The biological sciences include a wide range of disciplines that address the processes of life, all living organisms, their environments, and the actions and interactions of all living things. Biology has a rich history and an exciting future as it impacts ecology and the environment, medicine, biotechnology, and many other aspects of modern life. The Biology Department at West Georgia consists of men and women who are nationally and internationally recognized for their research accomplishments and excellence in teaching. The faculty enjoy interacting with students and teaching and, at the same time, offer opportunities for students to conduct cutting-edge research.

For more information, please see the Academic Catalog. A program map, which provides a guide for students to plan their course of study, is available for download in the Courses tab below.

  • Overview
  • Cost
  • Courses
  • Faculty
  • Admissions
  • Dates
  • Objectives
  • Overview

    The professional preparation track is a more restrictive program that is designed to prepare students well for the entrance exams and performance standards of medical, dental, veterinary, physical therapy, and physician’s assistant programs. The curriculum requires those courses most necessary for the demands of these professional programs. The secondary education track is a restrictive degree program that ensures future teachers meet all state and national content standards for science.

    Program Location

    Carrollton Campus

    Method of Delivery

    Face to Face

    Accreditation

    The University of West Georgia is accredited by The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

    Credit and transfer

    Total semester hours required: 120

  • Cost

    This program may be earned entirely face-to-face. However, depending on the courses chosen, a student may choose to take some partially or fully online courses.

    Save money

    UWG is often ranked as one of the most affordable accredited universities of its kind, regardless of the method of delivery chosen.

    Details

    • Total tuition costs and fees may vary, depending on the instructional method of the courses in which the student chooses to enroll.
    • The more courses a student takes in a single term, the more they will typically save in fees and total cost.
    • Face-to-face or partially online courses are charged at the general tuition rate and all mandatory campus fees, based on the student's residency (non-residents are charged at a higher rate).
    • Fully or entirely online courses are charged at the general tuition rate plus an eTuition rate BUT with fewer fees and no extra charges to non-Residents.
    • Together this means that GA residents pay about the same if they take all face-to-face or partially online courses as they do if they take only fully online courses exclusively; while non-residents save money by taking fully online courses.
    • One word of caution: If a student takes a combination of face-to-face and online courses in a single term, he/she will pay both all mandatory campus fees and the higher eTuition rate.
    • For cost information, as well as payment deadlines, see the Bursar's Office website

    There are a variety of financial assistance options for students, including scholarships and work study programs. Visit the Office of Financial Aid for more information.

  • Courses

    Downloads

    General

    Core Area A: must include MATH 1113 or MATH 1634* (*1 hr moved to Area F) Core Area C: foreign language is recommended Core Area D: must include MATH 1634* (*1hr moved to Area F) unless completed in Area A, and PHYS 1111 & 1111L, or 2211 & 2211L, 1112 & 1112L, or 2212 & 2212L. Core Area E: PSYC 1101 or SOCI 1101 is recommended. Core Area F: MATH 2644 or MATH 2063 *General Restrictions: Students are allowed only one D in the courses used to satisfy the major. A maximum of 4 hours of research is allowed in the degree program. Must complete 6 hours of 3000/4000 level DSW-courses where at least one is a chemistry course.

    • CHEM-1211 - Principles of Chemistry I

      First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. MATH 1113 and CHEM 1211L may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-1212 - Principles of Chemistry II

      Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics to be covered include chemical bonding, properties of solids, liquids and gases, solutions, equilibria, acids and bases, solubility, thermodynamics, kinetics and electricity. Corequisite: CHEM 1212L

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    • CHEM-2411 - Organic Chemistry I

      The first course of a two semester sequence which provides a broad introduction to the basic principles, theories and applications of the chemistry of carbon compounds. Topics will include modern structural theory, organic nomenclature, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and kinetics, and an introduction to functional group chemistry. Also covers the interpretation of IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy for the structure determination of organic compounds. CHEM 2411L may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-2411L - Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

      Emphasis of this laboratory will be on fundamental techniques and will provide experience with purification, physical and spectroscopic characterization and synthesis of organic substances.

