April 22, 2022
Reading time: 1 minute, 53 seconds

Prospective and current University of West Georgia students will save thousands of dollars thanks to a suite of new incentives to attract students, including in-state tuition for bordering states.

UWG students celebrating outdoors

All incoming and continuing undergraduate students from Tennessee, South Carolina, North Carolina and Florida will join Alabama in paying the same rate as Georgians through at least Spring 2025. To be eligible, a student must be a legal resident of one of these border states for a minimum of one year. If the student is under 24, the same rule applies to their parents.

Students who take an average of 15 hours per semester will save approximately $14,000 each year.
“UWG is excited to offer this opportunity to our neighboring states,” said Kimberly Scranage, UWG’s vice president for strategic enrollment management. “Ranked as one of the top institutions for social mobility, we know education can have a profound impact on our students, community and economy. This opportunity provides UWG with the tools and resources to offer quality education at an affordable price for our neighbors and continues to diversify our student population. We are eager to have new Wolves join our Pack from these states."

In addition to this news, the University System of Georgia Board of Regents recently voted for no tuition increase for 25 of its 26 state institutions and eliminated the “special institutional fee” that has been in effect since 2009. 

In-state tuition for full-time UWG undergraduate students per semester will remain at $2,732 for the 2022-23 year. For graduate students taking 12 credit hours, in-state tuition will remain $2,892. 

UWG President Dr. Brendan Kelly expressed his gratitude to the governor, the legislature and the Board of Regents for their support of Georgia’s college students on all fronts.

“To curate a first-choice university, we must ensure there are as few barriers as possible to students being successful in launching or advancing their careers before they graduate,” Kelly said. “All of these measures – opening up in-state tuition to our neighboring states; maintaining our current tuition rate; and eliminating the special institution fee, which by itself will save students approximately $200 per semester – help make our degrees more accessible while allowing our students to earn their degrees with less debt. On behalf of all our students, we are grateful.”