Forensic Science is a growing field and offers an excellent point of entry for students interested in combining natural and social scientific method and theory. The goal of this certificate is to use lecture, lab, and field work to prepare students for careers in Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, or Criminology, with a focus on forensic applications. Interdisciplinary and practical training in forensics offers high-quality employment opportunities in the private sector and in federal, state, and local agencies including law enforcement, The Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, and state and federal bureaus of investigation.

For more information, please see the Academic Catalog.

  • Overview
  • Cost
  • Courses
  • Faculty
  • Admissions
  • Dates
  • Objectives
  • Overview

    The program offers a flexible path towards completion for students form any department of origin and with any previous level of experience in forensics. Achieving this certificate will give our students an edge in today's highly competitive labor market while encouraging a positive social contribution and commitment to community.

    Method of Delivery

    Facet to Face

    Accreditation

    The University of West Georgia is accredited by The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

    Credit and transfer

    Total semester hours required: 16-17

  • Cost

    This program may be earned entirely face-to-face. However, depending on the courses chosen, a student may choose to take some partially or fully online courses.

    Save money

    UWG is often ranked as one of the most affordable accredited universities of its kind, regardless of the method of delivery chosen.

    Details

    • Total tuition costs and fees may vary, depending on the instructional method of the courses in which the student chooses to enroll.
    • The more courses a student takes in a single term, the more they will typically save in fees and total cost.
    • Face-to-face or partially online courses are charged at the general tuition rate and all mandatory campus fees, based on the student's residency (non-residents are charged at a higher rate).
    • Fully or entirely online courses are charged at the general tuition rate plus an eTuition rate BUT with fewer fees and no extra charges to non-Residents.
    • Together this means that GA residents pay about the same if they take all face-to-face or partially online courses as they do if they take only fully online courses exclusively; while non-residents save money by taking fully online courses.
    • One word of caution: If a student takes a combination of face-to-face and online courses in a single term, he/she will pay both all mandatory campus fees and the higher eTuition rate.
    • For cost information, as well as payment deadlines, see the Bursar's Office website

    There are a variety of financial assistance options for students, including scholarships and work study programs. Visit the Office of Financial Aid for more information.

  • Courses

    General

    Requirements - minimum 5 courses (16-17 hours)

    • Any two basic science courses from the list below:
      • BIOL 1010 Fundamentals of Biology and BIOL 1010L Fundamentals of Biology Lab
      • BIOL 1107 Principles of Biology and BIOL Principles of Biology I Lab
      • BIOL 1108 Principles of Biology and BIOL Principles of Biology II Lab
      • CHEM 1100 Introductory Chemistry and CHEM 1100 Introductory Chemistry Laboratory
      • CHEM 1151K Survey of Chemistry I
      • CHEM 1152K Survey of Chemistry II
      • CHEM 1211 Principles of Chemistry I and CHEM 1211L Principles of Chemistry I Laboratory
      • CHEM 1212 Principles of Chemistry II and CHEM 1212L Principles of Chemistry II Laboratory
    • At least one forensic course from the list below:
      • ANTH 4125 Forensic Anthropology
      • CHEM 3130 Modern Forensic Science
    • Any two other courses with themes in forensic science from the list immediately above or below (one must be from COSS [ANTH or CRIM]
      • ANTH 3110 Human Osteology
      • BIOL 4241 Entomology
      • BIOL 2021/L Anatomy and Physiology I or BIOL 2022/L Anatomy and Physiology II
      • CHEM 3140 Drugs and Drug Abuse 
      • CHEM 3411 Criminal Investigations
      • CRIM 3242 Drug Abuse
      • CRIM 4000 Research Methodology
      • ANTH 3250 Field Methods in Physical Anthropology or Archaeological Field Research
      • ANTH 3200 (or 4983) Directed Research or ANTH 4112 Senior Thesis - min 3 credit level, Forensic topic*
      • BIOL 4981 Independent Study or BIOL 4983 Senior Biology Research - min 3 credit level, Forensic Topic*
      • CRIM 4981 Directed Readings - min 3 credit level, Forensic* experience/topic*
    *For these classes, the topic of contributing experience or research must be primarily forensic in topic or application as confirmed in writing by the respective instructor.

    • ANTH-3110 - Human Osteology

      This course will introduce students to the basics of skeletal biology and learn how to accurately identify the elements of the human skeleton. It will include the major landmarks of each skeletal element with an aim to understanding the functional morphology of bones in an individual and as an anatomical system.

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    • ANTH-3200 - Directed Research

      This is a research project carried out under the guidance of a faculty member. Discussion of research areas with the faculty must be completed before registration. A formal report of the results of the research must be presented to the faculty of the Anthropology program.

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    • ANTH-3250 - Field Methods in Physical Anthropology

      Instruction in and application of the various methods primatologists use in the field. This course will involve observations and directed research projects done on living primate populations.

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    • ANTH-4125 - Forensic Anthropology

      This course will include a detailed study of the human skeleton. Primary focus will be on the methods used to identify human remains within a legal context. Responsibilities and ethics of a forensic anthropologist will be discussed.

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    • BIOL-1010 - Fundamentals of Biology

      Fundamentals of Biology will instruct students in basic biological phenomena and how organisms interact with their environments. Emphasis will be placed on humans and processes within the human biology. Topics will include: biological diversity, biological molecules, cells, organ systems, genetics and the interaction of man with his environment.

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    • BIOL-1010L - Fundamentals of Biology Laboratory

      Laboratory component of the Fundamentals of Biology course (BIOL 1010). The lecture and lab courses must be taken during the same term.

