To declare a minor in Film Studies, please fill out the declaration form, either online or in the department's main office (TLC 2255). We'll be glad to answer any questions you might have about the minor. Email questions to english@westga.edu.

For more information, please see the Academic Catalog.

  • Overview
  • Cost
  • Courses
  • Faculty
  • Admissions
  • Dates
  • Objectives
  • Overview

    The film minor at the University of West Georgia is designed to educate and inspire students interested in film. The addition of a film minor to the curriculum will complement the University of West Georgia’s strong liberal arts tradition. The minor consists of a series of courses from departments including English and Philosophy, Foreign Languages and Literatures, History, Mass Communications and Theatre Arts, and Psychology. These courses are designed to provide students with a solid background in the history, technical analysis, aesthetics and cultural significance of film. As an interdisciplinary minor, film studies encourages students to explore further the rich and diverse aesthetic, philosophical, historical, and cultural expressions articulated in films.

    Program Location

    Carrollton Campus

    Method of Delivery

    The majority of the courses required for the Film Studies minor meet in the classroom.

    Accreditation

    The University of West Georgia is accredited by The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

    Credit and transfer

    Total semester hours required: 18

  • Cost

    This program may be earned entirely face-to-face. However, depending on the courses chosen, a student may choose to take some partially or fully online courses.

    Save money

    UWG is often ranked as one of the most affordable accredited universities of its kind, regardless of the method of delivery chosen.

    Details

    • Total tuition costs and fees may vary, depending on the instructional method of the courses in which the student chooses to enroll.
    • The more courses a student takes in a single term, the more they will typically save in fees and total cost.
    • Face-to-face or partially online courses are charged at the general tuition rate and all mandatory campus fees, based on the student's residency (non-residents are charged at a higher rate).
    • Fully or entirely online courses are charged at the general tuition rate plus an eTuition rate BUT with fewer fees and no extra charges to non-Residents.
    • Together this means that GA residents pay about the same if they take all face-to-face or partially online courses as they do if they take only fully online courses exclusively; while non-residents save money by taking fully online courses.
    • One word of caution: If a student takes a combination of face-to-face and online courses in a single term, he/she will pay both all mandatory campus fees and the higher eTuition rate.
    • For cost information, as well as payment deadlines, see the Bursar's Office website

    There are a variety of financial assistance options for students, including scholarships and work study programs. Visit the Office of Financial Aid for more information.

  • Courses

    Coursework

    Requirements for a minor in Film Studies (18 semester hours):

    1. Three (3) hours of FILM 2080: Introduction to the Art of Film

    2. Three (3) hours FILM 2100: History and Theory of Film

    3. Twelve (12) hours chosen from the following 3000/4000-level electives* (or others when approved by advisor):

    COMM 3356: Film and Culture, HIST 4485: History in Film (Special Topics), PHIL 3160: Philosophy in Literature and Film, FILM 3200: Screenwriting, ENGL 4109: Film as Literature, FORL 3111: World Film, FORL 4485: Topics in National Film, FREN 4210: French Literature and Film**, GRMN 4220: German Culture Through Film**, GRMN 4240: Mystery & Horror in Lit & Film**, GRMN 4250: Contemporary German Cinema**, SPAN 4200: Spanish Literature and Film**, PSYC 4085: Psychology and Film (Horizon Seminar), THEA 3290: Costume Design, THEA 4485: Acting for the Camera (Special Topics), FILM 4081: Independent Study

    *Students are required to take electives in at least 3 different disciplines.
    ** These courses are currently taught in the specific foreign language, but FORL versions in English have been proposed. See FORL 3111 and FORL 4485 above.
    ***Other 3000 or 4000 level courses may be applied toward the minor with approval of coordinator of Film Studies.