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    • MATH-1113 - Precalculus

      This course is designed to prepare students for calculus, physics, and related technical subjects. Topics include an intensive study of algebraic and transcendental functions accompanied by analytic geometry. Credit for this course is not allowed if the student already has credit for MATH 1634. If course is taken through eCore, course is 3 credit hours.

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    • MATH-1634 - Calculus I

      The first of a three-course sequence in calculus. Limits, applications of derivatives to problems in geometry and the sciences (physical and behavioral). Problems which lead to anti-derivatives.

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    • MATH-2063 - Introductory Statistics

      (Non-credit for mathematics major or minor). A non-calculus based introduction to methods of descriptive statistics, probability, discrete and continuous distributions, and other fundamental concepts or statistics. variance will be covered. Appropriate technology, a graphing calculator or statistical software package, will be used.

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    • MATH-2644 - Calculus II

      A continuation of MATH 1634. The definite integral and applications, calculus of transcendental functions, standard techniques of integration, sequences and series.

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    • PHYS-1111 - Introductory Physics I

      An introductory course that will include material from mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. Elementary algebra and trigonometry will be used.

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    • PHYS-1112 - Introductory Physics II

      An introductory course that will include material from electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics. Elementary algebra and trigonometry will be used.

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    • PHYS-2212 - Principles of Physics II

      An introductory course that will include material from electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics. Elementary calculus will be used.

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    • PSYC-1101 - Introduction to General Psychology

      A broad survey of the major topics in psychology including, but not limited to, research methodology, biological and social factors influencing behavior, development, learning, memory, personality and abnormal.

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    • SOCI-1101 - Introductory Sociology

      A general introduction to the sociological perspective; including theoretical orientations; methodological approaches; the content of society and culture; the process of socialization; social institutions; and social stratification.

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    Major Required

    35XX - Either CHEM 3510 or 3521 or 3522 will satisfy this requirement. **CHEM Electives (3000 or above): The following courses are not allowed as Chemistry electives: CHEM 3130, 3140, 4083. One of the following: CS 1300, MATH 2654, or MATH 3303, SPAN XXXX Recommended Minor(Biology, Psychology, Spanish): 15-18 total hours with minimum 9-12 hours at 3000-level or above

    • BIOL-1110 - Biological Diversity

      This course is an Introductory foundation-building course for Biology majors. It is designed to familiarize students with the distinguishing characteristics, taxonomy, evolutionary relationships, and economic importance of all domains of life. For Biology majors only. Does not fulfill core requirements.

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    • BIOL-2107 - Principles of Biology I for Biology Majors

      This is the first of a two semester course designed for biology majors requiring a survey of fundamental topics in modern biology. Lectures build on a foundation of chemistry to develop current concepts of cell and molecular biology, genetics, evolution, and biological diversity. This course satisfies a core requirement of the Biology Major, but does not fulfill any of the requirements for general education.

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    • BIOL-2107L - Principles of Biology I Lab for Biology Majors

      This is the laboratory component for the lecture course, BIOL 2017. Lecture and lab must be taken in the same semester.

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    • BIOL-2108 - Principles of Biology II for Biology Majors

      This is the second of a two semester course designed for biology majors requiring a survey of fundamental topics in modern biology. Lectures build on a foundation of chemistry to develop current concepts of the form and function of plants and animals and of ecology. This course satisfies a core requirement of the Biology major but does not fulfill any of the requirements for general education.

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    • BIOL-2108L - Principles of Biology II Lab for Biology Majors

      This is the laboratory component for the lecture course, BIOL 2108. Lecture and lab must be taken in the same semester.

