Plan A, a traditional mathematics option, offers students a broad background in mathematics and is principally designed to prepare students for graduate study in pure or applied mathematics.

Four Year Plan (PDF)

Fall, Spring, Summer Plan (PDF)

For more information, please see the Academic Catalog. A program map, which provides a guide for students to plan their course of study, is available for download in the Courses tab below.

The Bachelor of Science degree program has four plans, each designed for specific career goals: Plan A, the Traditional Track; Plan B, the Applied Mathematics Track; Plan C, the Statistics/Actuarial Track; and Plan D, the UTEACH Secondary Education Track. The student’s advisor will help the student choose the best track, based on the student’s interests.

Career Opportunities

Buzzfile - Careers by Major:
http://www.buzzfile.com/Major/Mathematics External Resource

Program Location

Carrollton Campus

Method of Delivery

Traditional classes.

Accreditation

The University of West Georgia is accredited by The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

Credit and transfer

Total semester hours required: 120

This program may be earned entirely face-to-face. However, depending on the courses chosen, a student may choose to take some partially or fully online courses.

Save money

UWG is often ranked as one of the most affordable accredited universities of its kind, regardless of the method of delivery chosen.

Details

  • Total tuition costs and fees may vary, depending on the instructional method of the courses in which the student chooses to enroll.
  • The more courses a student takes in a single term, the more they will typically save in fees and total cost.
  • Face-to-face or partially online courses are charged at the general tuition rate and all mandatory campus fees, based on the student's residency (non-residents are charged at a higher rate).
  • Fully or entirely online course tuition rates and fees my vary depending on the program. Students enrolled in exclusively online courses do not pay non-Resident rates.
  • Together this means that GA residents pay about the same if they take all face-to-face or partially online courses as they do if they take only fully online courses exclusively; while non-residents save money by taking fully online courses.
  • One word of caution: If a student takes a combination of face-to-face and online courses in a single term, he/she will pay both all mandatory campus fees and the higher eTuition rate.
  • For cost information, as well as payment deadlines, see the Student Accounts and Billing Services website

There are a variety of financial assistance options for students, including scholarships and work study programs. Visit the Office of Financial Aid's website for more information.

Downloads

General

This course introduces two fundamental aspects of computer science--abstraction and design--as students learn to develop programs in a high-level programming language. Students will study and implement a variety of applications, including graphics and scientific simulations. The course assumes no prior background in programming or computer science.

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This course is designed to prepare students for calculus, physics, and related technical subjects. Topics include an intensive study of algebraic and transcendental functions accompanied by analytic geometry and trigonometry. Students cannot receive credit for MATH 1112 and MATH 1113.

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The first of a three-course sequence in calculus. Limits, applications of derivatives to problems in geometry and the sciences (physical and behavioral). Problems which lead to anti-derivatives.

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The impact of mathematics in the real world will be presented in the form of lectures, computer labs, and seminars offered by the department of mathematics faculty. The course includes problem solving sessions involving competition problems (e.g. Putnam, MCM, IMO,...) and the use of the technology and computer Algebra systems, such as Maple and Matlab. The course also explores applications of mathematics to the real world, its history and connection to other sciences through projects and reports. A final exam will assess their understanding of the subject matter discussed throughout the course.

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A continuation of MATH 1634. The definite integral and applications, calculus of transcendental functions, standard techniques of integration, sequences and series.

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A continuation of MATH 2644. Topics include functions of two, three, and more variables, multiple integrals, and topics in vector calculus.

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A concrete, applied approach to matrix theory and linear algebra. Topics include matrices and their connection to systems of linear equations, Gauss-Jordan elimination, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and diagonalization. The use of mathematical software is a component of the course.

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Major Required

This course explores the three fundamental aspects of computer science--theory, abstraction, and design--as the students develop moderately complex software in a high-level programming language. It will emphasize problem solving, algorithm development, and object-oriented design and programming. This course may not be attempted more than three times without department approval.

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A transition course to advanced mathematics. Topics include logic, set theory, properties of integers and mathematical induction, relations, and functions.

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A rigorous introduction to the fundamental concepts of single-variable calculus. Topics included the real numbers, limits, continuity, uniform continuity, differentiation, integration, and sequences and series.

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An in-depth study of selected topics in number theory.

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A calculus based statistics course with a strong emphasis on probability theory. Exercises are both theoretical and applied, including both discrete and continuous probability distributions such as the Binomial and Normal. The course provides the underlying theory and mathematically derived techniques of Statistics. Hypothesis testing for various parameters and regression are also discussed in this course.

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An introduction to Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries developed with the study of constructions, transformations, applications, and the rigorous proving of theorems.

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An introduction to measure theory and integration. Topics include metric spaces, measure and integration, elementary functional analysis, and function spaces.

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A study of the theory of complex functions and their applications, including analytic and elementary functions; derivatives and integrals; The Cauchy Integral Theorem and contour integration; Laurent series; the theory of residues; conformal mapping; and applications.

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The first of a two-course, in-depth, rigorous study in topics in the theory of groups, rings and fields.

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The first course in a comprehensive, theoretically-oriented, two-course sequence in linear algebra. Topics include vector spaces, subspaces, linear transformations, determinants, and elementary canonical forms.