    General

    • COMM-3356 - Film and Culture

      A study of the evolution and significance of the motion picture as a specialized form of artistic experience and as a form of Mass Communication.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • FILM-1000 - Georgia Film Academy I

      This course is the first of a two-course certificate program which will provide an introduction to the skills used in on-set film production, including all forms of narrative media which utilize film-industry standard organizational structure, professional equipment and on-set procedures. In addition to the use of topical lectures, PowerPoint presentations, videos and hand-outs, the course will include demonstrations of equipment and set operations as well as hands-on learning experiences. Students will: 1. Identify and describe film production organizational structure. 2. Define job descriptions in various film craft areas, names, uses, and protocols. 3. Explain the connections between these areas, names, uses, and protocols on-set. 4. Operate full lighting and grip equipment. 5. Summarize the above knowledge for purposes of self-marketing.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • FILM-2000 - Georgia Film Academy II

      This course is the second of a two-course certificate program designed specifically to provide students with a basic level of on-set film production skills, knowledge and experience with film-industry standard organizational structure, professional equipment and on-set procedures. The skills and knowledge gained in Course I will form a foundation for students to be able to perform at an entry-level on working productions. This course will focus on professional-level productions, on which students will have roles in on-set and pre-production crafts. Students will: 1. Demonstrate knowledge of on-set protocols and relationships. 2. Demonstrate basic abilities in multiple entry-level on-set jobs.* 3. Interpret and apply instructions from on-set supervisors. 4. Summarize the above experiences for purposes of self-marketing. *May include Camera, Lighting, Electrical, Security, Second Unit Director/Assistant Director, Art Department (Set Decorator/dressing, Production Design, Props), Set Construction, Makeup/Hair Department, Wardrobe Department, Sound Department, Post-Production (editing), Production Assistant, Locations, Script Supervisor (Continuity), Production Office, Production Accounting.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • FILM-2080 - Introduction to the Art of Film

      Students will consider the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. Students will watch a wide range of films from a variety of countries and historical moments in film history and will have the chance to explore many issues such as framing, photographic space, film shot, editing, sound, genre, narrative form, acting style, and lighting in the context of wider discussions of the weekly films. This is an introductory course and assumes no prior knowledge of film. Students will be evaluated primarily on the basis of weekly postings, a shot-by-shot analysis, and exams. Weekly screening on Monday nights.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • FILM-2100 - History and Theory of Film

      This course will explore major developments in film history, theory and criticism. Students will become familiar with several different film movements in the development of the art form and will be introduced to basic ideas in film theory. Through a variety of film movements and historical periods, students will develop an understanding of the cultural, industrial, and political contexts for some of the most significant debates about film. Specific topics covered will include Russian formalism, the history of classic Hollywood cinema, the French new wave, recent global cinemas, as well as alternatives to Hollywood in the United States. Class time will be divided between the discussion of the historical movements and critical texts and the application of those texts to a primary cinematic text. Students will be evaluated on the basis of weekly postings, participation in discussion, essay exams and formal writing opportunities.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • FILM-4081 - Independent Study

      Guided investigation of a topic not addressed by regularly scheduled courses. Students must propose a detailed plan of readings, articulating precise learning objectives, and secure the written consent of both a supervising instructor and of the department chair.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • FORL-3111 - World Film

      This course will offer film viewings and analysis of films selected from different national traditions, several of which will always be represented. Readings in Film History and Theory will be used to illuminate selected films from differing cultures and traditions (French, German, Spanish, Latin American, Japanese, etc.) All films have subtitles and all readings are in English. No knowledge of the foreign language (s) in question is necessary. Course may be repeated with a different subject.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • FORL-4485 - Topics in National Film Traditions

      This course will offer film viewings and analysis within individual national traditions. Readings in Film History and Theory will be used to illuminate selected films from a national tradition (French, German, Spanish, Latin American, Japanese, etc). All films have subtitles and all readings are in English. No knowledge of the foreign language(s) in question is necessary. Course may be repeated with a different subject.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • FREN-4210 - French Literature and Film

      A comparative approach to the study of French literature and its cinematic adaptation and/or a thematic approach to selected literary texts and films.

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    • GRMN-4220 - German Culture through Film

      This course offers an introduction to 20th century history and culture through the depictions and interpretations of aspects of social history in German film and painting. Discussions and papers will be in German. Students may not receive credit for GRMN 4220 and the XIDS course of the same title.

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    • GRMN-4240 - Mystery and Horror in German Literature and Film

      This course traces the mystery and horror genres from their 'beginnings' in German Romanticism through early German film (including emigres to Hollywood and Hitchcock, who was schooled in Germany) to New German Film of the 70's and 80's Discussion, readings and paper will be in German. Students may not receive credit for GRMN 4240 and XIDS course of the same title.