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    • BIOL-3134 - Cell and Molecular Biology

      This course deals with the molecular aspects of cell structure and function,, emphasizing the chemical and molecular basis of cellular physiology. It also addresses genetic functions at the chromosomal and molecular levels, gene expression, and regulation.

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    • BIOL-3135 - Ecology

      This course is designed to familiarize Biology majors with the factors controlling the structure and function of populations, communities, and ecosystems. The role of evolutionary processes in the structure and function of these systems will also be explored. Basic concepts will be synthesized and reinforced by investigating the dynamics of the aquatic life zones and terrestrial biomes on earth.

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    • BIOL-3310 - Microbiology

      Microbiology is the study of biological organisms and agents too small to see with the unaided eye. This course will introduce students to the diversity, physiology, anatomy, and genetics of microorganisms, with particular emphasis on the bacteria. It will also introduce students to key areas of microbiology, including medical microbiology, microbial ecology, food microbiology, and biotechnology. In the laboratory students will learn techniques for medical microbiology and biotechnology.

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    • BIOL-3513 - Human Physiology

      A survey of the mechanisms involved in the function of the human body. Study is approached from the organ system level to address muscular, neural, hormonal, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, renal, and reproductive functions. Correlation will be made to the similarity between the demands placed on living systems regardless of whether the organism is multicellular or a single cell.

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    • BIOL-4242 - Invertebrate Zoology

      This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of taxonomy, morphology, physiology, and evolution of the more common invertebrate phyla. The distribution and interspecific relationships among invertebrates and other forms of life will be presented and discussed. The laboratory will be devoted primarily to developing an understanding of invertebrate morphology and classification.

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    • BIOL-4732 - Biology of Aging

      Since the beginning of time , the fear of aging has preoccupied mankind. Only recently we are gaining insights into important clues about biological process of aging. In this course we will focus on some of the ideas about aging put forward by early alchemists to modern molecular biologists. Biological principles behind anti-aging, aging intervention agents, and life-style options will be discussed.

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    • BIOL-4984 - Senior Biology Seminar

      The senior biology seminar is designed to prepare students for oral presentation of biological research and concepts and to allow a mechanism for feedback on presentation skills. Biology majors are required to first enroll in sophomore biology seminar. Students who have conducted research projects may present their own research results. Students who have conducted research projects may present their own research results. Others may present information from current biological research literature.

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    • CHEM-2130 - Sophomore Chemistry Seminar

      A course designed to introduce Chemistry majors to current literature and career opportunities in Chemistry and allied fields. Faculty will present brief seminars pertaining to their research and topics of current interest. Students will carry out literature searches and make oral and/or written presentations on topics chosen in consultation with the instructor(s).

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    • CHEM-3310K - Analytical Chemistry

      This course emphasizes skills needed for a student to function as a professional analytical chemist. The student will be firmly grounded in the areas of gravimetric and volumetric analysis, equilibria, quantitative spectroscopy, electrochemistry and chromatography. Special emphases will be placed on writing skills.

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    • CHEM-3422 - Organic Chemistry II

      The second course will systematically explore reactions of carbon-containing compounds and the mechanistic pathways involved in these processes. Reactions that will be discussed include functional group transformations, oxidation, reductions, cyclo-additions and carbon-carbon bond formation. The course begins to teach the student how to systematically design a multi-step synthesis of complex organic compounds. CHEM 3422L may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-3510 - Survey of Physical Chemistry

      This course is a survey course for students who do not need the more rigorous full-year sequence in physical chemistry. The course includes thermodynamics, chemical and phase equilibria, electrochemistry, kinetics and other topics in physical chemistry.