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    • BIOL-1107 - Principles of Biology I

      This course is designed for the biology major, other science majors, and secondary science majors. An integrated plant- animal approach, including form, function, and development of organisms, their systematics, ecology and evolution. Students must enroll in BIOL 1107L in the same term.

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    • BIOL-2021 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

      An introduction to the structural and functional relationships in the human body. This course will introduce the student to the background material and the organ systems associated with protection, support, and movement, as well as, the systems which control and integrate body functions. Course is designed to be taken before Biology 2022. This course is not intended for biology or other laboratory science majors and cannot be used for credit toward those degrees. Students must enroll in BIOL 2021L in the same term.

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    • BIOL-2022 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

      A continuation of the study of the structural and functional relationships in the human body. This course will introduce the student to the structure and function of the organ systems associated with blood production, blood flow, respiration, digestion, excretion, reproduction and immunity. This course is designed to follow Biology 2021. This course is not intended for biology or other laboratory science majors and cannot be used for credit toward those degrees.

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    • BIOL-4241 - Entomology

      The study of insects. This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of insect taxonomy, morphology, physiology, behavior, and evolution. The relationships between insects and humans, other animals, and plants will be examined. The influences of insects on culture, religion, art, history, and colonization will be discussed. The laboratory will be devoted primarily to developing an understanding of insect identification.

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    • BIOL-4981 - Independent Study

      Independent study of topics not offered in the current term. Independent study is only available for topics addressed by current courses if the topical course will not be offered during the academic year, or if the scheduling of the topical course is such that it will require a delay in timely completion of the degree for the student.

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    • CHEM-1100 - Introductory Chemistry

      A one semester course covering some basic concepts and applications of chemistry for non-science majors. There is an optional laboratory component.

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    • CHEM-1151K - Survey of Chemistry I

      First course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic, and biochemistry for allied health professions and non-science majors. Topics to be covered include: elements and compounds, chemical equations, organic nomenclature, and molecular geometry. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. MATH 1111 may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-1152K - Survey of Chemistry II

      Second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic, and biochemistry for allied health professions and non-science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.

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    • CHEM-1211 - Principles of Chemistry I

      First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. MATH 1113 and CHEM 1211L may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-1212 - Principles of Chemistry II

      Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include chemical bonding, properties of solids, liquids and gases, solutions, equilibria, acids and bases, solubility, thermodynamics, kinetics and electricity. Corequisite: CHEM 1212L

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    • CHEM-3140 - Drugs and Drug Abuse

      An examination of the current and historical patterns of alcohol, drug use, abuse, and control. Emphasis will be given to the patterns of usage, way these drugs affect body and types of rehabilitation centers. See CRIM 3242. Not applicable as a Chemistry elective for students majoring or minoring in Chemistry.

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    • CRIM-3242 - Drug Abuse

      An examination of the current and historical patterns of alcohol and drug use, abuse, and control. Strong emphasis will be given to patterns of usage and types and kinds of programs used by helping agencies in the rehabilitation process. Same as CHM 3140.

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    • CRIM-3411 - Criminal Investigations

      This course examines the basic principles of criminal investigation. Coverage includes study of current investigative procedures used in handling of crime scenes, interviews, evidence, surveillance, report writing, modus operandi, and technical resources. In addition, this course explores theories, philosophies, and concepts related to prevention, apprehension, and suppression of crimes.

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    • CRIM-4000 - Research Methodology

      An introduction to the logic and procedures of quantitative and qualitative research methods. Focuses on research design, use of computer and statistical packages, date interpretation, the relation of research and theory, and the writing of scientific research reports.

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    • CRIM-4981 - Directed Readings

      Title and description of the type of independent study to be offered will be specified on the variable credit form students must complete before registering for the class. May be repeated three times for credit.

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  • Faculty

    No faculty members listed

  • Admissions

    Guidelines for Admittance

    Each UWG online degree program has specific requirements that you must meet in order to enroll.

    Application Deadlines

    For more information, go to UWG Admission Deadlines

    Admission Process Checklist

    1. Review Admission Requirements for the different programs and guides for specific populations (non-traditional, transfer, transient, home school, joint enrollment students, etc).
    2. Review important deadlines:
      • Fall semester: June 1 (undergrads)
      • Spring semester: November 15 (undergrads)
      • Summer semester: May 15 (undergrads)
        See program specific calendars here
    3. Complete online application
      Undergraduate Admissions Guide

      Undergraduate Application

      Undergraduate International Application

    4. Submit $40 non-refundable application fee
    5. Submit official documents

      Request all official transcripts and test scores be sent directly to UWG from all colleges or universities attended. If a transcript is mailed to you, it cannot be treated as official if it has been opened. Save time by requesting transcripts be sent electronically.

      Undergraduate & Graduate Applicants should send all official transcripts to:
      Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Murphy Building
      University of West Georgia
      1601 Maple Street
      Carrollton, GA 30118-4160
    6. Submit a Certificate of Immunization, if required. If you will not ever be traveling to a UWG campus or site, you may apply for an Immunization Exemption. Contact the Immunization Clerk with your request.
    7. Check the status of your application

    Contact

    678-839-6455 phone
    678-839-6466 fax

    Email: anth@westga.edu

  • Dates

    Specific dates for Admissions (Undergraduate Only), Financial Aid, Fee Payment, Registration, Start/End of Term Dates, Final Exams, etc. are available in THE SCOOP.

    Specific Graduate Admissions Deadlines are available via the Graduate School

  • Objectives

    Objectives not available