Art History courses help prepare students to live in a media-saturated world by building skills in visual analysis, critical thinking, research, writing, and oral presentation. The Art History program at UWG offers courses in a wide range of geographical and chronological areas. The strengths of its faculty lie in the study of medieval art and modern/contemporary art and theory. Courses emphasize the interrelationship between art and historical cultural influences, such as the links between medieval pilgrimage and the artworks created to reinforce religious teachings and inspire spiritual responses, and the relationship between artmaking and critical theory in treating the changing concept of the avant-garde.

For more information, please see the Academic Catalog. A program map, which provides a guide for students to plan their course of study, is available for download in the Courses tab below.

  • Overview
  • Cost
  • Courses
  • Faculty
  • Admissions
  • Dates
  • Objectives
  • Overview

    The Art History program has offered an Art History major and minor since 2002. Art History majors are required to have a distribution of courses that include pre- and post-Renaissance work, as well as a course in the art of a non-western culture. Recommended minors for Art History majors include English, Anthropology, Business Administration, Chemistry (for Art Conservation), Film, Foreign Languages, Global Studies, History, Mass Communications, Philosophy, Sociology, Studio Art, and Women’s Studies. The program also supports all studio-based courses in the Art Department. All Art majors are required to take four Art History courses; two of these must be Art 2201 and 2202. For a minor in Art History, students are required to take Art 2201, Art 2202, and 9 additional hours at the 3000 level or above. Art History faculty work closely with faculty in studio-based disciplines and expect Art majors to forge connections between their studio work and the content of their Art History courses.

    Program Location

    Carrollton Campus

    Method of Delivery

    In-residence

    Accreditation

    The University of West Georgia is accredited by The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

    This program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art & Design (NASAD).

    Credit and transfer

    Total semester hours required:

  • Cost

    This program may be earned entirely face-to-face. However, depending on the courses chosen, a student may choose to take some partially or fully online courses.

    Save money

    UWG is often ranked as one of the most affordable accredited universities of its kind, regardless of the method of delivery chosen.

    Details

    • Total tuition costs and fees may vary, depending on the instructional method of the courses in which the student chooses to enroll.
    • The more courses a student takes in a single term, the more they will typically save in fees and total cost.
    • Face-to-face or partially online courses are charged at the general tuition rate and all mandatory campus fees, based on the student's residency (non-residents are charged at a higher rate).
    • Fully or entirely online courses are charged at the general tuition rate plus an eTuition rate BUT with fewer fees and no extra charges to non-Residents.
    • Together this means that GA residents pay about the same if they take all face-to-face or partially online courses as they do if they take only fully online courses exclusively; while non-residents save money by taking fully online courses.
    • One word of caution: If a student takes a combination of face-to-face and online courses in a single term, he/she will pay both all mandatory campus fees and the higher eTuition rate.
    • For cost information, as well as payment deadlines, see the Bursar's Office website

    There are a variety of financial assistance options for students, including scholarships and work study programs. Visit the Office of Financial Aid for more information.

  • Courses

    Downloads

    General

    • ART-1006 - Design I (2D)

      An introductory course dealing with the elements and principles of composition as they relate to the two-dimensional areas of the visual arts. For advising purposes, the Department of Art recommends that students take Design I (ART 1006) in conjunction with Drawing I (ART 1007).

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-1007 - Drawing I

      Introduction to drawing using various media and dealing with landscapes, still-life, one- and two-point perspective, and the figure. Both clothed and nude models may be used. For advising purposes, the Department of Art recommends that students take Design I (ART 1006) in conjunction with Drawing I (ART 1007).

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-1008 - Drawing II

      Drawing from the live model, both nude and clothed, focusing upon correct proportions and anatomy. A variety of drawing media will be used. For advising purposes, the Department of Art recommends that students take Design II (ART 1008) in conjunction with Drawing II (ART 1009).

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-1009 - Design II (3D)

      An introductory course dealing with the elements and principles of composition as they relate to the three-dimensional areas of the visual arts. For advising purposes the Department of Art recommends that students take Design II (ART 1008) in conjunction with Drawing II (ART 1009).