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A faculty-directed independent research project culminating in the writing of a paper and an oral presentation of the results of the project. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a mathematics major.

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Other

Note: This option also requires three additional math courses taken from the set {4213, 4423, 4473, 4483, 4523, 4613}.

A continuation of MATH 4203, this course introduces certain discrete and continuous distributions such as the Poisson, Gamma, T and F. The course also provides an introduction to multivariate distributions. Estimation techniques such as the method of moments and maximum likelihood are discussed along with properties such as unbiasedness, efficiency, sufficiency and consistency of estimators.

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A continuation of MATH 4413. Topics include linear groups, group representations, rings, factorization, modules, fields, and Galois Theory.

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An introduction to combinatorics. Topics include the pigeonhole principle, combinations, permutations, distributions, generating functions, recurrence relations, and inclusion-exclusion.

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An introduction to the fundamental concepts of graph theory. Topics include isomorphisms, Euler graphs, Hamiltonian graphs, graph colorings, trees, networks, planarity.

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A continuation of MATH 4513. Topics include rational and Jordan forms, inner product spaces, operators on inner product spaces, and bilinear forms.

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An elementary but rigorous study of the topology of the real line and plane and an introduction to general topological spaces and metric spaces. Emphasis placed on the properties of closure, compactness, and connectedness.

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James Bellon

James Bellon

Lecturer

Amin Boumenir, Ph.D.

Amin Boumenir, Ph.D.

Professor

Brian Brodsky

Brian Brodsky

Lecturer

Carrie Carmack

Carrie Carmack

Lecturer

Mark Faucette, Ph.D.

Mark Faucette, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Scott Gordon, Ph.D.

Scott Gordon, Ph.D.

Professor, Head of Graduate Studies

Nguyen Hoang, Ph.D.

Nguyen Hoang, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Christopher Jett, Ph.D.

Christopher Jett, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Ricky Johnson

Ricky Johnson

Instructor

Jeong-Hyun Kang, Ph.D.

Jeong-Hyun Kang, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Abdollah Khodkar, Ph.D.

Abdollah Khodkar, Ph.D.

Professor

David Leach, Ph.D.

David Leach, Ph.D.

Professor, Head of Undergraduate Studies

Kyunghee Moon, Ph.D.

Kyunghee Moon, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Veena Paliwal, Ph.D.

Veena Paliwal, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

David Robinson, Ph.D.

David Robinson, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer

Kwang Shin, Ph.D.

Kwang Shin, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Scott Sykes, Ph.D.

Scott Sykes, Ph.D.

Professor, Director of Freshmen Math

Tuan Vu, Ph.D.

Tuan Vu, Ph.D.

Professor

Fengrong Wei, Ph.D.

Fengrong Wei, Ph.D.

Professor

Rui Xu, Ph.D.

Rui Xu, Ph.D.

Professor

Mohammad Yazdani, Ph.D.

Mohammad Yazdani, Ph.D.

Professor, Head of Graduate Studies

Guidelines for Admittance

Each UWG online degree program has specific requirements that you must meet in order to enroll.

Application Deadlines

Fall Semester - June 1

Spring Semester - November 15

Summer Semester - May 15 

Admission Process Checklist

  1. Review Admission Requirements for the different programs and guides for specific populations (non-traditional, transfer, transient, home school, joint enrollment students, etc).
     
  2. Review important deadlines:
    • Fall semester: June 1 (undergrads)
    • Spring semester: November 15 (undergrads)
    • Summer semester: May 15 (undergrads)
      See program specific calendars here
       
  3. Complete online application
    Undergraduate Admissions Guide
    Undergraduate Application
    Undergraduate International Application

  4. Submit $40 non-refundable application fee
     
  5. Submit official documents

    Request all official transcripts and test scores be sent directly to UWG from all colleges or universities attended. If a transcript is mailed to you, it cannot be treated as official if it has been opened. Save time by requesting transcripts be sent electronically.

    Undergraduate & Graduate Applicants should send all official transcripts to:
    Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Murphy Building
    University of West Georgia
    1601 Maple Street
    Carrollton, GA 30118-4160
     
  6. Submit a Certificate of Immunization, if required. If you will not ever be traveling to a UWG campus or site, you may apply for an Immunization Exemption. Contact the Immunization Clerk with your request.
     
  7. Check the status of your application

Contact

Dr. David Leach, Director of Undergraduate Studies
Phone: 678-839-4127
Email: cleach@westga.edu

Specific dates for Admissions (Undergraduate only), Financial Aid, Fee Payments, Registration, Start/End of term, Final Exams, etc. are available in THE SCOOP.

L1.  A thorough understanding of the calculus, including its computational aspects, applications, and theoretical foundations.

L2.  An ability to read, write, and understand mathematical proofs involving foundational aspects of mathematics, such as logic, set theory, basic function theory, and mathematical induction.

L3.  A solid foundation in the fundamentals of applied linear algebra, including its computational aspects and applications.

L4.  An ability to make written an oral presentations on various mathematical topics and problems.

L6.  A broad understanding of the analytical, algebraic, and geometric branches of mathematics.

L7.  A solid background in the fundamentals of some branch of mathematics; e.g., analysis, combinatorics and graph theory, probability and statistics, abstract algebra