Professor

Biography

Fields of Study:  US Civil War and Reconstruction, The American South, Georgia History

Keith Bohannon is professor of history and teaches courses on the history of Georgia, the antebellum South, Jacksonian American, and the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction. His research focus is on the interaction during the Civil War between the soldiers and civilians on the battlefield and homefront, particularly in Georgia. In the past, Dr. Bohannon has worked for several U.S. National Parks as a historian and exhibits planner.

Education / Degrees

  • B.A., History, University of Georgia, 1989
  • M.A., History, University of Georgia, 1993
  • Ph.D., History, Pennsylvania State University, 2001
  • Courses Taught
  • Course Sections and Syllabi

    Fall 2017 Sections

    Summer 2017 Sections

    • HIST-6699 (Thesis) Section: 01

    Spring 2017 Sections

    Fall 2016 Sections

    Summer 2016 Sections

    • HIST-2111 (U S History I (to 1865)) Section: 91
    • HIST-4474 (History of Georgia) Section: 01

    Spring 2016 Sections

    Fall 2015 Sections

    Summer 2015 Sections

    • HIST-4474 (History of Georgia) Section: 01
    • HIST-6689 (Topics in Georgia History) Section: 01

    Spring 2015 Sections

    Fall 2014 Sections

    Summer 2014 Sections

    • HIST-4474 (History of Georgia) Section: 01

    Spring 2014 Sections

    Fall 2013 Sections

    • HIST-2111 (U S History I (to 1865)) Section: 01 Download Syllabus [PDF]
    • HIST-4474 (History of Georgia) Section: 01
    • HIST-5474 (History of Georgia) Section: 01

    Summer 2013 Sections

    • HIST-2111 (U S History I (to 1865)) Section: 02
    • HIST-4474 (History of Georgia) Section: 01

    Spring 2013 Sections

  • Publication List

    Campaigning with Old Stonewall in Virginia (LSU, 1998). Co-edited with Randall Allen [View Publication]

    Hallowed Banners: Historic Flags in the Georgia Capitol Collection (Atlanta: Georgia Secretary of State's Office, 2005)

    “'Breastworks are good things to have on battlefields:' Confederate Engineering Operations and Field Fortifications in the Overland Campaign” in Gary W. Gallegher and Caroline Janney, eds, Cold Harbor to the Crater (UNC, 2015).

    “‘More like Amazons than starving people:’ Women’s urban riots in Georgia in 1861” in Andrew Slap and Frank Towers, eds., Confederate Cities: The Urban South in the Civil War Era (Chicago, 2015).

    “‘He exhibited the highest soldierly qualities:’ General Edward C. Walthall’sConfederate Army Service” in Lawrence L. Hewitt., ed., Confederate Generals in theWestern Theater Vol. 4 (Tennessee, forthcoming, 2017).

    “Battles of Chickamauga and Chattanooga,” in Aaron Sheehan-Dean, ed., A Companionto the Civil War, 2 vols. (Wiley Blackwell, 2014).

    Foreward to Gilbert Claflin, A Quiet Corner of the War: The Civil War Letters of Gilbert and Esther Claflin, Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, 1862-1863 (Wisconsin, 2014).

    “The Battle of Chickamauga” and “Guerilla Warfare” entries in John C. Inscoe., ed., The Civil War in Georgia: A New Georgia Encyclopedia Companion (Georgia, 2011).

    New introduction and index for George W. Nichols, A Soldier’s Story of His Regiment (Alabama, 2011).

    New introduction and index for William A. McClendon, Recollections of Wartime (Alabama, 2010).

    “‘The Fatal Halt’ versus ‘Bad Conduct:’ John B. Gordon, Jubal Early, and the Battle ofCedar Creek,” in Gary Gallagher, ed., The Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864 (UNC, 2006).

    “‘Witness the Redemption of the Army:’ Reenlistments in the Confederate Army ofTennessee, January-March 1864,” Lesley J. Gordon and John C. Inscoe, eds, Inside theConfederate Nation: Essays in Honor of Emory M. Thomas (LSU, 2005).

    “John Bell Hood,” in Leaders of the Lost Cause, New Perspectives on the Confederate High Command, Gary W. Gallagher and Joseph Glatthaar, eds., (Stackpole Books, 2004).

    “‘Placed on the Pages of History in Letters of Blood:’ Reporting on and Remembering the 12th Georgia Infantry in the 1862 Valley Campaign,” in Gary Gallagher, ed., The Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1862 (UNC, 2003).

    “‘They Had Determined to Root Us Out:’ Dual Memoirs by a Unionist Couple in Blue Ridge Georgia,” in John Inscoe and Robert Kenzer, eds., Enemies of the Country: New Perspectives on Unionists in the Civil War South (Georgia, 2001).

    “‘These few, grey-haired, battle-scarred veterans:’ Confederate Army Reunions in Georgia, 1885-1895,” in Gary W. Gallagher and Alan Nolan, eds., The Myth of the Lost Cause (Indiana, 2000).

    “‘One Solid unbroken roar of thunder:’ Union and Confederate Artillery at the battle of Malvern Hill,” in Gary Gallagher, ed., The 1862 Richmond Campaign: The Peninsula and the Seven Days (UNC, 2000).

    “‘Dirty, Ragged, and ill-provided for:’ Confederate Logistical Problems in the 1862 Maryland Campaign,” in Gary W. Gallagher, ed., The Antietam Campaign (UNC, 1999).

    “‘Disgraced and Ruined by the Decision of the Court:’ The Court Martial of Emory F. Best, C.S.A,” in Gary W. Gallagher, ed., The Chancellorsville Campaign (UNC, 1996).

    “Cadets, Drillmasters, Draft Dodgers, and Soldiers: The Georgia Military Institute during the Civil War,” Georgia Historical Quarterly LXXIX (Spring 1995).