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    Major Required

    Select one:
    ART 3240 18th/19th Cen Art
    ART 3250 Italian Renaissance/Baroque Art
    ART 3260 American Art
    ART 3270 20th Cen Early Modern Art
    ART 3275 Art Since 1945
    ART 4290 Modernist Criticism

    Six (6) hours chosen from Foreign Language

    FORL 2001
    FORL 2002

    • ART-3210 - Non-Western Art

      Lecture-based course on selected topics in non-Western art of Asia, Africa, Oceania, or the New World, studying artworks from within or across these cultures in their cultural and historical contexts. May be repeated up to 9 credit hours if the topic changes.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-3220 - Art of the Ancient World

      Lecture-based course on selected topics in the art of Ancient Egypt, Ancient Near East, Greece or Rome, studying artworks from within or across these cultures in their cultural and historical contexts.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-3240 - Italian Renaissance or Baroque Art

      A lecture-based course in Italian Renaissance or Baroque art, studying artwork from the period in historical and cultural context. May be repeated up to 6 credit hours if the topic changes.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-3250 - 18th or 19th Century Art

      This is a lecture-based course on 18th or 19th century art which studies artwork in its historical and cultural aspects including Rococo, Neoclassical, Romantic or Realist movements. It focuses on the painting, sculpture, photography, graphic arts of the 18th or 19th century. May be repeated up to 6 credit hours if the topic changes.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-3270 - Pre-World War II Modernism

      Lecture-based course on the art and architecture of the pre-World War II period, exploring the concepts and formal characteristics of 'modernism' in Western art.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-3280 - Museum Seminar

      This course involves classroom study of the art collections and architecture of a city or country followed by a trip to visit what has been studied. The subject varies: American cities or abroad. Credit will vary by trip. Students enrolling in the summer Bayeux program will take 4 hours; others take 3 hours credit. May be repeated up to 16 hours credit.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-4078 - Junior Review

      All BA and BFA candidates must enroll and successfully complete ART 4078. (See department website for specific requirements for ART 4078). Art faculty will review juniors based on their portfolio, writings, presentation and transcript progress. Candidates will be assessed on the level of knowledge and skill base gain to date. Successful candidates will be allowed to enroll into their respective capstone courses (ART 4298 or ART 4998). Course May be repeated up to two additional times. Unsuccessful review on the third attempt may result in candidates being placed on probation or removed from their degree program. ART 4078 must be taken during a semester when the student is enrolled in 12 credit hours.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-4290 - Modernist Criticism

      A discussion-based seminar based on intellectual and theoretical debates about modern and contemporary art, focusing on the concept of the avant-garde and the practice of art criticism. Readings are informed by theoretical developments such as psychoanalysis, semiotics, Marxist Art History, gender and race studies, post structuralism and visual culture debates.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-4998 - Senior Capstone Experience I

      Research and study within a studio concentration tha tculminates in the public presentation of the senior exhibition (ART 4899: Senior Capstone II). Students will be required to research this project and document its development prior to the presentation of the written capstone component. With the aid of their peers, advisors and faculty jurors' students will work through the articulation of their goals by active critiquing and self-assessment.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-4999 - Senior Capstone Experience II

      Continued research and advanced study within a studio/design concentration will culminate in the public presentation of the senior exhibition. Capstone Experience II will provide an opportunity to consolidate, expand and refine the skills that are essential to your discipline. The preparation of an oral defense for this final body of work, their creative thesis visual project, will undergo the critical review of an Art Faculty Committee prior to its public presentation in the Senior Fine Arts Exhibition. Additionally, the completion of the written component of the creative visual project, begun in ART 49XX, Capstone Experience I, will describe in full the processes and the outcomes of the senior research.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    Major Selects

    ART HISTORY ELECTIVES - Choose twelve - fifteen (12-15) hours from:

    ART 3220 Art of the Ancient World
    ART 3230 Medieval Art
    ART 3240 18th/19th Cen Art
    ART 3250 Italian Renaissance/Baroque Art
    ART 3260 American Art
    ART 3270 20th Cen Early Modern Art
    ART 3275 Art Since 1945
    ART 3280 Museum Seminar
    ART 4290 Modernist Criticism
    ART 4295 Hist of American Architecture
    ART 4295 Special Topics: Art History