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    • GRMN-4250 - Contemporary German Cinema

      German cinema has changed radically in the past twenty years moving more and more toward Hollywood styles, big budgets, Hollywood ideologies. We will trace this change in German cinema from the days of the New German Cinema and its highly intellectual and artistic goals (Fassbinder, Wenders, Herzog, von Trotta, Schlondorff) to today's much more co-opted German film industry(Tykwer, Farberbock, Peterson, Kraume, and Ruzowitzsky).

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    • PHIL-3160 - Philosophy in Literature and Film

      An examination of significant philosophical and literary texts in terms of their thematic and/or conceptual interconnections.

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    • PSYC-4085 - Horizon Seminar

      A special series of topical seminars meant to explore subjects at the leading edge of contemporary psychology, which are of special interest to students and faculty. May be repeated for credit.

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    • THEA-3290 - Costume Design

      The student will be introduced to the total process of the costume designer. This process includes play analysis, research skills, costume period and style, design problems, rendering and construction skills, organization skills, and an understanding in the principles and elements of design. Prerequisites may be waived with permission of the instructor.

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    Major Required

    • FILM-2080 - Introduction to the Art of Film

      Students will consider the primary visual, aural, and narrative conventions by which motion pictures create and comment upon significant social experience. Students will watch a wide range of films from a variety of countries and historical moments in film history and will have the chance to explore many issues such as framing, photographic space, film shot, editing, sound, genre, narrative form, acting style, and lighting in the context of wider discussions of the weekly films. This is an introductory course and assumes no prior knowledge of film. Students will be evaluated primarily on the basis of weekly postings, a shot-by-shot analysis, and exams. Weekly screening on Monday nights.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

    • FILM-2100 - History and Theory of Film

      This course will explore major developments in film history, theory and criticism. Students will become familiar with several different film movements in the development of the art form and will be introduced to basic ideas in film theory. Through a variety of film movements and historical periods, students will develop an understanding of the cultural, industrial, and political contexts for some of the most significant debates about film. Specific topics covered will include Russian formalism, the history of classic Hollywood cinema, the French new wave, recent global cinemas, as well as alternatives to Hollywood in the United States. Class time will be divided between the discussion of the historical movements and critical texts and the application of those texts to a primary cinematic text. Students will be evaluated on the basis of weekly postings, participation in discussion, essay exams and formal writing opportunities.

      View Instructors, Syllabi and Other Details

  • Faculty

    No faculty members listed

  • Admissions

    Guidelines for Admittance

    Each UWG online degree program has specific requirements that you must meet in order to enroll.

    Admission Process Checklist

    1. Review Admission Requirements for the different programs and guides for specific populations (non-traditional, transfer, transient, home school, joint enrollment students, etc).
    2. Review important deadlines:
      • Fall semester: June 1 (undergrads)
      • Spring semester: November 15 (undergrads)
      • Summer semester: May 15 (undergrads)
        See program specific calendars here
    3. Complete online application
      Undergraduate Admissions Guide

      Undergraduate Application

      Undergraduate International Application

    4. Submit $40 non-refundable application fee
    5. Submit official documents

      Request all official transcripts and test scores be sent directly to UWG from all colleges or universities attended. If a transcript is mailed to you, it cannot be treated as official if it has been opened. Save time by requesting transcripts be sent electronically.

      Undergraduate & Graduate Applicants should send all official transcripts to:
      Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Murphy Building
      University of West Georgia
      1601 Maple Street
      Carrollton, GA 30118-4160
    6. Submit a Certificate of Immunization, if required. If you will not ever be traveling to a UWG campus or site, you may apply for an Immunization Exemption. Contact the Immunization Clerk with your request.
    7. Check the status of your application

    Contact

    emock@westga.edu

  • Dates

    Specific dates for admissions (Undergraduates Only), go to: UWG Admission Deadlines

  • Objectives
    • demonstrate a general knowledge of thei history of film through presentations and written assignments
    • demonstrate skills in cultural and filmic analysis and demonstrate an ability to speak and write critically about films produced internationally and in the U.S.
    • demonstrate knowledge of the mediums distinctive qualities and demonstrate the ability to read and understand the grammer of film as well as the specific terminology of the discipline
    • demonstrate visual literacy and demonstrate skills in interpreting, analyzing and discussing images
    • discuss critically in oral and written form the complex human condition as presented in film
    • demonstrate a working knowlege of the film industry