For more information, please see the Academic Catalog.

Program Location

Carrollton Campus

Method of Delivery

Face to Face

Accreditation

The University of West Georgia is accredited by The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

Credit and transfer

Total semester hours required:

This program may be earned entirely face-to-face. However, depending on the courses chosen, a student may choose to take some partially or fully online courses.

Save money

UWG is often ranked as one of the most affordable accredited universities of its kind, regardless of the method of delivery chosen.

Details

  • Total tuition costs and fees may vary, depending on the instructional method of the courses in which the student chooses to enroll.
  • The more courses a student takes in a single term, the more they will typically save in fees and total cost.
  • Face-to-face or partially online courses are charged at the general tuition rate and all mandatory campus fees, based on the student's residency (non-residents are charged at a higher rate).
  • Fully or entirely online course tuition rates and fees my vary depending on the program. Students enrolled in exclusively online courses do not pay non-Resident rates.
  • Together this means that GA residents pay about the same if they take all face-to-face or partially online courses as they do if they take only fully online courses exclusively; while non-residents save money by taking fully online courses.
  • One word of caution: If a student takes a combination of face-to-face and online courses in a single term, he/she will pay both all mandatory campus fees and the higher eTuition rate.
  • For cost information, as well as payment deadlines, see the Student Accounts and Billing Services website

There are a variety of financial assistance options for students, including scholarships and work study programs. Visit the Office of Financial Aid's website for more information.

Minor Required

Students must take a total of 15 credit hours.
   COMM 1154
   COMM 3353
   COMM 3356
   COMM 3305 or ENGL 3200 or FILM 3200
   COMM 4405 or COMM 4406 or COMM 4407

An introductory, yet critical examination of the historical development, and paramount economic, legal/policy, ethical, political, and social effects issues concerned with mass media, i.e., books, newspapers, magazines, recordings, radio, movies, television, the internet, public relations, and advertising. Particular attention given to competition, convergence, and mass media's impact on society, as well as society's impact on mass media.

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This is a writing workshop where students will investigate various story-telling styles, structures and techniques, and implement these analyses in the development of stories written for the screen. Students will also engage with marketing and promotional texts within the field.

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Fundamental techniques in producing, scripting, shooting, directing and editing film and video projects, with an emphasis on single camera narrative production for independent distribution.

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A study of the evolution and significance of the motion picture as a specialized form of artistic experience and as a form of Mass Communication.

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This workshop-based skills course explores the communicative uses of sound in audio-visual media, with an emphasis on early and deliberate decision-making about what listeners hear. A number of technically-driven creative skills projects are supported by an examination of the history of sound recording practices, the origins and development of the field of sound design, and critical listening and viewing exercises.

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This workshop-based skills course explores the communicative potential of the moving image. Students will analyze and practice deliberate strategies of image-making to produce intended effects for viewers. Through critical viewing and analysis, reading, skills exercises and a number of technically-driven creative projects, students will develop the expressive resources of the moving image for a broad use in audio-visual media.

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Students will work with the various aspects of film and video editing, synthesizing technology, creative storytelling, visual effects, motion graphics and sound editing, along with digital distribution formats and strategies.

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An introduction to the genre-specific workshop in either fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, screenwriting, or play writing. May be repeated up to 6 hours as topics vary. No more than 2 courses may be counted toward the major in English. Pre-requisites: ENGL 2060 or XIDS 2100 (The Creative Process).

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A study of the genres, structures and mechanics of screenwriting as well as the experience of writing, reading and revising a screenplay.

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Deon Kay

Deon Kay

Associate Professor & Associate Dean

Christopher Renaud

Christopher Renaud

Associate Professor

Specific dates for Admissions (Undergraduate Only), Financial Aid, Fee Payment, Registration, Start/End of Term Dates, Final Exams, etc. are available in THE SCOOP.

Objectives not available