is a collaboration of professionals that is chaired by the Dean of Students. CARE responds to concerns about distressed and disruptive students and advocates for student’s rights and concerns.

Functions

The CARE Team is a multidisciplinary team that meets regularly to serve five major functions for the university.

  1. Provide consultation and support to faculty, staff, and administration in assisting students who display concerning or disruptive behaviors;
  2. Gather information to assess situations involving students who display concerning or disruptive behaviors;
  3. Recommend appropriate intervention strategies or disciplinary sanctions;
  4. Connect students with needed campus and community resources;
  5. Monitor ongoing behavior of students who have displayed disruptive or concerning behavior. CARE is not intended to address routine conduct matters that occur in the classroom.

Membership

The CARE Team is composed of representatives from several critical areas of the campus community, and includes the following:

Dean of Students (Serves as CARE Chair) Dr. Xavier Whitaker
Director of the Counseling Center/Accessibility Services Dr. Lisa Adams Somerlot
Assistant Director of Counseling Maggie Tennant
UWG Police Lt. Laura Bennett
Sgt. Ashley Gossage
Director of Health Services Angie Bradley
Director of Housing and Residence Life Stephen Whitlock
Assistant Director of Residence Life Cassidy Nelson
Assistant Dean of Students/Coordinator of the Office of Community Standards AnnMarie Reed
Patient Advocates Corey Hindman
Jill Hendricks
Conduct Specialists Erin Taylor
Darius Thomas
  • Dean of Students (Serves as CARE Chair)
    Dr. Xavier Whitaker

  • Director of the Counseling Center/Accessibility Services
    Dr. Lisa Adams Somerlot

  • Assistant Director of Counseling
    Maggie Tennant

  • UWG Police
    Lt. Laura Bennett
    Sgt. Ashley Gossage

  • Director of Health Services
    Angie Bradley

  • Director of Housing and Residence Life
    Stephen Whitlock

  • Assistant Director of Residence Life
    Cassidy Nelson

  • Assistant Dean of Students/Coordinator of the Office of Community Standards
    AnnMarie Reed

  • Patient Advocates
    Corey Hindman
    Jill Hendricks

  • Conduct Specialists
    Erin Taylor
    Darius Thomas

A designee of the above may serve if a representative is absent or unavailable. The specific composition of CARE depends on the nature of the behavior problem that is being addressed. Additional members from the campus community are included in meetings of CARE as necessary.

Meetings

The full CARE Team meets weekly to discuss topics related to student behavior and intervention such as trends, best practices, and available resources. Additional meetings are called in response to concerns about students, brought to the attention of CARE, that require immediate action. A response team, composed of appropriate members of CARE, will convene on an as-needed basis.

Signs That a Student Needs Help

  • Examples of Distressed, Disturbing or Disruptive Behavior
    • Harmful to self or others
    • Making suicidal threats or gestures
    • Exhibiting alcohol or drug problems
    • Exhibiting a pattern of bizarre behavior
    • Disrupting the living or learning community
    • Withdrawing socially
    • Showing a decline in the quality of work
    • Preoccupation with violence
    • History of aggressiveness
    • Threats made as jokes
  • Suicidal Behavior 

    Warning signs might include:

    • Increased alcohol and other drug use
    • Feelings hopeless, helpless, or worthless
    • Risky or self-destructive behaviors
    • Recent impulsiveness
    • Dramatic mood changes
    • Social withdrawal
    • Unexpected rage or anger
    • Talk of death or suicide

    It is important to remember that asking a person if they are contemplating suicide DOES NOT give him/her the idea to do so. In fact, your openness and concern may allow the person to feel less lonely or isolated and ultimately more hopeful. Talking about suicide is NOT to be ignored.

  • Threatening Behavior

    If you are concerned about someone being a danger to others, you must report it. This is in the best interest of the individual and the community.

    Threatening behavior might include:

    • Physically violent behavior
    • Verbally threatening or overly aggressive behavior
    • Threatening or violent material in e-mails, letters, academic papers, or online blogs or social media posts
    • Harassing or stalking behaviors
    • Possession of a weapon, particularly a firearm
  • When To Make A Referral

     

    • If your efforts to manage a behavioral issue have not resolved the problem
    • If you are concerned about the welfare of another person or yourself
    • If the person asks for help in dealing with personal issues that are outside of your role
    • If you have referred the student for assistance in the past and there seems to be no improvement or things seem to be worsening
    • When you consult with a patient advocate or counselor and they recommend referral

Report an Incident

Anyone (including students, faculty, staff and parents) may use this form to request assistance or intervention for a distressed individual, as well as to report disturbing or disruptive behavior or suspicious activity.

Report an Incident or Concern