    • ART-3220 - Art of the Ancient World

      Lecture-based course on selected topics in the art of Ancient Egypt, Ancient Near East, Greece or Rome, studying artworks from within or across these cultures in their cultural and historical contexts.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-3230 - Medieval Art of Christian Europe and the Near East

      Lecture based course in religious and secular art in the Early Christian, Byzantine, Medieval, or Northern Renaissance periods, c. 100-1500 CE, including selected scripture, painting and architecture in historical and cultural context. May be repeated up to 9 credit hours if the topic changes.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-3240 - Italian Renaissance or Baroque Art

      A lecture-based course in Italian Renaissance or Baroque art, studying artwork from the period in historical and cultural context. May be repeated up to 6 credit hours if the topic changes.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-3250 - 18th or 19th Century Art

      This is a lecture-based course on 18th or 19th century art which studies artwork in its historical and cultural aspects including Rococo, Neoclassical, Romantic or Realist movements. It focuses on the painting, sculpture, photography, graphic arts of the 18th or 19th century. May be repeated up to 6 credit hours if the topic changes.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-3270 - Pre-World War II Modernism

      Lecture-based course on the art and architecture of the pre-World War II period, exploring the concepts and formal characteristics of 'modernism' in Western art.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-3280 - Museum Seminar

      This course involves classroom study of the art collections and architecture of a city or country followed by a trip to visit what has been studied. The subject varies: American cities or abroad. Credit will vary by trip. Students enrolling in the summer Bayeux program will take 4 hours; others take 3 hours credit. May be repeated up to 16 hours credit.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-4290 - Modernist Criticism

      A discussion-based seminar based on intellectual and theoretical debates about modern and contemporary art, focusing on the concept of the avant-garde and the practice of art criticism. Readings are informed by theoretical developments such as psychoanalysis, semiotics, Marxist Art History, gender and race studies, post structuralism and visual culture debates.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • ART-4295 - Special Topics in Art History

      Investigation of a particular topic, problem or issue in Art History with emphasis on those not covered in other art history courses.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

  • Faculty

    No faculty members listed

  • Admissions

    Guidelines for Admittance

    Each UWG online degree program has specific requirements that you must meet in order to enroll.

    Application Deadlines

    General admissions deadlines are typically:

    • Fall - June 1
    • Spring - Nov 15
    • Summer - May 15

    * Application, app fee, and document deadline; Dates may vary for Readmit, Transfer, and Transient students.

    See The Scoop for more specific deadlines.

    Specific graduate deadlines are listed here: https://www.westga.edu/academics/gradstudies/admissions-deadlines.php

    Admission Process Checklist

    1. Review Admission Requirements for the different programs and guides for specific populations (non-traditional, transfer, transient, home school, joint enrollment students, etc).
    2. Review important deadlines:
      • Fall semester: June 1 (undergrads)
      • Spring semester: November 15 (undergrads)
      • Summer semester: May 15 (undergrads)
        See program specific calendars here
    3. Complete online application
      Undergraduate Admissions Guide

      Undergraduate Application

      Undergraduate International Application

    4. Submit $40 non-refundable application fee
    5. Submit official documents

      Request all official transcripts and test scores be sent directly to UWG from all colleges or universities attended. If a transcript is mailed to you, it cannot be treated as official if it has been opened. Save time by requesting transcripts be sent electronically.

      Undergraduate & Graduate Applicants should send all official transcripts to:
      Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Murphy Building
      University of West Georgia
      1601 Maple Street
      Carrollton, GA 30118-4160
    6. Submit a Certificate of Immunization, if required. If you will not ever be traveling to a UWG campus or site, you may apply for an Immunization Exemption. Contact the Immunization Clerk with your request.
    7. Check the status of your application

  • Dates

    Specific dates for Admissions (Undergraduate Only), Financial Aid, Fee Payment, Registration, Start/End of Term Dates, Final Exams, etc. are available in THE SCOOP.

    Specific Graduate Admissions Deadlines are available via the Graduate School

  • Objectives
    • Develop broad knowledge on the history of art and design.
    • Demonstrates a broad understanding of the technical skill within the studio arts.
    • Develop thorough knowledge of the fundamentals of visual arts and design.
    • Demonstrates a broad understanding of content and conceptual development within aspects of creating art.