The study of the literature, languages, history, art, philosophy and political thought of the Greeks and Romans develops the mind by requiring students to engage critically with such timeless topics as beauty and esthetics, the ideal relationship of the citizen and the state, the roles of men and women in society, freedom and slavery, the nature of war and peace, the purpose of literature, and the role of religion in public and private life. It is not surprising, therefore, that the Classics have long been considered the ideal foundation of education for the informed citizen in any profession.

For more information, please see the Academic Catalog.

  • Overview
  • Cost
  • Courses
  • Faculty
  • Admissions
  • Dates
  • Objectives
  • Overview

    Students are required to complete a total of 15 credit hours (5 courses) to be drawn from at least three different departments. At least 9 credits (3 courses) must be taken at the 3000-level and above. Courses are to be selected from the approved lists of courses in the Classical World and the Classical Tradition and its reception after Antiquity, with the caveat that additional courses may qualify for the Minor, subject to the discretion of the Minor committee. Per USG rules, courses taken to satisfy Core areas A-E may not be counted as coursework in the Minor.

    Students are strongly recommended to take Introduction to Classical Studies, a XIDS 2100 course.

    Program Location

    Carrollton Campus

    Method of Delivery

    Face to Face

    Accreditation

    The University of West Georgia is accredited by The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

    Credit and transfer

    Total semester hours required: 15

  • Cost

    This program may be earned entirely face-to-face. However, depending on the courses chosen, a student may choose to take some partially or fully online courses.

    Save money

    UWG is often ranked as one of the most affordable accredited universities of its kind, regardless of the method of delivery chosen.

    Details

    • Total tuition costs and fees may vary, depending on the instructional method of the courses in which the student chooses to enroll.
    • The more courses a student takes in a single term, the more they will typically save in fees and total cost.
    • Face-to-face or partially online courses are charged at the general tuition rate and all mandatory campus fees, based on the student's residency (non-residents are charged at a higher rate).
    • Fully or entirely online courses are charged at the general tuition rate plus an eTuition rate BUT with fewer fees and no extra charges to non-Residents.
    • Together this means that GA residents pay about the same if they take all face-to-face or partially online courses as they do if they take only fully online courses exclusively; while non-residents save money by taking fully online courses.
    • One word of caution: If a student takes a combination of face-to-face and online courses in a single term, he/she will pay both all mandatory campus fees and the higher eTuition rate.
    • For cost information, as well as payment deadlines, see the Bursar's Office website

    There are a variety of financial assistance options for students, including scholarships and work study programs. Visit the Office of Financial Aid for more information.

  • Courses

    Coursework

    Students may select from one or both of these two catagories to meet the credit hour requirements for this program in addition to any other course requirements that must be met.

    Classical Tradition and its Reception after Antiquity

    The Greek and Roman civilizations have left a profound impact on the Western (and, to a smaller extent, non-Western) world, which continues to be felt to this day. These courses do not primarily study the Greeks and Romans themselves, but devote considerable attention to their impact on subsequent literary traditions, religion, art, language, and thought.

    • ART-3230 - Medieval Art of Christian Europe and the Near East

      Lecture based course in religious and secular art in the Early Christian, Byzantine, Medieval, or Northern Renaissance periods, c. 100-1500 CE, including selected scripture, painting and architecture in historical and cultural context. May be repeated up to 9 credit hours if the topic changes.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ENGL-4106 - Studies in Genre

      An intensive examination of the formal, social, cultural and historical contexts of a single literary genre as well as the theoretical concerns that underlie its analysis. May be repeated for credit as genre or topic varies. Students may enroll up to three semesters.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ENGL-4188 - Studies in Individual Authors

      An examination of the career of a single literary figure in the context of literary history. Frequent offerings in Shakespeare and Chaucer will rotate with courses in a variety of other figures from several literary traditions. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Shakespeare may be taken for up to six (6) hours, if topic varies, with department chair's permission.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • FORL-4185 - Topics in Language and Literature

      Content of course varies. This course focuses on topics related to the study of culture, literature, film, and/or linguistics. Taught in English. Course may be repeated for credit with different topic. (Possible topics: Language, Society, and Culture; Arab Women in Literature and Film; Applied Linguistics in the Foreign Language Classroom; U.S. Latino Culture and Literature, etc.)

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • XIDS-2100 - Arts and Ideas: Special Topics

      This course is an overview of the interdependent and interdevelopmental character of movements in the arts and historical/philosophical ideas. The course may be team-taught with a multivariable format which includes lecture-discussion, open discussion among the instructors, tapes, and presentations.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    Classical World

    These courses offer an in-depth look into different aspects of culture, history, language, literature, art, philosophy, religion, law, and political thought of the Greeks and Romans from the Greek Bronze Age to the Fall of the Roman Empire in the West.

    • ART-3220 - Art of the Ancient World

      Lecture-based course on selected topics in the art of Ancient Egypt, Ancient Near East, Greece or Rome, studying artworks from within or across these cultures in their cultural and historical contexts.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • HIST-1111 - Survey of World History/Civilization I

      A survey of global history to 1500. This course examines ancient and medieval civilizations to deepen understanding of the political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of World history. Emphasis is given to comparative themes, the study of causal relationships and patterns of change and continuity over time; and the social significance of ethnicity, gender, race, and class in historical events and study.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • HIST-4423 - Women and Gender in the Ancient World

      This course aims to introduce students to the roles of women of all social classes in different periods of Ancient Greece and Rome, as well as the problems of studying women's history in the Greco-Roman world. The course will combine a chronological approach with the thematic one, as each week will focus on women's roles and participation in a specific period and/or sphere of activity, such as religion, politics, the dramatic stage, the family and household, and law.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • HIST-4432 - The Roman Republic

      This course combines a chronological approach with a thematic one, in order to address such topics as evolution of the government system, social conflict, religion, the Roman family, and the Roman army over the course of the Roman Republic from the expulsion of the kings to the assassination of Julius Caesar.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • PHIL-3100 - Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

      An exploration of such philosophers as the pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Epictetus, Augustine, Aquinas, and Occam. Required for Philosophy majors.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • POLS-4601 - Ancient and Medieval Political Thought

      A critical reading of selected works by major ancient and medieval western political thinkers, e.g., Sophocles, Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, and Machievelli.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • XIDS-2100 - Arts and Ideas: Special Topics

      This course is an overview of the interdependent and interdevelopmental character of movements in the arts and historical/philosophical ideas. The course may be team-taught with a multivariable format which includes lecture-discussion, open discussion among the instructors, tapes, and presentations.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

  • Faculty
  • Admissions

    Contact

    Have questions or would like to declare a Minor in Classical Studies?
    Contact Dr. Nadya Williams (nwilliam@westga.edu or 678-839-5370)

  • Dates

    Specific dates for admissions (Undergraduates Only), go to: UWG Admission Deadlines

  • Objectives

    Objectives not available