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    • CHEM-3521 - Quantum Chemistry

      This course is an introduction to elementary quantum mechanics and its applications to selected chemical systems. Topics include an introduction to operators, 'particle in a box', harmonic oscillator, atomic structure, chemical bonding, atomic spectroscopy, rotational, vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of small molecules, and elementary statistical mechanics. MATH 2664 or MATH 3303 may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-3522 - Chemical Thermodynamics

      This course develops standard topics in classical physical chemistry, with primary emphasis on chemical thermodynamics. The course includes physical and chemical properties of real and ideal gases, the law of thermodynamics and their application to physical and chemical systems, chemical and phase equilibria, kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics, transport properties, and the application of quantum mechanics to thermodynamics in statistical mechanics. MATH 2654 or MATH 3303 may be taken concurrently.

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    • CHEM-4610 - Inorganic Chemistry

      The wave nature of electrons is applied to atomic structure and periodic trends. Inter and intramolecular bonding models are used to interpret the chemical and physical properties of various materials, from simplistic diatomic molecules to structurally complex molecular and ionic systems. Thermodynamic principles are used to determine the relative stability of inorganic compounds.

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    • CHEM-4711 - Biochemistry

      The first of two semester sequence in biochemistry covering the general physical and chemical properties of biomolecules and the metabolism. Topics will include biomolecular structure and function, first-order enzyme kinetics, glycolysis and carbohydrate metabolism, Kreb's cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid catabolism and biosynthesis, metabolism and utilization of amino acids, biologically important amines and regulation of metabolism.

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    • CHEM-4910L - Tools and Applications in Chemical Research and Practice

      Tools and Applications in Chemical Research and Practice is a 3 credit hour laboratory based course that introduces students to a research experience using a series of small-scale, multi-week research modules. This capstone course capitalizes on previous knowledge and skills from multidisciplinary chemistry courses and focuses on a narrow problem in a practical application. Each module begins with skill building activities followed by and in-depth exploration of one aspect of the problem allowing students access to research experiences as part of the mainstream curriculum.

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  • Faculty
  • Admissions

    Guidelines for Admittance

    Each UWG online degree program has specific requirements that you must meet in order to enroll.

    Application Deadlines

    UWG Admission Deadlines

    Admission Process Checklist

    1. Review Admission Requirements for the different programs and guides for specific populations (non-traditional, transfer, transient, home school, joint enrollment students, etc).
    2. Review important deadlines:
      • Fall semester: June 1 (undergrads)
      • Spring semester: November 15 (undergrads)
      • Summer semester: May 15 (undergrads)
        See program specific calendars here
    3. Complete online application
      Undergraduate Admissions Guide

      Undergraduate Application

      Undergraduate International Application

    4. Submit $40 non-refundable application fee
    5. Submit official documents

      Request all official transcripts and test scores be sent directly to UWG from all colleges or universities attended. If a transcript is mailed to you, it cannot be treated as official if it has been opened. Save time by requesting transcripts be sent electronically.

      Undergraduate & Graduate Applicants should send all official transcripts to:
      Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Murphy Building
      University of West Georgia
      1601 Maple Street
      Carrollton, GA 30118-4160
    6. Submit a Certificate of Immunization, if required. If you will not ever be traveling to a UWG campus or site, you may apply for an Immunization Exemption. Contact the Immunization Clerk with your request.
    7. Check the status of your application

    Contact

    chemistry@westga.edu

    (678) 839-6550

  • Dates

    Specific dates for Admissions (Undergraduate Only), Financial Aid, Fee Payment, Registration, Start/End of Term Dates, Final Exams, etc. are available in THE SCOOP.

    Specific Graduate Admissions Deadlines are available via the Graduate School

  • Objectives
    • Students will use concepts, principles, and knowledge to demonstrate mastery in at least three of the following four subject areas: 1. cell biology; 2. molecular biology and genetics; 3. organismal biology; 4. population biology, evolution, and ecology.
    • Students will use critical thinking skills or problem based learning skills to demonstrate mastery of the scientific method as it pertains to experimental design, data analysis, or interpretation of experimental data.
    • Students will communicate scientific information through the acquisition, organization, or presentation of scientific information in written form.
    • Students will communicate scientific information through the acquisition, organization, or presentation of scientific information in oral form.